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President Nelson Madiba Mandela Memorial Service Program, Media Coverage And Official Obituary


 

By Jueseppi B.

The World Mourns The Death Of Former South African President Nelson Mandela

 

 

STATE MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR THE LATE FORMER PRESIDENT

 
Date: 10 December 2013
18 July 1918 – 5 December 2013

 
Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela

 

 

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Obituary of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela
It is with deep sadness that the Government has learnt of the passing of the father of South Africa’s democracy – Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela.
He passed on peacefully in the company of his family around 20h50 on the 5th of December 2013.

 

The man who was to become one of the world’s greatest icons was born in Mvezo, Transkei on 18 July 1918, to Nongaphi Nosekeni and Henry Gadla Mandela. His father was the key counsellor/advisor to the Thembu royal house. After his father’s death in 1927,
the young Rolihlahla became the ward of Chief Jongintaba Dalindyebo, the acting regent of the Thembu nation. It was at the Thembu royal homestead that his personality values and political views were shaped. There can be no doubt that the young man went on to bring about some of the most significant and remarkable changes in South African history and politics.

 
It is through Mandela that the world cast its eyes on South Africa and took notice of the severe and organized repression of black South Africans. Yet it was also through Mandela that the world would learn the spirit of endurance, the triumph of forgiveness and
the beauty of reconciliation. Indeed, the story of Nelson Mandela is so much the story of South Africa.

 
When he was only 25 years old, Nelson Mandela joined the African National Congress. His political career would span decades more – as he himself said: “The struggle is my life.” The young Mandela also qualified and practiced as a lawyer. Together with Oliver Tambo he opened the first black legal practice in Johannesburg.

 
Mandela married Evelyn Nomathamsanqa Mase in 1945. They were married for fourteen years and had four children: Thembekile (1946), Makaziwe (1947), who died at nine months, Makgatho (1951) and Makaziwe (1954).The couple divorced in 1958.

 

He was instrumental in the formation of the radical African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL) in the 1940s which was determined to change the face of politics. Mandela was elected the league’s National Secretary in 1948 and President in 1952.

 
Much of the years that followed saw Mandela deeply involved in activism, rallying for political change against the increasingly aggressive apartheid government. He was a key player in the ANC’s Campaign for the Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952 and the Treason Trial in 1961. During this time he was incarcerated several times under the apartheid laws and banned from political activity. Realising that the ANC needed to prepare for more intensive struggle, he became an instrumental force behind the formation of a new section of the liberation movement, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK), as an armed nucleus with a view to preparing for armed struggle. Mandela was commander in chief of MK.

 
On 14 June 1958 Nelson and Winnie Madikizela were married at a local Bizana church. They had two children, Zenani (1958) Zindziswa (1960). In April 1992 they were separated and finally divorced in 1996.

 
He left the country in 1962 and traveled abroad to arrange guerilla training for members of Umkhonto weSizwe. On his return to South Africa he was arrested for illegal exiting the country and incitement to strike. Mandela decided to represent himself in court.
While on trial, Mandela was charged with sabotage in the Rivonia Trial. This is his famous statement from the dock made in 1964: “I have fought against White domination, and I have fought against Black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

 
In the same year Mandela and the other accused were sentenced to life imprisonment in the Rivonia Trial and sent to Robben Island, near Cape Town. While in prison, Mandela rejected offers made by his jailers to be released on condition that he renounced violence.
“Prisoners cannot enter into contracts. Only free men can negotiate,” he said. He served a total of 27 years in prison for his conviction to fight apartheid and its injustices. Released on 11 February 1990, Mandela plunged wholeheartedly into his life’s work,
striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after being banned for decades, Nelson Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation’s National Chairperson.

 
In a life that symbolises the triumph of the human spirit, Nelson Mandela accepted the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize (along with FW de Klerk) on behalf of all South Africans who suffered and sacrificed so much to bring peace to our land. The era of apartheid formally came to an end on the April 27, 1994, when Nelson Mandela voted for the first time in his life – along with his people. However, long before that date it had become clear, even before the start of negotiations at the World Trade Centre in Kempton Park, that the ANC was increasingly charting the future of South Africa.

 
Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was inaugurated as President of a democratic South Africa
on 10 May 1994.

 
This world icon worked tirelessly even after the achievement of democracy in South Africa to continue improving lives. Even as he retired from politics, his attention shifted to social issues such as HIV and AIDS and the wellbeing of the nation’s children. As a
testimony to his sharp political intellect, wisdom and unrelenting commitment to make the world a better place, Mandela formed the prestigious group of called The Elders – an independent group of eminent global leaders, who offer their collective influence and experience to support peace building, help address major causes of human suffering and promote the shared interests of humanity.

 
Mr Mandela is survived by his wife Graça, three daughters, 18 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

 

 

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Official Programme

 
Mr Cyril Ramaphosa and Ms Baleka Mbete

 

official-program

 
11:00 – 15:00

 
National Anthem: Mass Choir

 
Welcome and Opening Remarks: Programme Directors

 
Interfaith Prayers

 
Tribute by Family Friend: Andrew Mlangeni

 

 
Tribute by Family: General Thanduxolo Mandela

 

 
Tribute by the Grandchildren: Mbuso Mandela

 
Andile Mandela

 
Zozuko Dlamini

 
Phumla Mandela

 
Tribute by UN Representative: Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

 
Tribute by AU Commission Chair: Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma

 
Tribute by Foreign Dignitaries: President Barack Obama (USA)

 
President Dilma Rousseff (Brazil)

 
Vice-President Li Yuanchao (China)

 
President Hifikepunye Pohamba (Namibia)

 
President Pranab Mukherjee (India)

 
President Raúl Castro Ruz (Cuba)

 
Keynote Address by the President of the Republic of South Africa:

 
His Excellency Jacob Zuma

 
Sermon: Bishop Ivan Abrahams

 

 

Vote of Thanks: Premier of Gauteng, Nomvula Mokonyane

 

 

The Nelson Mandela Memorial Service begins at 4:00 AM US EST

 

Live streaming here:

 

Nelson Mandela Memorial Service

 

Scheduled for Dec 10, 2013

Nelson Mandela Memorial Service

 

 

 

Nelson Mandela

 

 

Mandela funeral coverage starts 3 a.m. Tuesday Chicago time

 

WASHINGTON–The national memorial service for South African leader and global icon Nelson Mandela will be televised live by U.S. networks, with coverage starting at 3 a.m. Tuesday Chicago time and running for four hours.

 

After interfaith prayers and tributes to Mandela from a family friend, family and four grandchildren global figures will speak: UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, African Union Commission Chair Nikosazana Zuma, six foreign leaders will speak, with President Barack Obama the first.

 

Obama will be followed by Brazil President Dilma Rousseff, who recently dropped a visit to the U.S. in the wake of NSA spying on Brazil; China Vice President Li Yuanchao, Nambia President Hifikepunya Pohamba, India President Pranab Mukjerjee and Cuba President Raul Castro.

 

The keynote will be delivered by South African President Jacob Zuma, who announced the death of Mandela last Thursday.

 

The South African government posted the program book for the service and you can see it HERE.

 

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Coverage Plans for Mandela Memorial Service

 

 

International leaders, including President Barack Obama and former Presidents George W. BushBill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, will honor Nelson Mandela at a public memorial service at FNB Stadium in Johannesburg tomorrow. The memorial service will begin at 11 a.m. local time (4 am ET).

 

Brian Williams will anchor a special report for NBC News beginning at 4 am ET Tuesday. Williams will also anchor “Nightly News” from Pretoria tonight and tomorrow.

 

CBS News will have coverage of the memorial service during “Up to the Minute,” the early morning newscast, beginning at 4 am ET. CBSNews.com will have a live stream of the service.

 

ABC News will air a special report from Times Square beginning at 4 am ET. George Stephanopoulos and Robin Roberts will anchor from New York, with Terry Moran and Byron Pitts from South Africa.

 

Fox News will cover the memorial service when it begins at 4 am ET, with coverage continuing through “Fox & Friends First” and “Fox & Friends.”Greg Palkot and producer Paul Tilsley will contribute to the network’s coverage from the FNB Stadium in South Africa.

 

CNN has Anderson CooperChris Cuomo and Christiane Amanpour reporting from South Africa. Cooper will anchor both editions of “AC360″ live from outside Mandela’s home tonight.

 

MSNBC will simulcast NBC News’ special report, with the “Morning Joe” team taking over at 6 am ET. The full memorial service will stream on msnbc.com.

 

Continuous live coverage of Nelson Mandela Memorial events on South African channel SABC

 

 

 

 

Nelson Mandela’s Funeral, Farewell Plans – Day By Day Schedule. The President & First Lady Will Attend.

 

Thank you CNN:

 

By Robyn Curnow, CNN

 

Johannesburg (CNN) – For the Xhosa people of South Africa, death is traditionally not something to be talked about or to be planned for, no matter how inevitable or close it may seem.

 

But those close to Nelson Mandela had little choice as the country’s first black leader lay in a Pretoria hospital and then at home in Johannesburg on life support.

 

In the final years of his life, secret plans were hammered out between the government, the military and his family as they prepared for a fitting farewell for a great man.

 

Below is a breakdown of how those plans will unfold over the next 10 days, culminating in a state funeral to be broadcast to millions worldwide and a very private farewell for those closest to him.

 

As is often the case with events of this magnitude, plans might change due to weather, security and other factors. But for now, this is what the authorities and the family hope will happen.

 

According to multiple sources involved with the planning of the final farewell to the South African icon, the 10 days of mourning will combine both Western traditions and those of the Thembu, Mandela’s native clan.

 

 

Day 1 to Day 4

Mandela passed away at 8.50 p.m. Thursday (1.50 p.m. ET), surrounded by his family, South African President Jacob Zuma said. CNN understands that during his final hours, Mandela would have also been surrounded by Thembu elders. Importantly, at some stage – either at his home or in the mortuary – the traditional leaders will gather for a first ceremony, a tradition called “the closing of the eyes.”

 

Throughout the ceremony, they’ll be talking to Mandela, as well as to his tribal ancestors, to explain what’s happening at each and every stage to ease the transition from life to beyond.

 

After the ceremony, it’s believed Mandela’s body will be embalmed at the mortuary, which is understood to be a military hospital in Pretoria.

 

 

Day 5

No formal public events will be held until five days after Mandela’s death when tens of thousands of people are expected to converge on the FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto for a memorial service.

 

It was at that stadium that in July 2010 Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final.

 

Spectators rose to their feet, their cheers partly drowned out by the deafening shriek of thousands of vuvuzelas to pay tribute to the then-92- year-old who some had feared might be too infirm to show up.

 

In stark contrast to the mood of elation, the atmosphere on Day 5 is expected to hang heavy with grief as a nation mourns Madiba.

 

It is unclear whether Mandela’s casket will be there.

 

Some world leaders might attend this memorial service instead of the state funeral later on in the week.

 

A White House Official tells CNN the administration is working on plans for President Barack Obama to travel to South Africa to attend the memorial service.

 

 

Day 6 to 8

According to sources, Mandela’s body will then lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, the seat of power of the South African government.

 

The first day will be reserved for dignitaries. The public will be allowed to file past his casket on days 7 and 8. Viewing hours are expected to be limited to daylight. Long lines will likely form from the very early hours of the morning.

 

It was at the historic Union Buildings that Mandela was inaugurated as president on May 10, 1994. On that extraordinary day, crowds converged around the building to witness history being made. That day, a former political prisoner achieved what was once unthinkable and became South Africa’s first post-apartheid black leader.

 

 

Day 9

Nine days after Mandela’s death, a military aircraft will leave a Pretoria airbase and fly south to Mthatha, the main town in the South African province of Eastern Cape.

 

Thembu elders and members of the Mandela family make the journey with Mandela’s casket.

 

Thousands of mourners are expected to line the streets from Mthatha airport to watch as the military transports Mandela’s casket on a gun carriage to the remote village of Qunu, where the former leader spent his childhood years.

 

Along the way the procession is expected to pause for prayers to allow ordinary South Africans to pay their respects.

 

Once at Mandela’s house, the military will formally pass responsibility for his remains to his family.

 

The South African flag that is expected to be draped over the coffin will be replaced with a traditional Xhosa blanket, symbolizing the return of one of their own.

 

At dusk, ANC leaders, local chiefs and Mandela’s family are expected to gather for a private night vigil before a very public funeral the next day.

 

 

Day 10

The funeral and burial will be on the grounds of Mandela’s Qunu home. It’s expected that thousands of people, including dozens of heads of state, will gather for the state funeral. The funeral will take place under a large tent nestled in the hills where Mandela ran and played as a child.

 

A tight military cordon is expected, in an attempt to assuage security fears. The event will be broadcast to an audience of millions around the world.

 

At midday – when the summer sun is high in the sky – Mandela will be buried into the rocky soil of his homeland. Only a few hundred close family members will bid that final farewell to Mandela as he is laid to rest.

 

The burial area has been especially built for him; some of Mandela’s long deceased family members are already buried at the site.

 

It will be, according to custom, a homecoming.

 

His grave site is surrounded by rocky outcrops, hardy grass used for the grazing cattle and bright orange aloe plants.

 

The aloes are indigenous succulents which are hardy, drought-resistant, medicinal plants that bloom across the bushveld when all else is dry and dull. A symbolic floral gesture to a man whose life was filled with sacrifice and tragedy but who triumphed with a tenacity of spirit and hope in even the darkest of days.

 

 

 

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Human Rights Day 2013: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Human Rights Day is celebrated annually across the world on December 10th.

 

The date was chosen to honor the United Nations— General Assembly‘s adoption and proclamation, on 10 December 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the first global enunciation of human rights and one of the first major achievements of the new United Nations. The formal establishment of Human Rights Day occurred at the 317th Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on 4 December 1950, when the General Assembly declared resolution 423(V), inviting all member states and any other interested organizations to celebrate the day as they saw fit.

 

The day is normally marked both by high-level political conferences and meetings and by cultural events and exhibitions dealing with human rights issues. In addition, it is traditionally on 10 December that the five-yearly United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights and Nobel Peace Prize are awarded. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations active in the human rights field also schedule special events to commemorate the day, as do many civil and social-cause organizations.

 

The theme for 2006 was the struggle against poverty, taking it as a human rights issue. Several statements were released on that occasion, including the one issued by 37 United Nations Special Procedures mandate holders.

 

“Today, poverty prevails as the gravest human rights challenge in the world. Combating poverty, deprivation and exclusion is not a matter of charity, and it does not depend on how rich a country is. By tackling poverty as a matter of human rights obligation, the world will have a better chance of abolishing this scourge in our lifetime… Poverty eradication is an achievable goal.”

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour, 10 December 2006

 

The 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights occurred on 10 December 2008, and the UN Secretary-General launched a year-long campaign leading up to this anniversary. Because the UDHR holds the world record as the most translated document, except for the Bible, organizations around the globe used the year to focus on helping people everywhere learn about their rights.

 

Date variance

  • In South Africa, Human Rights Day is celebrated on 21 March, in remembrance of the Sharpeville massacre which took place on 21 March 1960. This massacre occurred as a result of protests against the Apartheid regime in South Africa.

It is celebrated on 11 December in Kiribati.

 

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

 

 

 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights II

 

The Human Rights Action Center presents
the 30 articles of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights read aloud by artists, advocates and children in support of the 60th Anniversary of this UN document.

 

 

 

Brief History of Human Rights

 

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2012

Short educational video about the history of “Human Rights” and how it actually started from Iran(Persia) thousands of Years ago.

 

 

 

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Universal Declaration of Human Rights

 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of theSecond World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitledThe full text is published by the United Nations on its website.

 

It consists of 30 articles which have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions and laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966 the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights; and in 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill took on the force of international law.

 

PREAMBLE

Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

 

Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,

 

Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,

 

Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,

 

Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,

 

Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

 

Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,

 

Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

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Article 1.

  • All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

 

Article 2.

  • Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

 

Article 3.

  • Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

 

Article 4.

  • No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

 

Article 5.

  • No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

 

Article 6.

  • Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

 

Article 7.

  • All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

 

Article 8.

  • Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

 

Article 9.

  • No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

 

Article 10.

  • Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

 

Article 11.

  • (1) Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.
  • (2) No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

 

Article 12.

  • No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

 

Article 13.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.
  • (2) Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

 

Article 14.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.
  • (2) This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

 

Article 15.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.
  • (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

 

Article 16.

  • (1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
  • (2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
  • (3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

 

Article 17.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
  • (2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

 

Article 18.

  • Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

 

Article 19.

  • Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

 

Article 20.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
  • (2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

 

Article 21.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
  • (2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
  • (3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

 

Article 22.

  • Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

 

Article 23.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.
  • (2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.
  • (3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.
  • (4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

 

Article 24.

  • Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

 

Article 25.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.
  • (2) Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

 

Article 26.

  • (1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
  • (2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.
  • (3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

 

Article 27.

  • (1) Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
  • (2) Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

 

Article 28.

  • Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

 

Article 29.

  • (1) Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible.
  • (2) In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society.
  • (3) These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

 

Article 30.

  • Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.
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Barack After Dark™: The White House Blog.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Adam Garber
Adam Garber

December 09, 2013
03:50 PM EST

 

 

The 2013 White House holiday theme is Gather Around, celebrating heartfelt memories from American families across the country. Thoughtful hand-made decorations in each room of the White House helps tell a story. As part of White House holiday tradition, the State Dining Room is home to the famous gingerbread house. Over the course of several weeks, pastry chef Bill Yosses and his talented team created a 300-pound, edible White House replica. This year’s creation features a mini Bo and Sunny sitting on the front steps of the house lit from within, and a functioning replica of the North Lawn fountain.

 

The gingerbread house rests on a life-size, custom-made hearth fashioned from over 1,200 Springerle Cookies. (You can get the recipe for the Springerle Cookies here) These sweet treats tell stories through images imprinted on their dough by hand-carved, wooden molds. Framing the opening of the hearth are sugar paste recreations of the tiles commissioned for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s fireplace. The edible fireplace reminds us of President Roosevelt’s famous “fireside chats” and will certainly evoke memories for so many of their own special moments gathered around a fireplace.

The time lapse video lets you see how Chef Yosses and his team put the whole project together.

 

 

 

For additional information about holidays at the White House 2013, go to WH.gov/Holidays. Holiday-related content from the White House will be tagged #WHHoliday on Twitter.

 

 

 

Randy Paris
December 09, 2013
09:00 AM EST

 

This week is Computer Science Education Week, or “CSEdWeek,” an annual campaign highlighting the importance of learning computer science. CSEdWeek is held in recognition of the birthday of computer science pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, widely known for popularizing the idea of “debugging” a computer—a phrase inspired by her team’s removal of an actual moth from a relay in a Harvard Mark II computer in 1947. (Its remains can be found in the group’s log book at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.)

 

This year, non-profit group Code.org is driving CSEdWeek activities in more than 150 countries around the world and sponsoring an “Hour of Code” campaign that encourages all students to devote an hour this week to getting a taste of computer programming.

 

The ability to write computer software—to code—is an important skill. It moves people from being consumers of technology to creators of it. An understanding of coding helps people learn new strategies for solving problems and harness the power of computers to realize their own visions, whatever they may be. Everyone—scientists, fashion designers, doctors, journalists, lawyers, musicians, students—can benefit from a greater understanding of how to use computing.

 

 

 

 

Computer literacy is important for success in today’s digital economy, yet many American schools still view computer science education as an exotic elective. Only a handful of states allow computer science courses to count as math or science credits toward high school graduation requirements. AP Computer Science is taught in just 10% of our high schools, whereas the UK recently added computer science to its curriculum, teaching CS to all students from ages 5 to 17. China teaches all of its students one year of computer science. The CS 10K Initiative, supported by the National Science Foundation, is working to build curricula and course materials to support educators’ needs so they can more effectively teach computer science.

 

Take some time this week to introduce yourself to computer science. Many companies, schools, and non-profit organizations—including Khan AcademyCodecademy, MIT’s Scratch and AppInventor projects, and Code.org itself—are making free, hour-long coding tutorials available. We suspect you will find coding fun, creative, and intellectually challenging. With a little practice you too will be able to create your own games, websites, and applications.

 

For some extra inspiration, see above for a message from President Obama on the importance of computer science in America, as well as Code.org’s celebrity-packed CSEdWeek kickoff video.

 

 

Learn what most schools don’t teach

 

 

 

Also, be sure to check out NASA’s Hour of Code message from the International Space Station:

 

Hour of Code Message From the International Space Station

 

Published on Dec 8, 2013

NASA Astronauts Mike Hopkins and Rick Mastraccio deliver a message from the International Space Station to participants in the Dec. 9, 2013 Hour of Code.

 

 

 

Michael Daniel
Michael Daniel

December 09, 2013
11:28 AM EST

 

Every week seems to bring news of yet another website hacked, user accounts compromised, or personal data stolen or misused. Just recently, many Facebook users were required to change their passwords because of hacks at Adobe, a completely different company. Why? Because hackers know that users frequently re-use the same password at multiple websites. This is just one of many reasons that the system of passwords as it exists today is hopelessly broken. And while today it might be a social media website, tomorrow it could be your bank, health services providers, or even public utilities. Two complementary national initiatives aim to do better before the impacts of this problem grow even worse.

 

Developed in 2011, the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) is a key Administration initiative to work collaboratively with the private sector, advocacy groups, public sector agencies, and other organizations to improve the privacy, security, and convenience of sensitive online transactions. NSTIC calls for the creation of an Identity Ecosystem – an online environment in which individuals can trust each other because they follow agreed-upon standards to authenticate their digital identities. What this means for individual users is that they will be able to choose from a variety of more secure, privacy-enhancing identity solutions that they can use in lieu of passwords for safer, more convenient experiences everywhere they go online.

 

Read More

 

 

Kasie Coccaro
Kasie Coccaro

December 09, 2013
01:00 PM EST

 

During the 2013 holiday season more than 70,000 visitors will have the chance to tour the White House holiday decorations, created and hung with care by a team of crafty staff and volunteers.

 

On Monday, December 16th 2013 we are inviting Pinners, Instgramers and White House Twitter followers from near and far to take in the 2013 holiday decorations and learn about how it all came together. Guests will join us for a craft project, meet with the people that helped transform the White House this holiday season – and share it all with their social media followers with the hashtag #WHHoliday.

 

Interested in joining? Sign up for your chance to join other White House social media followers at the #WHHoliday social.

 

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In order to apply you must follow an official White House TwitterPinterestor Instagram account. After you sign up, spread the word! Let your followers know that you applied to attend the #WHHoliday social.

 

White House holiday crafts, tour booklet and information can be found at WH.gov/Holidays.

 

 

Nick Sinai and Haley Van Dyck
December 09, 2013
03:48 PM EST

 

On May 9, 2013, President Obama signed an Executive Order,Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information, directing historic steps to make government-held data more accessible to the public, entrepreneurs, and others as fuel for innovation, economic growth, and government efficiency.

 

Under the terms of the Executive Order and the Administration’s Open Data Policy, all newly-generated government data are required to be made available in open, machine-readable formats, which greatly enhances their accessibility and usefulness while continuing to ensure privacy and security. Federal agencies are also required to:

 

  • Create a Single Agency Data Inventory. Agencies are required to catalogue their data assets, just like they would inventory computers or desk chairs, to better manage and use these resources.
  • Publish a Public Data Listing. On their agency.gov/data pages, agencies are required to publish a list of their data assets that are public, or could be made public.
  • Develop New Public Feedback Mechanisms. Agencies are required to set up feedback mechanisms to engage the public about where agencies should focus open data efforts, such as facilitating and prioritizing the release of datasets. Agencies are also required to identify public points of contacts for agency data sets.

 

While there is still much more work to do, we are excited to see the great progress being made by Federal agencies to unleash the power of open data.

 

Over a dozen agencies have launched webpages at agency.gov/data, making it easier for the public to find, understand, and use government data.  Many agencies have released—and will continue to release—new data sets, which are now available both on agencies’ public data webpages and on Data.gov.

 

Federal agencies are also working to put processes in place to manage data more strategically. In fact, over 15 agencies have launched data working groups inside their agency to improve coordination around data management, data security and protection, and data release efforts.

 

Read More

 

 

barackobamacrat

 

Statement by the President

When I took office, the American auto industry – the heartbeat of American manufacturing – was on the verge of collapse.  Two of the Big Three – GM and Chrysler – were on the brink of failure, threatening to take suppliers, distributors and entire communities down with them.  In the midst of what was already the worst recession since the Great Depression, another one million Americans were in danger of losing their jobs.

 

As President, I refused to let that happen.  I refused to walk away from American workers and an iconic American industry.  But in exchange for rescuing and retooling GM and Chrysler with taxpayer dollars, we demanded responsibility and results.  In 2011, we marked the end of an important chapter as Chrysler repaid every dime and more of what it owed the American taxpayers from the investment we made under my Administration’s watch.  Today, we’re closing the book by selling the remaining shares of the federal government’s investment in General Motors.  GM has now repaid every taxpayer dollar my Administration committed to its rescue, plus billions invested by the previous Administration.

 

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Less than five years later, each of the Big Three automakers is now strong enough to stand on its own.  They’re profitable for the first time in nearly a decade.  The industry has added more than 372,000 new jobs – its strongest growth since the 1990s.  Thanks to the workers on our assembly lines, some of the most high-tech, fuel-efficient cars in the world are once again designed, engineered, and built right here in America – and the rest of the world is buying more of them than ever before.

 

When things looked darkest for our most iconic industry, we bet on what was true: the ingenuity and resilience of the proud, hardworking men and women who make this country strong.  Today, that bet has paid off.  The American auto industry is back.

 

For our autoworkers and the communities that depend on them, the road we’ve taken these past five years has been a long and difficult one.  But it’s one we’ve traveled together.  And as long as there’s more work to do to restore opportunity and broad-based growth for all Americans, that’s what we’ll keep doing to reach the brighter days ahead.

 

 

Statements and Releases December 09, 2013

 

Readout of Vice President Biden’s Call with Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych

 

Message to the Congress — Swiss Social Security

 

Statement by the President on the World Trade Organization Trade Agreement

 

 

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Continuous Live Coverage Of Nelson Mandela Memorial On South African TV Channel SABC


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Continuous live coverage of Nelson Mandela Memorial events on South African channel SABC

 

 

 

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Nelson Mandela’s Funeral, Farewell Plans – Day By Day Schedule. The President & First Lady Will Attend.

 

Thank you CNN:

 

By Robyn Curnow, CNN

 

Johannesburg (CNN) – For the Xhosa people of South Africa, death is traditionally not something to be talked about or to be planned for, no matter how inevitable or close it may seem.

 

But those close to Nelson Mandela had little choice as the country’s first black leader lay in a Pretoria hospital and then at home in Johannesburg on life support.

 

In the final years of his life, secret plans were hammered out between the government, the military and his family as they prepared for a fitting farewell for a great man.

 

Below is a breakdown of how those plans will unfold over the next 10 days, culminating in a state funeral to be broadcast to millions worldwide and a very private farewell for those closest to him.

 

As is often the case with events of this magnitude, plans might change due to weather, security and other factors. But for now, this is what the authorities and the family hope will happen.

 

According to multiple sources involved with the planning of the final farewell to the South African icon, the 10 days of mourning will combine both Western traditions and those of the Thembu, Mandela’s native clan.

 

 

Day 1 to Day 4

Mandela passed away at 8.50 p.m. Thursday (1.50 p.m. ET), surrounded by his family, South African President Jacob Zuma said. CNN understands that during his final hours, Mandela would have also been surrounded by Thembu elders. Importantly, at some stage – either at his home or in the mortuary – the traditional leaders will gather for a first ceremony, a tradition called “the closing of the eyes.”

 

Throughout the ceremony, they’ll be talking to Mandela, as well as to his tribal ancestors, to explain what’s happening at each and every stage to ease the transition from life to beyond.

 

After the ceremony, it’s believed Mandela’s body will be embalmed at the mortuary, which is understood to be a military hospital in Pretoria.

 

 

Day 5

No formal public events will be held until five days after Mandela’s death when tens of thousands of people are expected to converge on the FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto for a memorial service.

 

It was at that stadium that in July 2010 Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final.

 

Spectators rose to their feet, their cheers partly drowned out by the deafening shriek of thousands of vuvuzelas to pay tribute to the then-92- year-old who some had feared might be too infirm to show up.

 

In stark contrast to the mood of elation, the atmosphere on Day 5 is expected to hang heavy with grief as a nation mourns Madiba.

 

It is unclear whether Mandela’s casket will be there.

 

Some world leaders might attend this memorial service instead of the state funeral later on in the week.

 

A White House Official tells CNN the administration is working on plans for President Barack Obama to travel to South Africa to attend the memorial service.

 

 

Day 6 to 8

According to sources, Mandela’s body will then lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, the seat of power of the South African government.

 

The first day will be reserved for dignitaries. The public will be allowed to file past his casket on days 7 and 8. Viewing hours are expected to be limited to daylight. Long lines will likely form from the very early hours of the morning.

 

It was at the historic Union Buildings that Mandela was inaugurated as president on May 10, 1994. On that extraordinary day, crowds converged around the building to witness history being made. That day, a former political prisoner achieved what was once unthinkable and became South Africa’s first post-apartheid black leader.

 

 

Day 9

Nine days after Mandela’s death, a military aircraft will leave a Pretoria airbase and fly south to Mthatha, the main town in the South African province of Eastern Cape.

 

Thembu elders and members of the Mandela family make the journey with Mandela’s casket.

 

Thousands of mourners are expected to line the streets from Mthatha airport to watch as the military transports Mandela’s casket on a gun carriage to the remote village of Qunu, where the former leader spent his childhood years.

 

Along the way the procession is expected to pause for prayers to allow ordinary South Africans to pay their respects.

 

Once at Mandela’s house, the military will formally pass responsibility for his remains to his family.

 

The South African flag that is expected to be draped over the coffin will be replaced with a traditional Xhosa blanket, symbolizing the return of one of their own.

 

At dusk, ANC leaders, local chiefs and Mandela’s family are expected to gather for a private night vigil before a very public funeral the next day.

 

 

Day 10

The funeral and burial will be on the grounds of Mandela’s Qunu home. It’s expected that thousands of people, including dozens of heads of state, will gather for the state funeral. The funeral will take place under a large tent nestled in the hills where Mandela ran and played as a child.

 

A tight military cordon is expected, in an attempt to assuage security fears. The event will be broadcast to an audience of millions around the world.

 

At midday – when the summer sun is high in the sky – Mandela will be buried into the rocky soil of his homeland. Only a few hundred close family members will bid that final farewell to Mandela as he is laid to rest.

 

The burial area has been especially built for him; some of Mandela’s long deceased family members are already buried at the site.

 

It will be, according to custom, a homecoming.

 

His grave site is surrounded by rocky outcrops, hardy grass used for the grazing cattle and bright orange aloe plants.

 

The aloes are indigenous succulents which are hardy, drought-resistant, medicinal plants that bloom across the bushveld when all else is dry and dull. A symbolic floral gesture to a man whose life was filled with sacrifice and tragedy but who triumphed with a tenacity of spirit and hope in even the darkest of days.

 

 

Obama, First Lady Michelle to South Africa next week for Nelson Mandela memorials

 

WASHINGTON–President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle will travel to South Africa next week for memorial events in the wake of the death of former South Africa President Nelson Mandela, according to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney

 

“President Obama and the First Lady will go to South Africa next week to pay their respects to the memory of Nelson Mandela and to participate in memorial events. We’ll have further updates on timing and logistics as they become available,” Carney said.

 

 

President Obama Expected To Speak At Nelson Mandela Memorial

 

By David Jackson, USA TODAY

 

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One in Maryland on Dec. 9. (Photo: Evan Vucci, AP)

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One in Maryland on Dec. 9.
(Photo: Evan Vucci, AP)

 

President Obama will make remarks on Nelson Mandela’s legacy during a memorial service Tuesday for the late South African freedom fighter, officials said Monday.

 

“We do expect President Obama to speak as part of the program,” said Ben Rhodes, deputy national security adviser for strategic communications.

 

The president and first lady Michelle Obama departed Monday for Johannesburg, where a Mandela memorial service will be held in a soccer stadium.

 

Obama, who will also spend time with the Mandela family, is not scheduled to hold any bilateral meetings with foreign leaders while in South Africa, Rhodes said.

 

Rhodes also said the U.S. expects to have a delegation at Mandela’s burial on Sunday, but the details are still being worked out.

 

STORY: South Africa prepares for Mandela service

 

Former president George W. Bush and wife Laura are aboard Air Force One with Obama.

 

So is former secretary of State Hillary Clinton, but former president Bill Clinton is traveling separately.

 

Former president Jimmy Carter will also attend the Mandela memorial in South Africa.

 

Meanwhile, Vice President Biden and wife Jill visited the South Africa Embassy in Washington on Monday to sign a condolence book honoring Nelson Mandela.

 

Biden will speak Wednesday at a special memorial service for Mandela to be held at the National Cathedral in Washington.

 

According to the vice president’s office, Biden wrote in the condolence book:

 

“On behalf of the American people, our deepest condolences to the people of South Africa for the passing of Nelson Mandela. But more than that, our profound gratitude — for his compassion, his humility, and his courage.

 

“Through his unflagging, unflinching commitment to human dignity and his willingness to forgive, he inspired us and challenged us all to do better.

 

“He once said that ‘a good head and a good heart is a formidable combination.’ Mandela’s head and heart lifted a nation to freedom. We will continue to keep his spirit alive and strive to live by his example.”

 

Thank you USA TODAY.

 

Statement by the Vice President on the Death of Nelson Mandela

 

Readout of the President’s Call to President Zuma of South Africa

 

Statement by National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice, on the Death of Nelson Mandela of South Africa

 

 

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for 'freedom', in Shanghai. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for ‘freedom’, in Shanghai. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI        (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

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A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

 

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Maya Angelou’s “His Day is Done” Tribute to Nelson Mandela.


 

By Jueseppi B.

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI        (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

A person walks pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 (AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI Getty Images)

 

WASHINGTON–Poet Maya Angelou, who met Nelson Mandela in the 1960s, when she was married to a South Africanpenned a poem in tribute to his memory titled “His Day is Done.” She wrote the poem at the request of the U.S. State Department, which produced the video below.

 

His Day is Done – A Tribute Poem for Nelson Mandela by Dr. Maya Angelou

 

Published on Dec 6, 2013

Video message delivered by Dr. Maya Angelou on behalf of the American people in memory of Nelson Mandela.

 

 

 

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

 

Dr. Maya Angelou in Memory of Nelson Mandela

His day is done.

Is done.

The news came on the wings of a wind

Reluctant to carry its burden.

Nelson Mandela’s day is done.

The news, expected and still unwelcome

Reached us in the United States and suddenly

Our world became somber.

Our skies were leadened

His day is done.

We see you, South African people

Standing speechless at the slamming

Of that final door

Through which no traveler returns.

Our spirits reach out to you

Bantu, Zulu, Xhosa, Boer

We think of you

And your Son of Africa,

Your Father

Your One More Wonder of the World.

We send our souls to you

As you reflect upon

Your David armed with

A mere stone facing down

The Mighty Goliath,

Man of strength Gideon,

Emerging triumphant

Although born into the brutal embrace of Apartheid

Scarred by the savage atmosphere of racism,

Unjustly imprisoned

In the bloody maws of South African dungeons.

Would the man survive?

Could the man survive?

His answer strengthened men and women

Around the world.

In the Alamo in San Antonio, TX

On the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco,

In Chicago’s loop

In New Orleans Mardi Gras

In New York City’s Times Square

We watched as the hope of Africa sprang

Through the prison’s doors

His stupendous heart in tact

His gargantuan will

Hale and hearty

He had not been crippled by brutes

Nor was his passion for the rights

Of human beings

Diminished by twenty-seven years of imprisonment

Even here in America

We felt the cool

Refreshing breeze of freedom

When Nelson Mandela took

The seat of the Presidency

In his Country

Where formally he was not even allowed to vote

We were enlarged by tears of pride

As we saw Nelson Mandela’s

Former prison guards

Invited, courteously, by him to watch

From the front rows

His inauguration.

We saw him accept

The world’s award in Norway

With the grace and gratitude

Of the Solon in Ancient Roman Courts

And the confidence of African Chiefs

From ancient royal stools.

No sun outlasts its sunset

But will rise again

And bring the dawn

Yes, Mandela’s day is done,

Yet we, his inheritors

Will open the gates wider

For reconciliation and we will respond

Generously to the cries

Of the Blacks and Whites,

The Asian, the Hispanic,

The poor who live piteously

On the floor of our planet

He has offered us understanding

We will not withhold forgiveness

Even from those who do not ask

Nelson Mandela’s day is done

We confess it in tearful voices

Yet we lift our own to say

Thank You.

Thank You, Our Gideon.

Thank You, Our David.

Our great courageous man

We will not forget you

We will not dishonor you

We will remember and be glad

That you lived among us

That you taught us

And

That you loved us

All!

 

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for 'freedom', in Shanghai. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for ‘freedom’, in Shanghai. (Getty)

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

Nelson Mandela’s Funeral, Farewell Plans – Day By Day Schedule. The President & First Lady Will Attend.

 

Thank you CNN:

 

By Robyn Curnow, CNN

 

Johannesburg (CNN) – For the Xhosa people of South Africa, death is traditionally not something to be talked about or to be planned for, no matter how inevitable or close it may seem.

 

But those close to Nelson Mandela had little choice as the country’s first black leader lay in a Pretoria hospital and then at home in Johannesburg on life support.

 

In the final years of his life, secret plans were hammered out between the government, the military and his family as they prepared for a fitting farewell for a great man.

 

Below is a breakdown of how those plans will unfold over the next 10 days, culminating in a state funeral to be broadcast to millions worldwide and a very private farewell for those closest to him.

 

As is often the case with events of this magnitude, plans might change due to weather, security and other factors. But for now, this is what the authorities and the family hope will happen.

 

According to multiple sources involved with the planning of the final farewell to the South African icon, the 10 days of mourning will combine both Western traditions and those of the Thembu, Mandela’s native clan.

 

 

Day 1 to Day 4

Mandela passed away at 8.50 p.m. Thursday (1.50 p.m. ET), surrounded by his family, South African President Jacob Zuma said. CNN understands that during his final hours, Mandela would have also been surrounded by Thembu elders. Importantly, at some stage – either at his home or in the mortuary – the traditional leaders will gather for a first ceremony, a tradition called “the closing of the eyes.”

 

Throughout the ceremony, they’ll be talking to Mandela, as well as to his tribal ancestors, to explain what’s happening at each and every stage to ease the transition from life to beyond.

 

After the ceremony, it’s believed Mandela’s body will be embalmed at the mortuary, which is understood to be a military hospital in Pretoria.

 

 

Day 5

No formal public events will be held until five days after Mandela’s death when tens of thousands of people are expected to converge on the FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto for a memorial service.

 

It was at that stadium that in July 2010 Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final.

 

Spectators rose to their feet, their cheers partly drowned out by the deafening shriek of thousands of vuvuzelas to pay tribute to the then-92- year-old who some had feared might be too infirm to show up.

 

In stark contrast to the mood of elation, the atmosphere on Day 5 is expected to hang heavy with grief as a nation mourns Madiba.

 

It is unclear whether Mandela’s casket will be there.

 

Some world leaders might attend this memorial service instead of the state funeral later on in the week.

 

A White House Official tells CNN the administration is working on plans for President Barack Obama to travel to South Africa to attend the memorial service.

 

 

Day 6 to 8

According to sources, Mandela’s body will then lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, the seat of power of the South African government.

 

The first day will be reserved for dignitaries. The public will be allowed to file past his casket on days 7 and 8. Viewing hours are expected to be limited to daylight. Long lines will likely form from the very early hours of the morning.

 

It was at the historic Union Buildings that Mandela was inaugurated as president on May 10, 1994. On that extraordinary day, crowds converged around the building to witness history being made. That day, a former political prisoner achieved what was once unthinkable and became South Africa’s first post-apartheid black leader.

 

 

Day 9

Nine days after Mandela’s death, a military aircraft will leave a Pretoria airbase and fly south to Mthatha, the main town in the South African province of Eastern Cape.

 

Thembu elders and members of the Mandela family make the journey with Mandela’s casket.

 

Thousands of mourners are expected to line the streets from Mthatha airport to watch as the military transports Mandela’s casket on a gun carriage to the remote village of Qunu, where the former leader spent his childhood years.

 

Along the way the procession is expected to pause for prayers to allow ordinary South Africans to pay their respects.

 

Once at Mandela’s house, the military will formally pass responsibility for his remains to his family.

 

The South African flag that is expected to be draped over the coffin will be replaced with a traditional Xhosa blanket, symbolizing the return of one of their own.

 

At dusk, ANC leaders, local chiefs and Mandela’s family are expected to gather for a private night vigil before a very public funeral the next day.

 

 

Day 10

The funeral and burial will be on the grounds of Mandela’s Qunu home. It’s expected that thousands of people, including dozens of heads of state, will gather for the state funeral. The funeral will take place under a large tent nestled in the hills where Mandela ran and played as a child.

 

A tight military cordon is expected, in an attempt to assuage security fears. The event will be broadcast to an audience of millions around the world.

 

At midday – when the summer sun is high in the sky – Mandela will be buried into the rocky soil of his homeland. Only a few hundred close family members will bid that final farewell to Mandela as he is laid to rest.

 

The burial area has been especially built for him; some of Mandela’s long deceased family members are already buried at the site.

 

It will be, according to custom, a homecoming.

 

His grave site is surrounded by rocky outcrops, hardy grass used for the grazing cattle and bright orange aloe plants.

 

The aloes are indigenous succulents which are hardy, drought-resistant, medicinal plants that bloom across the bushveld when all else is dry and dull. A symbolic floral gesture to a man whose life was filled with sacrifice and tragedy but who triumphed with a tenacity of spirit and hope in even the darkest of days.

 

 

Obama, First Lady Michelle to South Africa next week for Nelson Mandela memorials

 

WASHINGTON–President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle will travel to South Africa next week for memorial events in the wake of the death of former South Africa President Nelson Mandela, according to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney

 

“President Obama and the First Lady will go to South Africa next week to pay their respects to the memory of Nelson Mandela and to participate in memorial events. We’ll have further updates on timing and logistics as they become available,” Carney said.

 

 

Statement by the Vice President on the Death of Nelson Mandela

 

Readout of the President’s Call to President Zuma of South Africa

 

Statement by National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice, on the Death of Nelson Mandela of South Africa

 

 

obama-mandela

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

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