A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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A moving tribute to a legendary figure

 

Nelson Mandela’s struggle against South African apartheid inspired millions. And his great call for justice and equality continues to resonate around the world, as new generations of young people pursue the ideals he embraced.

 

Earlier today in Johannesburg, President Obama paid tribute to a hero and a leader — and spoke about the path that’s still ahead.

 

It’s a powerful, moving speech. Watch this tribute to Nelson Mandela:

 

Remembering Nelson Mandela

 

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

December 10, 2013
06:30 PM EST
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President Obama Speaks at a Memorial Service for Nelson Mandela

December 10, 2013 | 19:14 |Public Domain

 

President Obama delivers remarks at a national memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela.

 

 

 

Remarks by President Obama at Memorial Service for Former South African President Nelson Mandela

Today in Johannesburg, President Obama joined leaders from the United States and around the world at a national memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela.

 

In President Obama’s remarks, he reflected on what Mandela meant to him personally, as well as to the people of South Africa, and urged all of us to remember Madiba’s legacy and contributions to humanity.

 

For the people of South Africa, for those he inspired around the globe, Madiba’s passing is rightly a time of mourning, and a time to celebrate a heroic life. But I believe it should also prompt in each of us a time for self-reflection.  With honesty, regardless of our station or our circumstance, we must ask:  How well have I applied his lessons in my own life?  It’s a question I ask myself, as a man and as a President.

 

“The questions we face today — how to promote equality and justice; how to uphold freedom and human rights; how to end conflict and sectarian war — these things do not have easy answers,” President Obama said.

 

Nelson Mandela reminds us that it always seems impossible until it is done. South Africa shows that is true. South Africa shows we can change, that we can choose a world defined not by our differences, but by our common hopes. We can choose a world defined not by conflict, but by peace and justice and opportunity.

 


During the President and First Lady’s trip to Africa this summer, they had the opportunity to visit Robben Island, home of the maximum security prison where Nelson Mandela and other anti-apartheid activists were jailed. Watch the video below to learn more about their experience.

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On Board: Behind the Scenes with the President & The First Lady at Robben Island

 

 

Published on Jul 2, 2013

Go behind the scenes with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama as they visit Robben Island. From the 1960s through the 1990s, this Island housed a maximum security prison. Many of the prisoners there were activists who worked to bring down Apartheid, the South African government’s policies that discriminated against people of color including Nelson Mandela and current South African President Jacob Zuma. Narrated by the First Lady, Michelle Obama. June 30, 2013

 

South Africa Mandela Memorial

 

 

Nelson Mandela’s Funeral, Farewell Plans – Day By Day Schedule. The President & First Lady Will Attend.

 

Thank you CNN:

 

By Robyn Curnow, CNN

 

Johannesburg (CNN) – For the Xhosa people of South Africa, death is traditionally not something to be talked about or to be planned for, no matter how inevitable or close it may seem.

 

But those close to Nelson Mandela had little choice as the country’s first black leader lay in a Pretoria hospital and then at home in Johannesburg on life support.

 

In the final years of his life, secret plans were hammered out between the government, the military and his family as they prepared for a fitting farewell for a great man.

 

Below is a breakdown of how those plans will unfold over the next 10 days, culminating in a state funeral to be broadcast to millions worldwide and a very private farewell for those closest to him.

 

As is often the case with events of this magnitude, plans might change due to weather, security and other factors. But for now, this is what the authorities and the family hope will happen.

 

According to multiple sources involved with the planning of the final farewell to the South African icon, the 10 days of mourning will combine both Western traditions and those of the Thembu, Mandela’s native clan.

 

 

Day 1 to Day 4

Mandela passed away at 8.50 p.m. Thursday (1.50 p.m. ET), surrounded by his family, South African President Jacob Zuma said. CNN understands that during his final hours, Mandela would have also been surrounded by Thembu elders. Importantly, at some stage – either at his home or in the mortuary – the traditional leaders will gather for a first ceremony, a tradition called “the closing of the eyes.”

 

Throughout the ceremony, they’ll be talking to Mandela, as well as to his tribal ancestors, to explain what’s happening at each and every stage to ease the transition from life to beyond.

 

After the ceremony, it’s believed Mandela’s body will be embalmed at the mortuary, which is understood to be a military hospital in Pretoria.

 

 

Day 5

No formal public events will be held until five days after Mandela’s death when tens of thousands of people are expected to converge on the FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto for a memorial service.

 

It was at that stadium that in July 2010 Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final.

 

Spectators rose to their feet, their cheers partly drowned out by the deafening shriek of thousands of vuvuzelas to pay tribute to the then-92- year-old who some had feared might be too infirm to show up.

 

In stark contrast to the mood of elation, the atmosphere on Day 5 is expected to hang heavy with grief as a nation mourns Madiba.

 

It is unclear whether Mandela’s casket will be there.

 

Some world leaders might attend this memorial service instead of the state funeral later on in the week.

 

A White House Official tells CNN the administration is working on plans for President Barack Obama to travel to South Africa to attend the memorial service.

 

 

Day 6 to 8

According to sources, Mandela’s body will then lie in state for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, the seat of power of the South African government.

 

The first day will be reserved for dignitaries. The public will be allowed to file past his casket on days 7 and 8. Viewing hours are expected to be limited to daylight. Long lines will likely form from the very early hours of the morning.

 

It was at the historic Union Buildings that Mandela was inaugurated as president on May 10, 1994. On that extraordinary day, crowds converged around the building to witness history being made. That day, a former political prisoner achieved what was once unthinkable and became South Africa’s first post-apartheid black leader.

 

 

Day 9

Nine days after Mandela’s death, a military aircraft will leave a Pretoria airbase and fly south to Mthatha, the main town in the South African province of Eastern Cape.

 

Thembu elders and members of the Mandela family make the journey with Mandela’s casket.

 

Thousands of mourners are expected to line the streets from Mthatha airport to watch as the military transports Mandela’s casket on a gun carriage to the remote village of Qunu, where the former leader spent his childhood years.

 

Along the way the procession is expected to pause for prayers to allow ordinary South Africans to pay their respects.

 

Once at Mandela’s house, the military will formally pass responsibility for his remains to his family.

 

The South African flag that is expected to be draped over the coffin will be replaced with a traditional Xhosa blanket, symbolizing the return of one of their own.

 

At dusk, ANC leaders, local chiefs and Mandela’s family are expected to gather for a private night vigil before a very public funeral the next day.

 

 

Day 10

The funeral and burial will be on the grounds of Mandela’s Qunu home. It’s expected that thousands of people, including dozens of heads of state, will gather for the state funeral. The funeral will take place under a large tent nestled in the hills where Mandela ran and played as a child.

 

A tight military cordon is expected, in an attempt to assuage security fears. The event will be broadcast to an audience of millions around the world.

 

At midday – when the summer sun is high in the sky – Mandela will be buried into the rocky soil of his homeland. Only a few hundred close family members will bid that final farewell to Mandela as he is laid to rest.

 

The burial area has been especially built for him; some of Mandela’s long deceased family members are already buried at the site.

 

It will be, according to custom, a homecoming.

 

His grave site is surrounded by rocky outcrops, hardy grass used for the grazing cattle and bright orange aloe plants.

 

The aloes are indigenous succulents which are hardy, drought-resistant, medicinal plants that bloom across the bushveld when all else is dry and dull. A symbolic floral gesture to a man whose life was filled with sacrifice and tragedy but who triumphed with a tenacity of spirit and hope in even the darkest of days.

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Images from history….
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President Barack Obama addresses the crowd during a memorial service for Nelson Mandela at FNB Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa

President Barack Obama addresses the crowd during a memorial service for Nelson Mandela at FNB Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa

 

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Nelson Mandela
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The World Mourns The Death Of Former South African President Nelson Mandela
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A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

A piece of art outside the Pretoria Heart Hospital on June 30, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for 'freedom', in Shanghai. (Getty)

This photo shows Shanghai-based, 34-year-old Belgian artist Phil Akashi sitting in front of his portrait of South African peace icon and former boxer Nelson Mandela, which he forged by pounding the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for ‘freedom’, in Shanghai. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A sand sculpture in tribute to former South African president Nelson Mandela, made by sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik, at the Golden Sea Beach in Puri. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

A colorful mural in the Harlem neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

Heart-shaped street art depicting former South African President Nelson Mandela is seen in Cape Town on July 4, 2013. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

Street artist Xolani Mahlangu poses next to his stencil art of Nelson Mandela and other freedom icons in Soweto Township on July 16, 2013 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. (Getty)

From "A Tribute to Nelson Mandela" Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

From “A Tribute to Nelson Mandela” Art Installation at Rockefeller Plaza. (Getty)

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

An orphan from Orlando Children’s Home pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside of his house on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec 9

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI        (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

pass a mural painting of Nelson Mandela in Cape Town on November 10, 2013 AFP PHOTO / MASIXOLE FENI (Photo credit should read MASIXOLE FENI/AFP/Getty Images)

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Schoolchildren hold candles, portraits of Mandela during ceremony in Chennai, India (Reuters)

Schoolchildren hold candles, portraits of Mandela during ceremony in Chennai, India (Reuters)

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

A descendant of slaves who became First Lady with a prisoner of 27 yrs who became President. There is always hope.

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

The Only Time Pres. Obama Met Mandela in Washington

Young Mandela Africa Fighting

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Locals stroll past a mural, outside the house former President Nelson Mandela stayed in the 1940s, in Alexandra township
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14 Responses

  1. […] A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba. (theobamacrat.com) […]

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  2. […] A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba. […]

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  3. […] A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba. (theobamacrat.com) […]

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  4. You are a true blessing my friend. Thank you

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  5. […] A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba. (theobamacrat.com) […]

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  6. […] A Moving Tribute To A Legendary Figure: Kupumzika kwa amani Nelson Mandela Madiba. (theobamacrat.com) […]

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  7. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
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