What Did Barack Do Today™ And The Last 24™


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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In the afternoon, the President will sign S. 517, Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, into law. There will be a stills only pool spray of this signing in the Oval Office.

 

During Press Secretary Josh Earnest press briefing, President Obama will make a statement on the Friday Jobs report.

 

White House Schedule – August 1, 2014

 

Friday, August 1 2014  All Times ET

 

At 2:35 p.m. ET today, the President will deliver a statement from the Press Briefing Room here at the White House.

 

The President Delivers a Statement

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

President Obama briefs the press on the economy and foreign policy issues on Aug. 1, 2014.

 

 

 

3:45 PM: The President holds a bill signing, Oval Office.

 

 

The Employment Situation in July

 

Total job growth exceeded 200,000 for the sixth straight month in July, the first time that has happened since 1997. This encouraging trend in the labor market is consistent with other recent economic indicators, including the strong second-quarter GDP growth reported on Wednesday. To ensure this momentum can be sustained, the President is pressing Congress to act to create jobs and expand opportunity, while simultaneously using his own executive authority to encourage investment in the United States, boost the income of working families, and ensure safe and fair treatment of American workers.

 

FIVE KEY POINTS IN TODAY’S REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

 

1. The private sector has added 9.9 million jobs over 53 straight months of job growth, the longest streak on record. Today we learned that total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 209,000 in July, mainly reflecting a 198,000 increase in private employment. Private-sector job growth in May and June were revised up slightly, so that over the past twelve months, private employment has risen by a total of 2.5 million

 

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Answering the Public’s Call

 

Ed. note: This is cross-posted from The Huffington Post. See the original here.

 

Today, President Obama will sign into law the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, and in doing so, will achieve a rare trifecta: a win for American consumers, a win for wireless competition, and an example of democracy at its best — bipartisan congressional action in direct response to a call to action from the American people.

 

The story of how we broke through Washington gridlock to restore the freedom of consumers to take their mobile phone wherever they choose is one worth telling, and a model worth repeating.

 

The effort began with a digital petition on the White House’s We the People site, an online platform where citizens can offer ideas for the Administration to take action on important issues facing our country. A digital rights activist named Sina Khanifar submitted a simple request: restore an exception to the law to let consumers take their mobile phone to the carrier that best suits their needs by “unlocking” the device.

 

Read More.

 

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The private sector has added 9.9 million jobs over 53 straight months of job growth, the longest streak on record. Today we learned that total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 209,000 in July, mainly reflecting a 198,000 increase in private employment. Private-sector job growth in May and June were revised up slightly, so that over the past twelve months, private employment has risen by a total of 2.5 million.

 

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Yeah, I did this.

 

Jobs Report: U.S. Economy Adds 209,000 Jobs In July, Unemployment at Up To 6.2%

Jobs Report: U.S. Economy Adds 209,000 Jobs In July, Unemployment at Up To 6.2%

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US Employers Add 209K Jobs, Rate 6.2 Pct

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

U.S. employers extended their hiring surge into July by adding a solid 209,000 jobs. It was the sixth straight month of job growth above 200,000, evidence that businesses are gradually shedding the caution that had marked the 5-year-old recovery. (Aug. 1)

 

 

 

July 2014 – Jobs Report

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

The July Employment Situation report shows that we’ve now seen six consecutive months with job growth topping 200,000, and 53 consecutive months of private sector job growth – the longest streak on record. Businesses added 209,000 jobs in July, bringing us to a total of 9.9 million since February 2010.

 

 

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West Wing Week 08/01/14 or, “A Walk Down Main St.”

 

This week, the President hosted the inaugural Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, reaffirmed America’s commitment to Ukraine, and continued responding to Americans’ letters – this time in Kansas City.

 

 

 

Friday, July 25th

·    The President and Vice President hosted Presidents Otto Perez Molina of Guatemala, Juan Orlando Hernandez of Honduras, and Salvador Sanchez Ceren of El Salvador to discuss how the United States and Central American governments are cooperating to disrupt smuggling organizations and promote safe, legal, and orderly migration.

 

·    The President spoke to the American Legion Boys and Girls Nation in the East Room, where he was serenaded ahead of his birthday, and took a photo with the group of budding American leaders.

 

·    At the end of the day, the President dropped by the Vice President’s office to meet the nation’s oldest living female veteran, 108 year-old Lucy Coffey.

 

 

Monday, July 28th

·      During a town hall with 500 young African leaders, President Obama announced the expansion of his Young African Leaders Initiative, which helps the United States invest in the next generation of African leaders.  The event served as a lead-up to next week’s inaugural U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit.

 

·      The President presented the 2013 National Medal of Arts and the National Humanities Medal to 22 recipients during a ceremony in the East Room.  The National Medal of Arts is the government’s highest award given to artists and arts patrons for their outstanding contributions and broadened our citizens’ engagement with history, literature, languages, philosophy, and other humanities subjects.

 

 

Tuesday, July 29th

·      The President stopped by the East Room to extend his gratitude to the White House summer interns for their service dedication to his administration.

·      The President delivered a statement on the South Lawn concerning American diplomatic support for Ukraine and its sovereignty.

·      The President then boarded Air Force One for a trip to Kansas City, where he ate dinner with a group of Americans who wrote to him concerning the struggles they face.

 

 

Wednesday, July 30th

·      The President delivered remarks on the economy at the Uptown Theatre in Kansas City.

·      The President took a walk down Main Street in Parkville, Missouri, to visit with locals and shop owners before returning to Washington.

 

 

Thursday, July 31st

·    The President signed an Executive Order on Fair Pay and a Safe Workplace, which requires prospective federal contractors to disclose labor law violations and gives guidance on how to consider these violations when awarding federal contracts.

·    Then he invited this year’s five Kavli Prize laureates into the Oval Office to honor them for their achievements in Astrophysics, Nanoscience Neuroscience.

·    The President congratulated the outgoing Secretary of the Department of Housing and Development, Shaun Donovan, on his new post at the White House’s Office of Management and Budget, and honored HUD’s new secretary, Julian Castro.

·    That evening, the President and First Lady commemorated the Special Olympics with a celebration in the East Room.

 

 

The President Speaks at Dinner to Celebrate Special Olympics

July 31, 2014 | 9:23 | Public Domain

President Obama delivers remarks at a dinner in celebration of Special Olympics and A Unified Generation.

 

 

 

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The First Lady: Veteran Homelessness is a “Stain on the Soul of this Nation”

 

August 01, 2014
01:59 PM EDT
The First Lady addresses the 2014 National Conference on Ending Homelessness
First Lady Michelle Obama, in support of the Joining Forces initiative, addresses the 2014 National Conference on Ending Homelessness, in Washington, D.C., July 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

They risked their lives for our country, yet each night tens of thousands of veterans are sleeping in shelters, in their car, or on the street. Across the country, there are more than 58,000 homeless veterans, a staggering number that First Lady Michelle Obama called “a stain on the soul of this nation,” during a speech yesterday at the National Alliance to End Homelessness Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.

 

“But as Americans, the idea that anyone who has worn our country’s uniform spends their nights sleeping on the ground should horrify us.”

 

And so it is truly our duty to right this wrong and put an end to veteran homelessness, once and for all.

 

But that moral and patriotic duty is only part of the reason why ending veteran homelessness is so critical. As we all know, ending homelessness for our veterans can also be a crucial first step — a proof point — to show that we can end homelessness for everyone in this country, too

 

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UNICEF: Israel deliberately targeting Palestinian children in Gaza

 

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If Israel’s barbaric slaughter of innocent Palestinian children doesn’t shock this Nation to its senses, nothing will?

 

There is no justification for the slaughter of 264 innocent little children.  This is terrorism in every sense of the word.

 

Everyone across the globe should be OUTRAGED. Condemn this savagery with fierceness. Palestinian lives matter!

 

Monica Awad, the spokeswoman of the UNICEF, condemned Israel’s targeting of women and children in its ongoing assault on the Gaza Strip.

 

In an interview with Al-Jazeera yesterday, Awad said Israeli forces had deliberately killed 264 children in Gaza, which is equal to 11 children per day, and injured more than 2,000.

 

“Where’s the international community’s reactions to the slaughtering of children in Gaza? Where are the international human rights covenants?” she asked.

 

Earlier on Friday, an Israeli official said that a 72-hour humanitarian ceasefire with Palestinian factions in the Gaza Strip had collapsed.

 

Israel has been pounding the Gaza Strip for almost four weeks, which killed at least 1458 Palestinians and injured more than 8300 others. Almost a third of those killed are said to be children.

 

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Eric Garner’s Death a Homicide: Medical Examiner Rules-Says He Was Killed By Chokehold

 

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Unseen Video Of Eric Garner Death – Over 7 minutes handcuffed not breathing NYPD chokehold AFTERMATH

 

Published on Jul 19, 2014

Eric Garner laying on ground not breathing for over 5 minutes, no resuscitation, he is placed on stretcher and taken into ambulance.

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The city medical examiner has ruled the death of Eric Garner, the 43-year-old father whose death in police custody sparked national outrage, a homicide, saying a chokehold killed him.

The medical examiner said compression of the neck and chest, along with Garner’s positioning on the ground while being restrained by police during the July 17 stop on Staten Island, caused his death.

 

Garner’s acute and chronic bronchial asthma, obesity and hypertensive cardiovascular disease were contributing factors, the medical examiner determined

 

A spokesman for Richmond County District Attorney Daniel M. Donovan, who’s leading the investigation in the case, said his office had been contacted with the cause and manner of Garner’s death but was waiting for the official death certificate and the autopsy report to be issued.

 

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton also said he received the medical examiner’s report and that the department will continue to cooperate with district attorney’s office.

 

An amateur video shows a plainclothes police officer placing Garner in what appears be a chokehold during the arrest. In the video, Garner can be heard multiple times gasping, “I can’t breathe!” Chokeholds are banned under NYPD policy.

After receiving the medical examiner’s findings, Mayor de Blasio released a statement expressing his sympathies to Garner’s family and said his administration will continue to work with the Staten Island district attorney and other authorities “to ensure a fair and justified outcome.”

“We all have a responsibility to work together to heal the wounds from decades of mistrust and create a culture where the police department and the communities they protect respect each other — and that’s a responsibility that Commissioner Bratton and I take very seriously,” he said.

De Blasio said he remained “absolutely committed to ensuring that the proper reforms are enacted to ensure that this won’t happen again.”

Just one day before, the mayor hosted a reform talk at City Hall in an attempt to ease tensions with minority communities after Garner’s death. The discussion got heated as the Rev. Al Sharpton criticized Bratton and said to de Blasio: “If Dante wasn’t your son, he’d be a candidate for a chokehold.”

Sharpton said Friday neither he nor the Garner family had a immediate comment, but that they would make a statement tomorrow at the headquarters of the National Action Network.

Garner’s family members and Sharpton met with federal prosecutors last month to press for an investigation into his death. Sharpton said police violated Garner’s civil rights while arresting him for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes, and that led to his death.

The U.S. attorney hasn’t commented on the meeting with the Garners. Previously, Attorney General Eric Holder said the Justice Department is closely monitoring” the investigation into Garner’s death.

One officer has been stripped of his gun and badge pending an internal NYPD investigation and another has also been placed on desk duty. Two paramedics and two EMTs were suspended without pay after allegedly failing to provide CPR in a timely manner.

The president of the police officers union expressed sympathy to Garner’s family and friends and said that “police officers don’t start their days expecting or wanting something like this to occur in the performance of their duties.”

Pat Lynch of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association went on to say: “We believe, however, that if he had not resisted the lawful order of the police officers placing him under arrest, this tragedy would not have occurred.”

The case has incited calls for sweeping police department reform. New alleged chokehold videos have emerged in its wake, including one involving an alleged fare beater and another involving a pregnant Brooklyn woman who claims she was put in a chokehold when she questioned officers’ requests to move the site of her BBQ.

Bratton has said the officer appeared to have placed Garner in a chokehold and has ordered a top-to-bottom redesigning of use-of-force training in the NYPD.

 

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Obama: Congress holding up progress

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

The President comments on Congress’ inability to pass immigration legislation before their August recess.

 

 

 

Obama Explains America’s Influence in the World

 

 

Dumbass question by a dumbass member of the dumbass white house press corp.

 

 

Readout of the President’s Call with President Putin of Russia

President Obama spoke today with Russian President Putin about the situation in Ukraine and the bilateral relationship.  The President reiterated his deep concerns about Russia’s increased support for the separatists in Ukraine.  The President reinforced his preference for a diplomatic solution to the crisis in Ukraine, and the two leaders agreed to keep open their channels of communication.  The President also reiterated his concerns about Russia’s compliance with its obligations under the INF Treaty.

 

 

Readout of the Vice President’s Call with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko

 

Vice President Joe Biden spoke today with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko regarding the political situation in Ukraine, the Ukrainian government’s efforts to ensure unhindered access to the MH-17 crash site, and Russia’s destabilizing actions in eastern Ukraine. The Vice President also announced approximately $8 million in new assistance to the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service. This additional assistance includes engineering equipment for improving infrastructure along Ukraine’s borders, transport and patrol vehicles, surveillance equipment to extend the visual range of border security patrols, and small boats to conduct maritime patrol and interdiction operations. The Vice President congratulated Poroshenko on the Ukrainian parliament’s confidence vote in Prime Minister Yatsenyuk as well the passage of important economic reform bills and the ratification of agreements with Australia and the Netherlands for security personnel to access to the MH-17 crash site in support of the international investigation. President Poroshenko informed the Vice President that access to the crash site had been secured both yesterday and today despite continued separatist attacks in the vicinity. The two leaders also discussed Russia’s deeply destabilizing efforts to continue supplying weapons to its proxies in eastern Ukraine and the increasing prevalence of artillery and rocket fire coming from the Russian side of the border.

 

 

C-SPAN Censors President Obama admitting “We Tortured Some Folks”

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

Press Conference 8/1/2014 over CIA Spying & Torture Tactics
Obama Says After 9-11, US ‘Tortured Some Folks’.
(ABC) The United States tortured al Qaida detainees captured after the 9/11 attacks, President Obama acknowledged Friday, in some of his most expansive comments to date about a controversial set of CIA practices that he banned after taking office.

 

 

“We tortured some folks,” Obama said at a televised news conference at the White House. “We did some things that were contrary to our values.”

 

 

Addressing the impending release of a Senate report that criticizes CIA treatment of detainees, Obama said he believed the mistreatment happened because of the pressure national security officials felt to forestall another attack. He said Americans should not be too “sanctimonious,” about passing judgment through the lens of a seemingly safer present day.

 

 

That posture, which he expressed as a candidate for national office in 2008 and early in his presidency, explains why Obama did not push to pursue criminal charges against the Bush era officials who carried out the CIA program. To this day, many of those officials insist that what they did was not torture, which is a felony under U.S. law.

 

 

Still, Obama’s remarks on Friday were more emphatic than his previous comments on the subject, including a 2009 speech in which he trumpeted his ban of “so-called enhanced interrogation techniques,” and “brutal methods,” but did not flatly say the U.S. has engaged in torture.

 

 

“I believe that waterboarding was torture and, whatever legal rationales were used, it was a mistake,” he said in April 2009.
Obama on Friday did not address two other central arguments of the soon-to-be-released Senate report — that the brutal interrogations didn’t produce life-saving intelligence, and that the CIA lied to other elements of the U.S. government about exactly what it was doing.

 

 

The president also expressed confidence in his CIA director, John Brennan, in the wake of an internal CIA report documenting that the spy agency improperly accessed Senate computers. There have been calls for his resignation on Capitol Hill.

 

 

 

 

Obama On Post-9/11 CIA: “We Tortured Some Folks”

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

President Obama Says After 9-11, US ‘Tortured Some Folks’.
(ABC) The United States tortured al Qaida detainees captured after the 9/11 attacks, President Obama acknowledged Friday, in some of his most expansive comments to date about a controversial set of CIA practices that he banned after taking office.

 

 

“We tortured some folks,” Obama said at a televised news conference at the White House. “We did some things that were contrary to our values.”

 

 

 

 

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Three Questions with Aubrey Hruby on the 2014 Africa Leaders Summit

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

Africa Center Visiting Fellow on the upcoming 2014 Africa Leaders Summit, taking place July 31 – August 8 in Washington, DC.

 

 

 

 

Are mentally ill Americans getting adequate health care?

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

Millions of Americans are now eligible for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, including 1.2 million people with mental illnesses. But is this particularly vulnerable group getting the heath care it needs?

 

 

 

#WWJVD: Drugs, Guns & Immigrants | Jesse Ventura Off The Grid

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

For today’s edition of #WWJVD, the Governor tackles the vicious cycle linking our border crisis with our drug policy at home and our arms trade. What would president Jesse do to solve this? Plus, a new poll-cat running for Governor in Minnesota & Jesse answers your #AskJesse questions and comments! Got a question for the Governor? Message him at ora.tv/offthegrid/askjesse and @GovJVentura.

 

 

 

Organizing Update: What makes a Day of Action

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

You might have the term — but what does a “Day of Action” really mean? It’s a day on the calendar when OFA volunteers across the country come together to coordinate their organizing around an issue. While one chapter is holding a phone bank in Portland, Oregon, another one is hosting a house party in Florida. That’s how you build the grassroots, one conversation at a time — and it adds up fast.

 

 

 

 

Statements and Releases – August 1st, 2014

 

Statement by the Press Secretary on H.R. 1528, S. 517

 

Readout of the President’s Call with President Putin of Russia

 

Readout of the Vice President’s Call with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko

 

On-the-Record Conference Call on the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit

 

 

Obama: GOP Not Even Trying to Solve Immigration

 

Published on Aug 1, 2014

President Barack Obama says House Republicans are trying to pass the most extreme and unworkable version of an immigration bill even though they know the bill isn’t going anywhere. (August 1)

 

 

 

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The Last 24™


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White House Schedule – July 31, 2014

 

President will sign an Executive Order titled “Fair Pay and Safe Workplace” that will ensure that all hardworking Americans get the fair pay and safe workplaces they deserve. Specifically, the new order will require prospective federal contractors to disclose labor law violations and give federal agencies more guidance on how to consider labor violations when awarding federal contracts. This event in South Court Auditorium is open press.

 

Later in the afternoon, the President will deliver remarks at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. There will be expanded pool coverage of the President’s remarks.

 

In the evening, the President and First Lady will host “A Celebration of Special Olympics and A Unified Generation” at the White House to mark the anniversary of the Special Olympics. The President will deliver remarks in the East Room, and the President and the First Lady will attend a concert commemorating the Special Olympics in the State Dining Room. There will be pooled press coverage of this event.

 

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12:00 PM: Press Briefing by Press Secretary Josh Earnest, Brady Press Briefing Room.

 

Press Briefing

July 31, 2014 | 48:08 | Public Domain

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

1:20 PM: The President delivers remarks and signs an Executive Order, South Court Auditorium.

 

The President Signs the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Executive Order

July 31, 2014 | 15:54 | Public Domain

President Obama delivers remarks before signing the Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Executive Order in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building‘s South Court Auditorium.

 

 

 

3:40 PM: The President delivers remarks, The Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

The President Welcomes a New Secretary to HUD

July 31, 2014 | 10:48 | Public Domain

President Obama joins staff in welcoming Julian Castro as the new Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

 

 

7:25 PM: The President and First Lady host “A Celebration of Special Olympics and A Unified Generation”; The President delivers remarks, East Room.

 

The President Speaks at Dinner to Celebrate Special Olympics

July 31, 2014 | 9:23 | Public Domain

President Obama delivers remarks at a dinner in celebration of Special Olympics and A Unified Generation.

 

 

 

8:25 PM: The President and First Lady attend a concert commemorating the Special Olympics, State Dining Room.

 

President Obama Attends a Performance Commemorating the Special Olympics

 

 

 

Raw: Obama Gets Hug From Special Olympian

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

During an event at the White House honoring the Special Olympics, President Barack Obama received a hug from Tim Harris, a Special Olympian and owner of a restaurant called Tim’s Place. (July 31)

 

 

 

Raw Video: The President Takes a Walk Down Main Street

 

President Obama traveled to Kansas City, Missouri this week — where he grabbed some BBQ with Americans who had written him letters, and delivered a speech about how he’s working to get things done for hardworking Americans even as Congress chooses not to act to move this country forward.

 

And before he left, the President took a walk down Main Street (literally), spending time with store owners, touring an antique watch shop, and chatting with customers at a local coffee shop.

 

 

Raw Video: The President visits Main Street in Parkville, MO

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

During a trip to Kansas City, Missouri, President Obama took a walk down Main Street — talking with residents and visiting some “mom and pop” shops along the way.

 

 

 

President Obama: “You don’t have time to be cynical. Hope is a better choice.”

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

President Obama speaks on expanding opportunity for more Americans at the Uptown Theater in Kansas City, Missouri. July 30, 2014.

 

 

 

Susan E. Rice: Previewing the U.S.- Africa Leaders Summit

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

United States national security Advisor Susan E. Rice previews the first-ever U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit where President Obama will welcome nearly 50 African heads of state to Washington, as well as leaders from across Africa’s civil society, private sector and faith communities.

 

 

 

World Hepatitis Day 2014

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

U.S. and international leaders gather at the White House to commemorate World Hepatitis Day, discussing the global impact of viral hepatitis and the importance of public health leadership. July 30, 2014

 

 

 

Save The Babies. Save The Children. It’s Time For Gun Sense In America.

 

Published on May 29, 2014

Common sense gun reforms and responsible gun control laws are needed now. Whose child will be next? How many more have to die? Does your second amendment rights trump my U.S. Constitutional rights to life, liberty & the pursuit of happiness?

 

 

 

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Ann Coulter: we need ‘Netanyahu’ in America, Palestinians killed for associating with terrorists

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

On Fox News Hannity 9/31/2014 over U.S. – Mexico border crisis.

 

 

 

Teen Raped At Keith Urban Concert

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

“A teenage girl was raped at the same Keith Urban show where 20 people got so drunk they were hospitalized, police said.

 

The attack happened in front of a large crowd of other concertgoers on the lawn of the Xfinity Center, an outdoor amphitheater in Mansfield, Massachusetts, on Saturday night, a police statement said.

 

The rape ended when a woman in the crowd pushed the alleged attacker off the victim and he fled, police said.”

 

 

 

Russell Simmons, LL Cool J Visit Youth at Jail

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

A group of young people at a New York City jail complex got some words of encouragement on Thursday from hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons and actor LL Cool J. (July 31)

 

 

 

PBS NewsHour | Full Episode | July 31, 2014

 

Published on Jul 31, 2014

Thursday on the NewsHour, Attorney General Eric Holder discusses immigration, the death penalty and voter ID laws. Also: A divided Congress struggles to address the border crisis, educators push back on legislation that puts the burden on colleges to investigate sexual assaults, Israel, Hamas and the laws of war, plus a Colorado town makes a musical recovery after a devastating flood.

 

 

 

Democrats Stage Protest Against Boehner’s Lawsuit on the House Floor

 

 

 

Rep Hastings Rips Boehner’s Lawsuit, ‘It’s Red Meat for a Base that Hates Our President’

 

 

 

25 Painfully Disturbing Facts About Human Trafficking

 

Published on Jun 4, 2014

Did you know that there are more slaves today than ever before in history? These are 25 painfully disturbing facts about human trafficking.

 

World Day against Trafficking in Persons … July 30!!

 

 

 

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Speeches and Remarks/Statements and Releases- July 31st, 2014

 

Remarks by the President at HUD

 

Remarks by the First Lady at the National Alliance to End Homelessness Annual Conference

 

Remarks by the President at the Signing of Fair Pay and Safe Workplace Executive Order

 

President Obama Nominates Two to Serve on the United States District Courts

 

Readout of Consultative Meeting with Congressional Leaders on National Security Issues

 

Statement by the Press Secretary

 

Op-ed by First Lady Michelle Obama on McClatchy: Let’s end veteran homelessness once and for all

 

FACT SHEET: Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order

 

 

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The Last 24™: July 30th, 2014.


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Remarks by the First Lady at the Summit of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders

 

The Omni Shoreham Hotel
Washington, D.C.

11:01 A.M. EDT

 

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MRS. OBAMA:  Oh, my goodness.  Look at you all!  (Applause.)  Oh, please sit, sit.  Rest.  (Laughter.)  How has everything been?  Exciting?  So you’ve talked to a lot of important people — my husband, he was here.  (Applause.)  That’s good.  And a few other people?  You’ve been traveling around the country doing great things.  It is such a pleasure, and such an honor and a joy to join you here today for this wonderful summit.

 

Let me start by thanking John for that beautiful introduction, but more importantly, for his outstanding leadership for young people — in particular, young girls — in Uganda.  And I want to take a moment to thank all of you for being part of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders.  Yes.  (Applause.)  We have been so excited about your presence here in this country.  We have been so excited.

 

Now, I’ve had the opportunity to read through your bios, and I have to tell you that I am truly in awe of what you all have achieved.  Many of you are barely half my age, yet you already have founded businesses and NGOs, you’ve served as leaders in your government, you’ve earned countless degrees, you know dozens of languages.  So you all truly represent the talent, the energy and the diversity that is Africa’s lifeblood, and it is an honor to host you here in the United States.  (Applause.)  We’re so proud.

 

Now, from what I’ve heard, you all have been making good use of this time here.  You’ve been learning new skills, questioning old assumptions, and having some frank conversations with experts and with each other about the challenges and opportunities in your countries.  And I want to use our time together today to continue that dialogue.  Today, I want us to talk -– and I mean really talk.  I want to speak as openly and honestly as possible about the issues we care about and what it means to be a leader not just in Africa but in the world today.

 

Now, one of the issues that I care deeply about is, as John alluded to, girls’ education.  And across the globe, the statistic on this issue are heartbreaking.  Right now, 62 million girls worldwide are not in school, including nearly 30 million girls in Sub-Saharan Africa.  And as we saw in Pakistan, where Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen, and in Nigeria where more than 200 girls were kidnapped from their school dormitory by Boko Haram terrorists, even when girls do attend school, they often do so at great risk.

 

And as my husband said earlier this week, we know that when girls aren’t educated, that doesn’t just limit their prospects, leaving them more vulnerable to poverty, violence and disease, it limits the prospects of their families and their countries as well.

 

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Michelle Obama: “the blood of Africa runs through my veins”

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

(Reuters) First Lady Michelle Obama embraces her family’s African roots in a speech to a group of young Africans and calls for changes in traditional beliefs around the education of women.

 

 

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Remarks by the First Lady Before a Roundtable with Young African Leaders

The Omni Shoreham Hotel
Washington, D.C.

11:41 A.M. EDT

 

MRS. OBAMA:  I don’t want to do too much talking because I just talked in there.  You heard my thoughts.  But I’m really interested in hearing from you.

 

As I’ve said — as you’ve heard, as Tina has shared with you — we are really focusing on education broadly in the United States, and girls’ education internationally.  And this isn’t just something that I care about now in my role as First Lady.  This is an issue that we’re going to have to continue to work on until I take my last breath.

 

And so that means that you all are going to be carrying a lot of this stuff that we begin over the finish line.  And it’s so important to hear your voices and understand directly from you how these issues impact your life, how do you think somebody in my position can utilize my platform and my resources, again, not just in my role as First Lady, but as the years go forward.

 

So I really want to hear from you.  And as you heard in my speech, I want us to speak as honestly and as openly as possible. Because I think that’s the only way we’re going to begin to chip away at some of these barriers and to really get a better, clear understanding of what the challenges really are if we’re going to solve this problem.

 

So with that, I’m going to stop talking.  And I understand that a few of you have some specific presentations, but I also want to know that — as the press clears out, which they will — that we can also — because I know you haven’t had an opportunity to talk to us one-on-one; you talked to the President — but if there are any questions that you have, I’d be happy, happy to take some time to talk to you, as well.

 

But let me just say I’m so proud of you all.  I really am.  And we’re really going to need your insight and your focus and your expertise.  So be bold, and be brave, and don’t be shy.

 

END
11:45 A.M. EDT

 

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The President Speaks in Kansas City, Missouri

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

President Obama delivers remarks on the economy, at the Uptown Theater in Kansas City, Missouri, July 30, 2014..

 

 

 

Parkville Coffee employees talk about the President’s visit

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

Two employees from Parkville Coffee talk about what it was like to serve the President of the United States.

 

 

 

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Remarks by the President on the Economy — Kansas, City, MO

Uptown Theater
Kansas City, Missouri

11:06 A.M. CDT

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Kansas City!  (Applause.)  Well, it is good to be back in Kansas City, back in the Midwest.  (Applause.)  And I have to say, I love these old theaters.  I mean, they are unbelievable.  This is just gorgeous.

 

It is good to see Governor Jay Nixon here today.  (Applause.)  Congressman Emanuel Cleaver is here.  (Applause.)  Congressman Lacy Clay is here.  (Applause.)  Mayor Sly James is here.  (Applause.)  And you’re here!  All of you are here.  (Applause.)

 

Now, if you have a seat, feel free to sit down, because I don’t want everybody starting to fall out.  (Laughter.)  If you don’t have a seat, don’t sit down.  But bend your knees a little bit.

 

It’s always good to spend a little time in Kansas City.  Last night, I had a chance to get some barbecue at Arthur Bryant’s.  (Applause.)  Now, they had run out of coleslaw, which I asked — I said, did you save some coleslaw for me?  They said, no, they hadn’t saved any.

 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  (Inaudible.)

 

THE PRESIDENT:  I’m sorry, what are you hollering about?

 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  (Inaudible) to God –

 

THE PRESIDENT:  I believe in God.  Thanks for the prayer.  Amen.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

 

AUDIENCE:  We love you!  We love you!

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  I just want to be on record, though, because people have been asking me this question.  I deal with a lot of tough issues — I am not going to decide who makes the best barbecue in Kansas City.  (Laughter.)  Bryant’s barbecue was tasty.  And Victor is right, I did plow through it pretty good.  (Laughter.)  But I have not had enough samples to make a definitive judgment, so I’m going to have to try some other barbecue the next time I come in.  I have to say, by the way, Victor was not shy about eating either.  (Laughter.)  So I just want to be clear.

 

But I had a chance — I went there for the barbecue, but also I went there because I wanted to have a chance to talk to Victor and three other people from the area who took the time to sit down with me and talk, because they had written letters to me.  Some of you may know –

 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I wrote you, too!  (Laughter.)

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, you know what, if I had known, I would have had you over for dinner, too.  (Laughter.)

 

But what happens is, every night I read 10 letters that we receive.  We get 40,000 correspondence.  And then our correspondence office chooses 10, sort of a sample for me to take a look at.  And it gives me a chance to hear directly from the people I serve.  And folks tell me their stories — they tell me their worries and their hopes and their hardships, their successes.  Some say I’m doing a good job.  (Applause.)  But other people say, “You’re an idiot.”

 

AUDIENCE:  No!

 

THE PRESIDENT:  No, no, I mean, this is how I know that I’m getting a good sample of letters.  (Laughter.)

 

Read More.

 

Kansas, City, MO: The Slide Show.

 

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World Hepatitis Day 2014

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

U.S. and international leaders gather at the White House to commemorate World Hepatitis Day, discussing the global impact of viral hepatitis and the importance of public health leadership. July 30, 2014.

 

 

 

Agriculture Champions of Change

 

Published on Jul 29, 2014

The White House honors leaders from across the country who are doing extraordinary things to build the bench for the next generation of farming and ranching. July 29, 2014.

 

 

 

7/29/14: White House Press Briefing

 

 

 

White House Innovation for Disaster Response and Recovery Demo Day

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

The White House hosts an event bringing together technologists, entrepreneurs, and members of the disaster response community to showcase tools that will make a tangible impact in the lives of survivors of large-scale emergencies. July 29, 2014.

 

 

 

The Video Israelis Should Be Ashamed Exists

 

 

 

US stands behind Israel after deadly strike on UN school

 

 

 

Suing Obama: GOP-led House Gives the Go-ahead

 

 

 

PBS NewsHour | Full Episode | July 30, 2014

 

 

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Dan Pfeiffer: “House Republicans Just Voted to Sue President Obama”

 

Today, Senior Advisor Dan Pfeiffer sent the message below to the White House email list. Didn’t get it? Sign up for updates.

 


 

The House of Representatives just took a vote — and it wasn’t to raise the minimum wage, put in place equal pay, create jobs, or reform our broken immigration system.

 

Instead, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives just voted to sue the President for using his executive authority. This lawsuit will waste valuable time and potentially millions of taxpayer dollars.

 

This is the least productive Congress in decades. And instead of doing their job, they are suing the President for doing his.

 

The President is committed to making a difference for the millions of hardworking Americans trying to do right by their families and communities. While Republicans in Congress continue to waste taxpayer money, this President is going to keep doing his job.

 

If you’re doing your own job — and you support President Obama doing his — add your name.

 

House Votes to Sue Obama

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

The House voted mostly along party lines Wednesday to authorize suing President Barack Obama, which Republicans called a principled move to rein in an increasingly lawless president and Democrats and the White House dismissed as a taxpayer-financed political stunt.

 

The resolution adopted 225-201 would authorize a lawsuit against the president over his implementation of the Affordable Care Act, with five Republicans joining all the Democrats in opposition — Paul Broun of Georgia, Steve Stockman of Texas, Scott Garrett of New Jersey, Thomas Massie of Kentucky and Walter B. Jones of North Carolina.

 

GOP leaders plan to sue over his decision to delay the employer mandate without authorization from Congress.

 

 

 

President Obama remains ready and willing to work with Republicans in Congress if they decide to get serious and do something for the American people. But he is also committed to acting even as Congress won’t. You’ve seen that time and time again this year — from raising the federal minimum wage on new federal government contracts, to expanding apprenticeship opportunities and making student loan payments more affordable.

 

The President is not going to back away from his efforts to use his authority to solve problems and help American families. In fact, the day after the vote, President Obama will announce his next executive action to crack down on federal contractors who put workers’ safety and hard-earned pay at risk. It’s just the next in a series of steps this Administration will be taking this year to make sure that American workers are getting a fair deal, and he has pledged to take executive action to deal with our broken immigration system in the months ahead.

 

That’s what this President is focused on. If you want to see it continue, and are sick and tired of stunts like the House Republicans’ lawsuit, then say so:

 

http://www.whitehouse.gov/doing-his-job

 

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The Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion: Giving More People a Chance

 

On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed both Medicare and Medicaid into law. Over the past 49 years, Medicare has provided comprehensive coverage to millions of seniors and people with disabilities, while Medicaid has provided coverage for millions of the most vulnerable Americans: low-income parents, children, and those with disabilities.

 

Bill Sheshko

 

Because of the Affordable Care Act, states are expanding their Medicaid programs to cover more Americans, and today, Medicaid covers over 66 million Americans.

 

Bill Sheshko, a 55-year-old self-employed man from Fair Lawn, New Jersey, experienced the benefits of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion first hand. He’d been without health insurance for years, but with the Affordable Care Act, and because his state decided to expand Medicaid, he finally became eligible for Medicaid.

 

A few months ago, Bill began having difficulty breathing and noticed his legs and feet starting to swell. Because of his new coverage, Bill was able to make an appointment with his doctor and was subsequently diagnosed with congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar. After a few scary days in the hospital, he is now home and working with his doctors to control his conditions with medication and diet. In a letter to the President, Bill wrote about the true meaning of his health coverage: “At least now I have a chance, all because of you.”

 

 

Like Mr. Sheshko, 34-year-old California native Anna Smith was given a chance, in her case after a traumatic accident. When she was 21 years old, Anna Smith fell out of a tree at a church picnic and fractured one of the vertebrae in her spine. She was instantly paralyzed, preventing her from walking or feeling her legs. Medical care suddenly became essential to her life. Because of her condition, she became one of over 3.7 million disabled Americans covered under both Medicare and Medicaid.

 

Anna Smith

 

Over the past 13 years since her accident, Medicare and Medicaid have helped Anna adjust to her new life and made it possible for her to pursue a master’s degree in social work. Anna wrote to President Obama to express her gratitude for the federal government’s Medicaid and Medicare programs: “I have been able to receive quality medical care without having to decide whether to pay a prescription copay or my electric bill.”

 

No one should have to make the choice between their health and paying the bills. There are millions of hardworking Americans across the country like Bill and Anna who rely on Medicaid and Medicare to get the health coverage they deserve. As Bill wrote in his letter to the President, “I think people have the wrong idea of what Medicaid is. I was doing good, and then the economic downturn happened, and suddenly I wasn’t doing so good.”

 

Forty-nine years ago, our country made a promise to older, disabled, and low-income Americans that they would have the medical care they need to live happier and healthier lives. Today, because of Medicare and Medicaid, millions of Americans are provided the same chance that Bill and Anna had. Millions more would benefit if all states expanded Medicaid under the health care law.

 

In speaking for millions of Americans across the country, Bill wrote to President Obama, “If this happened only 10 months ago I might be dead, or losing the house in which I was born and inherited from my parents. You have changed America, Mr. President. You saved my life and I will be forever grateful.”

 

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Statements and Releases – July 30th, 2014

 

Remarks by National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice “Africa and America: Partners in a Shared Future”

 

G-7 Leaders Statement on Ukraine

 

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First Lady Michelle LaVaughn Obama: Mandela Washington Fellowship For Young African Leaders Summit.


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Remarks by the First Lady at the Summit of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders

 

The Omni Shoreham Hotel
Washington, D.C.

11:01 A.M. EDT

 

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MRS. OBAMA:  Oh, my goodness.  Look at you all!  (Applause.)  Oh, please sit, sit.  Rest.  (Laughter.)  How has everything been?  Exciting?  So you’ve talked to a lot of important people — my husband, he was here.  (Applause.)  That’s good.  And a few other people?  You’ve been traveling around the country doing great things.  It is such a pleasure, and such an honor and a joy to join you here today for this wonderful summit.

 

Let me start by thanking John for that beautiful introduction, but more importantly, for his outstanding leadership for young people — in particular, young girls — in Uganda.  And I want to take a moment to thank all of you for being part of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders.  Yes.  (Applause.)  We have been so excited about your presence here in this country.  We have been so excited.

 

Now, I’ve had the opportunity to read through your bios, and I have to tell you that I am truly in awe of what you all have achieved.  Many of you are barely half my age, yet you already have founded businesses and NGOs, you’ve served as leaders in your government, you’ve earned countless degrees, you know dozens of languages.  So you all truly represent the talent, the energy and the diversity that is Africa’s lifeblood, and it is an honor to host you here in the United States.  (Applause.)  We’re so proud.

 

Now, from what I’ve heard, you all have been making good use of this time here.  You’ve been learning new skills, questioning old assumptions, and having some frank conversations with experts and with each other about the challenges and opportunities in your countries.  And I want to use our time together today to continue that dialogue.  Today, I want us to talk -– and I mean really talk.  I want to speak as openly and honestly as possible about the issues we care about and what it means to be a leader not just in Africa but in the world today.

 

Now, one of the issues that I care deeply about is, as John alluded to, girls’ education.  And across the globe, the statistic on this issue are heartbreaking.  Right now, 62 million girls worldwide are not in school, including nearly 30 million girls in Sub-Saharan Africa.  And as we saw in Pakistan, where Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen, and in Nigeria where more than 200 girls were kidnapped from their school dormitory by Boko Haram terrorists, even when girls do attend school, they often do so at great risk.

 

And as my husband said earlier this week, we know that when girls aren’t educated, that doesn’t just limit their prospects, leaving them more vulnerable to poverty, violence and disease, it limits the prospects of their families and their countries as well.

 

Now, in recent years, there’s been a lot of talk about how to address this issue, and how we need more schools and teachers, more money for toilets and uniforms, transportation, school fees.  And of course, all of these issues are critically important, and I could give a perfectly fine speech today about increasing investments in girls’ education around the world.

 

But I said I wanted to be honest.  And if I do that, we all know that the problem here isn’t only about resources, it’s also about attitudes and beliefs.  It’s about whether fathers and mothers think their daughters are as worthy of an education as their sons.  It’s about whether societies cling to outdated laws and traditions that oppress and exclude women, or whether they view women as full citizens entitled to fundamental rights.

 

So the truth is, I don’t think it’s really productive to talk about issues like girls’ education unless we’re willing to have a much bigger, bolder conversation about how women are viewed and treated in the world today.  (Applause.)  And we need to be having this conversation on every continent and in every country on this planet.  And that’s what I want to do today with all of you, because so many of you are already leading the charge for progress in Africa.

 

Now, as an African American woman, this conversation is deeply personal to me.  The roots of my family tree are in Africa.  As you know, my husband’s father was born and raised in Kenya — (applause) — and members of our extended family still live there.  I have had the pleasure of traveling to Africa a number of times over the years, including four trips as First Lady, and I have brought my mother and my daughters along with me whenever I can.  So believe me, the blood of Africa runs through my veins, and I care deeply about Africa’s future.  (Applause.)

 

Now, the status of women in Africa is also personal to me as a woman.  See, what I want you all to understand is that I am who I am today because of the people in my family -– particularly the men in my family -– who valued me and invested in me from the day I was born.  I had a father, a brother, uncles, grandfathers who encouraged me and challenged me, protected me, and told me that I was smart and strong and beautiful.  (Applause.)

 

And as I grew up, the men who raised me set a high bar for the type of men I’d allow into my life — (applause) — which is why I went on to marry a man who had the good sense to fall in love with a woman who was his equal — (applause) — and to treat me as such; a man who supports and reveres me, and who supports and reveres our daughters, as well.  (Applause.)

 

And throughout my life — understand this — every opportunity I’ve had, every achievement I’m proud of has stemmed from this solid foundation of love and respect.  So given these experiences, it saddens and confuses me to see that too often, women in some parts of Africa are still denied the rights and opportunities they deserve to realize their potential.

 

Now, let’s be very clear:  In many countries in Africa, women have made tremendous strides.  More girls are attending school.  More women are starting businesses.  Maternal mortality has plummeted.  And more women are serving in parliaments than ever before.  In fact, in some countries, more than 30 percent of legislators are women.  In Rwanda, it’s over 50 percent — which, by the way, is more than double the percentage of women in the U.S. Congress.  Yes.  (Applause.)

 

Now, these achievements represent remarkable progress.  But at the same time, when girls in some places are still being married off as children, sometimes before they even reach puberty; when female genital mutilation still continues in some countries; when human trafficking, rape and domestic abuse are still too common, and perpetrators are often facing no consequences for their crimes — then we still have some serious work to do in Africa and across the globe.

 

And while I have great respect for cultural differences, I think we can all agree that practices like genital cutting, forced child marriage, domestic violence are not legitimate cultural practices, they are serious human rights violations and have no place in any country on this Earth.  (Applause.)  These practices have no place in our shared future, because we all know that our future lies in our people -– in their talent, their ambition, their drive.  And no country can ever truly flourish if it stifles the potential of its women and deprives itself of the contributions of half of its citizens.

 

And I know this firsthand from the history of my own country.  A century ago, women in America weren’t allowed to vote.  Decades ago, it was perfectly legal for employers to refuse to hire women.  Domestic violence was viewed not as a crime, but as a private family matter between a man and his wife.

 

But in each generation, people of conscience stood up and rejected these unjust practices.  They chained themselves to the White House gates, waged hunger strikes in prison to win the right to vote.  They took their bosses to court.  They spoke out about rape and fought to prosecute rapists, despite the stigma and shame.  They left their abusive husbands, even when that meant winding up on the streets with their children.  (Applause.)

 

And today in America, we see the results of those hard-fought battles:  60 percent of college students today are women.  Women are now more than half the workforce.  And in recent decades, women’s employment has added nearly $2 trillion to the U.S. economy -– yes, trillion.  (Applause.)

 

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Now, are we anywhere near full economic, political, and domestic equality in the United States?  Absolutely not.  We still struggle every day with serious issues like violence against women, unequal pay.  Women are still woefully underrepresented in our government and in the senior ranks of our corporations.

 

But slowly, generation after generation, we’ve been moving in the right direction because of brave individuals who were willing to risk their jobs, their reputations, and even their lives to achieve equality.  And it wasn’t just brave women who made these sacrifices.  It was also brave men, too — (applause) — men who hired women, men who passed laws to empower women, men who prosecuted other men who abused women.

 

So to all the men, my brothers here today, I have a simple message:  We need you to shake things up.  (Applause.)  Too often, women are fighting these battles alone, but men like you, progressive men who are already ahead of the curve on women’s issues, you all are critically important to solving this problem.

 

And that starts by doing a little introspection.  And I say this not just to the 250 of you who are in the room today, but to men around the world.  Men in every country need to look into their hearts and souls and ask themselves whether they truly view and treat women as their equals.  (Applause.)  And then when you all encounter men in your lives who answer no to that question, then you need to take them to task.  You need to tell them that any man who uses his strength to oppress women is a coward, and he is holding back the progress of his family and his country.  (Applause.)

 

Tell them that a truly strong, powerful man isn’t threatened by a strong, powerful woman.  (Applause.)  Instead, he is challenged by her, he is inspired by her, he is pleased to relate to her as an equal.  And I want you to keep modeling that behavior yourselves by promoting women in your companies, passing laws to empower women in your countries, and holding the same ambitious dreams for your daughters as you do for your sons.

 

And to the women here, my sisters –

 

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

 

MRS. OBAMA:  And I love you.  I do.  (Applause.)  Which is why I want us as women to understand that oppression is not a one-way street.

 

See, too often, without even realizing it, we as women internalize the oppression we face in our societies by believing harmful messages about how we should look and act, particularly as women of color –- messages that tell us that we’re ugly or irrelevant, that we don’t deserve full control over our bodies, that we should keep our mouths shut and just do as we’re told.  And then, too often, we turn around and impose those same beliefs on other women and girls in our lives, including our own daughters.

 

For example, in countries across the globe, there are women who still support and carry out the practice of genital cutting.  There are women who are still insisting on marrying off their young daughters or keeping them home from school to help with the housework.

 

And then there are the more subtle harms that we afflict — inflict on each other — the harm of spurning our sisters who don’t conform to traditions because we’re jealous or suspicious of their courage and their freedom; the harm of turning a blind eye when a woman in our community is being abused because we don’t want to cause conflict with our neighbors by speaking up.

 

And I imagine that for some of you here today, getting your degree might have meant disobeying or disappointing your families.  Maybe while you’ve been acing your studies and thriving in your career, you have a grandmother who has been wringing her hands because you’re not yet married.  (Laughter and applause.)  But, my sisters, you all are here today because you have found a way to overcome these challenges, and you have blossomed into powerful, accomplished women.  And we need you all to help others do the same.

 

All of us, men and women on every continent, we all need to identify these problems in ourselves and in our communities, and then commit to solving them.  And I say this to you not just as lawyers and activists and business leaders, but as current and future parents.  Because as a mother myself, I can tell you that this is where change truly happens.  With the behavior we model, with our actions and inactions, every day, we as parents shape the values of the next generation.

 

For example, my parents never had the chance to attend university, but they had the courage and foresight to push me to get the best education I could.  And they weren’t threatened by the prospect of me having more opportunities than they had — just the opposite.  They were thrilled.

 

And that’s what should drive us all:  The hope of raising the next generation to be stronger, smarter and bolder than our generation.  (Applause.)  And that is exactly the kind of work that so many of you are already doing in your families and your communities, which is why I’m so proud of you.

 

I could name all of you, but there are a few of you that I will remark on.  Mahamadou Camara from Mali.  (Applause.)  He is working to educate women about micro-credit and accounting so that they can run their own businesses and build better lives for their children.  In Liberia, Patrice Juah.  (Applause.)  She founded Miss Education Awareness Pageant to inspire girls to pursue higher education and have opportunities their parents never dreamed of.  And in Burundi, Fikiri Nzoyisenga.  (Applause.)  He created a youth coalition to fight violence against women because he doesn’t want anything to hold them back from pursuing their dreams.

 

This is where Africa’s future lies –- with those women-run businesses, with those girls attending university, and with leaders like you who are making those dreams possible.  And the question today is how all of you and young people like you will steer Africa’s course to embrace that future.  Because ultimately, that’s what leadership is really about.  It’s not just about holding degrees or holding elected office.  And it’s not about preserving our own power or continuing traditions that oppress and exclude.

 

Leadership is about creating new traditions that honor the dignity and humanity of every individual.  Leadership is about empowering all of our people –- men, women, boys and girls –- to fulfill every last bit of their God-given potential.   And when we commit to that kind of leadership across the globe, that is when we truly start making progress on girls’ education.  Because that’s when families in small villages around the world will demand equal opportunities for their daughters.  They won’t wait.  That’s when countries will willingly and generously invest in sending their girls to school, because they’ll know how important it is.

 

And we all know the ripple effects we can have when we give our girls a chance to learn.  We all know that girls who are educated earn higher wages.  They’re more likely to stand up to discrimination and abuse.  They have healthier children who are more likely to attend school themselves.

 

So no matter where you all work, no matter what issue you focus on — whether it’s health or microfinance, human rights or clean energy — women’s equality must be a central part of your work.  It must.  (Applause.)  Because make no mistake about it, the work of transforming attitudes about women, it now falls on your shoulders.  And it’s up to you all to embrace the future, and then drag your parents and grandparents along with you.  (Laughter.)

 

And I know this won’t be easy.  I know that you will face all kinds of obstacles and resistance — you already have.  But when you get tired or frustrated, when things seem hopeless and you start thinking about giving up, I want you to remember the words of the man whom your fellowship is now named — and I know these words have been spoken many times.  As Madiba once said, “It always seems impossible until it is done.”  And I, oh, I know the truth of those words from my own history and from the history of my country.

 

My ancestors came here in chains.  My parents and grandparents knew the sting of segregation and discrimination.  Yet I attended some of the best universities in this country.  I had career opportunities beyond my wildest dreams.  And today, I live in the White House, a building — (applause) — but we must remember, we live in a home that was constructed by slaves.

 

Today, I watch my daughters –- two beautiful African American girls -– walking our dogs in the shadow of the Oval Office.  And today, I have the privilege of serving and representing the United States of America across the globe.

 

So my story and the story of my country is the story of the impossible getting done.  And I know that can be your story and that can be Africa’s story too.  (Applause.)  But it will take new energy, it will take new ideas, new leadership from young people like you.  That is why we brought you here today.

 

We’ve done this because we believe in Africa, and we believe in all of you.  And understand we are filled with so much hope and so many expectations for what you will achieve.  You hold the future of your continent in your hands, and I cannot wait to see everything you will continue to accomplish in the years ahead.

 

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Thank you.  God bless.  (Applause.)

END
11:26 A.M. EDT

 

The Young African Leaders Initiative

 

Published on Jul 28, 2014

The Obama administration’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) is a signature effort to invest in the next generation of African leaders. Nearly 1 in 3 Africans are between the ages of 10 and 24, and approximately 60 percent of Africa’s total population is below the age of 35. President Obama launched YALI in 2010 to support young African leaders as they spur growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Africa.

 

 

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The President Holds a Town Hall with Young African Leaders

 

Published on Jul 28, 2014

President Obama delivers remarks at the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders Presidential Summit Town Hall in Washington, D.C., July 28, 2014.

 

 

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Where In The World Is Barack™: Kansas City, Missouri.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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On Wednesday, while in Kansas City, the President will deliver remarks on the economy

 

In the morning, the President will deliver remarks on the economy at the Uptown Theater. This event is open to pre-credentialed media. 

 

In the afternoon, the President will depart Kansas City, Missouri en route Washington, DC. The departure from Kansas City International Airport is open to pre-credentialed media, and the arrival on the South Lawn is open press.

 

White House Schedule – July 30th, 2014

 

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
HuMpDaY July 30th, 2014

 

WEEKLY GUIDANCE AND SCHEDULE FOR
HuMpDaY, JULY 30th, 2014 

 

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Wednesday, July 30th, 2014  All Times ET

 

12:05 PM: The President delivers remarks on the economy. Local Event Time:11:05 AM, Uptown Theatre.

 

2:15 PM: The President departs Kansas City, Missouri en route Washington, DC. Local Event Time:1:15 PM, Kansas City International Airport.

 

4:25 PM; The President arrives Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

4:40 PM: The President arrives the White House, South Lawn.

 

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White House Live

 

Next Up

 

July 30, 2014 12:00 PM EDT

World Hepatitis Day 2014

The White House, White House LIVE Streaming

 

 

 

July 30, 2014 12:05 PM EDT

President Obama Speaks on the Economy

Kansas City, Missouri, White House LIVE Streaming

 

US President Barack Obama holds his first Twitter Town Hall

 

On Thursday, the President will deliver remarks at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. In the evening, the President and First Lady will host “A Celebration of Special Olympics and A Unified Generation” at the White House to mark the anniversary of the Special Olympics.

 

On Friday, the President will attend meetings at the White House.

 

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Will you stop this?

 

Published on Jul 28, 2014

Warning: Some may find this video disturbing.
Stop violence again women. Text SAFER to 877-877 to urge your senator to support legislation that will keep domestic abusers from getting guns. #SaveWomensLives

 

 

Still think the 2nd amendment is for gun ownership?

 

 

How to Respond to Open Carry Activists Part 1

 

As most people know, there are activists in Texas who are making a point of going to public places with visible firearms. They have gotten a lot of attention because some chain restaurants and stores have prohibited them from openly carrying their weapons, mostly because it frightens other patrons.

 

This fear is legitimate. As many have pointed out, there is no way for bystanders to know whether the people with guns are “good guys” or “bad guys.” It is rational to be afraid of someone with a weapon, especially if you know nothing about them.

 

 

 

How to Respond to Open Carry Activists Part 2

 

 

 

Cops approach open carry patriot, Auburn WA July 4

 

 

 

“How Much?”

 

 

 

Former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura on defamation suit victory

 

Published on Jul 30, 2014

Former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura joins the “CBS This Morning” co-hosts to discuss the details of his legal battle with a former U.S. sniper. A federal jury deliberated for six days and awarded Ventura $1.8 million dollars.

 

 

 

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Statements and Releases

 

White House Announces New Executive Secretary / Chief of Staff for the National Security Council Staff

Today, National Security Adviser Susan E. Rice announced that Suzy George will be named Deputy Assistant to the President, Executive Secretary of the National Security Council and Chief of Staff of the National Security Council staff.  Ms. George will succeed Brian McKeon, who will soon depart the White House to become the Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy at the Department of Defense.

 

Ambassador Rice said, “Suzy George brings a wealth of foreign policy, government and management experience to this position, through her long service at the Department of State and as a principal with the Albright Stonebridge Group.  Her service at the highest levels of the State Department, where she engaged with senior leaders across the U.S. government and with foreign partners, gives me great confidence in her ability to lead the National Security Council staff.”

 

Ms. George has served as a principal at the Albright Stonebridge Group LLC, an international strategic consulting firm, and previously with The Albright Group LLC, since 2001.  From 1997-2001, Ms. George served as the Deputy Chief of Staff in the Department of State, overseeing the management and coordination of travel and meetings, as a liaison to the White House and other Cabinet departments, and working across the Department on a range of foreign policy initiatives for Secretary Madeleine  Albright.

 

Ms. George has a BA from Mount Holyoke College, and a JD from the George Washington University Law School.

 

 

Presidential Nomination Sent to the Senate

 

 

Statement by the President on the Confirmation of Bob McDonald as the Secretary of Veterans Affairs

I applaud the overwhelming, bipartisan confirmation of Bob McDonald as our next Secretary of Veterans Affairs.  As a veteran himself and a proud member of a military family, Bob is deeply committed to serving our veterans and their families.  And as an executive with decades of private-sector experience, he is uniquely equipped to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, and to help change the way the VA does business.  As a country, we have a solemn duty to serve our veterans as well as they have served us.  I know Bob will help us honor that commitment and make sure every veteran gets the care they deserve, the benefits they’ve earned, and the chance to pursue the American Dream they’ve risked so much to protect.

 

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July 29th, 2014: Photo of the Day

 

President Barack Obama walks from the Oval Office to deliver a statement on the situation in Ukraine, on the South Lawn of the White House, July 29, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

President Barack Obama walks from the Oval Office to deliver a statement on the situation in Ukraine, on the South Lawn of the White House, July 29, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

 

Advance Estimate of GDP for the Second Quarter of 2014

 

Economic growth in the second quarter was strong, consistent with the recent further improvement in the labor market and other indicators. The economy could do even better if Congress does its part to help — starting with taking the steps needed to ensure that work on our roads and bridges is not brought to a halt this fall. But to make further progress, the President is pressing ahead on his own authority, taking action to facilitate investments in American manufacturing, energy, and infrastructure.

FIVE KEY POINTS IN TODAY’S REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

1. Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 4.0 percent at an annual rate in the second quarter of 2014, according to the advance estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The second-quarter increase in GDP follows a first-quarter decline that was slightly less steep than previously reported. In the second quarter, growth in consumer spending and business investment picked up from the previous quarter, and residential investment increased following two straight quarters of decline. Additionally, state and local government spending grew at the fastest quarterly rate in five years. However, net exports subtracted from overall GDP growth, as imports grew faster than exports. Over the last four quarters, real GDP has risen 2.4 percent.

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