Continuous Live Coverage Of Nelson Mandela Memorial On South African TV Channel SABC


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Continuous live coverage of Nelson Mandela Memorial events on South African channel SABC

 

 

 

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Nelson Mandela’s Funeral, Farewell Plans – Day By Day Schedule. The President & First Lady Will Attend.

 

Thank you CNN:

 

By Robyn Curnow, CNN

 

Johannesburg (CNN) – For the Xhosa people of South Africa, death is traditionally not something to be talked about or to be planned for, no matter how inevitable or close it may seem.

 

But those close to Nelson Mandela had little choice as the country’s first black leader lay in a Pretoria hospital and then at home in Johannesburg on life support.

 

In the final years of his life, secret plans were hammered out between the government, the military and his family as they prepared for a fitting farewell for a great man.

 

Below is a breakdown of how those plans will unfold over the next 10 days, culminating in a state funeral to be broadcast to millions worldwide and a very private farewell for those closest to him.

 

As is often the case with events of this magnitude, plans might change due to weather, security and other factors. But for now, this is what the authorities and the family hope will happen.

 

According to multiple sources involved with the planning of the final farewell to the South African icon, the 10 days of mourning will combine both Western traditions and those of the Thembu, Mandela’s native clan.

 

 

Day 1 to Day 4

Mandela passed away at 8.50 p.m. Thursday (1.50 p.m. ET), surrounded by his family, South African President Jacob Zuma said. CNN understands that during his final hours, Mandela would have also been surrounded by Thembu elders. Importantly, at some stage – either at his home or in the mortuary – the traditional leaders will gather for a first ceremony, a tradition called “the closing of the eyes.”

 

Throughout the ceremony, they’ll be talking to Mandela, as well as to his tribal ancestors, to explain what’s happening at each and every stage to ease the transition from life to beyond.

 

After the ceremony, it’s believed Mandela’s body will be embalmed at the mortuary, which is understood to be a military hospital in Pretoria.

 

 

Day 5

No formal public events will be held until five days after Mandela’s death when tens of thousands of people are expected to converge on the FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto for a memorial service.

 

It was at that stadium that in July 2010 Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final.

 

Spectators rose to their feet, their cheers partly drowned out by the deafening shriek of thousands of vuvuzelas to pay tribute to the then-92- year-old who some had feared might be too infirm to show up.

 

In stark contrast to the mood of elation, the atmosphere on Day 5 is expected to hang heavy with grief as a nation mourns Madiba.

 

It is unclear whether Mandela’s casket will be there.

 

Some world leaders might attend this memorial service instead of the state funeral later on in the week.

 

A White House Official tells CNN the administration is working on plans for President Barack Obama to travel to South Africa to attend the memorial service.

 

 

Day 6 to 8

According to sources, Mandela’s body will then lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, the seat of power of the South African government.

 

The first day will be reserved for dignitaries. The public will be allowed to file past his casket on days 7 and 8. Viewing hours are expected to be limited to daylight. Long lines will likely form from the very early hours of the morning.

 

It was at the historic Union Buildings that Mandela was inaugurated as president on May 10, 1994. On that extraordinary day, crowds converged around the building to witness history being made. That day, a former political prisoner achieved what was once unthinkable and became South Africa’s first post-apartheid black leader.

 

 

Day 9

Nine days after Mandela’s death, a military aircraft will leave a Pretoria airbase and fly south to Mthatha, the main town in the South African province of Eastern Cape.

 

Thembu elders and members of the Mandela family make the journey with Mandela’s casket.

 

Thousands of mourners are expected to line the streets from Mthatha airport to watch as the military transports Mandela’s casket on a gun carriage to the remote village of Qunu, where the former leader spent his childhood years.

 

Along the way the procession is expected to pause for prayers to allow ordinary South Africans to pay their respects.

 

Once at Mandela’s house, the military will formally pass responsibility for his remains to his family.

 

The South African flag that is expected to be draped over the coffin will be replaced with a traditional Xhosa blanket, symbolizing the return of one of their own.

 

At dusk, ANC leaders, local chiefs and Mandela’s family are expected to gather for a private night vigil before a very public funeral the next day.

 

 

Day 10

The funeral and burial will be on the grounds of Mandela’s Qunu home. It’s expected that thousands of people, including dozens of heads of state, will gather for the state funeral. The funeral will take place under a large tent nestled in the hills where Mandela ran and played as a child.

 

A tight military cordon is expected, in an attempt to assuage security fears. The event will be broadcast to an audience of millions around the world.

 

At midday – when the summer sun is high in the sky – Mandela will be buried into the rocky soil of his homeland. Only a few hundred close family members will bid that final farewell to Mandela as he is laid to rest.

 

The burial area has been especially built for him; some of Mandela’s long deceased family members are already buried at the site.

 

It will be, according to custom, a homecoming.

 

His grave site is surrounded by rocky outcrops, hardy grass used for the grazing cattle and bright orange aloe plants.

 

The aloes are indigenous succulents which are hardy, drought-resistant, medicinal plants that bloom across the bushveld when all else is dry and dull. A symbolic floral gesture to a man whose life was filled with sacrifice and tragedy but who triumphed with a tenacity of spirit and hope in even the darkest of days.

 

 

Obama, First Lady Michelle to South Africa next week for Nelson Mandela memorials

 

WASHINGTON–President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle will travel to South Africa next week for memorial events in the wake of the death of former South Africa President Nelson Mandela, according to White House Press Secretary Jay Carney

 

“President Obama and the First Lady will go to South Africa next week to pay their respects to the memory of Nelson Mandela and to participate in memorial events. We’ll have further updates on timing and logistics as they become available,” Carney said.

 

 

President Obama Expected To Speak At Nelson Mandela Memorial

 

By David Jackson, USA TODAY

 

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One in Maryland on Dec. 9. (Photo: Evan Vucci, AP)

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One in Maryland on Dec. 9.
(Photo: Evan Vucci, AP)

 

President Obama will make remarks on Nelson Mandela’s legacy during a memorial service Tuesday for the late South African freedom fighter, officials said Monday.

 

“We do expect President Obama to speak as part of the program,” said Ben Rhodes, deputy national security adviser for strategic communications.

 

The president and first lady Michelle Obama departed Monday for Johannesburg, where a Mandela memorial service will be held in a soccer stadium.

 

Obama, who will also spend time with the Mandela family, is not scheduled to hold any bilateral meetings with foreign leaders while in South Africa, Rhodes said.

 

Rhodes also said the U.S. expects to have a delegation at Mandela’s burial on Sunday, but the details are still being worked out.

 

STORY: South Africa prepares for Mandela service

 

Former president George W. Bush and wife Laura are aboard Air Force One with Obama.

 

So is former secretary of State Hillary Clinton, but former president Bill Clinton is traveling separately.

 

Former president Jimmy Carter will also attend the Mandela memorial in South Africa.

 

Meanwhile, Vice President Biden and wife Jill visited the South Africa Embassy in Washington on Monday to sign a condolence book honoring Nelson Mandela.

 

Biden will speak Wednesday at a special memorial service for Mandela to be held at the National Cathedral in Washington.

 

According to the vice president’s office, Biden wrote in the condolence book:

 

“On behalf of the American people, our deepest condolences to the people of South Africa for the passing of Nelson Mandela. But more than that, our profound gratitude — for his compassion, his humility, and his courage.

 

“Through his unflagging, unflinching commitment to human dignity and his willingness to forgive, he inspired us and challenged us all to do better.

 

“He once said that ‘a good head and a good heart is a formidable combination.’ Mandela’s head and heart lifted a nation to freedom. We will continue to keep his spirit alive and strive to live by his example.”

 

Thank you USA TODAY.

 

Statement by the Vice President on the Death of Nelson Mandela

 

Readout of the President’s Call to President Zuma of South Africa

 

Statement by National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice, on the Death of Nelson Mandela of South Africa

 

 

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for 'freedom', in Shanghai. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for ‘freedom’, in Shanghai. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI        (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

The newly installed statue of South African leader Nelson Mandela seen in front of the South African Embassy

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A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

 

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