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A Moment Of Silence: 2:49 PM. #BostonStrong.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Statement by the President

A year ago, tragedy struck at the 117th Boston Marathon.  Four innocent people were killed that week, and hundreds more were wounded.  Today, we remember Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu, Martin Richard, and Sean Collier.  And we send our thoughts and prayers to those still struggling to recover.

 

We also know that the most vivid images from that day were not of smoke and chaos, but of compassion, kindness and strength: A man in a cowboy hat helping a wounded stranger out of harm’s way; runners embracing loved ones, and each other; an EMT carrying a spectator to safety.  Today, we recognize the incredible courage and leadership of so many Bostonians in the wake of unspeakable tragedy.  And we offer our deepest gratitude to the courageous firefighters, police officers, medical professionals, runners and spectators who, in an instant, displayed the spirit Boston was built on – perseverance, freedom and love.

 

One year later, we also stand in awe of the men and women who continue to inspire us – learning to stand, walk, dance and run again.  With each new step our country is moved by the resilience of a community and a city.  And when the sun rises over Boylston Street next Monday – Patriot’s Day – hundreds of thousands will come together to show the world the meaning of Boston Strong as a city chooses to run again.

 

 

108 Hours: Inside the Hunt for the Boston Marathon Bombers

 

Published on Apr 12, 2014

Airdate: April 11, 2014

 

 

 

A Moment of Silence to Mark the One-Year Anniversary of the Boston Marathon Bombing

 

 

Today at 2:49 pm ET, President Obama will observe a moment of silence to mark the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing.

2014 Boston Marathon Tribute: Joe Biden

 

Published on Apr 15, 2014

http://www.UniversalSports.com 2014, Boston, Masschutes, USA, A week before the 118th Boston Marathon, the city of Boston came together to remember the tragic terrorist attack last year. And giving tribute to the heroes and the survivors of that day, Vice-President Joe Biden had these words.

 

President Obama also released a statement this morning on the tragedy.

Today, we remember Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu, Martin Richard, and Sean Collier. And we send our thoughts and prayers to those still struggling to recover.

We also know that the most vivid images from that day were not of smoke and chaos, but of compassion, kindness and strength: A man in a cowboy hat helping a wounded stranger out of harm’s way; runners embracing loved ones, and each other; an EMT carrying a spectator to safety. Today, we recognize the incredible courage and leadership of so many Bostonians in the wake of unspeakable tragedy. And we offer our deepest gratitude to the courageous firefighters, police officers, medical professionals, runners and spectators who, in an instant, displayed the spirit Boston was built on – perseverance, freedom and love.

 

 

Boston Marathon Bombing — The Hunt For Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

 

 

 

Boston and its surroundings braced for an emotional week that begins Tuesday with a large ceremony honoring the victims, first responders, medical personnel and others affected by the attack. It will be a chance to mourn the dead and remember the bloodshed, but also to proclaim that what is perhaps the world’s most famous footrace will continue for a 118th year, and to marvel at the way events have brought this community together.

 

“We’re going to turn it into a moment of unity and perseverance and [strength] as a city,” said Alison Beliveau, 25, of South Boston, who finished a run Monday morning outside Marathon Sports, where the first bomb went off one year ago. “We made it through. We’re going to make it.”

 

People stand at the site of the first Boston Marathon bombing nearly one year later at. Boston Commemorates Marathon Bombing Anniversary

People stand at the site of the first Boston Marathon bombing nearly one year later at. Boston Commemorates Marathon Bombing Anniversary

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@VP “We will never yield. We will never cower America will never never stand down. We are Boston.” – VP #BostonStrong

@VP “We will never yield. We will never cower America will never never stand down. We are Boston.” – VP #BostonStrong

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President Obama speaks during a statement to the press following explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in the briefing room of the White House April 15, 2013

President Obama speaks during a statement to the press following explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in the briefing room of the White House April 15, 2013

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8-Year-Old Tyler J. Doohan Dies Rescuing 6 Relatives From Trailer Fire, Dies Trying To Save The 7th Relative.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From The Democrat & Chronicle

 

Chief: Boy ‘saved those other 6 people’

 

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Tyler J. Doohan knew he didn’t have school Monday morning because of the holiday, and asked his mother if it would be OK if he stayed at his grandfather’s trailer at the East Avenue Manufactured Home Community off Route 441 in Penfield.

 

It was a place Tyler knew well. He stayed there frequently, playing with other kids in the neighborhood and having barbecues and bonfires with his family in the summer.

 

It was in the back bedroom of that small, single-wide trailer at 39 Fondiller Ave. that firefighters found Tyler’s body Monday morning, just a few feet away from the bed of his disabled Uncle Steve, who investigators believe Tyler was trying to save.

 

Firefighters say Tyler, an 8-year-old who seemingly spent much of his young life in different homes and school districts, was killed along with his grandfather, Louis J. Beach, 57, and Steven D. Smith, 54, in a fire that appears to have been caused by an electrical problem at the front of the trailer.

 

And as Penfield firefighters — working their third trailer fire in a little more than a year — sorted through the rubble of melted toys and furniture charred beyond recognition, neighbors discussed the number of people who’d taken up residence in a metal home which they say had been deemed unlivable more than once.

 

“The roof had collapsed on the front half of the trailer and one of the individuals was found there, probably on a couch but there was nothing left to even see if it was furniture,” said Penfield Fire Chief Chris Ebmeyer.

 

“In the rear, there was a bedroom and the other deceased male was found in a bed. The child was a few feet way.”

 

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8 year old boy saves 6 in blaze before dying while trying to save another

 

Published on Jan 22, 2014

An 8-year-old boy was killed in a mobile-home fire in upstate New York early Monday while attempting to rescue a disabled relative inside.

 

‘Too many people’

Ebmeyer said the fire started about 4:45 a.m. and spread quickly as the trailer’s nine occupants slept. It’s unknown whether there was a working fire alarm in the home.

 

Tyler was able to wake six people — including two other children, ages 4 and 6 — who all escaped. It was when Tyler tried to help Smith, who uses a wheelchair and crutches because he was without part of a leg, that he was killed.

 

The relatives who escaped the fire, who neighbors said included Tyler’s grandmother, aunt and cousins, were taken to Strong Memorial Hospital with injuries that were not considered life threatening. One woman suffered second-degree burns as she helped others from the burning trailer, Ebmeyer said.

 

Ebmeyer said the casualties of the fire could have been much worse if not for Tyler’s actions, given the fact that so many people were staying in the home.

 

“He saved those other six people,” he said, adding that he was unaware of the sleeping arrangements of the nine people in the trailer.

 

A dozen neighbors expressed a similar concern as they moved about the trailer community Monday morning, many still dressed in pajamas, drinking coffee and trying to find out what happened.

 

Some said they had been told by Beach family members and officials of Morgan Management, which owns the park, that the trailer had been deemed unlivable on at least one occasion (Beach had to replace the roof and the windows of the trailer within the past year) and that Louis Beach had been told there were too many people living on the property.au, whose son, Dillinger, would occasionally play with Tyler in the summer, and who at times grew concerned enough about the number of people living in the trailer to consider calling county officials.

 

“There was too many people, where would you put all those people?” said neighbor Michelle Brosseau, whose son, Dillinger, would occasionally play with Tyler in the summer, and who at times grew concerned enough about the number of people living in the trailer to consider calling county officials.

 

“Now, maybe, I wish I had called,” she said.

 

Darren Button, community manager of East Avenue, did not return a call for comment.

 

Ebmeyer said there are no occupancy restrictions governing trailers, and few fire regulations on trailers if they are privately owned.

 

“If it were a rental or an apartment building or a rented house it would be under the guise of the Fire Marshal’s Office regarding occupancy and inspections, but you can have 50 people living in your house, there’s no limit,” Ebmeyer said.

 

Regarding fire inspections: “People own these, some of them are rented by the park, this one was owned,” Ebmeyer said. “It’s the same as if you own your home. I’m sure at the factory they were inspected, but after that, it’s on the individual to maintain the trailer just as it is on the homeowner to maintain their home.”

 

 

‘Busy for trailer fires’

There are roughly 2,150 manufactured homes in Monroe County, according to the most recent available data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

One of the county’s largest manufactured home communities is East Avenue, where the fatal fire occurred. That community, located north of Linden Avenue, is owned by Morgan Management of Perinton. It has about 220 lots, according to a map on the company’s website.

 

Morgan Management also owns 125-lot Forest Lawn, located off Linden Avenue a half-mile west of the East Avenue community.

 

Separating the two is an even larger mobile-home community owned by Harper Homes.

 

Ebmeyer said the Penfield fire district has had an unusually high number of problems with trailer fires lately..

 

“We’ve had three working fully involved trailer fires in the last 13 months. It’s been kind of busy for trailer fires for us in Penfield,” he said. “I don’t know why because we’ve gone many years without one. We used to have fires back, early on, maybe 15 to 20 years ago.”

The causes of those fires have all been accidental, he said.

 

Once a trailer catches fire, the damage is often “immense,” he said.

 

“Trailers are constructed in a manner that keeps them light, very poorly insulated,” he said. “Very few windows, small windows if there are windows. All the utilities are contained inside the trailer, there are no basements.

 

“It’s essentially a metal box with flammable material inside and once it gets hot enough it will all ignite; and once it gets started it burns quickly.”

‘Bravely and selflessly’

 

Part of the reason there were so many people living in the home was because longtime resident Beach opened up his trailer to family members who needed a place to stay.

 

Tara DiMartino, a neighbor and family friend, said Beach’s granddaughter, Connie, was one of the people in the home who was able to escape the fire. She and her boyfriend and their three children had been staying in the trailer temporarily while they “got back on their feet.”

 

“They were trying to look for another place,” said DiMartino, who knew Beach as “Grandpa” and Smith as “Uncle Steve.”

 

Barbara Coffin, who has lived in the mobile home park for six years, described Beach as a nice man who helped people out all the time by clearing their driveways of snow or other home projects, despite health problems with his heart, back and hips.

 

“He’d go by and always talk to you and always help out people around here,” she said. “He was a really nice guy, he just had too many people in there.”

 

Neighbors described Tyler as an energetic and sometimes mischievous boy who liked to play kickball and tag.

 

“Tyler was always outside playing around, getting into things,” said DiMartino. “He was only there on occasion. During the summer there was always a lot of cookouts and bonfires and he was over there.”

 

According to information from school officials from three different districts, Tyler’s young education was replete with stops and starts.

 

For much of his time between kindergarten and second grade, Tyler was a student at Indian Landing School in the Penfield Central School District, according to a news release.

 

“A current Indian Landing student was also home at the time of the fire, but managed to escape and is expected to be OK,” Superintendent Stephen Grimm said. Counselors will be available at the school Tuesday.ar in 2010 at School 22 in northeast Rochester before leaving the district.

 

City School District spokesman Chip Partner said Tyler spent a few months of his first-grade year in 2010 at School 22 in northeast Rochester before leaving the district.

 

He enrolled in the city again in March of 2012 in second grade and attended School 43 on Lyell Avenue until May 2013, leaving before the school year ended, Partner said.

 

Tyler was currently enrolled as a fourth-grader in the East Rochester Central School District where officials on Monday called him a “hero” and said principals, psychologists, and other support staff were contacting the families of his classmates. Counseling and support will be available to all students and staff Tuesday.

 

“With great sadness, the East Rochester School District confirms one of the three victims of an early-morning fire in Penfield was a fourth-grade boy at our school,” reads a news release from interim Superintendent Richard Stutzman Jr.

 

“It is extremely important to remember that according to emergency personnel, (Tyler) was the person who discovered the fire and tried to wake the eight other people in the residence at the time. In bravely and selflessly giving his own life, he was able to save the lives of six others — and he is truly a hero.”

 

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JHAND@DemocratandChronicle.com

 

 

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James La Rue Avery, Sr, Star Of ‘The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air,’ Dies At Age 68


 

By Jueseppi B.

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James La Rue Avery, Sr. (November 27, 1948 – December 31, 2013) was an American actor, best known for his portrayal of the patriarch and attorney (later judge) Philip BanksWill Smith‘s character’s uncle, in the TV show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. This character was ranked #34 in TV Guide‘s “50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time.” He also provided the voice of Shredder in the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles television series, as well as War Machine in the animated series Iron Man and Junkyard Dog in Hulk Hogan’s Rock ‘n’ Wrestling. He also played Michael Kelso‘s commanding officer at the police academy late in the series run of the popular sitcom That ’70s Show.

 

Life and career

Avery was born in Virginia and raised in Atlantic CityNew Jersey. He served in the Vietnam War as a member of the U.S. Navy from 1968–1969, after graduating high school. Later on, he moved to San DiegoCalifornia where he began to write poetry and TV scripts. In addition to his fame insitcoms, he did voice acting for many animated series, most notably the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series (as the voice of The Shredder) and James Rhodes in the 1990s Iron Man series. He also performed in the single season production of Captain Simian and the Space Monkeys as “Gor-illa” a loveable, simple, and bi-polar gorilla.

 

He has been the primary host of Going Places, a popular travel and adventure series on PBS. He also guest starred in That ’70s Show as Officer Kennedy. In 2000, he guest starred in the “Unfriendly Skies” episode of CSI as Preston Cash, a legally-blind witness to a murder who assists the CSI team with a near-flawless verbal account of what he heard on board the flight. Avery played a Los Angeles County Medical Examiner, Dr. Crippen (who has recently appeared in a wheelchair), on the TNT series The Closer. In 2004, he guest starred on the television series That’s So Raven where he played an entrepreneur.

 

He also appeared in a 2005 episode of My Wife and Kids as Jay’s reluctant professor. He was cast in the new sitcom Sherri, starring Sherri Shepherd, playing her father.

 

Most recently, Avery wrapped production on Valediction, which could begin its film festival circuit as early as October 2011. He played the role of Edward, the husband of co-star Bonnie Bartlett. In addition, he starred in a 2012 role on the TV series Grey’s Anatomy, playing a distraught spouse to his brain-dead partner who was a patient.

 

Death

On December 31, 2013, Avery died from complications following open heart surgery in a Los Angeles hospital.

 

(CNN) – Actor James Avery, who played the beloved Uncle Phil on the hit 1990s sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” died Tuesday, his publicist confirmed. He was 68.

 

The cause of death was complications from open-heart surgery, said his manager, Toni Benson.

 

His “Fresh Prince” co-star Alfonso Ribeiro tweeted news of Avery’s passing.

 

“I’m deeply saddened to say that James Avery has passed away,” Riberio tweeted. “He was a second father to me. I will miss him greatly.

 

A classically trained actor and poet, Avery grew up in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he was raised by a single mother. He served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and first appeared onscreen as a dancer in an uncredited role in the 1980 film “The Blues Brothers.”

 

According to IMDb, after he served in the military, Avery moved to San Diego, California, where he began writing TV scripts and poetry for PBS. Before joining the military, he once said, he had dreams of being like Richard Wright and living in Paris. But life took a different turn.

 

“I knew I loved the arts,” Avery said in an interview for the show “Unscripted.” “I knew I wanted to be a writer, but the theater was something I had been involved in before.”

 

Avery appeared in multiple TV shows and movies, including “CSI,” “That ’70s Show,” “The Closer” and several appearances as a judge on “L.A. Law.”

 

Indeed, with his deep, mellifluous voice, he frequently played judges, professors and doctors — Uncle Phil began as a lawyer and eventually became a judge — and was much in demand as a voice actor. His voice roles included Shredder in the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” series and James “Rhodey” Rhodes in the 1990s animated series version of “Iron Man.”

 

He most recently appeared in Zach Braff’s new film, “Wish I Was Here,” which will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival later this month.

 

But his most famous role was as Phillip Banks, the stern but loving uncle to Will Smith’s character on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.” The show, co-executive produced by Quincy Jones and created by Andy Borowitz and Susan Borowitz, cast Smith — then best known as a rapper — as a Philadelphia teenager who is sent to live with his wealthy Los Angeles relatives. As Banks, a former civil-rights activist and Harvard Law-trained attorney, Avery provided a role model for Smith’s sometimes wild character.

 

Avery, too, leveled with youthful audiences, noting in “Unscripted” that he left home at 18 because “I had too good a time.”

 

In a 2007 interview with the New York Film Academy, he was forthright about his abilities.

 

“You can either be a movie star or an actor. I’m an actor,” he said. “(But) I’ve done pretty good.”

 

He is survived by his wife of 26 years, Barbara Avery, his mother, Florence Avery of Atlantic City, and a stepson, Kevin Waters.

 

People we lost in 2013

 

CNN’s Todd Leopold contributed to this story.

 

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Uncle Phil loses it

 

Uploaded on Sep 26, 2007

Uncle Phil goes psycho on Geoffrey after another sly insult from the butler.

 

 

 

Unscripted: James Avery

 

Uploaded on Jan 14, 2010

Best known as Will Smith’s “Uncle Phil” on the hit series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, the imposing James Avery is a classically trained actor who has written TV scripts and poetry, and earned an Emmy Award for production while working for PBS. Born and raised in Atlantic City, New Jersey, he served in Vietnam with the U.S. Navy. Avery made his first screen appearance in 1980 with an uncredited part in The Blues Brothers, and in the three decades since then has amassed a long list of film and TV credits that includes Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, C.S.I. and The Closer.

 

 

 

James Avery, who played the character of Phil Banks on the hit sitcom ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air,’ died at the age of 68 on Dec. 31.

James Avery, who played the character of Phil Banks on the hit sitcom ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air,’ died at the age of 68 on Dec. 31.

A Moment Of Silence For Newtown Connecticut And Sandy Hook Elementary School.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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A moment for Newtown

 

On December 14th, one year ago tomorrow, we lost 26 fellow Americans to gun violence at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. We lost 20 of our youngest students, and six dedicated school workers.

 

To mark the anniversary of that senseless tragedy, President Obama will honor those lost at Sandy Hook with a moment of silence tomorrow morning at 9:30 a.m. ET. We’d like you to join.

 

 

Street artist Panzarino prepares a memorial as he writes the names of the Sandy Hook Elementary School victims during the six-month anniversary of the massacre, at Union Square in New York

 

 

Join the moment of silence tomorrow, and help honor the victims of Newtown, Connecticut.

 

Sandy Hook: “Evil did not win.”

 

Published on Dec 6, 2013

A mother who lost her 6-year-old daughter at Sandy Hook shares what tragedy has taught her during the past year.

 

 

 

Children killed by guns since Newtown

 

Published on Dec 11, 2013

Mother Jones‘ special report on children killed by guns in the year since the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

 

 

 

Moms Demand Action: No More Silence 60 second ad

 

Published on Dec 4, 2013

Saturday, December 14 marks one year since the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Moms Demand Action will commemorate the anniversary with No More Silence, a campaign to honor the victims and show our resolve never to be silent again about gun violence. The campaign will include a week of action culminating on December 14, with events in more than 35 states. Each event will include a communal ringing of bells—a moment of No More Silence—to remember the victims and to show that the time for silence is over.

 

 

 

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If You Have Affluenza And Are Caucasian, YOU Can Get Away With Murdering FOUR Human Beings


 

By Jueseppi B.

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This past year we have witnessed a judge give a convicted rapist of his underage student, who committed suicide after the rape, 30 days in a county jail. Another rapist who raped a young woman for years, starting when she was just 13, got acquitted, because the judge said she knew what was going on.

 

Perhaps the worst case of a miscarriage of justice is this case…a 16 year old “kid” acquitted based on him having “Affluenza.”

 

Ethan Anthony Couch, who is 16 years old and hails from Fort Worth, Texas, killed four pedestrians this past June when he drunk-drove and crashed his car. Couch was driving 60-70 m.p.h. in a 40-mile zone. He had an BAC of .24 — three times the alcohol limit for an adult — and toxicology reports found Valium in Couch’s system. Aside from the four people he killed, Couch also injured 10 people. And just how does the Texas justice system punish him? By not giving him jail time … because Couch’s parents are wealthy.

 

Youth pastor Brian Jennings; mother and daughter Hollie and Shelby Boyles; and 24-year-old Breanna Mitchell died in the June 15 accident.

 

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‘Affluenza’ Teen Gets Away With Killing Four

 

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By ROD DREHER

 

A juvenile court judge sentenced 16-year-old Ethan Couch to 10 years’ probation Tuesday for the drunken driving crash that killed four people.

 

Judge Jean Boyd could have sentenced Couch to 20 years behind bars.

 

Youth pastor Brian Jennings; mother and daughter Hollie and Shelby Boyles; and 24-year-old Breanna Mitchell died in the June 15 accident.

 

Boyd told the teen that he is responsible for what happened, but she didn’t believe he would receive the necessary therapy in jail.

 

More:

Prior to sentencing, a psychologist called by the defense, Dr. G. Dick Miller,  testified that Couch’s life could be salvaged with one to two years’ treatment and no contact with his parents.

 

Investigators said Couch was driving a pickup truck between 68 and 70 miles-per-hour in a 40 mph zone. The four who died were standing on the side of the road outside their vehicle. Nine others were hurt.

 

Miller said Couch’s parents gave him “freedoms no young person should have.” He called Couch a product of “affluenza,” where his family felt that wealth bought privilege and there was no rational link between behavior and consequences.

 

He said Couch got whatever he wanted. As an example,  Miller said Couch’s parents gave no punishment after police ticketed the then-15-year-old when he was found in a parked pickup with a passed out, undressed, 14-year-old girl.

 

Miller also pointed out that Couch was allowed to drive at age 13. He said the teen was emotionally flat and needed years of therapy.

 

Ethan-Couch

 

At the time of the fatal wreck, Couch had a blood alcohol content of 0.24, said Tarrant County Sheriff Dee Anderson, four times the legal limit for an adult.

 

Unbelievable. Disgusting. This poor little rich kid killed four people — four people! — and because he suffered from “affluenza,” he won’t serve a day in jail. Not one day. Good work, Dr. G. Dick Miller and Judge Jean Boyd.

 

UPDATE: Reader JerriB adds in the comments thread:

A friend of mine worked that scene as a FWPD officer. She expects the officers to be dealing with the PTSD for a long while. The details she gave me as we talked over coffee (I’m an emergency responder, and we debrief together sometimes) were beyond what most of us can fathom. This kid was taken to the hospital for the blood draw for his test. Even after considerable time, his blood alcohol level was over 4x the legal. The whole time he was at the hospital, he was telling people the pills he took and how much alcohol he drank and was bragging about how he could hold his liquor, and after the blood draw, he asked if they were going to give him a ticket…and laughed. He knew nothing. He didn’t know he hit anyone. He didn’t know he had paralyzed one of his buddies in the truck. He remembered nothing.

 

Thank you American Conservative.

 

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Just to repeat so you comprehend what you just read is not a prank or an April Fools stunt in December….

 

From The Bustle.com:

 

“AFFLUENZA” TEXAS TEEN KILLS FOUR, ESCAPES JAIL TIME, BECAUSE MONEY

 

Couch didn’t literally get out of jail because he slipped the judge a check. But with 20 years of jail — yes, 20 years — looming as a possible punishment for Couch, his attorney had the brilliant idea of bringing in psychologist Dr. G. Dick Miller to testify on Couch’s behalf. Dr. Miller’s testimony on the stand focused on Couch’s wealth: the teenager, he said, had grown up amid privilege and had often expected his money to get him out of trouble. Therefore, Couch did not have a basic understanding of consequences.

 

Which Couch’s attorney used as a basis for his argument that why Couch shouldn’t be jailed for 20 years.

 

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But no judge would fall for that one, right? Well, this judge totally bought it. Straight from WFAA ABC:

 

Miller said Couch’s parents gave him “freedoms no young person should have.” He called Couch a product of “affluenza,” where his family felt that wealth bought privilege and there was no rational link between behavior and consequences.

He said Couch got whatever he wanted. As an example,  Miller said Couch’s parents gave no punishment after police ticketed the then-15-year-old when he was found in a parked pickup with a passed out, undressed, 14-year-old girl.

 

So “affluenza” is a real defense now, people. It’s catchily named, completely immoral, and it might save you from the whole “actions have consequences” thing. Rich people, use it to your advantage. Poor people — you’re still SOL.

 

Couch’s father will still have to pay $450,000 for Couch’s drug and alcohol rehab facility in California, and Couch will still face 10 years of probation. But that’s several notches below 20 years in prison, and these “compassionate” forms of rehabilitation don’t always turn out well.

 

We’re shocked, but not surprised. First, this is, after all, Texas. Secondly, wealth — or fame — can get you a lighter sentence more often than not.

 

And how do the victims’ relatives feel?

 

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“Reliving the facts and the events was difficult, but probably nothing more difficult than today,” said Eric Boyles to MyFoxDFW, who lost his wife and daughter in the crash. “Money always seems to keep Ethan out of trouble. This was one time I did ask the court for justice and for money not to prevail.” Thanks, justice system.

 

Thank you The Bustle.com

 

 

Read This One More Time….So It Sinks In…..

 

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Affluent drunk driving teen who killed 4 sentenced to probation on ‘affluenza’ defense

 

A Texas teen was sentenced to just 10 years of probation and forced to enter alcohol rehabilitation for killing four people and injuring two others when he crashed his car into them while inebriated.

 

Ethan Couch, 16, had a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.24 when he crashed into four people who had pulled over to assist a stranded driver on June 15. Couch’s BAC was three times the legal limit for an adult over the age of 21. Prosecutors said Couch and his friends had stolen beer from a Walmart located near the site of the accident outside the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

 

All four of the pedestrians were killed: the driver of the stranded vehicle, a mother and daughter who stopped to help, and a youth minister who did the same. Couch’s two 15-year-old friends were ejected from his vehicle in the crash. Solimon Mohman suffered a number of broken bones and internal injuries, while Sergio Molina can now only communicate with his eyes because he was paralyzed in the accident.

 

Couch admitted to drunk driving at the time, with seven passengers in his vehicle, and tests later revealed traces of Valium in his system.

 

Prosecutors asked State District Judge Jean Boyd to impose a 20-year sentence. Yet, despite the severity of Couch’s crime, Boyd handed down a sentence of just 10 years probation and mandated that the 16-year-old receive therapy at a long-term, inpatient facility near Newport Beach, California.

 

Defense attorneys pressed for such a sentence and told the court that Couch’s family would be willing to pay the estimated $450,000 for his therapy out-of-pocket. They blamed Couch’s actions on his upbringing, with a psychologist testifying that Couch’s parents used him as a weapon against each other and that the teen’s emotional age was close to 12.

 

The teen never learned to say that you’re sorry if you hurt someone,” psychologist Gary Miller said. “If you hurt someone you sent him money.”

 

Miller said Couch’s parents gave him “freedoms no young person should have,” raised in an environment of privilege that afforded him no understanding of actions and their consequences. The psychologist ultimately branded Couch a product of“affluenza.”

 

The perception that money has contributed to the case’s resolution has much of the surrounding community outraged. Families of the victims spoke in court and, while many admitted they have forgiven Couch, they said that justice had not been served. Prosecutor Richard Alpert said he was disappointed in Boyd’s decision and that “there can be no doubt that he will be in another courthouse one day blaming the lenient treatment here.”

 

Eric Boyles lost his wife in the crash earlier this year. He told the Star-Telegram that even though the families knew a harsh sentence wouldn’t bring back their loved ones, the disappointment was palpable.

 

Money always seems to keep [Couch] out of trouble,” Boyles said. “Ultimately today, I felt that money did prevail. If [he] had been any other youth, I feel like the circumstances would have been different.”

 

 

Judge gives probation to teen who killed four in crash

 

Published on Dec 10, 2013

A juvenile court judge sentenced 16-year-old Ethan Couch to 10 years’ probation Tuesday for the drunken driving crash that killed four people. Judge Jean Boyd could have sentenced Couch to 20 years behind bars.

 

 

 

Too spoiled for prison?

 

Published on Dec 11, 2013

A teenager in Texas killed four people in a drunk driving accident and was sentenced to only 10 years of probation. Ethan Couch, only 16 years old, had a blood alcohol level of .24 which is three times the legal limit. Reports also showed that he had valium in his system.But a psychologist for the defense claimed none of this was Couch’s fault. He argued that Couch was never held accountable for his actions and never learned right from wrong. The defense argued he suffered from “affluenza”, apparently arguing that he was just a victim of his family’s wealth and of bad parenting.

 

 

 

Loved ones of those killed in drunken crash take issue with 16-year-old’s sentence

 

Published on Dec 11, 2013

Eric Boyles waited months for the day his wife and daughter’s killer would face punishment for his crime. And when instead of 20 years in jail, Ethan Couch got 10 years probation, Boyles got none of the peace that he’d hoped for. Eric Boyles waited months for the day his wife and daughter’s killer would face punishment for his crime. And when instead of 20 years in jail, Ethan Couch got 10 years probation, Boyles got none of the peace that he’d hoped for. Eric Boyles waited months for the day his wife and daughter’s killer would face punishment for his crime. And when instead of 20 years in jail, Ethan Couch got 10 years probation, Boyles got none of the peace that he’d hoped for.

 

 

 

Teen Drunk Driver Kills Four People and gets Probation – Texas

 

Published on Dec 11, 2013

Drunk Driver Teen Kills Four People and Gets Probation Texas Judge Jean Boyd gives him Probation

A juvenile court judge sentenced 16-year-old Ethan Couch to 10 years’ probation Tuesday for the drunken driving crash that killed four people. Judge Jean Boyd could have sentenced Couch to 20 years behind bars.

 

 

 

Caucasian privilege is alive and well in Texas, which joins Florida as a state to avoid if you are not wealthy and caucasian.

 

 

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