Jueseppi B.:

The road is open and I am rumbling right down the right side. Thank you Mr. David.

Originally posted on Thoughts from the Outdoors:

the road to the future

————–

when confusion sets in…

And the dawn seems darker than

the night before…

Just remember that the road

 in the distance…

Is always blank…

Just ready to be

decorated by your

violet inspiration….

And willing to accept you

with the loving arms…

of a friend…

who adores you…

for just the person

you are…

and the person who surely…

you will be…

————–

David L. Whitman 02/01/13 on the bright side…

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The Joe Nocera “Gun Report” For Friday February 1st, 2013


By Jueseppi B.

 

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The Gun Report: February 1, 2013

By Joe Nocera

 

 

A 14-year-old student was shot in the head at Price Middle School in Atlanta on Thursday. The student was taken to Grady Memorial Hospital and was said to be alert and conscious. A suspect taken into custody has tentatively been identified as a student, according to police.

Fox 5 Atlanta

Kaufman County, Texas, assistant district attorney Mark Hasse was shot dead outside the courthouse Thursday after two suspects ambushed the prosecutor on his way into court and shot him multiple times. The shooting spurred a complete lockdown of the courthouse and a manhunt for the two shooters.

WFAA-TV

Three teenagers were shot at a gas station in Little Rock, Arkansas, Wednesday night. Jasmine Young, 17, was sitting with three other people in a Chevy Tahoe when someone sprayed the SUV with bullets. Young died at an area hospital. Little Rock Police do not have a motive.

KATV

The Vermilion Parish sheriff’s deputies have arrested a 67-year-old Abbeville, La., man in the shooting death of his son. Charles Larry Harrington is suspected of shooting 40-year-old Macade Jude Harrington Wednesday night after the two fought, leading to the fatal shooting.

Thibodaux Daily Comet

Authorities in central Illinois have charged a 17-year-old boy from Normal in the fatal shooting of a Bloomington teenager earlier this month. Sixteen-year-old Trae Massey was shot at his home on January 21 and died a short time later.

SF Gate

About the Joe Nocera Blog

Joe Nocera has been an Op-Ed columnist for The Times since April 2011. He has been chronicling the world of business for more than three decades, at magazines like Fortune and Texas Monthly, and in several books, the most recent of which is “All The Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis,” co-written with Bethany McLean. He wrote the Talking Business column for The Times before moving to the Opinion section.

 

 

 

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Jueseppi B.:

Vitally important information from Ms. Barbara at idealisticrebel.

Originally posted on idealisticrebel:

This is your opportunity to stop this subjection and ownership of the female gender

This is your opportunity to stop this subjection and ownership of the female gender

This is abuse

This is abuse

Abuse is part of the War on Women. The War is extensive and harsh. Today I want to talk about abuse. Women are abused here and around the world. Children are abused here and everywhere. 5% of American men are abused.

I helped to start a Women’s shelter in the 1970’s. It was started by Jewish, Catholic and Protestant women for women and children. It was a secular grass roots project and was run with lots of hard, sweaty, frustrating work. The first shelter was a rundown house because that is all we could get. We buried a penny in the tree lawn then rolled up sleeves and got to work.

We did not have assistance from police. More police are injured during domestic calls than any other type of call.We…

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Black History Month Moment: Presidential Proclamations


By Jueseppi B.

 

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Presidential Proclamations

 

January 31, 2013

Presidential Proclamation: National African American History Month, 2013

 

The White House

 

Office of the Press Secretary

 

For Immediate Release
January 31, 2013

Presidential Proclamation: National African American History Month, 2013

 

By The President of The United States of America

 

 

A Proclamation

In America, we share a dream that lies at the heart of our founding:  that no matter who you are, no matter what you look like, no matter how modest your beginnings or the circumstances of your birth, you can make it if you try.  Yet, for many and for much of our Nation’s history, that dream has gone unfulfilled. For African Americans, it was a dream denied until 150 years ago, when a great emancipator called for the end of slavery. It was a dream deferred less than 50 years ago, when a preacher spoke of justice and brotherhood from Lincoln’s memorial.  This dream of equality and fairness has never come easily — but it has always been sustained by the belief that in America, change is possible.

 

Today, because of that hope, coupled with the hard and painstaking labor of Americans sung and unsung, we live in a moment when the dream of equal opportunity is within reach for people of every color and creed.  National African American History Month is a time to tell those stories of freedom won and honor the individuals who wrote them.  We look back to the men and women who helped raise the pillars of democracy, even when the halls they built were not theirs to occupy.  We trace generations of African Americans, free and slave, who risked everything to realize their God-given rights.  We listen to the echoes of speeches and struggle that made our Nation stronger, and we hear again the thousands who sat in, stood up, and called out for equal treatment under the law.  And we see yesterday’s visionaries in tomorrow’s leaders, reminding us that while we have yet to reach the mountaintop, we cannot stop climbing.

 

Today, Dr. King, President Lincoln, and other shapers of our American story proudly watch over our National Mall.  But as we memorialize their extraordinary acts in statues and stone, let us not lose sight of the enduring truth that they were citizens first.  They spoke and marched and toiled and bled shoulder-to-shoulder with ordinary people who burned with the same hope for a brighter day.  That legacy is shared; that spirit is American.  And just as it guided us forward 150 years ago and 50 years ago, it guides us forward today.  So let us honor those who came before by striving toward their example, and let us follow in their footsteps toward the better future that is ours to claim.

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 2013 as National African American History Month.  I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

 

BARACK OBAMA

 

 

 

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February 01, 2013

Presidential Proclamation — 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Rosa Parks

 

 

The White House

 

 

Office of the Press Secretary

 

 

For Immediate Release
February 01, 2013

Presidential Proclamation — 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Rosa Parks

 

 

100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF ROSA PARKS

- – – – – – -

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

 

A PROCLAMATION

 

On December 1, 1955, our Nation was forever transformed when an African-American seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama, refused to give up her seat on a city bus to a white passenger. Just wanting to get home after a long day at work, Rosa Parks may not have been planning to make history, but her defiance spurred a movement that advanced our journey toward justice and equality for all.

 

Though Rosa Parks was not the first to confront the injustice of segregation laws, her courageous act of civil disobedience sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott — 381 days of peaceful protest when ordinary men, women, and children sent the extraordinary message that second-class citizenship was unacceptable. Rather than ride in the back of buses, families and friends walked. Neighborhoods and churches formed carpools. Their actions stirred the conscience of Americans of every background, and their resilience in the face of fierce violence and intimidation ultimately led to the desegregation of public transportation systems across our country.

 

Rosa Parks’s story did not end with the boycott she inspired. A lifelong champion of civil rights, she continued to give voice to the poor and the marginalized among us until her passing on October 24, 2005.

 

As we mark the 100th anniversary of Rosa Parks’s birth, we celebrate the life of a genuine American hero and remind ourselves that although the principle of equality has always been self-evident, it has never been self-executing. It has taken acts of courage from generations of fearless and hopeful Americans to make our country more just. As heirs to the progress won by those who came before us, let us pledge not only to honor their legacy, but also to take up their cause of perfecting our Union.

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 4, 2013, as the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Rosa Parks. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate service, community, and education programs to honor Rosa Parks’s enduring legacy.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

 

BARACK OBAMA

 

 

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A Sneak Peek At The 43rd Super Bowl Commercials


By Jueseppi B.

 

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SKECHERS Relaxed Fit Super Bowl Commercial Joe Montana Ronnie Lott

 

 

 

 

 

Doritos® – Fashionista Daddy — Crash the Super Bowl 2013 Finalist

 

 

 

 

 

“Space Babies” 2014 Kia Sorento Big Game Ad

 

 

 

 

 

Kate Upton Washes the All-New Mercedes-Benz CLA in Slow Motion

 

 

 

 

 

Sunny Side: 2013 Volkswagen Super Bowl Teaser Video with Jimmy Cliff (Get Happy)

 

 

 

 

 

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2013 Gildan Teaser — “Getaway”

 

 

 

 

 

MiO Fit 2013 Big-Game Ad Teaser – ‘BLEEP’

 

 

 

 

 

Toyota Game Day Teaser “I Wish” Starring Kaley Cuoco (Official)

 

 

 

 

 

Grandpa Goes Wild – 2013 Taco Bell Game Day Commercial Teaser

 

 

 

 

 

Budweiser Black Crown – Arrival

 

 

 

 

 

Coke Chase – Who Will You Vote For?

 

 

 

 

 

Go Daddy Super Bowl 2013 Ad: Your Big Idea .co

 

 

 

 

 

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