Cooking With Honey – Honeycomb Pull Apart Cake


Originally posted on Romancing the Bee:

Reblogged from Chronicles of a Beekeeper Wife

Honeycomb Pull Apart Cake

Honeycomb cake image

Do you have some special people coming over, a birthday celebration,or maybe you are going to your annual beekeepers’ potluck? You’ll do no wrong by serving this conversational piece. It is easy to make and fun to serve. The honey lemon glaze is especially tasty, and on a hot summer day, I suggest serving alongside a scoop of lemon sorbet or Italian ice. Either way, serving up this honeycomb cake is going to be a hit at your next gathering!

Prep
You’ll need to purchase this Honeycomb novelty pan. Itis made by Nordic Ware (very high quality heavy cast aluminum construction). HONEYCOMB PAN AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE FROM ROMANCING THE BEE – $45 plus shipping and handling.

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Front side
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Batter side

You’ll need to pick up several ingredients if you don’t already have them in your pantry.

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Love…

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Rand Corp. Study Of ObamaCARES Effect On Health Insurance: 9.3 Million New Insured And Counting.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Rand’s Obamacare stats: 9.3 million new insureds, and counting

 

By Michael Hiltzik

 

The long-awaited Rand Corp. study of Obamacare’s effect on health insurance coverage was released Tuesday and confirmed the numbers that had been telegraphed for more than a week: At least 9.3 million more Americans have health insurance now than in September 2013, virtually all of them as a result of the law.

 

 

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

 

That’s a net figure, accommodating all those who lost their individual health insurance because of cancellations. The Rand study confirms other surveys that placed the number of people who lost their old insurance and did not or could not replace it — the focus of an enormous volume of anti-Obamacare rhetoric — at less than 1 million. The Rand experts call this a “very small” number, less than 1% of the U.S. population age 18 to 64.

 

 

The Rand study was eagerly anticipated in part because of the dearth of hard information from other sources, including the federal and state governments, which are still compiling their statistics and may not have a full slate for months.

 

Rand acknowledges that its figures have limitations — they’re based on a survey sampling, meaning that the breakdowns are subject to various margins of error, and they don’t include much of the surge in enrollments in late March and early April. Those 3.2-million sign-ups not counted by Rand could “dramatically affect” the figures on total insureds, the organization said.

A few other important takeaways:

–The number of people getting insurance through their employers increased by 8.2 million. Rand said the increase is likely to have been driven by a decline in unemployment, which made more people eligible for employer plans, and by the incentives in the Affordable Care Act encouraging more employer coverage. The figure certainly undermines the contention by the healthcare law’s critics that the legislation gave employers an incentive to drop coverage.

–Of the 3.9 million people counted by Rand as obtaining insurance on the individual exchange market, 36% were previously uninsured. That ratio is expected to rise when the late signups are factored in. Medicaid enrollment increased by 5.9 million, the majority of whom did not have insurance before signing up.

–These figures are only the leading edge of a long-term trend. “It’s still early in the life of the ACA,” Rand said. Its experts expect more enrollments “as people become more familiar with the law, the individual mandates increase to their highest levels, the employer mandate kicks in, and other changes occur.” But their bottom line is that the law already has led to “a substantial increase in insurance coverage.”

 

 

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The Obamacare success stories you haven’t been hearing about

 

Last summer Ellen Holzman and Meredith Vezina, a married gay couple in San Diego County, got kicked off their long-term Kaiser health plan, for which they’d been paying more than $1,300 a month. The cause wasn’t the Affordable Care Act, as far as they knew. They’d been living outside Kaiser’s service area, and the health plan had decided to tighten its rules.

 

That’s when they discovered the chilly hazards of dependence on the individual health insurance market. When they applied for a replacement policy with Anthem Blue Cross of California, Ellen, 59, disclosed that she might have carpal tunnel syndrome. She wasn’t sure–her condition was still being diagnosed by Kaiser when her coverage ended. But the possibility was enough to scare Anthem. “They said, ‘We will not insure you because you have a pre-existing condition,'” Holzman recalls.

 

But they were lucky, thanks to Obamacare. Through Covered California, the state’s individual insurance marketplace, they’ve found a plan through Sharp Healthcare that will cover them both for a total premium of $142 a month, after a government subsidy based on their income. They’ll have a higher deductible than Kaiser’s but lower co-pays. But their possible savings will be impressive.

 

More important than that was knowing that they couldn’t be turned down for coverage come Jan. 1. “We felt we didn’t have to panic, or worry,” Holzman says. “If not for the Affordable Care Act, our ability to get insurance would be very limited, if we could get it at all.”

 

Holzman and Vezina are exactly the type of people Obamacare is designed to help–indeed, rescue from the cold, hard world of individual health insurance of the past. That was a world where even an undiagnosed condition might render you uninsurable. Where your insurance could be canceled after you got sick or had an accident. Where your financial health was at risk as much as your physical well-being.

 

These are the stories you’re not hearing amid the pumped-up panic over canceled individual policies and premium shocks–many of which stories are certainly true, but the noise being made about them leads people to think they’re more common than they are.

 

We’ve compiled several alternative examples for this post. They’re anecdotes, sure, just like the anecdotes you’ve been seeing and reading about people learning they’ll be paying more for coverage next year.

 

The difference is that Americans learning that they’ll be eligible for coverage perhaps for the first time, or at sharply lower cost, are far more typical of the individual insurance market. Two-thirds of the 30 million Americans who will be eligible for individual coverage next year are uninsured today, whether because they can’t afford it now or because they’re barred by pre-existing condition limitations, which will no longer be legal. And more than three-quarters will be eligible for subsidies that will cut their premium costs and even co-pays and deductibles substantially.

 

Let’s hear from a few more of them.

 

David Shevlino, 51, is an artist in Delaware. Between the COBRA policy that extends the coverage his wife, Kathy, received at a former job and the bare-bones policy that covers himself and their 15-year-old son, they’ve been laying out $1,000 a month in premiums. Next year they’ll pay $650 a month, after the government subsidy, for a plan through Blue Cross of Delaware that covers the entire family and provides many services that have been excluded up to now.

 

That makes a big difference, especially for Kathy, who is still dealing with injuries she suffered in a cycling accident and that would have made her uninsurable once her COBRA ran out less than a year from now. “She had already been turned down by Aetna and Blue Cross, the very company that will now insure her,” Shevlino says. “This is a really significant thing–to me, the fact that insurance companies could turn you down didn’t make sense in terms of what healthcare is supposed to be for.”

 

And Judith Silverstein, 49, a Californian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2007. Her family helps her pay the $750 monthly cost of her existing plan–which she only had because of federal law requiring that insurers who provide employer-based insurance continue to offer coverage if the employer goes out of business, as hers did. Next year she’ll get a subsidy that will get her a good “silver” level plan for $50.

 

For Silverstein that coverage is indispensable. Her case is relatively mild, but MS is a progressive condition that typically has made its sufferers pariahs of the individual insurance market in the past. “I researched the options,” she says. “Nobody’s going to sell you insurance in the individual market if you have MS.” But these customers can’t be excluded or saddled with big premium markups any more.

 

It’s not only recipients of subsidies who are benefiting. Jason Noble, 44, who has his own property management firm in Southern California, found a gold plan that will cover his wife and their three children–a daughter, 9, and 5-year-old twins–for a little less than $1,300 a month. That’s slightly more than they’d be paying next year for their existing Blue Shield plan, but the benefits are much greater, including pediatric dental coverage. Their family deductible will fall from $3,400 to zero. Last year, the family had a health scare that ran them $1,800 in out-of-pocket expenses; a similar event next year would cost them nothing. “It’s definitely a good deal,” Noble says.

 

It’s fair to observe that not all these people are enamored with their enrollment experience. Ellen Holzman found Covered California’s website “definitely clunky,” and she and Vezina are still awaiting enrollment documents from Sharp that they say are well overdue.

 

Brian Sheppard, 58, a self-employed Southern California attorney, says he spent five to seven hours on the website before determining that he could upgrade from the existing Kaiser plan covering him and his wife for an additional $100 a month, but with lower deductibles and prescription costs. He’s still waiting to hear whether he’ll be eligible for a subsidy that would slash his expenses significantly.

 

“I’m persistent, I’m a lawyer, and I found it very difficult to work through that system,” he says. But for him it was worth the effort. “In 2010, when people were being canceled because they got sick, there was all this outrage,” he observes. “People have forgotten that.”

The difficulties of the federal government’s healthcare.gov and some state enrollment websites are real, and have kept hundreds of thousands of Americans, even millions, from enrolling. But many of those who understand the benefits of the Affordable Care Act know that obsessing about the technical glitches is like mistaking the scoreboard for the game.

Political opportunists (like House Speaker John Boehner), exploit near-term difficulties to obscure the tangible benefits the Affordable Care Act will bring to tens of millions of their constituents. When they say “this law has to go,” as Boehner’s spokesman did this weekend, they’re talking about returning people to the era of exclusions for pre-existing conditions. To people learning they’re uninsurable because of injuries from accidents, or chronic diseases, or the sheer bloody-mindedness of insurance company bureaucrats.

Let’s hear Boehner and his people explain to Holzman and Vezina, the Shevlinos, the Nobles, the Sheppards, and Silverstein–and to 20-30 million other Americans like them who might be locked out of the individual insurance market without the law they ridicule as “Obamacare”–how they’d be better off that way.

 

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Read The Full Rand Corporation Report

 

 

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The Latest Hitler Inspired Anti-ObamaCARES Ad By Foster Friess: Hitler finds out he can’t keep his doctor under Obamacare

This is what America has become, The United States Of AmeriKKKa. This idiot posted this “preamble” to his racist anti-Semitic video…

 

Since people were subscribing to my YouTube channel, I felt the pressure to produce, produce, produce! So, here’s another take on “Hitler finds out..” 

 
This time, Hitler learns that he is losing his doctor because Dr Steiner is not in the network for his new health insurance.

 
Also, I would like to apologize to anyone who is, is related to, or knows any proctologists named Feingold. The use of the name Dr. Feingold is not meant to make fun of any individual, except for President Obama.
Make your own Hitler video at http://downfall.jfedor.org/

 

This Crapplefratz is truly a dumbass full of dumbfuckery.

 

 

 

Amazing that something that helps 9.3 million Americans can be hated by AmeriKKKans.

 

 

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A New Feature On WhiteHouse.gov: Tools You’ll Use.


 

 

By Jueseppi B.

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There are a lot of .gov websites out there. But with so many, you might miss some of the ones that are most useful for you.

That’s why we’re launching WhiteHouse.gov/Tools: It’s a collection of tools from across the government that can make your life easier.

And those are just some of the tools we’re spotlighting.

 

 

TOOLS YOU’LL USE

 

Spotlighting government tools that make your life easier.

 

 

COLLEGE SCORECARD

 

I want to find a college that’s a good fit for me or my kids.

You can use the scorecard to get a sense of a college’s affordability and value – helping you make an informed decision about which college to attend. Additionally, you can get scorecards based on programs or majors offered, location, and enrollment size.

 

College Scorecards in the U.S. Department of Education’s College Affordability and Transparency Center make it easier for you to search for a college that is a good fit for you. You can use the College Scorecard to find out more about a college’s affordability and value so you can make more informed decisions about which college to attend.
To start, enter the name of a college of interest to you or select factors that are important in your college search. You can find scorecards for colleges based on factors such as programs or majors offered, location, and enrollment size.

 

 

 

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Assess the energy efficiency of your home and see how it measures up:

 

EPA‘s Home Energy Yardstick provides a simple assessment of your home’s annual energy use compared to similar homes. By answering a few basic questions about your home, you can get:

  • Your home’s Home Energy Yardstick score (on a scale of 1 to 10);
  • Insights into how much of your home’s energy use is related to heating and cooling versus other everyday uses like appliances, lighting, and hot water;
  • Links to guidance from ENERGY STAR on how to increase your home’s score, improve comfort, and lower utility bills; and
  • An estimate of your home’s annual carbon emissions.

Learn more about how the Home Energy Yardstick works.

See a sample results page.

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Getting Started:

To calculate your Yardstick score, all you need is some basic information about your home:

  • Your ZIP code;
  • Your home’s square footage;
  • Number of full time home occupants;
  • A list of all the different fuels used in your home (e.g., electricity, natural gas, fuel oil); and
  • Your home’s last 12 months of utility bills (usually found in the 12 month summary provided on your bill or through a Green Button file ?).

Having trouble with the Home Energy Yardstick? Contact us at yardstick@energystar.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Compass

 

With the tools below, learn about how USDA and our federal partners support local and regional food economies; see communities putting these resources to work; and explore the map to find out what’s happening near you. Use the tools and get involved!

 

 

Welcome to the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Compass

 

Uploaded on Feb 28, 2012

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and USDA Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan introduce the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Compass, an electronic document and interactive map that will help you support local and regional food systems.

 

 

 

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To select different vehicle pairs including non-hybrid models or to consider additional cost factors, visit the Vehicle Cost Calculator at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center.

Note: This tool compares hybrids to their non-hybrid counterparts in very simple terms—only fuel costs and MSRP are considered. Other factors, such as insurance, maintenance, or resale value, are not considered since they can vary widely.

Every effort was made to match each hybrid vehicle with a conventional vehicle from the same manufacturer that is as similar as possible in terms of amenities and utility. For unique hybrids with no conventional counterpart like the Toyota Prius, Prius c and the Honda Insight, a different model was chosen from the same manufacturer if it appeared to be reasonably similar. Ultimately, consumers will have to judge for themselves how similar the vehicles are.

 

 

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We developed a shorter, simpler credit card agreement that spells out the terms for the consumer. Note that this is not a model form, and use is not mandatory. Our prototype is shown here. We believe our approach will help consumers better understand their credit card agreements. Tell us what you think of it.

 

Review the sample agreement below. (You can also view a PDF copy.) The terms that are underlined in the agreement are defined in a separate list of definitions of credit card contract terms. Click any section of the agreement to learn more about it. Then leave your comments about the agreement or the definitions at the bottom of the page.

 

If you want to see what current agreements look like, check out our Credit Card Agreement Database.

 

 

 

 

Been Sued or Gotten a Demand Letter?
Answers To Common Questions About Abusive Patent Litigation

Received a letter about or been sued over a patent? You’re in the right place. See below for answers to common questions:

 

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In June 2013, President Obama ordered the creation of this website to empower those who have received a demand letter or may be threatened with a patent lawsuit with information about their options. In response, the USPTO has created this site.

The information presented on this site does not constitute legal advice. It should not be considered to replace advice from an attorney. Reference to any specific organizations, attorneys, law firms, corporations, or websites does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the USPTO.

We welcome your comments and suggestions in the box below.

 

 

Have you seen something we should feature here? Tell us about it.

 

See something you think we should spotlight? Tell us here. And for even more, go to USA.gov.

 

 

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Eric Holder smacks down GOPer: “You don’t want to go there, buddy!”


Originally posted on The Fifth Column:

Eric Holder smacks down GOPer: "You don't want to go there, buddy!"

Attorney General Eric Holder (Credit: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Salon

Attorney General Eric Holder and congressman Louie Gohmert are not fans of one another, a fact that was further confirmed when the two got into a verbal tiff during a hearing on Tuesday over whether the former cared when the House held him in contempt in 2012 over the “fast-and-furious” scandal.

What set off this latest tussle was a passive-aggressive shot Gohmert took at Holder over fast-and-furious-related documents the Department of Justice had handed over in response to a House Republican request. “I’ve read you what your department promised and it is inadequate,” Gohmert told Holder. “And I realize that [being held in] contempt is not a big deal to our attorney general but it is important that we have proper oversight.”

“You don’t want to go there, buddy, all right?” Holder testily responded. “You don’t want to…

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Chunky Guacamole, my best friend this evening.


Originally posted on simplyvegetarian777:

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It feels unbelievable that I have some me time this evening. How did this happen?

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It happened and I enjoyed a good cup of tea with some freshly made Guacamole and Tortilla Chips. No, I didn’t make the chips :). I actually love guacamole so much that I don’t need any chips to dip in it, my own finger is enough…..just dip and lick….nothing and I mean nothing can match the taste of the food which is eaten with bare hands. If you think that it is silly of me then be it :).

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Here is my favorite Chunky Guacamole recipe, which can be hurled in 2 minutes with no special kitchen equipment besides a humble knife and a fork. Yes, that’s it :). Awesome, right?

Yields : 3/4 cup

Ingredients :

Avocado, ripe : 1, medium to big in size.
Garlic pods : 2, big or 3-4 small, grated…

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