The First Lady’s Travel Journal: Visiting The Great Wall Of China. Photos & Video.


 

By Jueseppi B.

First Lady Michelle Obama and Malia and Sasha visit the Great Wall of China. March 22, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

First Lady Michelle Obama and Malia and Sasha visit the Great Wall of China. March 22, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

 

 

 

A gift presented to the First Lady at the Great Wall.

A gift presented to the First Lady at the Great Wall.

The First Lady and her daughters look out at the Great Wall of China. http://wh.gov/lpKi6  #FLOTUSinChina

The First Lady and her daughters look out at the Great Wall of China. http://wh.gov/lpKi6 #FLOTUSinChina

 

Raw: First Lady, Daughters Visit Great Wall

 

Published on Mar 23, 2014

United States First Lady Michelle Obama and her daughters, Malia and Sasha, visited a section of the Great Wall outside of Beijing on Sunday. (March 23)

 

 

 

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The First Lady’s Travel Journal: Visiting The Great Wall Of China

 

Michelle Obama
Michelle Obama

March 23, 2014
07:38 AM EDT

 

Note: This post is part of a series authored by First Lady Michelle Obama to share her visit to China with young people in the U.S. You can read all of the First Lady’s posts at WhiteHouse.gov/First-Lady-China-Trip.

 

Today we drove about an hour north of Beijing to a village called Mutianyu to visit a section of the Great Wall of China, which was simply breathtaking. The scenery on the way there was beautiful – a wide vista of mountains and trees – so the car ride alone was a treat.  But then, running along the highest ridges of the mountains, you see it: The Great Wall – one of the great marvels of human history.

 

In its entirety, the Great Wall stretches from east to west across more than 13,000 miles of Chinese countryside (that’s about four times the length of the entire United States from Maine to Oregon!).  It is not a single, uninterrupted wall, but rather a series of smaller walls which sometimes overlap and run parallel to each other.

 

Certain sections of the Wall date back as far as the seventh century B.C., but the majority of the Great Wall we know today – including the section at Mutianyu – was built between the 1300s and the 1600s.

 

To get to the Wall, we rode a cable car up a mountain (and we later rode back down on a long slide!).  The section we visited is one of the more popular parts of the Wall for tourists, and it’s easy to see why.  At Mutianyu, the Wall is roughly 20 to 25 feet tall and full of stairs, and there’s a watchtower every 100 yards or so. Those watchtowers serve as a reminder of why the Wall was built in the first place – to defend against attacks from armies descending from the north. Throughout its history, the Great Wall has gone through decades, even centuries, of ruin and disrepair.  But it has always served as not only a physical barrier, but a psychological one to intimidate potential invaders.

 

During our visit to the Wall, I couldn’t stop thinking about what a massive undertaking it must have been to build it. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and peasants were given the dangerous, painstaking – and often fatal – task of carrying ton after ton of granite, brick, dirt, and wood through the forests, up over the hills, and down through the valleys to create this incredible structure. They did this year after year, decade after decade – and it’s because of their hard work and sacrifice that the Great Wall remains standing today.

 

First Lady Michelle Obama takes a toboggan ride after visiting the Great Wall of ChinaFirst Lady Michelle Obama takes a toboggan ride after visiting the Great Wall of China with Malia and Sasha. March 23, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

 

 

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The First Lady on the Importance of Studying Abroad

 

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The First Lady speaks to American and Chinese students at the Stanford Center at Peking University on the importance of studying abroad.

 

 

 

Follow the First Lady’s first visit to China as she highlights the #PowerOfEducationhttp://sfy.co/qRVK  #FLOTUSinChina

 

On Board: Travels with the First Lady in China, Day One. Hear from the First Lady Michelle Obama as she recaps day one of her trip to China and previews her upcoming address on study abroad and connecting students across continents.

On Board: Travels with the First Lady in China. Hear from the First Lady Michelle Obama as she recaps
her trip to China and previews her upcoming address on study abroad and connecting students across continents.

 

 

Fun On The Great Wall Of China…..

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First Lady Michelle Obama hosts education roundtable in China

 

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Remarks by the First Lady and Ambassador Baucus Before Roundtable with Chinese Educators, Parents and Students

 

Remarks by the First Lady and Ambassador Baucus Before Roundtable with Chinese Educators, Parents and Students

 

American Embassy Beijing, China

 

10:09 A.M. CST

 

AMBASSADOR BAUCUS:  Zăoshàng hăo.  We’re very honored that all of you are here.  And it’s most appropriate that we’re — talked about education — and, more specifically, how we can help each other get that — of educating each other, helping each other and learning from each other’s country, and how we can work better together.

 

I’m going to be very brief.  I just wanted to tell you how excited I am that Michelle Obama is here; second, the subject is just — it’s education.  It’s kids, because the kids are our future.

 

I believe that all of us have a moral obligation who are on this place — on this planet — we’re not here very long.  We leave it, and we leave it in as good a shape or better shape than we found it.  That means our children and our grandchildren — leave it in as good a shape, a better shape than we found it for our kids and for our grandkids.  And education is a key way to help accomplish that objective.

 

So I just wanted to tell you how happy we are that we’re here together.  And thank you, Mrs. Obama, for being here.

 

MRS. OBAMA:  Oh, thank you.  Thank you, Ambassador Baucus.  I’m not going to talk long either.

 

I have had a wonderful first few days here in Beijing.  And, as the Ambassador said, one of the reasons I have come to China is to learn more about education around the world.  Education is an important focus for me.  It’s personal, because I wouldn’t be where I am today without my parents investing and pushing me to get a good education.

 

And my parents were not educated themselves, but one of the things they understood was that my brother and I needed that foundation.  So the President and I have made education a key focus of our work over the coming years because we want to make sure that as many young people in the United States and around the world, quite frankly, have access to education.

 

So I’ve had a chance to visit a high school with Madame Peng here in Beijing and talked to some of the high school students there.  Yesterday, I had an amazing conversation with a group of students at Peking University yesterday, along with students at Stanford because through the Internet, we were able to have a joint conversation.  In a couple of days, I’m going to travel to Chengdu, and I’m going to be able to speak with more high school students there, really to see another region of the country and to speak to the students there, as well.  So I’m very excited.

 

But today, I am grateful to all of you, first of all, for taking the time on a Sunday — (laughter) — to be here with me, and for your willingness to share your stories and your experiences.  Because one of the things we say, it’s really by sharing our stories with each other that those bonds of connection really grow.

 

So I’m here to learn and to listen, although anything you want to ask me, of course, I’m more than willing to share.

 

END                 10:13 A.M. CST

 

 

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In Case You Missed These…..

 

Remarks by the First Lady and Ambassador Baucus Before Roundtable with Chinese Educators, Parents and Students

 

Remarks by the First Lady in Video Conference with Students at Peking University and Stanford University in California

 

Remarks by the First Lady at Stanford Center at Peking University

 

Remarks by the First Lady Michelle Obama and President Xi Jinping of China

 

Remarks by First Lady Michelle Obama and Madame Peng Before Tour of Beijing Normal School

 

First Lady Michelle LaVaughn Obama in Beijing, China.

 

The 1st Lady’s Orient Trip Day 2: The First Lady’s Travel Journal; Meeting With American & Chinese Students At Peking University.

 

First Lady Michelle Obama Meets With Arlington Heights Students In China

 

First Lady in Video Conference With Students At Peking University And Stanford University In California.

 

 

And we must not forget Barack….

 

The Presidents Week Ahead: Presidential Trips To The Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, The Vatican And Saudi Arabia.

 

 

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16 Responses

  1. That must be security behind Michelle on the toboggan. :) She’s braver than me!
    :) I submitted an invention today on Quirky.com, though. It’s a plate for stroke victims and could help millions. I’m all excited and have been told by one person it would have helped their parents.

    I hope you are having as much fun as Michelle and the girls. :: I’m still pushing ACA too.

    Like

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