When Gang Rape In America Becomes A Joke….”Boys Will Be Boys”…..


By Jueseppi B.

 

 

article-0-16DDA84E000005DC-453_306x469

 

 

 

 

Kat Barr, UltraViolet:

 

 

“They raped her… They raped her quicker than Mike Tyson raped that one girl… she is so raped.”

 

 

That’s what a local man, who has been identified and is known to the media and police, said on camera about the now-infamous gang rape of a teenage girl by members of the Steubenville, Ohio high school football team last August. In the 12-minute video he is barely able to speak through his laughter.[1] He also tweeted that night that “Song of the night is definitely Rape Me by Nirvana.”[2] The girl was carried, unconscious, to different parties and raped at multiple locations throughout the night. And the dozens of teens who were there didn’t try to stop them, get help or call the police–instead they took photos and posted jokes about the attack on Twitter.[3]

 

 

Now, months later, local police are still dragging their feet and a special prosecutor has taken over the case. But only two people were arrested, and none of the teens who photographed or tweeted jokes about the crime have been held accountable. Despite the petitions, the protests, and the media attention, the sheriff announced that nobody else will be charged.[4] The city even released a statement claiming that Ohio law gives them no recourse against people who took photos or posted comments online while the girl was attacked.[5]

 

 

But under Ohio law, failing to report a felony is a crime.[6] And based on his 12-minute video, this man not only knew about the rape, but witnessed it.[7] It’s outrageous that local authorities are sweeping this under the rug–but it’s not too late for the special prosecutors to charge him and others involved. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is paying attention to the media coverage and public outrage about this case, and UltraViolet has joined with NOW, Justice for Children, and the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence to call on him to prosecute the man. Can you sign our petition that demands that DeWine prosecute anyone who knowingly failed to report the crime?

 

 

Add your name.

 

 

Last August, the 16-year-old girl and her parents found out she was raped the next day by reading about it on social networks and the local news.[8] In recent weeks, Steubenville has been under a media spotlight while photos, videos, and posts to sites like Twitter and Instagram have surfaced. The crime was documented online in real time by teens on their phones.[9] It’s painfully clear that people were there, they knew about it, and some have even tried to cover it up after the fact.

 

 

But months later, only two boys have been charged with the rape. More than 70,000 UltraViolet members have signed a petition to Attorney General Mike DeWine demanding that everyone involved be held accountable. And just this Saturday, hundreds of people rallied in downtown Steubenville to demand justice for the survivor–the third rally since December. But the town is divided, and many people are supporting their local football heroes and blaming the survivor for the crimes committed against her.

 

 

We know the Attorney General is paying attention to the media scrutiny–just a few weeks ago, Ohio State University students delivered petitions to his office. He personally met with them to discuss the case and accept the 70,000 signatures from UltraViolet members. But we’re running out of time to make sure that others involved are charged. The law is clear–in Ohio, it’s a crime to knowingly fail to report a felony.  Can you sign the petition to demand justice for the survivor?

 

 

Add your name.

 

 

Thanks for speaking out,

 

Nita, Shaunna, Kat, and Karin, the UltraViolet team

 

 

Sources:

 

1. The Steubenville Gang Rape – A Timeline *Slight Update*, DailyKos, January 3, 2013

 

 

 

2. How An Alleged Rape Involving Ohio High School Football Players Unfolded On Twitter, Instagram, And YouTube, Deadspin, December 17,2012

 

 

3. Rape Case Unfolds on Web and Splits City, New York Times, December 16, 2012

 

 

 

4. Steubenville Rape Case: Ohio Sheriff Confronts Protesters, Huffington Post, January 7, 2013

 

 

 
5. Online outrage over Ohio rape case prompts city website, CNN, January 5, 2013

 

 

 

6. 2921.22 Failure to report a crime or knowledge of a death or burn injury, Ohio Revised Code

 

 

 

7. The Steubenville Gang Rape – A Timeline *Slight Update*, DailyKos, January 3, 2013

 

 

 

8. Rape Case Unfolds on Web and Splits City, New York Times, December 16, 2012

 

 

 

9. The Steubenville Gang Rape – A Timeline *Slight Update*, DailyKos, January 3, 2013

 

 

 

bloggers4peace

 

 

 

 

 

blackhistorymonthbanner

 

 

 

Alabama Standoff Is Over. Kidnapper Dykes Is Dead, Little Ethan Is Safe.


By Jueseppi B.

 

 

20960766_BG3

 

Jimmy Lee Dykes (Source: Dale Co. Sheriff’s Dept.)

 

 

CBS/AP) MIDLAND CITY, Ala. – A U.S. official tells CBS News that a nearly week-long hostage standoff in which a 5-year-old was being held captive in southeast Alabama has ended in the kidnapper’s death. The child is said to be okay.

 

 

Authorities said 65-year-old Jimmy Dykes gunned down a school bus driver Tuesday and abducted a 5-year-old boy from the bus before taking him to an underground bunker on his rural property. The driver, 66-year-old Charles Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

 

Dykes, a decorated Vietnam-era veteran described as a loner who railed against the government, lived up a dirt road just off the main road north to the state capital of Montgomery, about 80 miles away.

 

 

CBS radio affiliate WSB says reporters heard what may have been a concussion grenade before ambulance and fire vehicles went to and from Dykes’ property about 4:00 P.M. Eastern Time Monday.

 

 

Authorities say growing speculation on the mental state of Jimmy Lee Dykes, 65, was the main concern and reasoning for the invasion of the bunker at this time today.

 

 

Jim Lee Dykes, 65 — a decorated Vietnam-era veteran known as Jimmy to neighbors — gunned down a school bus driver and abducted a 5-year-old boy from the bus, taking him to an underground bunker on his rural property. The driver, 66-year-old Charles Albert Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

Dykes, described as a loner who railed against the government, lives up a dirt road outside this tiny hamlet north of Dothan in the southeastern corner of the state. His home is just off the main road north to the state capital of Montgomery, about 80 miles away.

 

 

Dykes grew up in the Dothan area. Mel Adams, a Midland City Council member who owns the lot where reporters are gathered, said he has known Dykes since they were ages 3 and 4.

 
He said Dykes has a sister and a brother, but that he is estranged from his family.
Adams said he didn’t know what caused the falling-out, but that he knew Dykes “had told part of his family to go to hell.”

 

 

Government records and interviews with neighbors indicate that Dykes joined the Navy in Midland City, serving on active duty from 1964 to 1969. His record shows several awards, including the Vietnam Service Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. Dykes was trained in aviation maintenance and at one point was based in Japan. It was unclear if he saw combat in Vietnam.

 

 

At some point after his time in the Navy, Dykes lived in Florida, where he worked as a surveyor and a long-haul truck driver. It’s unclear how long he stayed there.

 

He had some scrapes with the law in Florida, including a 1995 arrest for improper exhibition of a weapon. The misdemeanor was dismissed. He also was arrested for marijuana possession in 2000.
He returned to Alabama about two years ago, moving onto the rural tract about 100 yards from his nearest neighbors, Michael Creel and his father, Greg.

 

Neighbors described Dykes as a man who once beat a dog to death with a lead pipe, threatened to shoot children for setting foot on his property, and patrolled his yard at night with a flashlight and a firearm. Michael Creel said Dykes had an adult daughter, but the two lost touch years ago.

 

 

Here’s how the siege was ended:

 

At 3:12 PM State FBI along with assistance from State police, ended the hostage situation. Fearing emanate danger, after observing Dykes with a weapon, the FBI entered the underground bunker on his rural property and shot dead Jimmy Lee Dykes and rescued little Ethan. This move by the Alabama State FBI was orchestrated after negotiations deteriorated.

 

 

All praise and thanks to all who worked tirelessly to resolve this situation with the desired results of saving the life of little Ethan who has Asperger’s syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

 

Our prayers, hearts and gratitude go out to the family of hero bus driver, 66-year-old Mr. Charles Albert Poland Jr., who gave his life to protect the other children on that bus. Mr. Charles Albert Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

In the nearby community of Ozark on Sunday, more than 500 people filed into the Civic Center to pay a final tribute to Poland, who was being hailed as a hero for protecting the other children on the school bus before he was shot Tuesday.

 

Poland is now “an angel who is watching over” the little boy, said Dale County School Superintendent Donny Bynum, who read letters written by three students who had ridden on Poland’s bus. “You didn’t deserve to die but you died knowing you kept everyone safe,” one child wrote.

 

Outside the funeral, school buses from several counties lined the funeral procession route. The buses had black ribbons tied to their side mirrors.

 

 

0130-ALABAMA-SHOOTING-BUS-DRIVER-HOSTAGE_full_380

 

Charles Albert Poland Jr., 66, has been identified as the bus driver who was shot after refusing to hand over children from his school bus. The ongoing crisis continues in Alabama; but one must not forget Poland, who died while defending 21 children.

 

When the gunman came onto the bus, he said he “wanted two boys 6 to 8 years old,” as reported by CBS News. He started down the aisle and the children “scrambled” toward the back of the bus. That is when Poland “put his arm out to grab a pole near the front steps of the vehicle, trying to block the suspect.” He was shot four times at that point and the gunman randomly grabbed a five-year-old boy and fled.

 

Thank you Mr. Poland, for giving your life so 21 children could live.

 

 

email-header

 

 

 

bloggers4peace

 

 

 

blackhistorymonthbanner

 

 

Fighting The NRAssholes Continues……Full Video Of The President Speaking In Minneapolis, MN.


By Jueseppi B.

 

kb2vz-slma-91

 

 

 

 

Sandy Hook Choir & Jennifer Hudson Sing at Super Bowl 2013 Pre-Game America America Live

 

Published on Feb 3, 2013

Brave children from Sandy Hook Elementary School take the field with singer Jennifer Hudson for an emotional performance.

 

 

 

 

 

406254_3424754469097_1816395501_n

 

 

 

Super Bowl Ad: Background Checks for All Gun Purchases

 

Published on Feb 3, 2013

The ad highlights NRA leader Wayne LaPierre‘s recent flip-flop on closing background check loopholes.

 

 

 

 

 

A Hat Tip/Shout Out to the following contributors of this post, their valuable information is greatly appreciated: Steve BenenJosh Marshall (TPM), Michael Tomasky.

 

Steve Benen: Last night, if you were watching the Super Bowl you saw a rather powerful ad on gun policy  …. The spot, sponsored by Mayors Against Illegal Guns, urges policymakers to approve a universal background check, and features “America, the Beautiful” against the backdrop of young children.

 

About 12 hours earlier, Americans could see theNRA’s Wayne LaPierre on “Fox News Sunday,” making a very different kind of argument: “I make the same thing during the campaign, when he said to people I will not take away your rifle, shotgun, handgun. They leafletted the country with flyers like this, ‘Obama is not going to take your gun, Obama is going to protect gun rights.’ And, now, he’s trying to take away all three.”

 

…..  therein lies the problem: the policy debate has become increasingly strained because one of the most influential lobbying groups in Washington relies on arguments based on evidence the organization has simply made up…..

 

Full post here

 

 

 

Josh Marshall (TPM): I just found out that last September the NRA published an official list of gun enemies including the ADA, AMA, ADL, Mel Brooks, Chaka Khan and hundreds of other domestic gun enemies…..

 

The following organizations have lent monetary, grassroots or some other type of direct support to anti-gun organizations. In many instances, these organizations lent their name in support of specific campaigns to pass anti-gun legislation such as the March 1995 HCI “Campaign to Protect Sane Gun Laws.” Many of these organizations were listed as “Campaign Partners,” for having pledged to fight any efforts to repeal the Brady Act and the Clinton “assault weapons” ban. All have officially endorsed anti-gun positions.

 

More here

 

 

 

Michael Tomasky: The Strangest NRA Story Yet – The fact that the NRA was keeping a list of its foes isn’t all that bizarre. But the list itself is positively loony — yet more evidence of just how nuts the NRA is

 

One of the sure markers of the paranoid mind is the urge to keep lists. In particular, lists of enemies, subversives, no-goodniks ….  It virtually goes without saying that the keepers of such lists are always the bullies who survive by fomenting hatred and making sure that their constituents stay in a state of constant agitation. And so it was no surprise to learn over the weekend that the NRA has a little list of 497 people and organizations who are in some way, shape, or form anti-gun. It makes for hilarious reading, although it’s sort of frightening to think about the demented minds of the people who assembled it.

 

More here

 

 

President Obama visited the Minneapolis Police Department’s Special Operations center to talk about his gun control proposals with local law enforcement officials.

 

obama020413

 

 

 

Monday, February 4, 2013

 

Pres. Obama travels to the Minneapolis Police Department Special Operations Center to deliver remarks and discuss with local leaders and law enforcement officials his ideas to prevent gun violence.

 

The President is expected to address local experiences with gun violence and discuss additional steps that can be taken at the federal level to reduce gun violence.

 

In January, Pres. Obama announced anti-gun violence proposals recommended by the White House task force chaired by Vice President Joe Biden. In remarks to the press, he outlined proposals for legislative and executive actions to ban assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, implement universal background checks for all gun buyers, and to establish mental health and school safety measures.

The task force was formed in response to the December 14, 2012, elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn. Minneapolis is another city that had a deadly mass shooting in 2012.

 

 

US-POLITICS-OBAMA

A man holds up a gun control sign while President Obama’s motorcade passes on the way to the Minneapolis Police Department’s Special Operations Center Feb. 4

 

 

 

20130204_obama4_53

Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, Feb 4

 

 

 

Joan G., whose son was murdered with a gun – I Demand A Plan

 

 

 

 

 

BCR-DSjCMAARetu

 

 

 

BCSK31eCUAAjqMe

Minneapolis today: Tom Morgan (right) & his friend drove from Detroit to show support for Pres Obama’s gun control plan.

 

 

 

2013-02-04T202354Z_422132314_GM1E9250C6K01_RTRMADP_3_USA-OBAMA-GUNS

President Obama greets law enforcement officers in Minnesota Monday (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters.

 

 

 

POTUS Obama Calls for Universal Background Checks for All Gun Purchases

 

Published on Feb 4, 2013

At a press conference with the Minneapolis Police Department in Minneapolis Feb. 4, 2013, President Barack Obama called for action by way of “a set of commonsense ideas to reduce gun violence,” including universal background checks for all gun purchases, which he says are almost “universally supported by gun owners.”

 

 

 

 

 

The White House

 

Office of the Press Secretary

 

For Immediate Release
February 04, 2013

Remarks by the President on Preventing Gun Violence in Minneapolis, MN

Special Operations Center
Minneapolis Police Department
Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

1:46 P.M. CST

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, everybody.  Please have a seat.  Have a seat.

 

Well, it is good to be back in Minnesota.  (Applause.)  It is good to be back.  Although I was commenting that they don’t really have winter in Washington, D.C.  (Laughter.)  So I’ve gotten soft over these last four years.  When I was in Chicago, this was nothing.  Now it’s something.  (Laughter.)  But I’m grateful for all of you being here today.  I want to thank Chief Harteau and the entire Minneapolis Police Department for having me here today.

 

 

There are a number of other people that I just want to acknowledge here.  First of all, a wonderful man and one of America’s greatest public servants is here — Walter Mondale, former Vice President.  (Applause.)  Your outstanding Governor, Mark Dayton, is here.  (Applause.)  Two great Mayors — Mayor R.T. Rybak of Minneapolis, and Mayor Chris Coleman of St. Paul.  (Applause.)  And your outstanding congressional delegation — Senator Amy Klobuchar — (applause) — Senator Al Franken —  (applause) — Representative Keith Ellison — (applause) — and Representative Betty McCullough.  (Applause.)

 

 

And I should acknowledge my outstanding Attorney General — what’s your name again?  (Laughter.)  He does a great job every single day, and I could not be prouder of Eric Holder for his leadership on this issue in particular.  (Applause.)

 

 

Now, I just had a chance to sit down with some local police officers but also community leaders, as well as folks who themselves had been victims or whose families had been victims of gun violence, to hear their ideas about how we can protect our kids and address the broader epidemic of gun violence in this country.  Because if we’re serious about preventing the kinds of tragedies that happened in Newtown, or the tragedies that happen every day in places like Chicago or Philadelphia or Minneapolis, then law enforcement and other community leaders must have a seat at the table.

 

All the folks standing here behind me today, they’re the ones on the front line of this fight.  They see the awful consequences — the lives lost, the families shattered.  They know what works, they know what doesn’t work, and they know how to get things done without regard for politics.

 

So we’ve had a very productive discussion.  And one of the things that struck me was that even though those who were sitting around that table represented very different communities, from big cities to small towns, they all believe it’s time to take some basic, common-sense steps to reduce gun violence.  We may not be able to prevent every massacre or random shooting.  No law or set of laws can keep our children completely safe.  But if there’s even one thing we can do, if there’s just one life we can save, we’ve got an obligation to try.

 

That’s been the philosophy here in Minneapolis.  A few years back, you suffered a spike in violent crime involving young people.  So this city came together.  You launched a series of youth initiatives that have reduced the number of young people injured by guns by 40 percent — 40 percent.  So when it comes to protecting our children from gun violence, you’ve shown that progress is possible.  We’ve still got to deal with the 60 percent that remains, but that 40 percent means lives saved — parents whose hearts aren’t broken, communities that aren’t terrorized and afraid.

 

We don’t have to agree on everything to agree it’s time to do something.  (Applause.)  That’s my main message here today.

 

And each of us has a role to play.  A few weeks ago, I took action on my own to strengthen background checks, to help schools get more resource officers if they want them, and to direct the Centers for Disease Control to study the causes of violence.  Because for a long time, even looking at the evidence was considered somehow tough politics.  And so Congress had taken the approach that, we don’t want to know.  Well, that’s never the answer to a problem — is not wanting to know what is going on.

 

So we’ve been able to take some steps through administrative action.  But while these steps are important, real and lasting change also requires Congress to do its part and to do it soon, not to wait.  The good news is that we’re starting to see a consensus emerge about the action Congress needs to take.

 

The vast majority of Americans — including a majority of gun owners — support requiring criminal background checks for anyone trying to buy a gun.  (Applause.)  So right now, Democrats and Republicans in the Senate are working on a bill that would ban anyone from selling a gun to somebody legally prohibited from owning one.  That’s common sense.  There’s no reason we can’t get that done.  That is not a liberal idea or a conservative idea; it’s not a Democratic or Republican idea — that is a smart idea. We want to keep those guns out of hands of folks who shouldn’t have them.

 

Senators from both parties have also come together and proposed a bill that would crack down on people who buy guns only to turn them around and sell them to criminals.  It’s a bill that would keep more guns off the street and out of the hands of people with the intent of doing harm.  (Applause.)

 

And, by the way, in addition to reducing violence on the streets, it would also make life a lot easier and a lot safer for the people standing behind me here today.  (Applause.)

 

We shouldn’t stop there.  We should restore the ban on military-style assault weapons and a 10-round limit for magazines.  (Applause.)  And that deserves a vote in Congress — because weapons of war have no place on our streets, or in our schools, or threatening our law enforcement officers.  Our law enforcement officers should never be out-gunned on the streets.  (Applause.)

 

But we also know that if we’re going to solve the problem of gun violence, then we’ve got to look at root causes as well.  That means we should make it easier for young people to get access to mental health treatment.  (Applause.)  We should help communities like this one keep more cops on the beat.  (Applause.)  And since Congress hasn’t confirmed a director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in six years, they should confirm your U.S. Attorney from Minnesota, Todd Jones, who is here today and who I’ve nominated for this post.  (Applause.)

 

These are common-sense measures supported by Democrats, Republicans and independents, and many of them are responsible gun owners.  And we’re seeing members of Congress from both parties put aside their differences and work together to make many of them a reality.

 

But if there’s one thing that I’ve learned over the last four years, it’s that you can’t count on anything in Washington until it’s done.  And nothing is done yet.  There’s been a lot of talk, a lot of conversation, a lot of publicity, but we haven’t actually taken concrete steps yet.

 

Last week, the Senate held its first hearing since Newtown on the need to address gun violence and the best way to move forward, and the first people to offer testimony were Gabby Giffords and her husband, Mark Kelly.  They talked about how a complex problem like this has no single solution, but if we still had a 10-round limit on magazines, for example, the gunman who shot Gabby may never have been able to inflict 33 gunshot wounds in 15 seconds.  Fifteen seconds, 33 rounds fired.  Some of the six people who lost their lives that day in Tucson might still be with us.

 

Now, changing the status quo is never easy.  This will be no exception.  The only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the American people decide it’s important.  If you decide it’s important.  If parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, Americans of every background stand up and say this time it’s got to be different — we’ve suffered too much pain to stand by and do nothing.

 

And by the way, it’s really important for us to engage with folks who don’t agree with us on everything, because we hope that we can find some areas where we do agree.  And we have to recognize that there are going to be regional differences and geographic differences.  The experience that people have of guns in an urban neighborhood may not be the same as in a rural community.

 

But we know, for example, from polling that universal background checks are universally supported just about, by gun owners.  The majority of gun owners, overwhelming majority of gun owners think that’s a good idea.  So if we’ve got lobbyists in Washington claiming to speak for gun owners saying something different, we need to go to the source and reach out to people directly.  We can’t allow those filters to get in the way of common sense.

 

That’s why I need everybody who’s listening to keep the pressure on your member of Congress to do the right thing.  Ask them if they support common-sense reforms like requiring universal background checks, or restoring the ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.  Tell them there’s no legislation to eliminate all guns; there’s no legislation being proposed to subvert the Second Amendment.  Tell them specifically what we’re talking about — things that the majority of Americans, when they’re asked, support.

 

And tell them now is the time for action.  That we’re not going to wait until the next Newtown or the next Aurora.  We’re not going to wait until after we lose more innocent Americans on street corners all across the country.  We’re not going to wait until somebody else’s father or son are murdered.

Some of the officers here today know what it’s like to look into the eyes of a parent or a grandparent, a brother or a sister who has just lost a loved one to an act of violence; to see the pain and the heartbreak from wondering why this precious life, this piece of your heart was in the wrong place at the wrong time.  It changes you.  You’re not the same afterwards.

 

And obviously whatever that experience is like is nothing compared to the experience that those families are actually going through.  And it makes you realize that if there’s even one thing we can do to keep our children and our community safe, if there’s just one step we can take to prevent more families from feeling what they feel after they’ve lost a loved one, we’ve got an obligation to take that step.  We’ve got an obligation to give our police officers and our communities the tools they need to make some of the same progress that’s been made here in Minneapolis.

 

There won’t be perfect solutions.  We’re not going to save every life.  But we can make a difference.  And that’s our responsibility as Americans.  And that’s what I’ll do every single day as long I’ve got the honor of serving as your President.

 

So thank you.  God bless you.  God bless these United States of America.  (Applause.)  Thank you.  (Applause.)

 

END
2:02 P.M. CST

 

 

 

bloggers4peace

 

 

 

email-header

 

 

 

 

blackhistorymonthbanner

 

 

 


Jueseppi B.:

For my vegan friends from Stash, at Simple Kitchen Seasons.

Originally posted on Simple Kitchen Seasons:

There is a world of difference between chickpeas prepared from scratch, and canned versions. With the latter, what you save in terms of convenience sacrifices taste and beauty as the difference is immeasurable. An added bonus is the chickpea cooking broth, which is jam-packed with flavor. I often use it as a substitute for water when making soup, pasta or rice, or any dish where stock would normally be called for, such as risotto.

Below is a vegan version of the tapa known as “garbanzos con espinaca” but one that uses watercress in place of spinach. This was adapted from a recent recipe by David Tanis, which you can view here. Mr. Tanis is a New York Times food columnist and is a chef formerly associated with the restaurant Chez Panisse, located in Berkeley, California.

Chickpeas with winter greens and almonds

Chickpeas with Winter Greens and Almonds

For the chickpeas and broth:

1 cup…

View original 440 more words

The Daily 411 From Barack’s Blog


By Jueseppi B.

 

 

MYhouse

 

 

Today’s Schedule:

 

Today’s Schedule

 

All times are Eastern Standard Time (EST).

 

7:00 AM: The Vice President and Dr. Jill Biden arrive in Berlin

 

 

10:15 AM: The President departs the White House en route to Joint Base Andrews

 

 

10:30 AM: The President departs Joint Base Andrews en route to Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

 

11:15 AM: The Vice President and Dr. Biden arrive in London at London Stansted Airport

 

 

1:00 PM: The President arrives in Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

 

1:30 PM: The President participates in a discussion with local leaders and law enforcement officials

 

 

2:30 PM: The President delivers remarks on a comprehensive set of common sense ideas to reduce gun violence

 

 

3:35 PM: The President departs Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

 

5:45 PM: The President arrives at Joint Base Andrews

 

 

6:00 PM: The President arrives at the White House

 

 

Watch at 2:30 p.m. EST: President Obama gives an update on his plan to reduce gun violence. Watch live on WhiteHouse.gov/Live

 

 

In Case You Missed It

 

Here are some of the top stories from the White House blog:

 

Vice President Biden and Dr. Biden Visit Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany
Vice President Joe Biden, Dr. Jill Biden, and Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter visit with Wounded Warriors and their medical caretakers at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (RMC) in Landstuhl, Germany.

 

 

Weekly Address: A Balanced Approach to Growing the Economy in 2013
In last week’s address, President Obama called on Congress to work together on a balanced approach to reduce our deficit and promote economic growth and job creation.

 

 

Weekly Wrap Up: Strengthening Our Country’s Future
Here’s quick glimpse at what happened last week on WhiteHouse.gov.

 

 

 

Keeping Up the Demand for Action on Gun Violence

 

Maureen Tracey-Mooney
By  Maureen Tracey-Mooney  February 04, 2013  The White House Blog

 

It’s been two weeks since President Obama released his plan for reducing gun violence. Since then, the President and the Vice President have continued their push for common-sense steps to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence. They’ve spoken with mayors, law enforcement officers, and ordinary Americans about the plan going forward. They’ve continued to meet with experts about effective steps that cities and states have taken. And they’ve kept in contact with members of Congress about how to move forward on common-sense legislation to prevent gun violence.

 

On January 17, the day after the President released his gun violence prevention plan, the Vice President spoke to the U.S. Conference of Mayors about the plan. Last week, the Conference officially endorsed the President and Vice President’s proposals.

 

 

 

v011713dl-0308

 

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the winter meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, at the Capital Hilton, in Washington, DC, Jan. 17, 2013. (Official White House Photo by David Lienemann).

 

 

On January 25th, the Vice President traveled to Richmond, Virginia to hold a roundtable discussion with experts who helped improve Virginia’s background check system after the Virginia Tech shooting. Along with Secretaries Napolitano and Sebelius, Senator Tim Kaine, and Congressman Bobby Scott, they talked about what still needs to be done to make sure that there is a criminal background check for every gun sale in America.

 

The roundtable discussed the need to make sure states and the Federal government are making complete information available to our background check system about those who aren’t allowed to have guns. The President’s gun violence plan includes four executive actions to do just that. But to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people, we also need Congress to pass new legislation requiring background checks for all gun sales, with common-sense exceptions for cases like transfers between family members.

 

On Monday, January 28th, the President and Vice President, along with members of the Cabinet, met with police chiefs and sheriffs from across the country about their work on the ground to reduce gun violence. Police chiefs from Aurora, Oak Creek, and Newtown shared their personal stories and the lessons they have learned from responding to and recovering from a mass shooting. Our plan would give law enforcement additional tools to prevent and prosecute gun crime by making gun trafficking a Federal crime with serious penalties, helping communities put 15,000 cops on the street, and taking other common-sense steps.

 

Senator Patrick Leahy chaired a hearing last week at which several witnesses explained why the President’s proposals are so important. Two of those witnesses, former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly, also came to meet with President Obama at the White House on Wednesday.

 

 

p013013ps-01993

President Barack Obama greets former Rep. Gabrielle “Gabby” Giffords and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly, in the Oval Office after they testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence, Jan. 30, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

 

Finally, Vice President Biden personally called on Congress to act when he traveled to the Hill last Thursday to meet with Democratic Senators. Congress is already making progress on passing key components of the President’s plan. Multiple bills that would take steps to reduce gun violence have been introduced in the Senate. The Vice President urged his former colleagues to continue this progress, work quickly, and take the bold action this moment demands.

 

There is more activity to come. Today the President travels to Minnesota to discuss his plan. We will continue to provide updates as we go forward.

 

 

 

email-header

 

 

 

bloggers4peace

 

 

 

blackhistorymonthbanner

 

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 266,506 other followers

%d bloggers like this: