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Rand Corp. Study Of ObamaCARES Effect On Health Insurance: 9.3 Million New Insured And Counting.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Rand’s Obamacare stats: 9.3 million new insureds, and counting

 

By Michael Hiltzik

 

The long-awaited Rand Corp. study of Obamacare’s effect on health insurance coverage was released Tuesday and confirmed the numbers that had been telegraphed for more than a week: At least 9.3 million more Americans have health insurance now than in September 2013, virtually all of them as a result of the law.

 

 

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

 

That’s a net figure, accommodating all those who lost their individual health insurance because of cancellations. The Rand study confirms other surveys that placed the number of people who lost their old insurance and did not or could not replace it — the focus of an enormous volume of anti-Obamacare rhetoric — at less than 1 million. The Rand experts call this a “very small” number, less than 1% of the U.S. population age 18 to 64.

 

 

The Rand study was eagerly anticipated in part because of the dearth of hard information from other sources, including the federal and state governments, which are still compiling their statistics and may not have a full slate for months.

 

Rand acknowledges that its figures have limitations — they’re based on a survey sampling, meaning that the breakdowns are subject to various margins of error, and they don’t include much of the surge in enrollments in late March and early April. Those 3.2-million sign-ups not counted by Rand could “dramatically affect” the figures on total insureds, the organization said.

A few other important takeaways:

–The number of people getting insurance through their employers increased by 8.2 million. Rand said the increase is likely to have been driven by a decline in unemployment, which made more people eligible for employer plans, and by the incentives in the Affordable Care Act encouraging more employer coverage. The figure certainly undermines the contention by the healthcare law’s critics that the legislation gave employers an incentive to drop coverage.

–Of the 3.9 million people counted by Rand as obtaining insurance on the individual exchange market, 36% were previously uninsured. That ratio is expected to rise when the late signups are factored in. Medicaid enrollment increased by 5.9 million, the majority of whom did not have insurance before signing up.

–These figures are only the leading edge of a long-term trend. “It’s still early in the life of the ACA,” Rand said. Its experts expect more enrollments “as people become more familiar with the law, the individual mandates increase to their highest levels, the employer mandate kicks in, and other changes occur.” But their bottom line is that the law already has led to “a substantial increase in insurance coverage.”

 

 

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The Obamacare success stories you haven’t been hearing about

 

Last summer Ellen Holzman and Meredith Vezina, a married gay couple in San Diego County, got kicked off their long-term Kaiser health plan, for which they’d been paying more than $1,300 a month. The cause wasn’t the Affordable Care Act, as far as they knew. They’d been living outside Kaiser’s service area, and the health plan had decided to tighten its rules.

 

That’s when they discovered the chilly hazards of dependence on the individual health insurance market. When they applied for a replacement policy with Anthem Blue Cross of California, Ellen, 59, disclosed that she might have carpal tunnel syndrome. She wasn’t sure–her condition was still being diagnosed by Kaiser when her coverage ended. But the possibility was enough to scare Anthem. “They said, ‘We will not insure you because you have a pre-existing condition,’” Holzman recalls.

 

But they were lucky, thanks to Obamacare. Through Covered California, the state’s individual insurance marketplace, they’ve found a plan through Sharp Healthcare that will cover them both for a total premium of $142 a month, after a government subsidy based on their income. They’ll have a higher deductible than Kaiser’s but lower co-pays. But their possible savings will be impressive.

 

More important than that was knowing that they couldn’t be turned down for coverage come Jan. 1. “We felt we didn’t have to panic, or worry,” Holzman says. “If not for the Affordable Care Act, our ability to get insurance would be very limited, if we could get it at all.”

 

Holzman and Vezina are exactly the type of people Obamacare is designed to help–indeed, rescue from the cold, hard world of individual health insurance of the past. That was a world where even an undiagnosed condition might render you uninsurable. Where your insurance could be canceled after you got sick or had an accident. Where your financial health was at risk as much as your physical well-being.

 

These are the stories you’re not hearing amid the pumped-up panic over canceled individual policies and premium shocks–many of which stories are certainly true, but the noise being made about them leads people to think they’re more common than they are.

 

We’ve compiled several alternative examples for this post. They’re anecdotes, sure, just like the anecdotes you’ve been seeing and reading about people learning they’ll be paying more for coverage next year.

 

The difference is that Americans learning that they’ll be eligible for coverage perhaps for the first time, or at sharply lower cost, are far more typical of the individual insurance market. Two-thirds of the 30 million Americans who will be eligible for individual coverage next year are uninsured today, whether because they can’t afford it now or because they’re barred by pre-existing condition limitations, which will no longer be legal. And more than three-quarters will be eligible for subsidies that will cut their premium costs and even co-pays and deductibles substantially.

 

Let’s hear from a few more of them.

 

David Shevlino, 51, is an artist in Delaware. Between the COBRA policy that extends the coverage his wife, Kathy, received at a former job and the bare-bones policy that covers himself and their 15-year-old son, they’ve been laying out $1,000 a month in premiums. Next year they’ll pay $650 a month, after the government subsidy, for a plan through Blue Cross of Delaware that covers the entire family and provides many services that have been excluded up to now.

 

That makes a big difference, especially for Kathy, who is still dealing with injuries she suffered in a cycling accident and that would have made her uninsurable once her COBRA ran out less than a year from now. “She had already been turned down by Aetna and Blue Cross, the very company that will now insure her,” Shevlino says. “This is a really significant thing–to me, the fact that insurance companies could turn you down didn’t make sense in terms of what healthcare is supposed to be for.”

 

And Judith Silverstein, 49, a Californian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2007. Her family helps her pay the $750 monthly cost of her existing plan–which she only had because of federal law requiring that insurers who provide employer-based insurance continue to offer coverage if the employer goes out of business, as hers did. Next year she’ll get a subsidy that will get her a good “silver” level plan for $50.

 

For Silverstein that coverage is indispensable. Her case is relatively mild, but MS is a progressive condition that typically has made its sufferers pariahs of the individual insurance market in the past. “I researched the options,” she says. “Nobody’s going to sell you insurance in the individual market if you have MS.” But these customers can’t be excluded or saddled with big premium markups any more.

 

It’s not only recipients of subsidies who are benefiting. Jason Noble, 44, who has his own property management firm in Southern California, found a gold plan that will cover his wife and their three children–a daughter, 9, and 5-year-old twins–for a little less than $1,300 a month. That’s slightly more than they’d be paying next year for their existing Blue Shield plan, but the benefits are much greater, including pediatric dental coverage. Their family deductible will fall from $3,400 to zero. Last year, the family had a health scare that ran them $1,800 in out-of-pocket expenses; a similar event next year would cost them nothing. “It’s definitely a good deal,” Noble says.

 

It’s fair to observe that not all these people are enamored with their enrollment experience. Ellen Holzman found Covered California’s website “definitely clunky,” and she and Vezina are still awaiting enrollment documents from Sharp that they say are well overdue.

 

Brian Sheppard, 58, a self-employed Southern California attorney, says he spent five to seven hours on the website before determining that he could upgrade from the existing Kaiser plan covering him and his wife for an additional $100 a month, but with lower deductibles and prescription costs. He’s still waiting to hear whether he’ll be eligible for a subsidy that would slash his expenses significantly.

 

“I’m persistent, I’m a lawyer, and I found it very difficult to work through that system,” he says. But for him it was worth the effort. “In 2010, when people were being canceled because they got sick, there was all this outrage,” he observes. “People have forgotten that.”

The difficulties of the federal government’s healthcare.gov and some state enrollment websites are real, and have kept hundreds of thousands of Americans, even millions, from enrolling. But many of those who understand the benefits of the Affordable Care Act know that obsessing about the technical glitches is like mistaking the scoreboard for the game.

Political opportunists (like House Speaker John Boehner), exploit near-term difficulties to obscure the tangible benefits the Affordable Care Act will bring to tens of millions of their constituents. When they say “this law has to go,” as Boehner’s spokesman did this weekend, they’re talking about returning people to the era of exclusions for pre-existing conditions. To people learning they’re uninsurable because of injuries from accidents, or chronic diseases, or the sheer bloody-mindedness of insurance company bureaucrats.

Let’s hear Boehner and his people explain to Holzman and Vezina, the Shevlinos, the Nobles, the Sheppards, and Silverstein–and to 20-30 million other Americans like them who might be locked out of the individual insurance market without the law they ridicule as “Obamacare”–how they’d be better off that way.

 

Thank you logoSmall

 

 

 

Read The Full Rand Corporation Report

 

 

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The Latest Hitler Inspired Anti-ObamaCARES Ad By Foster Friess: Hitler finds out he can’t keep his doctor under Obamacare

This is what America has become, The United States Of AmeriKKKa. This idiot posted this “preamble” to his racist anti-Semitic video…

 

Since people were subscribing to my YouTube channel, I felt the pressure to produce, produce, produce! So, here’s another take on “Hitler finds out..” 

 
This time, Hitler learns that he is losing his doctor because Dr Steiner is not in the network for his new health insurance.

 
Also, I would like to apologize to anyone who is, is related to, or knows any proctologists named Feingold. The use of the name Dr. Feingold is not meant to make fun of any individual, except for President Obama.
Make your own Hitler video at http://downfall.jfedor.org/

 

This Crapplefratz is truly a dumbass full of dumbfuckery.

 

 

 

Amazing that something that helps 9.3 million Americans can be hated by AmeriKKKans.

 

 

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Equal Pay Day At Barack’s House. There Is NO Glass Ceiling At THIS White House.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Taking Action in Honor of National Equal Pay Day

 

 

President Barack Obama signs executive actions to strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws for women, at an event marking Equal Pay Day, in the East Room of the White House, April 8, 2014.

President Barack Obama signs executive actions to strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws for women, at an event marking Equal Pay Day, in the East Room of the White House, April 8, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Today, President Obama signed a new Executive Order to prevent workplace discrimination and empower workers to take control over negotiations regarding their pay.

 

Just over two months after President Obama raised the minimum wage to $10.10 for federal contractors, he is again leading by example and taking action to protect American workers from retaliation if they broach the topic of unequal compensation. This is a problem facing a broad range of American workers, but women in particular are too often on the receiving end of subtle or overt penalties for even mentioning their pay.

 

In addition, the President is asking the Secretary of Labor to require federal contractors to submit data on employee compensation by race and gender — which will help employers take proactive efforts to ensure fair pay for all their employees.

 

President Obama is committed to ensuring equal opportunity and empowering women in the workforce. Shortly after taking office, he signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and established theNational Equal Pay Task Force. His commitment to women’s equality stems not only from his experiences as the son of a single mom, a husband, and the father of two daughters, but also as our nation’s leader, focused every day on strengthening our economy and maintaining our competitive edge in the world.

 

Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act Signing

President Barack Obama signs into law the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in the East Room of the White House. January 29, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Joyce Boghosian)

As the President said in his most recent State of the Union address, “when women succeed, America succeeds.” We truly can’t afford to have women held back or prevent them from reaching their full potential if we hope to maximize the strength and productivity of our workforce.

 

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act into law to combat gender-based wage discrimination, and in the decades since, women have made extraordinary progress. But there is still a great amount of work that needs to be done. Women still make just 77 cents on average for every dollar a man earns, and continue to face prejudice in the workplace. And that number hasn’t improved — the pay gap has stayed constant since 2002.

 

Women now make up roughly half of America’s workforce and graduate at a higher rate than men from college and graduate schools — but even professional women make less than men in the same occupation with equivalent degrees. And the wage gapgets worse as they get older: Until they turn 35, women earn roughly 90 percent of what men make; after that, women typically earn about 75 to 80 percent of what men make.

 

This June, the President will host the first-ever White House Summit on Working Families to discuss issues ranging from fair pay and the minimum wage to childcare and flexible workplace policies to ensure that parents can be productive workers while handling their responsibilities at home.

 

The summit will convene a diverse group of business leaders, advocates, parents, and stakeholders from across the country to share best practices, identify strategies that work, and take those ideas to scale.

 

The summit and Executive Order will build on President Obama’s ongoing commitment to strengthen the middle class, maximize opportunity for all, and put every hardworking American in a position to succeed.

 

 

Presidential Actions

 

Executive Order — Non-Retaliation for Disclosure of Compensation Information

 

 

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President Obama Speaks on Equal Pay for Equal Work

 

Published on Apr 8, 2014

Following an introduction by Lilly Ledbetter, President Obama announces two new executive actions to strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws for women.

 

 

President Barack Obama is introduced to speak by Lilly Ledbetter at an event aimed at increasing transparency about women’s pay during an event at the White House. The first law President Obama signed after taking office in 2009 was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which extended time periods for employees to file claims for wages lost as a result of discrimination.

President Barack Obama is introduced to speak by Lilly Ledbetter at an event aimed at increasing transparency about women’s pay during an event at the White House. The first law President Obama signed after taking office in 2009 was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which extended time periods for employees to file claims for wages lost as a result of discrimination.

 

 

 

 

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Remarks by the President on Equal Pay for Equal Work

 

 

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East Room

11:58 A.M. EDT

 

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THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you, everybody.  (Applause.)  All right.  Well, thanks to my friend, Lilly Ledbetter, not only for that introduction but for fighting for a simple principle:  Equal pay for equal work.  It’s not that complicated.  And, Lilly, I assure you, you remain the face of fair pay.  (Laughter.)  People don’t want my mug on there.  (Laughter.)  They want your face.

 

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As Lilly mentioned, she did not set out to be a trailblazer. She was just somebody who was waking up every day, going to work, doing her job the best that she could.  And then one day, she finds out, after years, that she earned less than her male colleagues for doing the same job.  I want to make that point again.  (Laughter.)  Doing the same job.  Sometimes when you — when we discuss this issue of fair pay, equal pay for equal work, and the pay gap between men and women, you’ll hear all sorts of excuses about, well, they’re child-bearing, and they’re choosing to do this, and they’re this and they’re that and the other.  She was doing the same job — probably doing better.  (Laughter and applause.)  Same job.  Working just as hard, probably putting in more hours.  But she was getting systematically paid less.

 

And so she set out to make sure this country lived up to its founding, the idea that all of us are created equal.  And when the courts didn’t answer her call, Congress did.

 

The first time Lilly and I stood together in this room was my tenth day in office, and that’s when we signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.  (Applause.)  First bill I signed into law.  And some of the leaders who helped make that happen are here today, including Leader Pelosi and Senator Mikulski and Congresswoman DeLauro.  (Applause.)  I want to thank all the members of Congress and all the state legislators who are here  and all the advocates who are here, because you all contributed to that effort.  And I want to give a special thanks to the members of the National Equal Pay Task Force, who’ve done outstanding work to make workplaces across America more fair.

 

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We’re here because today is Equal Pay Day.  (Applause.)  Equal Pay Day.  And it’s nice to have a day, but it’s even better to have equal pay.  (Applause.)  And our job is not finished yet. Equal Pay Day means that a woman has to work about this far into 2014 to earn what a man earned in 2013.  Think about that.  A woman has got to work about three more months in order to get what a man got because she’s paid less.  That’s not fair.  That’s like adding an extra six miles to a marathon.  (Laughter.)  It’s not right.

 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Ain’t right.

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Ain’t right.  (Laughter.)  It’s not right and it ain’t right.  (Laughter.)

 

America should be a level playing field, a fair race for everybody — a place where anybody who’s willing to work hard has a chance to get ahead.  And restoring that opportunity for every American — men and women — has to be a driving focus for our country.

 

Now, the good news is today our economy is growing; businesses have created almost 9 million new jobs over the past four years.   More than 7 million Americans have signed up for health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act. (Applause.)

 

That’s a good thing, too.  I know it’s Equal Pay Day and not Obamacare Day — (laughter) — but I do want to point out that the Affordable Care Act guarantees free preventive care, like mammograms and contraceptive care, for tens of millions of women, and ends the days when you could be charged more just for being a woman when it comes to your health insurance.  (Applause.)  And that’s true for everybody.  (Applause.)  That’s just one more place where things were not fair.

 

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We’ll talk about drycleaners next, right — (laughter) — because I know that — I don’t know why it costs more for Michelle’s blouse than my shirt.  (Laughter.)

 

But we’ve got to make sure that America works for everybody. Anybody who is willing to work hard, they should be able to get ahead.  And we’ve got to build an economy that works for everybody, not just those at the top.  Restoring opportunity for all has to be our priority.  That’s what America is about.  It doesn’t matter where you started off, what you look like — you work hard, you take responsibility, you make the effort, you should be able to get ahead.

 

And we’ve got to fight for an opportunity agenda, which means more good jobs that pay good wages, and training Americans to make sure that they can fill those jobs, and guaranteeing every child a world-class education, and making sure the economy rewards hard work for every single American.

 

And part of that is fighting for fair pay for women — because when women succeed, America succeeds.  (Applause.)  When women succeed, America succeeds.  It’s true.  I believe that.  (Applause.)  It’s true.  It’s true.  It’s true.

 

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Now, here’s the challenge:  Today, the average full-time working woman earns just 77 cents for every dollar a man earns; for African American women, Latinas, it’s even less.  And in 2014, that’s an embarrassment.  It is wrong.  And this is not just an issue of fairness.  It’s also a family issue and an economic issue, because women make up about half of our workforce and they’re increasingly the breadwinners for a whole lot of families out there.  So when they make less money, it means less money for gas, less money for groceries, less money for child care, less money for college tuition, less money is going into retirement savings.

 

And it’s all bad for business, because our economy depends on customers out there, and when customers have less money, when hardworking women don’t have the resources, that’s a problem.  When businesses lose terrific women talent because they’re fed up with unfair policies, that’s bad for business.  They lose out on the contributions that those women could be making.  When any of our citizens can’t fulfill their potential for reasons that have nothing to do with their talent or their character or their work ethic, we’re not living up to our founding values.  We don’t have second-class citizens in this country — and certainly not in the workplace.

 

So, tomorrow, the Senate has the chance to start making this right by passing a bill that Lilly already alluded to — the Paycheck Fairness Act.  (Applause.)  They’ve got a chance to do the right thing.  And it would put sensible rules into place, like making sure employees who discuss their salaries don’t face retaliation by their employers.

 

And here’s why this is important.  There are women here today who worked in offices where it was against the rules for employees to discuss salaries with one another.  And because of that, they didn’t know they were being paid less than men — just like Lilly didn’t know — for doing the exact same work.  For some, it was years before they found out.  And even then, it only happened because a manager accidentally let it slip or, as in Lilly’s case, a sympathetic co-worker quietly passed a note.  She only found out she earned less than her male colleagues for doing the same work because somebody left an anonymous note.

 

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We can’t leave that to chance.  And over the course of Lilly’s career, she lost more than $200,000 in salary, even more in pension and Social Security benefits — both of which are pegged to salary — simply because she was a woman.

 

And Lilly, and some of the other women here, decided it was wrong, set out to fix it.  They went to their bosses; they asked for a raise.  That didn’t work.  They turned to the law; they filed suit.  And for some, for years after waiting and persisting they finally got some justice.

 
Well, tomorrow, the Senate could pay tribute to their courage by voting yes for paycheck fairness.  (Applause.)  This should not be a hard proposition.  This should not be that complicated.  (Applause.)

 
And so far, Republicans in Congress have been gumming up the works.  They’ve been blocking progress on this issue, and of course other issues that would help with the economic recovery and help us grow faster.  But we don’t have to accept that.  America, you don’t have to sit still.  You can make sure that you’re putting some pressure on members of Congress about this issue.  And I don’t care whether you’re a Democrat or a Republican.  If you’re a voter — if you’ve got a daughter, you got a sister, you got a mom — I know you got a mom — (laughter) — this is something you should care about.

 

 

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And I’m not going to stand still either.  So in this year of action I’ve used my executive authority whenever I could to create opportunity for more Americans.  And today, I’m going to take action — executive action — to make it easier for working women to earn fair pay.  So first, I’m going to sign an executive order to create more pay transparency by prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who discuss their pay with each other.  (Applause.)  Pay secrecy fosters discrimination and we should not tolerate it — not in federal contracting or anywhere else.

 

Second, I’m signing a presidential memorandum directing the Department of Labor and our outstanding Secretary of Labor, Tom Perez, to require federal contractors to provide data about their employee compensation so pay discrimination can be spotted more easily.

 

Now, I want to be clear:  There are great employers out there who do the right thing.  There are plenty of employers out there who are absolutely certain that there’s no pay discrimination happening in their offices.  But then sometimes when the data is laid out, it paints a different picture.  Many times they then do everything they can to fix the problem, and so we want to encourage them to fix these problems if they exist by making sure that the data is out there.

 

So everybody who cares about this should pay attention to how the Senate votes tomorrow on this paycheck fairness act, because the majority of senators support this bill, but two years ago, a minority of Senate Republicans blocked it from getting a vote.  Even worse, some commentators are out there saying that the pay gap doesn’t even exist.  They say it’s a myth.  But it’s not a myth; it’s math.  (Laughter and applause.)  You can look at the paychecks.  You can look at the stubs.  (Applause.)

 

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I mean, Lilly Ledbetter didn’t just make this up.  (Laughter.)  The court, when it looked at the documents, said, yep, you’ve been getting paid less for doing the same job.  It’s just the court then said, you know, it’s been — as Lilly said — it’s been happening so long, you can’t do anything about it anymore — which made no sense and that’s why we had to sign another bill.  It’s basic math that adds up to real money.  It makes a real difference for a lot of Americans who are working hard to support their families.

 

And of course, the fact that we’ve got some resistance from some folks on this issue up on Capitol Hill just fits with this larger problem, this vision that the congressional Republicans seem to be continually embracing — this notion that, you know what, you’re just on your own, no matter how unfair things are.  You see it in their budget.  The budget the Republicans in Congress just put forward last week, it’s like a bad rerun.  It would give massive tax cuts to households making more than a million dollars a year, force deep cuts to things that actually help working families like early education and college grants and job training.

 

And, of course, it includes that novel idea of repealing the Affordable Care Act.  (Laughter.)  Fiftieth time they’ve tried that — which would mean the more than 7 million Americans who’ve done the responsible thing and signed up to buy health insurance, they’d lose their health insurance; and the 3 million young adults who’ve stayed on their parents’ plan, they’d no longer have that available; take us back to the days when insurers could charge women more just for being a woman.

 

On minimum wage, three out of four Americans support raising the minimum wage.  Usually when three out of four Americans support something, members of Congress are right there.  (Laughter.)  And yet here, Republicans in Congress are dead set against it, blocking a pay raise for tens of millions of Americans — a majority of them women.  This isn’t just about treating women fairly.  This is about Republicans seemingly opposing any efforts to even the playing field for working families.

 

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And I was up in Michigan last week and I just asked — I don’t understand fully the theory behind this.  I don’t know why you would resist the idea that women should be paid the same as men, and then deny that that’s not always happening out there.  If Republicans in Congress want to prove me wrong, if they want to show that they, in fact, do care about women being paid the same as men, then show me.  They can start tomorrow.  They can join us in this, the 21st century, and vote yes on the Paycheck Fairness Act.  (Applause.)  Vote yes.

 

And if anybody is watching or listening, if you care about this issue, then let your senators know where you stand — because America deserves equal pay for equal work.

 

This is not something we’re going to achieve in a day.  There’s going to be a lot of stuff that we’ve got to do to close the pay gap.  We got to make it possible for more women to enter high-paying fields that up until now have been dominated by men, like engineering and computer science.  Women hold less than 6 percent of our country’s commercial patents — that’s not good enough.  We need more parents and high school teachers and college professors encouraging girls and women to study math and science.  We need more businesses to make gender diversity a priority when they hire and when they promote.  Fewer than five percent of Fortune 500 companies have women at the helm.

 

I think we’d all agree that we need more women in Congress. (Applause.)  Fewer than 20 percent of congressional seats are held by women.  Clearly, Congress would get more done if the ratio was — (laughter) — evened out a little bit.  So we’ve got to work on that.

 

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And we’ve all got to do more to make our workplaces more welcoming to women.  Because the numbers show that even when men and women are in the same profession and have the same education, there’s still a wage gap, and it widens over time.  So we’re going to keep making the case for why these policies are the right ones for working families and businesses.  And this is all going to lead up to this first-ever White House Summit on Working Families on June 23rd.

 

So, ultimately, equal pay is not just an economic issue for millions of Americans and their families.  It’s also about whether we’re willing to build an economy that works for everybody, and whether we’re going to do our part to make sure that our daughters have the same chances to pursue their dreams as our sons, and whether or not we’re willing to restore to the heart of this country that basic idea — you can make it, no matter who you are, if you try.

 

And that’s personal for me.  I’ve said this before — I’ve got two daughters and I expect them to be treated just like anybody’s sons.  And I think about my single mom working hard, going to school, trying to raise two kids all at the same time.  And I think about my grandmother trying to work her way up through her career and then hitting the glass ceiling.  And I’ve seen how hard they’ve worked, and I’ve seen how they’ve sucked it up.  And they put up with stuff and they don’t say anything, and they just take care of their family and they take care of themselves, and they don’t complain a lot.  But at a certain point, we have the power to do something about it for the next generation.  And this is a good place to start.

 

So, for everybody out there who’s listening, ask your senator where you stand on paycheck fairness.  (Applause.)  If they tell you that there’s not a pay gap out there, you tell them to look at the data, because there is.  It’s time to get this done.  And I’m going to do my small part right now by signing this executive order and presidential memoranda.  (Applause.)

 

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FACT SHEET: Expanding Opportunity for All: Ensuring Equal Pay for Women and Promoting the Women’s Economic Agenda

When women succeed, our families succeed and America succeeds. President Obama believes that ensuring that women earn equal pay for equal work is essential to improving the economic security of our families and the growth of our middle class and our economy.  Women compose nearly half of the American workforce – yet, according to the latest U.S. Census statistics, on average, full-time working women still earn 77 cents to every dollar earned by men.

The first piece of legislation that the President signed into law after taking office was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which empowers women to recover wages lost to discrimination by extending the time period in which an employee can file a claim.  Yet a central challenge that remains to enforcing equal pay laws is that many women do not even know that they are underpaid, and therefore cannot take steps to ensure equal pay for equal work.

That’s why the President is taking two new executive actions to help combat pay discrimination and strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws:

  • The President is signing an Executive Order prohibiting federal contractors from retaliating against employees who choose to discuss their compensation.  The Executive Order does not compel workers to discuss pay, nor does it require employers to publish or otherwise disseminate pay data – but it does provide a critical tool to encourage pay transparency, so workers have a potential way of discovering violations of equal pay laws and are able to seek appropriate remedies.

 

  • In addition, the President is signing a Presidential Memoranduminstructing the Secretary of Labor to establish new regulations requiring federal contractors to submit to the Department of Labor summary data on compensation paid to their employees, including data by sex and race.  The Department of Labor will use the data to encourage compliance with equal pay laws and to target enforcement more effectively by focusing efforts where there are discrepancies and reducing burdens on other employers.

 

This week, the Senate is considering the Paycheck Fairness Act, which the President believes Congress must pass to ensure the standards put forward by the executive order he will sign are applied to all employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The President is using the power of his pen to act where he can on this issue, and will continue to urge Congress to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act to ensure all employers are held to the same high standard working women deserve.

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Building on Progress

Since day one, President Obama has been laser-focused on ensuring women have the fundamental rights they deserve when it comes to earning a fair and equal wage.

For example, President Obama has fought for an increase in the national minimum wage, including signing an executive order that will raise the minimum wage to $10.10 for federal contract workers.  Raising the national minimum wage would give millions of hard working Americans a raise and would especially benefit women:

  • While women account for about half of the workforce, 55 percent of non-tipped workers benefiting from increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour are women – and women are even more disproportionately represented in predominantly tipped occupations.

 

  • Women account for a higher concentration of workers in low-wage sectors of the labor force such as food preparation, sales and personal care workers.

 

  • Raising the minimum wage would increase the average wage among the bottom quartile of female workers by 93 cents (from $8.78), compared to 60 cents (from $9.65) for the bottom quartile of male workers.

 

Women are the primary breadwinners in 40 percent of U.S. households but are bringing home 23 percent less than their male counterparts – which means less for families’ everyday needs, less for investments in our children’s futures, and, when added over a lifetime of work, substantially less for retirement.   And the pay gap is significantly greater for women of color, with African-American women earning 64 cents and Latinas earning 56 cents for every dollar earned by a Caucasian man. That is why the Obama Administration is:

  • Combating pay discrimination.  The President made the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act the first bill he signed into law, which extended the time period in which claimants can bring pay discrimination claims and enabled countless victims of pay discrimination to seek redress where they otherwise could not.

 

  • Created a National Equal Pay Task Force.  In 2010, the President created the National Equal Pay Task Force to crack down on violations of equal pay laws.  Under this Administration, the government has strengthened enforcement, recovered substantial monetary recoveries, and made critical investments in education and outreach for both employers and employees.

 

  • Promoting the Paycheck Fairness Act.  The President continues to call on Congress to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act, commonsense legislation that would give women additional tools to fight pay discrimination.

 

  • Encouraging State Paid Leave Initiatives. In addition, the President’s Budget provides support for States that are considering establishing paid leave programs, as California, New Jersey and Rhode Island have done.

 

  • Leveraging Technology to Close the Pay Gap.  DOL, in conjunction with the Equal Pay Task Force, launched the “Equal Pay App Challenge” and invited software developers to create applications that provide greater access to pay data, deploy interactive tools for early career coaching or online mentoring, or disseminate data to help inform pay negotiations.  The winning teams created tools that (1) provide easy access to U.S. wage estimates by city, state and job title, empowering employees or applicants for employment with reliable and specific compensation information to support informed salary negotiations; and (2) supply users with current wage data and interview, resume and negotiation tools, as well as connect users to relevant social networks.

 

  • Expanding the EITC for Childless Workers. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a proven tool to increase and reward work among low-income families with children.  However, childless workers – including noncustodial parents – can receive only up to $500 and must be at least 25 years old, so the credit does little to encourage work, particularly during the crucial years at the beginning of a young person’s career. The President has proposed doubling the maximum credit to $1,000, raising the income eligibility standard so the credit is available to a full-time minimum wage worker, and lowering the age limit from 25 to 21. The proposed expansion would be fully paid for within his budget and would benefit 13.5 million workers, including 6.1 million women.

 

 

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TheObamaCrat™ Wake-Up Call For Monday The 7th Of April. Barack Goes To School. Maria Contreras-Sweet Gets Sworn In.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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White House Schedule – April 7th, 2014

 

On  a rainy Monday, President Barack Obama travels to a Washington suburb in Maryland to talk about high school students getting “real-world career skills and college-level courses,”  meets with the Executive Director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and delivers remarks at the  ceremonial swearing-in of Maria Contreras-Sweet as the new Small Business Administration chief.

 

 

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 7th, 2014

 

DAILY GUIDANCE AND SCHEDULE FOR
MONDAY, April 7th, 2014

 

In the morning, the President will receive the Presidential Daily Briefing in the Oval Office.  This meeting is closed press.

 

Later in the morning, the President will travel to Bladensburg High School in Bladensburg, Maryland to announce the winners of a competition he launched last fall to bring together educators and employers to redesign the high school experience to give students access to real-world career skills and college-level courses. The President’s remarks are open to pre-credentialed media and there will be in-town travel pool coverage of the President’s classroom visit at Bladensburg High School.

 

In the afternoon, the President will meet with the Commander-in-Chief and Executive Director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in the Oval Office. This meeting is closed press.

 

Later in the afternoon, the President and the Vice President will attend and deliver remarks at the ceremonial swearing-in of Maria Contreras-Sweet as Administrator of the Small Business Administration. This event in the South Court Auditorium is open press.

 

 

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Monday, April 7 2014 All Times ET

 

 

10:00 AM: THE PRESIDENT receives the Presidential Daily Briefing, Oval Office.

 

 

11:15 AM: THE PRESIDENT visits a classroom at Bladensburg High School, Bladensburg High School, Bladensburg, Maryland.

 

 

11:35 AM: THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks at Bladensburg High School, Bladensburg High School, Bladensburg, Maryland.

 

 

1:15 PM: Press Briefing by Press Secretary Jay Carney, The Brady Press Briefing Room.

 

 

2:00 PM: THE PRESIDENT meets with the Commander-in-Chief and Executive Director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Oval Office.

 

 

3:25 PM: THE PRESIDENT and THE VICE PRESIDENT attend the ceremonial swearing in of Maria Contreras-Sweet as Administrator of the Small Business Administration, South Court Auditorium.

 

 

 

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Barack Hussein Obama Week Ahead Schedule, April 7th, To 11th, 2014

 

 

On Monday, the President will travel to Prince George’s County, MD to host an event on the economy. Following this event, he will meet with the Commander-in-Chief and Executive Director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

 

On Tuesday, the President  will host an event on the economy at the White House.

 

 

On Wednesday, the President and the First Lady will travel to Houston, TX. The President will attend DCCC and DSCC events.  More details regarding the President and First Lady’s travel to Houston will be forthcoming.

 

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will attend Wednesday’s memorial service for the victims of last week’s shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, a top White House official announced.

 

Obama vowed after the shootings that “We’re going to get to the bottom of exactly what happened” at Fort Hood, where three soldiers were killed and 16 wounded Wednesday afternoon by a soldier who then took his own life. Investigators have identified the killer as Spc. Ivan Lopez, a 34-year-old Iraq war veteran with a history of depression and anxiety.

White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer confirmed the trip Sunday morning during an appearance on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” Obama also addressed the memorial service for an earlier massacre at Fort Hood, in 2009.

 

On Thursday, the President and the First Lady will travel to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library in Austin, TX.  The President will deliver remarks at a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. The President and the First Lady will return to Washington, DC, in the afternoon.

 

On Friday, the President will travel to New York, NY to deliver remarks at the National Action Network’s 16th Annual Convention.

 

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From  Associated Press:

 

The Obamas to attend Fort Hood memorial

 

Flowers are laid at the main gate at the U.S. Army post at Fort Hood, Texas, gunman Ivan Lopez opened fire in the Fort Hood Army base area in central Texas on April 2, 2014 injuring  16 and killing 4 including himself.

Flowers are laid at the main gate at the U.S. Army post at Fort Hood, Texas, where gunman Ivan Lopez opened fire in the Fort Hood Army base area in central Texas on April 2, 2014 injuring 16 and killing 4 including himself.

 

WASHINGTON — President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will visit Fort Hood on Wednesday to pay respect to the victims of last week’s shooting tragedy at the Texas military installation, a senior White House official announced Sunday.

 

“It’s a terrible tragedy what happened at Fort Hood,” senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said during an appearance on CBS’ Face the Nation.“The president and first lady send their thoughts and prayers out to the victims and families and everyone on the base, and they’re going to actually travel down on Wednesday to the memorial ceremony.”

 

The Obamas were already scheduled to begin a two-day trip to Texas on Wednesday to take part in Democratic campaign fundraisers in Houston. On Thursday, they are both scheduled to travel to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum in Austin, where the president is to deliver remarks at a civil rights summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

 

Obama visited Fort Hood in November 2009 under similar circumstances following the shooting rampage by a Muslim Army officer that left 13 dead and injured 30 more. Maj. Nidal Hasan was convicted in August of those killings, which occurred after Hasan had communicated via e-mail with a radical Muslim cleric living in Yemen.

 

Meanwhile, Rep. Mike McCaul, R-Texas, repeated on Sunday that the latest incident at Fort Hood — in which three soldiers were killed before the gunman, Spc. Ivan Lopez, killed himself — underscores the need for military personnel to be allowed to carry concealed weapons on base.

 

“We should be looking at the idea of senior leadership at these bases, give them the ability to carry a weapon,” said McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee on Fox News Sunday. “They defend us overseas and defend our freedom abroad, so the idea that they are defenseless when they come on our home bases, I think, Congress should be looking at that and having a discussion with the bases about what would be the best policy.”

 

Pfeiffer, however, suggested the White House wouldn’t support such legislation.

 

“The Pentagon has looked at proposals like the one Congressman McCaul has talked about,” Pfeiffer said. “They don’t think it’s a good idea.”

 

Meanwhile, dozens gathered in the Fort Hood community of Killeen, Texas, on Sunday to honor the victims of last week’s mass shooting.

 

Pastor Robert Sperbeck tried to comfort the congregation at Tabernacle Baptist Church in Killeen, saying most everyone is asking why a shooting like this would happen again.

 

Sperbeck said “the devil is the author of what happened,” but that “the way of God leads to the way of comfort.” The pastor added that God gives individuals choice, and that the shooter chose to follow darkness.

 

 

Thank you Associated Press.

 

 

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President Obama Delivers a Statement on Fort Hood

 

Published on Apr 3, 2014

The President delivers brief remarks about the shooting at
the Fort Hood, Texas military base that took place on Wednesday afternoon. April 2, 2014.

 

 

 

 

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The White House Blog

 

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Weekly Address: The President’s Budget Ensures Opportunity for All Hardworking Americans

 

In this week’s address, the President highlighted the important differences between the budget he’s put forward — built on opportunity for all — and the budget House Republicans are advocating for, which stacks the deck against the middle class.

While the President is focused on building lasting economic security and ensuring that hardworking Americans have the opportunity to get ahead, Republicans are advancing the same old top-down approach of cutting taxes for the wealthiest Americans and slashing important investments in education, infrastructure, and research and development.

 

 

 

 

Weekly Wrap Up: Millions Get Covered, Team USA Visits, and More

 

This week, the President announced that 7.1 million Americans got covered, and the First Lady worked with students to plant the Kitchen Garden. Plus, 2014 U.S. Olympians and Paralympians visited the White House. Check out what else you may have missed in this week’s wrap up.

 

 

America’s PrepareAthon!

 

Here at the White House, we’re getting ready for the first America’s PrepareAthon!, a national day of action that will take place April 30, 2014.

 

Join us this Monday, April 7 at 1:00 p.m. ET to discuss America’s PrepareAthon!, a community-based campaign to build a more secure and resilient nation by getting people to understand what disasters could happen in their communities and to take action to increase their preparedness. Actions include signing up for mobile alerts and warnings, holding a preparedness discussion to emphasize the steps people should take to be ready should a disaster occur, and conducting a drill so people are familiar with what to do beforehand.

 

 

You’re Invited: White House Easter Egg Roll Social

 

On Monday, April 21, 2014, the First Family will host the 136th annual White House Easter Egg Roll. This year’s theme is “Hop into Healthy, Swing into Shape,” and more than 30,000 people will assemble on the South Lawn to join in the fun. For our next White House Social, we are giving our followers of @LetsMove and @FLOTUS on Twitter, or @MichelleObama on Instagram, a chance to attend.

 

Interested in attending the White House Easter Egg Roll? Sign up for your chance to join us and learn more about the history of the White House Easter Egg Roll atWhiteHouse.gov/EasterEggRoll. All applicants must have children ages 5 to 13.

 

 

 

While Marketplace Enrollment Ended, Medicaid Enrollment Continues

 

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has already provided coverage to millions of Americans. More than 7.1 million Americans signed up for coverage through the Marketplaces, 3 million additional young adults were covered under their parents’ insurance and millions more will have access through Medicaid. A new report shows that more people are gaining coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) as a result of the health law. The analysis, produced by the Health and Human Services Department shows enrollment in Medicaid and CHIP in February was at least 3 million people higher than it was, on average, between July and September. That does not include March, which saw an enormous spike in Marketplace enrollment and traffic to HealthCare.gov.

 

 

 

West Wing Week: 4/4/14 or, “The Rosies”

 

This week, the President wrapped up a six day trip to Europe and Saudi Arabia, spoke on the success of the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, traveled to Michigan to highlight the importance of raising the federal minimum wage, and honored both the World Series Champion Boston Red Sox, and the 2014 US Olympic and Paralympic teams. That’s March 28th to April 3rd or, “The Rosies.”

 

 

 

 

The Employment Situation in March

 

Economy added 192,000 jobs in March; unemployment rate steady at 6.7 percent

 

The U.S. economy added 192,000 jobs in March, according to government data released Friday morning, a concrete sign that the recovery remains on track despite a slowdown over the winter.

 

The Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate held steady at 6.7 percent as about half a million people joined the labor force, and the broad-based expansion touched industries ranging from health care to construction.

 

The private sector has added 8.9 million jobs over 49 straight months of job growth. Today we learned that total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 192,000 in March, entirely due to an increase in private employment, while government employment was unchanged on net. Job growth in January and February was revised up, so that that over the past twelve months, private employment has risen by 2.3 million, or an average of 189,000 a month. This is slightly faster than the pace of job gains over the preceding twelve-month period (175,000 a month).

 

 

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Statements and Releases

 

Statement by the President on the 20th Commemoration of the Genocide in Rwanda

 

Statement by the President on Elections in Afghanistan

 

 

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Press Briefing

April 04, 2014 | 53:48 | Public Domain

 

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

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White House Streaming LIVE!!

 

Next Up…
April 07, 2014 10:30 AM EDT

Vice President Biden Speaks at the 94th Annual Convention of the American Association of Community Colleges

Audio Only

Washington, DC, Listen White House Streaming LIVE!!

 

 

 

April 07, 2014 11:35 AM EDT

President Obama Speaks at Bladensburg High School

Bladensburg, Maryland, Watch White House Streaming LIVE!!

 

 

 

April 07, 2014 1:15 PM PM EDT

 

Press Briefing by Press Briefing by Press Secretary Jay Carney

The White House, Watch White House Streaming LIVE!!

 

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Will Ortiz’s Selfie be Obama’s Last? I fail to see what all the fuss is about.

 

After presenting the president with an "Obama 44" Red Sox jersey, Boston DH David Ortiz and Obama posed for a "selfie" on the South White House Lawn. (Jim Davis/Globe Staff).

After presenting the president with an “Obama 44″ Red Sox jersey, Boston DH David Ortiz and Obama posed for a “selfie” on the South White House Lawn. (Jim Davis/Globe Staff).

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Are selfies causing President Obama more trouble than they’re worth?

 

White House Senior Advisor Dan Pfeiffer told “Face the Nation” host Bob Schieffer Sunday that the recent kerfuffle over David Ortiz’s impromptu cell phone shot could mean the end of presidential selfies as we know them.

 

“Well, [Obama] obviously didn’t know anything about Samsung’s connection to this,” he said. “And, perhaps, maybe this will be the end of all selfies. But in general, whenever someone tries to use the president’s likeness to promote a product, that’s a problem with the White House Counsel”

 

Pfeiffer declined to comment on whether the administration would seek legal action over the photograph.

 

Ortiz: “That was one of those things that just happened,” Ortiz told the Globe last week. “I gave [Obama] the jersey, and the photographers were going to take their pictures and I thought, really at the last second, maybe I should snap a shot with my phone while I have the chance.

 

“It had nothing to do with no deals.”

 

He took a selfie and then used it for personal gain….so what. Ain’t that the American way? Well ain’t it Niccah?

 

 

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How Many Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES) Enrollees Were Uninsured? 5.4 Million.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From The L.A. Times:

 

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A look at how many Obamacare enrollees were uninsured: 5.4 million

 

By Michael Hiltzik

 

Reason to smile again? HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius at the White House ceremony this week announcing the Obamacare enrollment numbers. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

Reason to smile again? HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius at the White House ceremony this week announcing the Obamacare enrollment numbers. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

 

 

As we observed earlier this week, one of the obsessions of opponents of the Affordable Care Act is the question of how many enrollees in Obamacare health plans already had insurance. The goal is to knock down the latest enrollment numbers by suggesting that most of the 7.1 million people enrolled through the individual insurance exchanges just moved from one insurance plan to another in a waste of time and effort.

 

The real figure probably won’t be known for weeks, even months. But researchers at the Urban Institute‘s Health Policy Center have weighed in with their own estimate. They’re figuring that the ACA has reduced the number of uninsured Americans by 5.4 million from the first quarter of 2013 through early March this year.

 

Their estimate is based on data from their March 2014 Health Reform Marketing Survey, which consists of public polling. Their finding is that the uninsurance rate for adults ages 18–64 was 15.2% for the nation in early March, a decline of 2.7 percentage points since September 2013, just before open enrollment on the exchanges began Oct. 1.

 

“This represents a gain in coverage for about 5.4 million adults,” they write.

 

Although the Urban Institute figures aren’t keyed to the enrollment figures, it’s worth observing that if all those newly insureds were among those who signed up on the individual exchanges, that would mean that of the 7.1 million enrollees, 77% were previously uninsured.

 

The researchers say, however, that their figures include people who will receive their insurance from Medicaid, which was expanded in about half the states. (The others refused to take up the federal government’s offer to pick up 90% to 100% of the tab.)

 

In Medicaid-expanding states, the uninsured rate fell by an average of 4% and is now an average 12.4%, according to the survey; in the others, it fell by an average of only 1.5% and is stuck at an average 18%. Thus does ideological opposition to the ACA by Republican office-holders in non-expanding states make suckers of their citizens.

 

The Urban Institute says its figures probably understate the decline in the uninsured ratio for two reasons. First, it doesn’t count the late-March surge of enrollments that brought the exchange total to 7.1 million; second, it doesn’t measure the effect of other ACA provisions, including one allowing adults up to the age of 26 to stay on their parent’s health plans.

 

That said, it’s proper to observe that the debate over how many people were previously insured is something of a red herring. The ACA had several goals — to impose national consumer protection standards on the health insurance industry by eliminating exclusions for preexisting conditions, among other things; slow the growth of healthcare costs; reduce the number of underinsureds (those who were forced because of costs to buy plans with limited coverage); and finally to reduce the number of uninsured people.

 

All those goals, not just the last, have been advanced by the ACA. In addition, it has always been clear that the act is a multi-year project. Judging its success or failure by this one metric of how many uninsured people were signed up in year one doesn’t tell us anything about how it will change healthcare coverage in the U.S. over time.

 

Thank you MICHAEL HILTZIK & The L.A. Times.

 

 

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President Obama: “7.1 Million Americans”

 

 

President Barack Obama, joined by Vice President Joe Biden, delivers a statement on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the Rose Garden of the White House, April 1, 2014.President Barack Obama, joined by Vice President Joe Biden, delivers a statement on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the Rose Garden of the White House, April 1, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

 

The President sent the message below to the White House email list this afternoon following his remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

Didn’t get the email? Make sure you’re signed up for White House updates.

 

 

President Obama Delivers a Statement on the Affordable Care Act

April 01, 2014 | 18:13 |Public Domain

 

Following the closing of the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, the President delivers remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private health coverage.

 

 

 

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Hello everybody,

 

Last night, the first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act came to an end.

 

And this afternoon, we announced that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance plans through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

7.1 million.

 

That doesn’t count the more than 3 million young adults who have gained insurance under this law by staying on their families’ plans. It doesn’t count the millions more who have gotten covered through the expansion of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It doesn’t include the more than 100 million folks who now have better care — who are receiving additional benefits, like mammograms and contraceptive care, at no extra cost.

 

Now, millions of our fellow Americans have the comfort and peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re no longer leaving their health and well-being to chance. For many of them, quality health insurance wasn’t an option until this year — maybe because they couldn’t afford it, or because a pre-existing condition kept them locked out of a discriminatory system.

 

Today, that’s changed. And while our long-broken health care system may not be completely fixed, it’s without question a lot better. That’s something to be proud of — and there’s no good reason to go back.

 

Regardless of your politics, or your feelings about the Affordable Care Act, millions more Americans with health coverage is something that’s good for our economy and our country.

 

At the end of the day, that is what this law — and the other reforms we’re fighting for, from a 21st-century immigration system to a fairer wage for every American who’s willing to work for it — are all about:

 

Making sure our country lives up to our highest ideals.

 

I am thankful to be your President today, and every day. And I am proud that this law will continue to make life better for millions of Americans in the years to come.

 

Thank you.

President Barack Obama

 

 

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President Obama Speaks About The Success Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES).


 

By Jueseppi B.

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More Than 7 Million Americans Have Enrolled in Private Health Coverage Under the Affordable Care Act

 

 

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Today, the White House announced that more than 7 million Americans signed up for affordable care through the Health Insurance Marketplace during the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment, which ended on March 31.

The number, announced during Press Secretary Jay Carney‘s briefing, means that millions of Americans across the country now have access to quality, affordable care. And as numbers continue to come in from states that run their own Marketplaces, that number will continue to rise.

Later today, President Obama will deliver a statement on the Affordable Care Act in the Rose Garden — you can watch on WhiteHouse.gov/Live at 4:15 p.m. ET.

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President Obama Delivers a Statement on the Affordable Care Act

 

Published on Apr 1, 2014

Following the closing of the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, the President delivers remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private health coverage. April 1, 2014.

 

 

 

President Barack Obama: 7.1 million Americans.

 

Last night, the first open enrollment period under theAffordable Care Act came to an end.

 

And this afternoon, we announced that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance plans through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

7.1 million.

 

That doesn’t count the more than 3 million young adults who have gained insurance under this law by staying on their families’ plans. It doesn’t count the millions more who have gotten covered through the expansion of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It doesn’t include the more than 100 million folks who now have better care — who are receiving additional benefits, like mammograms and contraceptive care, at no extra cost.

 

Now, millions of our fellow Americans have the comfort and peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re no longer leaving their health and well-being to chance. For many of them, quality health insurance wasn’t an option until this year — maybe because they couldn’t afford it, or because a pre-existing condition kept them locked out of a discriminatory system.

 

Today, that’s changed. And while our long-broken health care system may not be completely fixed, it’s without question a lot better. That’s something to be proud of — and there’s no good reason to go back.

 

Regardless of your politics, or your feelings about the Affordable Care Act, millions more Americans with health coverage is something that’s good for our economy and our country.

 

At the end of the day, that is what this law — and the other reforms we’re fighting for, from a 21st-century immigration system to a fairer wage for every American who’s willing to work for it — are all about:

 

Making sure our country lives up to our highest ideals.

 

I am thankful to be your President today, and every day. And I am proud that this law will continue to make life better for millions of Americans in the years to come.

 

Thank you.

President Barack Obama

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Though HealthCare.gov got off to a rocky start in October, the open enrollment period ended with soaring interest — including a record-breaking 4.8 million visits to HealthCare.gov, and around 2 million calls to CMS call centers. Throughout this weekend, Americans across the country were literally lined up around the block at local enrollment centers.

It’s important to remember that 7 million represents only part of the total number of people who have received coverage under the Affordable Care Act: millions more have been covered by state Medicaid expansions, and around 3 million Americans under 26 are now covered under their parents’ plans.

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