The Image Of A Strong Stable Black Family.


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This image is what racist caucasians in The United States Of AmeriKKKa hate most about President of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama and First Lady Of The United States Of America, Michelle LaVaughn Obama.

 

A portrait of a unified, strong, stable Black Family.

 

Racist caucasian have long viewed the Black family as splintered, broken, non-existent. And along comes this first family with a strong Black father, an even stronger Black mother, children who are precious in their intelligence and manners and knowledge of their roles as first children….and a Grandmother, Mother-In-Law and Mom who is the backbone of this historic Black family unit.

 

How dare these Negros be all that many AmeriKKKan families are not?

 

How dare this Black man be a Harvard graduate, President of The Harvard Law Review. Then have the audacity to be a community organizer to boot? How dare he imagine he could occupy the White Man’s House?

 

How dare this Negro woman, First Lady of the United States, raised on the South Side of Chicago, attended Princeton University and Harvard Law School before returning to Chicago to work at the law firm Sidley Austin, HOW DARE THEY!!

 

What an uppity bunch of colored folk.

 

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You see, many Black families in America exist, but our biased, unfair and unbalanced media refuses to put these Strong Stable Black Families on The Evening News.

 

Fear and loathing is further associated with the Black family by AmeriKKKan media in it’s many forms, but informed, intelligent Americans comprehend that America is comprised of many whole, complete, strong stable families of people of all colors, sexual orientations and religious beliefs.

 

Only the racist, moronic, idiots who want to believe in lies and misinformation of the Reich wing, choose to buy into caucasian families being the only “normal’ family units. Thats a myth.

 

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Parade Magazine: The President & First Lady Michelle Obama On Work, Family, And Juggling It All.

 

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The President and Michelle Obama on Work, Family, and Juggling It All

 

President Barack Obama and wife Michelle have never been your typical working stiffs. With four Ivy League degrees between them, they’ve enjoyed high incomes and strong job security. But before and during college, they each worked minimum-wage jobs. And there was a time when they felt the same kind of financial aches and marriage strains that today’s dual-income families know all too well. As a young married couple in Chicago, they were mired in student debt, juggling multiple jobs and two kids, and bickering over who did what housework. “I wouldn’t fold,” remembers the president. “I didn’t separate, and Michelle’s point was, that’s not laundry.”

 

Silly suds stories aside, the Obamas feel they’ve been there. They know what families need, especially America’s working moms. According to the Pew Research Center, a record 40 percent of households with children under the age of 18 are led by mothers who, much like the president’s own mother, are either the sole or primary breadwinner for the family. Of working mothers with very young children, one in five has a low-wage job.

 

On June 23, to help raise the national discussion of these issues, the president will host the White House Summit on Working Families in Washington, D.C., a listen, learn, and recommendation session open to business leaders, lawmakers, economists, and ordinary citizens. Says the president, “There are structures that can help families around child care, health care, and schooling that make an enormous difference in people’s lives.”

 

In a May 20 interview with Parade editor in chief -Maggie Murphy and contributing writer Lynn Sherr in the Oval Office, the first couple discussed their work experiences, what they hope to get done before they leave the White House, and their roots in the ordinary. The president, who once scooped ice cream at Baskin-Robbins, began by recalling his days as a waiter in an assisted living facility—a story that even surprised his wife.

 

Read the entire interview here at TheObamaCrat™

 

You see, this President and First Lady started out dirt poor, as many common everyday Americans start out their journey. Now most every past 43 POTUSA started out in The Oval Office wealthy, it’s why they can fun for the highest office in the land, cash.

 

This POTUSA was not wealthy, rich or even well off. Barack Hussein Obama broke the mold and the rules.

 

Barack also loves, respects and adores his wife, his children and his Mother-In-Law.

 

Real Love Looks Like This

 

“On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her and it tasted like chocolate.” – President Barack Hussein Obama from an interview in O, The Oprah Magazine. February , 2007.

 

 

 

Barack & Michelle

 

Barack & Michelle Showing The World What real Unity & Love Looks Like. This Is MY POTUSA!!

 

 

 

Another Black Man myth busted. The Black Family is alive and well In The United States Of America, unlike the lies, misinformation, racist rhetoric and media fear mongering currently floating around in The United States Of AmeriKKKa.

 

Now YOU know why racist caucasians hate Barack Hussein Obama, Michelle LaVaughn Obama, Natasha Obama, Malia Ann Obama and Marian Lois Robinson.

 

And The Un-supreme Court says Racism in AmeriKKKa is no more.

 

Yeah. Right. Uh-huh.

 

REMEMBER! everytown1

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February 7th Is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. Did You Know?


 

By Jueseppi B.

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What We Do

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD) is an HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative for Blacks in the United States and across the Diaspora.

 

There are four specific focal points: Get Educated, Get Tested, Get Involved, and Get Treated.

 

Get Educated

The focus of NBHAAD is to get Blacks educated about the basics of HIV and AIDS in their local communities.
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Get Tested

Testing is at the core of this initiative and is critical for prevention of HIV in Black communities. It is hoped that Blacks will mark February 7 of every year as their annual or bi-annual day to get tested for HIV. 

This is vital for those who are sexually active and those at high risk of contracting HIV.

 

 

Get Involved

Getting Blacks involved to host and participate in NBHAAD events is another key focus area. Whether it is organizing a testing and awareness event at a local college, speaking about the importance of HIV prevention and treatment at your local faith-based organizations, or supporting a local AIDS service provider, it is key that you get involved.

 

 

Get Treated

For those who have HIV, the connections to treatment and care services are paramount. Seeing a doctor and receiving care, and taking prescribed HIV medicines helps individuals stay healthy and reduces the risk of transmitting the virus to others. Without treatment, HIV leads to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and can lead to early death

 

 

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day February 7, 2014

 

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About National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day was conceived by five national organizations funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1999 to provide capacity building assistance to Black communities and organizations. The mobilization of communities begin in 2000 with these organizations: Concerned Black Men, Inc. of Philadelphia; Health Watch Information and Promotion Services, Inc.; Jackson State University – Mississippi Urban Research Center; National Black Alcoholism and Addictions Council; and National Black Leadership Commission.

 

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day began as a grass roots effort with hundreds of organizations registering events and/or activities to raise the awareness of HIV and AIDS in their communities. It is continually shaped around the needs of those communities that work hard each and every year to make it a success. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, African Americans have the most severe burden of HIV of all racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Compared with other races and ethnicities, African Americans account for a higher proportion of HIV infections at all stages of disease—from new infections to deaths.

 

February 7, 2014 marks the 14th year for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a national HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative targeted at Blacks in the United States and the Diaspora. There are four specific focal points: educate, test, involve, and treat. From aneducationally focal point, the task is to get African Americans educated about the basics of HIV/AIDS in their local communities. Since testing is at the core of this initiative, it is our intention to have February 7th become an annual or biannual day to get tested for HIV.

 

This is vital for those who are sexually active and those at high risk of contracting HIV. When it comes to community and organization leadership, getting Blacks involved to serve is another key focus. We need Black People from all walks of life, economic classes, literacy levels, shades and tones as well as communities (large and small) to get connected to the work happening on the ground in their local areas. And lastly, for those living with HIV or newly testing positive for the virus, getting them connected to treatment and care services becomes paramount. We have learned that you can’t lead Black people towards HIV/AIDS education, prevention, testing, leadership or treatment unless you love them. And, we can’t save Black people from an epidemic unless we serve Black people.

With the Affordable Care Act now in motion, it becomes particularly important for those who are at the highest risk of contracting HIV to get tested and connected to HIV/AIDS prevention, education, testing, and treatment programs and services in their area.  To learn more about the ACA and how it affects those loving with HIV/AIDS, see video below:

 

The Affordable Care Act and HIV – with Secretary of Health Kathleen Sebelius, HHS

 

Published on Jul 31, 2013

U.S. Secretary of Health, Kathleen Sebelius discusses the Affordable Care Act and how it benefits those at risk for or living with HIV. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/jvH3

 

 

 

Regardless of where we stand on sexual orientation, religious beliefs/values, age, income, education or otherwise; Black Life is worth saving and working for the betterment of our survival has to become our paramount objective and goal. “We know how it feels to lose someone from an illness, but we also know how to love someone through it. It is time for us to end AIDS in Black communities by making sure those living with HIV or AIDS take care of themselves. We stand on some strong shoulders that intended for us to survive.” says, LaMont “Montee” Evans, NBHAAD National Coordinator.

 

Since 2006, Healthy Black Communities, Inc. has served as the lead organization for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day under the leadership of LaMont “Montee” Evans who served as the Executive Director for Concerned Black Men, Inc. of Philadelphia and oversaw the initiative between 2003-2004.  Evans has been responsible for overseeing the initiative and coordinating communication via email, and regular mail; developing the imagery of the initiative annually; designing and maintaining the website; and ensuring orders and registrations are received and processed accordingly. February 7, 2014 will make the 11th year Evans has overseen NBHAAD either overall or through national partnerships.

 

This initiative has had an array of national spokespersons: congressional leaders, faith based leaders, entertainers, actors, actresses, authors, radio personalities, and the list goes on and on. Some of the most notable spokespersons have been: President Barack Obama during his term in the Illinois Senate, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, Bishop TD Jakes, Radio Personality Tom Joyner, former NAACP President and CEO Kwesi  Mfume,Congressman Elijah Cummings, Actor/Author Harper Hill, ScreenwriterPatrik Ian Polk, Ludacris, and so many more.

 

By working together, we can ensure future generations will not have to bury or watch others struggle with HIV/AIDS.  This is our time to show what we are made of.

 

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HIV/AIDS AWARENESS DAYS

 

 

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Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #10: Black Women Who Were Lynched In America.


 

By Jueseppi B.

Until "we" own it, and teach it, and accept responsibility for stealing Africans from their homeland to enslave them in America, there will always be a need for Black History Month.

Until “we” own it, and teach it, and accept responsibility for stealing Africans from their homeland to enslave them in America, there will always be a need for Black History Month.

 

Throughout the month Of February, TheObamaCrat™ will post a daily series called The Black History Moment Series. Each day for 28 days of this historic month you will be given the food of Black History to satisfy your hunger for knowledge. 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #10: Black Women Who Were Lynched In America.

 

Lynching in the United States

 

Unidentified Man and Two Women Lynched.

Unidentified Man and Two Women Lynched.

 

Lynching, the practice of killing people by extrajudicial mob action, occurred in the United States chiefly from the late 18th century through the 1960s. Lynchings took place most frequently against black men in theSouthern United States from 1890 to the 1920s, with a peak in the annual toll in 1892. Lynchings were also very common in the Old West, although victims were different.

 

Lynching in the South is associated with the whites re-imposition of white supremacy after the Civil War. The granting of U.S. Constitutional rights to freedmen in the Reconstruction era (1865–77) aroused anxieties among white Southerners, who were not ready to concede social status to African Americans, blaming the freedmen for their own wartime hardship, economic loss, and forfeiture of social and political privilege. During Reconstruction, Black Americans, and Whites active in the pursuit of integration rights, were sometimes lynched in the South.

 

In addition, blacks were intimidated and attacked to prevent their voting. Lynchings reached a peak in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, following the withdrawal of federal troops, and the Democrats taking back control of state legislatures: they passed new constitutions and electoral rules to disfranchise most blacks and many poor whites. They enacted a series of segregation and Jim Crow laws to reestablish White supremacy. During the Civil Rights Movement, violence erupted again; notable lynchings of integration rights workers during the 1960s in Mississippi resulted in the galvanizing of national public support for federal civil rights legislation.

 

The Tuskegee Institute has recorded 3,446 blacks and 1,297 whites being lynched between 1882 and 1968, with the peak annually in the late 19th century.

African Americans mounted resistance to lynchings in numerous ways. Intellectuals and journalists encouraged public education, actively protesting and lobbying against lynch mob violence and government complicity in that violence. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), as well as numerous other organizations, organized support from white and black Americans alike and conducted a national campaign to get a federal anti-lynching law passed.

 

African-American women’s clubs raised funds to support the work of public campaigns, including anti-lynching plays. Their petition drives, letter campaigns, meetings and demonstrations helped to highlight the issues and combat lynching. In the Great Migration, extending in two waves from 1910 to 1970, 6.5 million African Americans left the South, primarily for destinations in northern and mid-western cities, bot to gain better jobs and education, and to escape the high rate of violence.

 

From 1882 to 1968, “…nearly 200 anti-lynching bills were introduced in Congress, and three passed the House. Seven presidents between 1890 and 1952 petitioned Congress to pass a federal law.” In 1920 the Republican Party promised at its national convention to support passage of such a law. In 1921 Leonidas C. Dyer from Saint Louis sponsored an anti-lynching bill; it was passed in January 1922 in the United States House of Representatives, but a Senate filibuster by the Southern white Democratic block defeated it in December 1922. With the NAACP, Representative Dyer spoke across the country in support of his bill in 1923 and tried to gain passage that year and the next, but was defeated by the Southern Democratic block.

 

Jennie Steers
On July 25, 1903 a mob lynched Jennie Steers on the Beard Plantation in Louisiana for supposedly giving a white teenager, 16 year-old Elizabeth Dolan, a glass of poisoned lemonade. Before they killed her, the mob tried to force her to confess but she refused and was hanged. (100 Years at Lynching. Ralph Ginzburg)

 

Laura Nelson
Laura Nelson was lynched on May 23, 1911 In Okemah, Okluskee, Oklahoma. Her fifteen year old son was also lynched at the same time but I could not find a photo of her son. The photograph of Nelson was drawn from a postcard. Authorities accused her of killing a deputy sheriff who supposedly stumbled on some stolen goods in her house. Why they lynched her child is a mystery. The mob raped and dragged Nelson six miles to the Canadian River and hanged her from a bridge.(NAACP: One Hundred Years of Lynching in the US 1889-1918 )

 

Ann Barksdale or Ann Bostwick
The lynchers maintained that Ann Barksdale or Ann Bostwlck killed her female employer in Pinehurst, Georgia on June 24, 1912. Nobody knows if or why Barksdale or Bostick killed her employer because there was no trial and no one thought to take a statement from this Black woman who authorities claimed had ”violent fits of insanity” and should have been placed in a hospital. Nobody was arrested and the crowd was In a festive mood. Placed in a car with a rope around her neck, and the other end tied to a tree limb, the lynchers drove at high speed and she was strangled to death. For good measure the mob shot her eyes out and shot enough bullets Into her body that she was “cut in two.”

 

Marie Scott
March 31, 1914, a white mob of at least a dozen males, yanked seventeen year-old Marie Scott from jail, threw a rope over her head as she screamed and hanged her from a telephone pole in Wagoner County, Oklahoma. What happened? Two drunken white men barged Into her house as she was dressing. They locked themselves in her room and criminally “assaulted” her. Her brother apparently heard her screams for help, kicked down the door, killed one assailant and fled. Some accounts state that the assailant was stabbed. Frustrated by their inability to lynch Marie Scott’s brother the mob lynched Marie Scott. (Crisis 1914 and 100 Years of Lynching)

 

Mary Turner 1918 Eight Months Pregnant
Mobs lynched Mary Turner on May 17, 1918 in Lowndes County. Georgia because she vowed to have those responsible for killing her husband arrested. Her husband was arrested in connection with the shooting and killing Hampton Smith, a white farmer for whom the couple had worked, and wounding his wife. Sidney Johnson. a Black, apparently killed Smith because he was tired of the farmer’s abuse. Unable to find Johnson. the killers lynched eight other Blacks Including Hayes Turner and his wife Mary. The mob hanged Mary by her feet, poured gasoline and oil on her and set fire to her body. One white man sliced her open and Mrs. Turner’s baby tumbled to the ground with a “little cry” and the mob stomped the baby to death and sprayed bullets into Mary Turner. (NAACP: Thirty Years of Lynching in the U.S. 1889-1918  )

 

Maggie Howze and Alma Howze -Both Pregnant
Accused of the murder of Dr. E.L. Johnston in December 1918. Whites lynched Andrew Clark, age 15, Major Clark, age 20, Maggie Howze, age 20, and Alma Howze, age 16 from a bridge near Shutaba, a town in Mississippi. The local press described Johnston as being a wealthy dentist, but he did not have an established business in the true sense of the word. He sought patients by riding his buggy throughout the community offering his services to the public at large in Alabama.

 

Unable to make money “peddling” dentistry, the dentist returned to Mississippi to work on his father’s land near Shabuta. During his travels he had developed an intimate relationship with Maggie Howze. a Black woman who he had asked to move and lived with him. He also asked that she bring her sister Alma Howze along. While using the Black young women as sexual objects Johnson impregnated both of them though he was married and had a child. Three Black laborers worked on Johnston’s plantation, two of whom were brothers, Major and Andrew Clark. Major tried to court Maggie, but Johnson was violently opposed to her trying to create a world of her own that did not include him. To block a threat to his sexual fiefdom, Johnston threaten Clark’s life. Shortly after Johnston turned up dead and the finger was pointed at Major Clark and the Howze sisters. The whites picked up Major, his brother, Maggie and her sister and threw them in jail. To extract a confession from Major Clark, the authorities placed his testicles between the “jaws of a vise” and slowly closed it until Clark admitted that he killed Johnston.

 

White community members took the four Blacks out of jail, placed them in an automobile, turned the head lights out and headed to the lynching site. Eighteen other cars, carrying members of the mob, followed close behind. Someone shut the power plant down and the town fell into darkness. Ropes were placed around the necks of the four Blacks and the other ends tied to the girder of the bridge. Maggie Howze cried, “I ain’t guilty of killing the doctor and you oughtn’t to kill me.” Someone took a monkey wrench and “struck her In the mouth with It, knocking her teeth out. She was also hit across the head with the same instrument, cutting a long gash In which the side of a person’s hand could be placed.” While the three other Blacks were killed instantly, Maggie Howze, four months pregnant, managed to grab the side of the bridge to break her fall. She did this twice before she died and the mob joked about how difficult it was to kill that “big Jersey woman.” No one stepped forward to claim the bodies. No one held funeral services for the victims. The Black community demanded that the whites cut them down and bury them because they ‘lynched them.” The whites placed them in unmarked graves.

 

Alma Howze was on the verge of giving birth when the whites killed her. One witness claimed that at her “burial on the second day following, the movements of her unborn child could be detected.” Keep in mind, Johnston’s parents felt that the Blacks had nothing to do with their son’s death and that some irate white man killed him, knowing that the blame would fall on the Black’s shoulders. The indefatigable Walter White, NAACP secretary, visited the scene of the execution and crafted the report. He pressed Governor Bilbo of Mississippi to look into the lynching and Bilbo told the NAACP to go to hell. (NAACP: Thirty Years of Lynching in the U.S.. 1889-1918 ) (Papers of the NAACP)

 

Holbert Burnt at the Stake
Luther Holbert, a Black, supposedly killed James Eastland, a wealthy planter and John Carr, a negro, who lived near Doddsville Mississippi. After a hundred mile chase over four days, the mob of more than 1,000 persons caught Luther and his wife and tied them both to trees. They were forced to hold out their hands while one finger at a time was chopped off and their ears were cut off. Pieces of raw quivering flesh was pulled out of their arms, legs and body with a bore screw and kept for souvenirs. Holbert was beaten and his skull fractured. An eye was knocked out with a stick and hung from the socket. (100 Years of Lynching by Ralph Ginzburg)

 

 

WHO ARE OUR REAL HEROES?
American mobs lynched some 5.000 Blacks since 1859, scores of whom were women, several of them pregnant. Rarely did the killers spend time in jail because the white mobs and the government officials who protected them believed justice meant (just us) white folks. Lynching denied Blacks the right to a trial or the right to due process. No need for a lawyer and a jury of your peers: the white community decided what happened and what ought to be done. After the whites accused Laura Nelson of killing a white deputy In Oklahoma, they raped this Black woman, tied her to a bridge trestle and for good measure.

 

They lynched her son from a telephone pole. Had the white community reacted in horror after viewing the dangling corpses of Laura Nelson and her son? No, they came by the hundreds, making their way by cars, horse driven wagons, and by foot to view the lynching. Dressed in their Sunday best, holding their children’s hands and hugging their babies the white on-lookers looked forward to witnessing the spectacle of a modern day crucifixion. They snapped pictures of Laura Nelson, placed them on postcards and mailed them to their friends boasting about the execution. They chopped of f the fingers, sliced off the ears of Ms. Holbert, placed the parts In jars of alcohol and displayed them in their windows.

 

White America today know little or nothing about lynching because it contradicts every value America purports to stand for. Blacks, too, know far too little about the lynchings because the subject is rarely taught in school. Had they known more about these lynchings, I am almost certain that Blacks would have taken anyone to task, including gangster rappers, for calling themselves niggers or calling Black women “hoes” and “bitches.” How could anybody in their right mind call these Black women who were sexually abused, mutilated, tortured and mocked the same degrading Please do not throw this away. Give it to a friend or a names that the psychopathic lynchers called them? relative. Peace.

 

What Black woman in her right state of mind would snap her fingers or tap her feet toihe beat of a song that contained the same degrading remarks that the whites uttered when they raped and lynched them The lynchers and the thousands of gleeful spectators called these Black women niggers when they captured them, niggers when they placed the rope around their necks and niggers when their necks snapped. Whites viewed Black women as hated black things, for, how else can one explain the treatment of Mary Turner?

 

The lynch mob ignored her cries for mercy, ripped off her clothes, tied her ankles together, turned her upside down, doused her naked body with gas and oil, set her naked body on fire, ripped her baby out of her, stomped the child to death and laughed about it. Blacks purchased Winchesters to protect themselves, staged demonstrations, created anti-lynching organizations, pushed for anti-lynching legislation and published articles and books attacking the extralegal violence. Many pocked up. left the community never to return again. Others went through bouts of sadness, despair, and grief. Some broke down, a few went insane. Others probably fell on their knees, put their hands together, closed their eyes and begged Jesus for help.

 

Jesus help us. Do not forsake us. But Jesus. the same white man the lyncher’s ancestors taught us to love, never flew out of the bush in a flame of fire armed with frogs and files and locusts to save Mary Turner. No thunder, no rain, no hail and no fire blocked the lynchers from hanging Laura Nelson. He did not see the “affliction” of the Holberts; he did not hear the screams of Marie Scott or the cry of Jennifer Steers.

 

So who are our real heroes?. Little Kim Is not a hero. Oprah is not a hero.. Whoople Goldberg is not a hero. Michael Jordan is not a hero. Dennis Rodman Is not a hero. They are entertainers, sport figures. creations of the media, media icons and they are about making huge sums of money and we wish these enterprising stars well. . Mary Turner, Laura Nelson, Marie Scott and Jennie Steers are your true historical heroes. Niggers they were not. Bitches they were not. Hoes they were not. They will not go down in history for plastering their bodies with tattoos, inventing exotic diets, endorsing Gator Ade, embracing studIo gangsterism, They were strong beautiful Black women who suffered excruciating pain, died horrible deaths. Their legacy of -strength lives on. These are my heroes. Make them yours as well.

 
Below are women who were lynched in addition to the initial findings of Dr. Daniel Meaders. They can be found in the pages of the book 100 Years of Lynching by Ralph Ginzburg.

 

Mae Murray Dorsey and Dorothy Malcolm
On July 25, 1946, four young African Americans—George & Mae Murray Dorsey and Roger & Dorothy Malcom—were shot hundreds of times by 12 to 15 unmasked white men in broad daylight at the Moore’s Ford bridge spanning the Apalachee River, 60 miles east of Atlanta, Georgia. These killings, for which no one was ever prosecuted, enraged President Harry Truman and led to historic changes, but were quickly forgotten in Oconee and Walton Counties where they occurred. No one was ever brought to justice for the crime.

 

Ballie Crutchfield
Around midnight on March 15, 1901 Ballie Crutchfield was taken from her home in Rome to a bridge over Round Lick Creek by a mob. There her hands were tied behind her, and she was shot through the head and then thrown in the creek. Her body was recovered the next day and an inquest found that she met her death at the hands of persons unknown (euphemism for lynching).

 

After Walter Sampson lost a pocketbook containing $120, it was found by a little boy. As he went to return it to its owner, William Crutchfield, Ballie’s brother, met the boy. Apparently, the boy gave him the pocketbook after being convinced it had no value. Sampson had Crutchfield arrested and taken to the house of one Squire Bains.

 

A mob came to take Crutchfield for execution. On the way he broke lose and escaped in the dark. The mob was so blind with rage they lay blame on Ballie as a co-conspirator in her brother’s alleged crime and proceeded to enact upon their beliefs culminating in the aforementioned orgy of inhumanity.

 

Belle Hathaway
At 9 o’clock the night of January 23, 1912 100 men congregated in front of the Hamilton, Georgia courthouse. They then broke into the Harris County Jail. After overpowering Jailor E.M. Robinson they took three men and a woman one mile from town.

 

Belle Hathaway, John Moore, Eugene Hamming, and “Dusty” Cruthfield were in jail after being charged with the shooting death a farmer named Norman Hadley.

 

Writhing bodies silhouetted against the sky as revolvers and rifles blazed forth a cacophony of 300 shots at the victims before the mob dispersed.

 

Sullivan Couple Hung as Deputy Sheriff and Posse Watch
Fred Sullivan and his wife were hanged after being accused of burning a barn on a plantation near Byhalia, Mississippi November 25, 1914. The deputy sheriff and his posse were forced to watch the proceedings.

 

Cordella Stevenson Raped and Lynched
Wednesday, December 8, 1915 Cordella Stevenson was hung from the limb of a tree without any clothing about fifty yards north of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad outside Columbus, Mississippi. The gruesomely horrific scene was witnessed by thousands and thousands of passengers who traveled in and out of the city the next morning.

 

She was hung there by a bloodthirsty mob who had taken her from slumber, husband and home to the spot where she was raped and lynched. All this was done after she had been brought to the police station for questioning in connection with the arson of Gabe Frank’s barn. Her son had been suspected of the fire. The police released her after she convinced them her son had left home several months prior and she did not know his whereabouts.

 

After going to bed early, a knock was heard at the door. Her husband, Arch Stevenson went to answer, but the door was broken down first and his wife was seized. He was threatened with rifle barrels to his head should he move.

 

The body was left hanging until Friday morning. An inquest returned a verdict of “death at the hands of persons unknown.”

 

5 Hanged on One Oak Tree
Three men and two women were taken from the jail in Newberry, Florida on August 19, 1916 and hanged by a mob. Another man was shot by deputy sheriffs near Jonesville, Florida. All this was the result of the killing the day prior of Constable S.G. Wynne and the shooting of Dr. L.G. Harris by Boisey Long. Those who were lynched had been accused of aiding Long in his escape.

 

Mary Conley
After Sam Conley had been reprimanded by E.M. Melvin near Arlington, Georgia, his mother Mary intervened to express her resentment. After Melvin slapped and grappled with her, Sam Conley struck Melvin on the head with an iron scale weight, resulting in his death shortly afterward.

 

Although Sam escaped, his mother was captured and jailed. She was taken from the jail at Leary and her body was riddled with bullets. Her remains were found along the roadside by parties entering into Arlington the next morning.

 

Bertha Lowman
Demon Lowman, Bertha Lowman, and their cousin Clarence Lowman were in the Aiken, South Carolina jail when it was raided by a mob early on October 8, 1926. The three had been in jail for a year and a half while they were tried for the murder of Sheriff and Klansman Henry H.H. Howard. Howard was shot in the back while raiding the house of Sam Lowman, father to Bertha and Demon. Klansmen filed by Howard’s body two-by-two when it laid in state. A year after his funeral a cross was burned in the cemetery at his grave.

 

Although the Lowman’s were tried and sentenced to death, a State Supreme Court reversed the findings and ordered a new trial. Demon had just been found not guilty when the raid on the jail occurred. Taken to a pine thicket just beyond the city limits their bodies were riddled with bullets.

 

The events which resulted in this lynching are surreal to say the least. Samuel Lowman was away from home at a mill having meal ground on April 25, 1925. Sheriff Howard and three deputies appeared at the Lowman Cabin three miles from Aiken. Annie Lowman, Samuel’s wife and their daughter Bertha were out back of the house working. Their family had never been in any kind of trouble. They did not know the sheriff and he did not know them. Furthermore, they were not wearing any uniform or regalia depicting them as law enforcers. Hence the alarming state of mind they had when four white men entered their yard unannounced, even if it was on a routine whiskey check. It was even more distressing because a group of white men had come to the house a few weeks earlier and whipped Demon for no reason at all. After speaking softly to each other the women decided to go in the house.

 

When the men saw the women move towards the house they drew their revolvers and rushed forward. Sheriff Howard reached the back step at the same time as Bertha. He struck her in the mouth with his pistol butt. Mrs. Lowman picked up an axe and rushed to her daughter’s aid. A deputy emptied his revolver into the old woman killing her.

 

Demon and Clarence were working in a nearby field when they heard Bertha’s scream. Demon retrieved a pistol from a shed while Clarence armed himself with a shotgun. The deputies shot at Demon, who returned fire. Clarence’s actions are not clear. When it was all over a few seconds later the Sheriff was dead. Bertha had received two gunshots to the chest just above her heart. Clarence and Demon were wounded also. In total five members of the Lowman family were in put jail.

 

Samuel Lowman returned to find in his absence he had become a widower with four of his children in jail along with his nephew. In three days he would be charged with harboring illegal liquor when a quarter of a bottle of the substance is found in his backyard. For that the elderly farmer was sentenced to two years on the chain gang.

 

18 year old Bertha, 22 year old Demon and 15 year old Clarence were tried for the Sheriff’s murder and swiftly found guilty. The men were sentenced to death with Bertha given a life sentence.

 

Demon’s acquittal made it appear that Clarence and Bertha would been freed as well. The day they were murdered they were taken from the jail, driven to a tourist a few miles from town and set loose. As they ran they were shot down.

 

Mr. Lowman contended one of the deputies who coveted the Sheriff’s job was his real killer. The same man later led the mob which slew Lowman’s children and nephew. Apparently, he knew they could identify him as the culprit.

 

This piece was originally posted by Ms. Henrietta Vinton Davis’s Weblog. Please visit her informative, factual & true web site for more Black History.

 

The lynching of Laura Nelson

The lynching of Laura Nelson

 

Black Women who were Lynched in America

 

(Note: this post  is just a partial list of Black Women who were lynched in America.  More research has revealed there are over 150 documented cases of African American women lynched in America.  Four of them were known to have been pregnant. You can see the full list at the post Recorded Cases of Black Female Lynching Victims 1886-1957: More on Black Women Who Were Lynched.)

 

 

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Strange Fruit

Southern trees bear strange fruit
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze
Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees

 

Pastoral scene of the gallant south
The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth
Scent of magnolias, sweet and fresh
Then the sudden smell of burning flesh

 

Here is fruit for the crows to pluck
For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck
For the sun to rot, for the trees to drop
Here is a strange and bitter crop

 

 

 

 

More Black Women who were Lynched

 

 

Black History Month 2014 Presents: Celebrating Black History Month; The Black History Moment Series.

 

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #1. Slavery.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #2. The Middle Passage.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #3. Post Racial AmeriKKKa.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #4 The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #5 Rosewood, Florida. The Rosewood Massacre.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #6: The Destruction of The Black Family.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #7: Black Indians In The United States.

 

 

Happy 101st Birthday Ms. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #8: Charles H. Wright Museum Of African American History.

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #9: The History Of Slavery In America.

 

 

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Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #9: The History Of Slavery In America.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Throughout the month Of February, TheObamaCrat™ will post a daily series called The Black History Moment Series. Each day for 28 days of this historic month you will be given the food of Black History to satisfy your hunger for knowledge. 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #9: The History Of Slavery In America.

 

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Slavery in the United States began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia in 1607 and lasted as a legal institution until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865. It continues illegally to this day.

 

The History of Slavery In America

 

 

 

Before the widespread establishment of chattel slavery, much labor was organized under a system of bonded labor known as indentured servitude. This typically lasted for several years for white and black alike, and it was a means of using labor to pay the costs of transporting people to the colonies.

 

By the 18th century, court rulings established the racial basis of the American incarnation of slavery to apply chiefly to Black Africans and people of African descent, and occasionally to Native Americans.

 

A 1705 Virginia law stated slavery would apply to those peoples from nations that were not Christian. In part because of the success of tobacco as a cash crop in the Southern colonies, its labor-intensive character caused planters to import more slaves for labor by the end of the 17th century than did the northern colonies.

 

The South had a significantly higher number and proportion of slaves in the population. Religious differences contributed to this geographic disparity as well.

 

From 1654 until 1865, slavery for life was legal within the boundaries of much of the present United States. Most slaves were black and were held by whites, although some Native Americans and free blacks also held slaves; there were a small number of white slaves as well. The majority of slave holding was in the southern United States where most slaves were engaged in an efficient machine-like gang system of agriculture.

 

According to the 1860 U.S. census, nearly four million slaves were held in a total population of just over 12 million in the 15 states in which slavery was legal. Of all 8,289,782 free persons in the 15 slave states, 393,967 people (4.8%) held slaves, with the average number of slaves held by any single owner being 10.

 

The majority of slaves were held by planters, defined by historians as those who held 20 or more slaves.Ninety-five percent of black people lived in the South, comprising one-third of the population there, as opposed to 2% of the population of the North. The wealth of the United States in the first half of the 19th century was greatly enhanced by the labor of African Americans.

 

But with the Union victory in the American Civil War, the slave-labor system was abolished in the South. This contributed to the decline of the postbellum Southern economy, but it was most affected by the continuing decline in the price of cotton through the end of the century.

 

That made it difficult for the region to recover from the war, as did its comparative lack of infrastructure, which kept products from markets. The South faced significant new competition from foreign cotton producers such as India and Egypt. Northern industry, which had expanded rapidly before and during the war, surged even further ahead of the South’s agricultural economy.

 

Industrialists from northeastern states came to dominate many aspects of the nation’s life, including social and some aspects of political affairs. The planter class of the South lost power temporarily. The rapid economic development following the Civil War accelerated the development of the modern U.S. industrial economy.

 

Twelve million Africans were shipped to the Americas from the 16th to the 19th centuries Of these, an estimated 645,000 were brought to what is now the United States. The largest number were shipped to Brazil. The slave population in the United States had grown to four million by the 1860 Census.

 

Africa’s Slave Trade to Colonialism to Liberation

 

 

 

The history behind Africa’s slave trade, how it started, and where in Africa it began first. African chiefs used to sell their own people in exchange for valued goods, or treasured assets. Then, when the Europeans arrived they began trading with them. The Europeans offered what they had in exchange for slaves and the slave trade became a widely known, and relevant phenomenon in most parts of the world.

 

America and Europe needed people who could do hard labor, who could do their work for them which were rigorous tasks. Slave traders came along the African coast, which was the Sub-region (South of the Sahara) to acquire slaves. They would get them in large numbers and pack them inside the ships they came with. Then, in the 1800s the slave trade was abolished by Abraham Lincoln and then European colonialism/imperialism became the new system in which mainly the Europeans created to strengthen their nations.

 

The necessity of raw materials, namely natural resources, led to European colonization. Also, to establish colonies which were brought up in the ways of the colonial powers, particularly Britain, France, Belgium, Portugal, Germany, among others in order to extend their influence both culturally, politically, socially, and religiously. The geographic borders one sees on the map today of Africa, were designed by the European colonial powers who wanted to divide the continent into sections whereby it would be clear who’s colony was where, and that each colony would stay within boundaries.

 

This was carried out in 1884 in Berlin, Germany. Africa’s resources were being exported immensely to the nations which ruled over certain colonies there, thus being distributed out to the rest of the world. After World War 2 and the establishment of the United Nations, nationalists movements began which internal self government came into focus and practice, thus leading to independence, sovereignty, and the emancipation /liberation of the African continent.

 

Pan Africanists/nationalists/freedom fighters like Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Sekou Toure, among others came into being and agitated for independence.

 

 

African History BEFORE Slavery

 

 

 

Black History Month 2014 Presents: Celebrating Black History Month; The Black History Moment Series.

 

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

BLACK HISTORY: A slave auction was held near this location in Zanzibar for many years. This is an image of a sculpture, Memory for the Slaves by Clara Sörnäs, concrete, 1998.

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #1. Slavery.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #2. The Middle Passage.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #3. Post Racial AmeriKKKa.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #4 The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month: The Black History Moment Series #5 Rosewood, Florida. The Rosewood Massacre.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #6: The Destruction of The Black Family.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #7: Black Indians In The United States.

 

 

Happy 101st Birthday Ms. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month, The Black History Moment Series #8: Charles H. Wright Museum Of African American History.

 

 

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Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956 after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city's bus system. Behind Parks is Nicholas C. Chriss, a UPI reporter covering the event.

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956 after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled segregation illegal on the city’s bus system. Behind Parks is Nicholas C. Chriss, a UPI reporter covering the event.

Barack Obama sitting on the bus. Parks was arrested sitting in the same row Obama is in, but on the opposite side.

Barack Obama sitting on the bus. Parks was arrested sitting in the same row Obama is in, but on the opposite side.

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A Picture Of Greatness. Black History is American History!

A Picture Of Greatness. Black History is American History!

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“What are you doing for others?” #MLKDay Of Service


 

By Jueseppi B.

MLK-Day

 

 

 

President and First Lady, Vice President Biden, Cabinet Secretaries, Senior Administration Officials Honor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service

 

President Barack Obama checks in on First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia as they prepare burritos while volunteering at the DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C., on Martin Luther King Day, January 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama checks in on First Lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia as they prepare burritos while volunteering at the DC Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C., on Martin Luther King Day, January 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Obama Honors MLK Holiday, Visits Soup Kitchen

 

Published on Jan 20, 2014

President Barack Obama and his family honored Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy of service Monday by helping a soup kitchen prepare its daily meals. (Jan. 20)

 

 

WASHINGTON, DC – To honor the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Day of Service and Dr. King’s life and legacy, the President and Mrs. Obama, the Vice President, Cabinet Secretaries, and other senior administration officials participated in community service projects and events.  The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service is an opportunity for all Americans to come together to help meet the needs of their communities and make an ongoing commitment to service throughout the year.

 

The First Family participated in a service project at the DC Central Kitchen, which is also celebrating its 25th anniversary today.  They were joined by Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett. They served alongside volunteers including a number of veterans who have continued to serve in their community through programs and organizations such as DC Central Kitchen, AmeriCorps VISTA, The Mission Continues, Team RWB, Teach for America, and Team Rubicon.  The First Family and Ms. Jarrett prepared meals for distribution to shelters in the local area.

 

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Also today, the Vice President delivered remarks at the National Action Network’s Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Breakfast. The Vice President then joined members of the Catholic Volunteer Network to serve hot lunch to guests at SOME (So Others Might Eat) in Washington, DC.

 

For more on the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Day of Service, please visit the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) at www.serve.gov/mlkday.

 

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“What are you doing for others?”

 

Published on Jan 20, 2014

The First Family commemorates the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr Day of Service by helping prepare meals at D.C. Central Kitchen alongside Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service.

 

 

On January 20th, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Cabinet Members will participate in the Day of Service in the Washington, DC area.   Events include the following:

 

  • Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew will serve by sorting and packing clothing for homeless veterans at the VA Medical Center in Washington, DC with American University Students and Public Allies (an AmeriCorps program);

 

  • Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker will serve food at Food and Friends, a local organization that prepares and delivers meals and groceries to people living with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and other life-challenging illnesses in the DC metropolitan area;

 

  • Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx will speak at the National Action Network’s Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Breakfast in Washington, DC;

 

  • Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will join CityYear corps members and local volunteers at Coolidge High School;

 

  • Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki will volunteer at SOME (So Others Might Eat);

 

  • Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Gina McCarthy will serve at the Marvin Gaye Community Greening Center;

 

  • Ambassador Michael Froman and White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough will participate in Family and Community Fun Day alongside veterans and community members at Dunbar High School;

 

  • ONDCP Director Kerlikowske will serve at Clean and Sober Streets (C&SS), a 120-bed residential community in the Federal City Shelter Complex in Washington, DC;

 

  • Peace Corps Acting Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet will visit with grade school children in collaboration with Little Friends for Peace, an award-winning organization centered on peace education; and

 

  • CNCS Director Wendy Spencer will participate in various service projects throughout Washington, DC.

 

  • In addition, on January 18th, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell participated in a service project at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.

 

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<> on August 22, 2011 in Washington, DC.

 

 

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