Two Statements From Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America Founder, Ms. Shannon Watts.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Statement by Moms Demand Action Founder Shannon Watts on Defeat of the Paul Amendment to Allow Loaded Guns in Post Offices

 

By Moms Demand Action

 

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We are pleased the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs rejected an NRA-backed measure today that would have allowed concealed, loaded guns to be carried in post offices. Moms from across the country came out in full force to oppose this dangerous amendment – making calls, tweeting and sending emails – and we are happy to see our political leaders heard us loud and clear. Forcing gun lobby priorities onto unrelated bills – with little debate and less concern for public safety – has been a tried and true tactic for the NRA. We’re encouraged that the Senators rejected the most extreme measure today, and we hope that the Senators will continue to work to improve public safety.”

 

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Statement by Moms Demand Action Founder, Shannon Watts, on Wendy Davis’s Open Carry Announcement

 

By Moms Demand Action

 

Earlier today, Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis announced that she supports new laws that would allow Texans to openly carry loaded firearms in public. Davis’s position is disappointing and dangerous given that there is no federal or state requirement for background checks on private gun sales in Texas, making it easy for felons and other dangerous criminals, including domestic abusers, to get guns.

 

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In November, while several members of Moms Demand Action gathered in a restaurant outside Dallas, nearly 40 open carry activists stood in the parking lot with long guns – including semi-automatic rifles – waiting for our mom members to leave the restaurant. This episode of intimidation illustrates clearly that with rights come responsibilities, and passing background checks on all gun sales should be the priority before passing laws that allow open carry.

 

Davis has voiced her support for background checks – this past September she said, ‘If I were governor and a bill came to my desk that provided for background checks at gun shows, I would sign that.’ And just this week the commissioners of Travis County, Texas, stood up for background checks at gun shows in their county.

 

As a mother, as an elected official, and as a champion of survivors of domestic abuse victims, we expect State Senator Davis to do the same and close the background check loophole to protect Texas families.

 

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About Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America Much like Mothers Against Drunk Driving was created to change laws regarding drunk driving, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America was created to build support for common-sense gun reforms. The nonpartisan grassroots movement of American mothers is demanding new and stronger solutions to lax gun laws and loopholes that jeopardize the safety of our children and families. In just one year, the organization has more than 130,000 members with a chapter in every state in the country. The group recently joined forces with Mayors Against Illegal Guns, the largest gun violence prevention organization in the country. For more information or to get involved visit www.momsdemandaction.org. Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/MomsDemandAction or on Twitter @MomsDemand

 

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Shattered Lives Radio: Melissa Seigel Discusses Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month


Originally posted on ImaginePublicity:

Shattered Lives Radio, Donna R. Gore, LadyJustice

Listen to Shattered Lives Radio LIVE!

Everyone deserves a healthy relationship. Unfortunately many teens don’t know what that looks like and fall prey to violence because it may be all they know, or don’t know, about. February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month and brings programs and presentations to teens across the country with the hope that educating them about what to expect in a healthy relationship will stop the cycle of violence that’s being accepted as normal.

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Charlotte, North Carolina is offering many first rate events coordinated by Melissa Siegel, the current Chair of the national youth advisory board for Love is Respect.  As an Information and Education Coordinator for Mecklenburg County Community Support Services Women’s Commission, Melissa is planning prevention and outreach efforts for teen dating violence and child witnessing of domestic violence.

Along with Melissa Siegel listeners will meet Juliana Lozano, a survivor of dating violence currently in…

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Insurance Companies Cancels Plans, Scam Customers, Blame President


Originally posted on Middle Class Life:

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Not one policy was canceled because of Obamacare. NOT ONE! and He did not lie he was unaware of what I am about to share with you.  Here is the truth no one is looking at, the real culprits-the insurance companies,  don’t want you to realize their guilt in the canceled policies and the GOP does not want you to wake up to.

First if a plan was canceled it was not a good plans in the first place and the insurance companies know that. Most people just settled on what the could afford. as opposed to what they actually need.  Some companies had huge copays and yearly and lifetime caps.  with Obama Cares Law, there  are not caps.  Some consumers had to pay the first, say from $500, up to as much as $5,000, and maybe more, of health care costs before their health insurance kicks in.  That’s…

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Currency of Corruption bring their “Dishonest Rock ‘n’ Roll” to the Booth


Originally posted on Ruth Jacobs:

Currency of Corruption

CURRENCY OF CORRUPTION is the “dishonest rock ‘n’ roll” duo of Richard Godly (vocals/drums) and Dean ‘Deano’ Leavens (keyboards/arrangements) plus various session musicians

Can you tell me how Currency of Corruption first got together?  

We were introduced by our friend Mick Fox. I was looking to do something more organic than just jamming with friends and Deano was looking to work with musicians – at the time he was producing dance music in his spare bedroom, but not finding it fulfilling.

What are you up to at the moment? 

We’re currently recording our first album and very soon we’ll be auditioning for a drummer and a bass player to complete the line up. Once we’ve found the right people, we’ll be busy rehearsing so we can start gigging. This summer should see the first of our gigs.

What’s the history of the band?

I have a small recording studio…

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Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #9: The History Of Slavery In America.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Throughout the month Of February, TheObamaCrat™ will post a daily series called The Black History Moment Series. Each day for 28 days of this historic month you will be given the food of Black History to satisfy your hunger for knowledge. 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #9: The History Of Slavery In America.

 

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Slavery in the United States began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia in 1607 and lasted as a legal institution until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865. It continues illegally to this day.

 

The History of Slavery In America

 

 

 

Before the widespread establishment of chattel slavery, much labor was organized under a system of bonded labor known as indentured servitude. This typically lasted for several years for white and black alike, and it was a means of using labor to pay the costs of transporting people to the colonies.

 

By the 18th century, court rulings established the racial basis of the American incarnation of slavery to apply chiefly to Black Africans and people of African descent, and occasionally to Native Americans.

 

A 1705 Virginia law stated slavery would apply to those peoples from nations that were not Christian. In part because of the success of tobacco as a cash crop in the Southern colonies, its labor-intensive character caused planters to import more slaves for labor by the end of the 17th century than did the northern colonies.

 

The South had a significantly higher number and proportion of slaves in the population. Religious differences contributed to this geographic disparity as well.

 

From 1654 until 1865, slavery for life was legal within the boundaries of much of the present United States. Most slaves were black and were held by whites, although some Native Americans and free blacks also held slaves; there were a small number of white slaves as well. The majority of slave holding was in the southern United States where most slaves were engaged in an efficient machine-like gang system of agriculture.

 

According to the 1860 U.S. census, nearly four million slaves were held in a total population of just over 12 million in the 15 states in which slavery was legal. Of all 8,289,782 free persons in the 15 slave states, 393,967 people (4.8%) held slaves, with the average number of slaves held by any single owner being 10.

 

The majority of slaves were held by planters, defined by historians as those who held 20 or more slaves.Ninety-five percent of black people lived in the South, comprising one-third of the population there, as opposed to 2% of the population of the North. The wealth of the United States in the first half of the 19th century was greatly enhanced by the labor of African Americans.

 

But with the Union victory in the American Civil War, the slave-labor system was abolished in the South. This contributed to the decline of the postbellum Southern economy, but it was most affected by the continuing decline in the price of cotton through the end of the century.

 

That made it difficult for the region to recover from the war, as did its comparative lack of infrastructure, which kept products from markets. The South faced significant new competition from foreign cotton producers such as India and Egypt. Northern industry, which had expanded rapidly before and during the war, surged even further ahead of the South’s agricultural economy.

 

Industrialists from northeastern states came to dominate many aspects of the nation’s life, including social and some aspects of political affairs. The planter class of the South lost power temporarily. The rapid economic development following the Civil War accelerated the development of the modern U.S. industrial economy.

 

Twelve million Africans were shipped to the Americas from the 16th to the 19th centuries Of these, an estimated 645,000 were brought to what is now the United States. The largest number were shipped to Brazil. The slave population in the United States had grown to four million by the 1860 Census.

 

Africa’s Slave Trade to Colonialism to Liberation

 

 

 

The history behind Africa’s slave trade, how it started, and where in Africa it began first. African chiefs used to sell their own people in exchange for valued goods, or treasured assets. Then, when the Europeans arrived they began trading with them. The Europeans offered what they had in exchange for slaves and the slave trade became a widely known, and relevant phenomenon in most parts of the world.

 

America and Europe needed people who could do hard labor, who could do their work for them which were rigorous tasks. Slave traders came along the African coast, which was the Sub-region (South of the Sahara) to acquire slaves. They would get them in large numbers and pack them inside the ships they came with. Then, in the 1800s the slave trade was abolished by Abraham Lincoln and then European colonialism/imperialism became the new system in which mainly the Europeans created to strengthen their nations.

 

The necessity of raw materials, namely natural resources, led to European colonization. Also, to establish colonies which were brought up in the ways of the colonial powers, particularly Britain, France, Belgium, Portugal, Germany, among others in order to extend their influence both culturally, politically, socially, and religiously. The geographic borders one sees on the map today of Africa, were designed by the European colonial powers who wanted to divide the continent into sections whereby it would be clear who’s colony was where, and that each colony would stay within boundaries.

 

This was carried out in 1884 in Berlin, Germany. Africa’s resources were being exported immensely to the nations which ruled over certain colonies there, thus being distributed out to the rest of the world. After World War 2 and the establishment of the United Nations, nationalists movements began which internal self government came into focus and practice, thus leading to independence, sovereignty, and the emancipation /liberation of the African continent.

 

Pan Africanists/nationalists/freedom fighters like Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Sekou Toure, among others came into being and agitated for independence.

 

 

African History BEFORE Slavery

 

 

 

Black History Month 2014 Presents: Celebrating Black History Month; The Black History Moment Series.

 

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #1. Slavery.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #2. The Middle Passage.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #3. Post Racial AmeriKKKa.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #4 The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #5 Rosewood, Florida. The Rosewood Massacre.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #6: The Destruction of The Black Family.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #7: Black Indians In The United States.

 

 

Happy 101st Birthday Ms. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #8: Charles H. Wright Museum Of African American History.

 

 

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Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956 after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city's bus system. Behind Parks is Nicholas C. Chriss, a UPI reporter covering the event.

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956 after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city’s bus system. Behind Parks is Nicholas C. Chriss, a UPI reporter covering the event.

Barack Obama sitting on the bus. Parks was arrested sitting in the same row Obama is in, but on the opposite side.

Barack Obama sitting on the bus. Parks was arrested sitting in the same row Obama is in, but on the opposite side.

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A Picture Of Greatness. Black History is American History!

A Picture Of Greatness. Black History is American History!

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