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A Monday Potpourri: Naval Yard Shooter Identified. President Obama Responds To Naval Yard Tragedy.


 

By Jueseppi B.

Potpourri NMNSignUpLP

 

 

 

 

 

breakingnews

 

 

Aaron Alexis Identified As Alleged Navy Yard Shooter

 

 

 

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Aaron Alexis has been identified by police as the dead Washington Navy Yard shooter, NBC News reports.

 

Alexis, 34, originally of Fort Worth, Texas, recently began working at the Navy yard as a civilian contractor, the station reported.USA Today and CBS News also report that an unnamed source identified Alexis as the shooter, who was confirmed dead by police earlier today.

 

At least 13 people were killed — including Alexis — and more were wounded at the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters building after at least one gunman opened fire after 8:20 a.m. Monday, a Defense Department official said.

 

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier said at a press conference that a Metropolitan Police officer is among those who have been shot, among other “multiple victims inside who are deceased.” There were other reports that a naval security guard was reportedly among the wounded.

 

The suspect was reportedly killed at that location, but few details about the death were immediately available. One other person of interest is still on the loose. He’s described as a black male, 50, with an olive military-style uniform who may be in possession of a long gun.

 

A third person of interest was cleared.

 

The FBI released a photo and description of Alexis, asking the public for any information about the deceased suspect:

 

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FBI Posts Photos Of Gunman

 

Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office, said at a press conference that the FBI has posted photos of Aaron Alexisconfirmed by an FBI official as the dead gunman. Parlave asked the public for information on Alexis. Anyone with knowledge should call 1-800-CALL-FBI.

 

White House press secretary Jay Carney was reluctant to reopen a debate on gun control Monday after 13 people were killed in a mass shooting at Washington Navy Yard.

Carney was pressed during his daily briefing with reporters on whether President Barack Obama would use the incident to renew his push for stricter gun laws.

“This is an ongoing investigation, it’s an ongoing situation on the ground,” Carney responded. “There are law enforcement officials right now dealing with this, doing everything they can to make sure people here in Washington are safe [and] people around the incident are safe.”

“So it would be inappropriate to try to put in context something about which we have so few facts,” he added.

 

Read more about the White House response from Sabrina Siddiqui

 

 

The death toll has now been increased to 13 dead and as many as 12 injured.

 

 

D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said authorities were seeking a potential second suspect, described as a black male, approximately 40 to 50 years old, 5 foot 10, 180 pounds, medium complexion with gray sideburns, wearing an olive military-style uniform and carrying “a long gun.”

 

Before a scheduled economic speech at the White House, President Barack Obama deplored “yet another mass shooting” — this one targeting military and civilian personnel.

 

“These are men and women who were going to work, doing their job, protecting all of us,” Obama said. “They’re patriots, and they know the dangers of serving abroad. But today they faced the unimaginable: violence that they wouldn’t have expected here at home.”

 

“We will do everything in our power to make sure that whoever carried out this cowardly act is held responsible,” the president added. “I want the investigation to be seamless.”

 

At Least 12 Dead, Several Others Injured In Shooting At D.C. Navy Yard

 

Full coverage: Washington Navy Yard shooting

 

 

Statements and Releases/Speeches and Remarks

 

September 16, 2013

 

President Obama Marks the Five-Year Anniversary of the Financial Crisis & On The Naval Yard Shooting

 

Published on Sep 16, 2013

After making a statement about the situation at the Washington Navy Yard, President Obama marks the anniversary of the financial crisis and the efforts over the last five years to stabilize the economy and get it growing and creating jobs again. September 16, 2013.

 

 

 

Remarks by the Presideent at the Five-Year Anniversary of the Financial Crisis

 

 

The White House to Host Convening on Food Marketing to Children

 

 

Statement by the NSC Spokesperson Caitlin Hayden on the Presidential Determination with Respect to Syria

 

 

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Remarks by the First Lady at the Música Latina Workshop

 

Remarks by the First Lady at the Música Latina Workshop

State Dining Room

10:56 A.M. EDT

 

MRS. OBAMA:  Good morning, everyone.

 

AUDIENCE: Good morning.

 

MRS. OBAMA:  And buenos dias.

 

AUDIENCE:  Buenos dias.

 

MRS. OBAMA:  That’s about all I got.  (Laughter.)  You guys, sit, rest.  It’s good to have you here.  How is everybody doing?  Did you get in easily?  Nobody got too wet?  It’s exciting.  You’re in the White House!  How does it feel?  (Applause.)

 

I want to start by introducing the wonderful people on stage with me.  Of course, we have Gloria and Emilio Estefan, who are just legends — (applause) — legends and dear, dear friends.  They have been here quite often, and they feel like family.  They’re used to this place, and we are so glad to have them back and — taking the time to do this.

 

We have Lila Downs — Lila.  (Applause.)  Romeo Santos we have, as well.  (Applause.)  Marco Antonio Solis.  (Applause.)  And my wonderful friend, Bob Santelli from the Grammy Museum, who has just been so instrumental in making these workshops happen.  Bob, thank you, as always, for being here.  (Applause.)

 

But our very special, most important guests today are all of you.  You guys come from the area — we’ve got Woodrow Wilson High School and the Columbia Heights Educational Campus here from D.C.  You guys, whoop it up.  Give yourselves a round of applause.  (Applause.)  We have students from Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring — (applause) — see, that’s what you do.  All right, we can go back to Woodrow Wilson and Columbia Heights, because you guys didn’t do that for yourselves.  (Applause.)  And Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Virginia.  (Applause.)  Way to go, well done.  (Laughter.)

 

And I really want you all to know that today and every day, this is your house.  So I want you guys to relax, to loosen up, to take a deep breath.  Because I want to make sure that you get everything you can get out of this experience, and you can do that if you kind of breathe in and stop thinking about being in the State Room, but actually — using this as an opportunity to learn and ask questions.  So make yourselves at home.  That’s what this workshop is all about.  And it is one of the most important traditions that our family has started here at the White House.

 

Whenever we have musicians or artists or movie stars come here to perform — which these folks will be doing these evening for a bunch of rich people and fancy people and all of that, right — the most fun is when we invite young people like all of you here during the day so that you get a chance to talk to these folks and learn from them.  It’s a very special part of sharing what we do here at the White House with young people all over the country.

 

And we’ve held workshops from everything from classical music, we’ve done Motown, we’ve done country music.  We’ve even done some modern dance workshops, as well as workshops on civil rights.  We’re going to be doing some things with film in the coming month.

 

So today, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re here to celebrate some of the most fun, dynamic rhythmic melodies you’ll ever hear in your entire life, and that’s Latin music.  Me encanta la musica Latina!  (Applause.)  I’m trying, I’m trying.  Both the girls are taking Spanish, and they think we’re pretty pathetic.  (Laughter.)

 

Now, the percussive beats and the buoyant melodies from these songs come just — from just about everywhere.  You’ll learn they come from the Caribbean and Mexico, and from Central and South America, and also even from Africa and Europe.  And when you put all of that together, you can’t help but move to the music — even the President, you will see tonight, will shake his groove thing every now and then.  (Laughter.)

 

And over the past few decades, more and more people across America have experienced this music for themselves — stars like Gloria and Ritchie Valens and Ricky Martin have not only helped Latin music move into the mainstream, but they have produced some of the biggest hits this world, this country has ever seen.

 

So in a little bit, I’m going to turn it over to Bob, and these wonderful people up here are going to talk to you about their music, but also about how they got where they are today, which is always so cool to hear.  So as you listen to their stories, I want you to think about how the lessons they’ve learned in their lives can apply to your own lives.  Because the truth is, I want you to remember that when all of us were your age, I’m sure that none of us imagined that we would be here in the White House — none of us.

 

I grew up on the South Side of Chicago.  My parents were working class.  I was a good student.  But no one could have told me that I would be the First Lady of the United States.

 

Romeo was just a shy kid from the Bronx who didn’t start singing until he joined his church choir when he was 13 years old.  And then, I hear that was just because he wanted to meet girls.  (Laughter.)  And Gloria still remembers growing up on meals of Spam and cheese.  Emilio first emigrated to the United States — when he did, he lived in an apartment, a little apartment in Miami with 15 cousins.  And Lila spent time working in her mom’s auto parts store in Mexico before her career got going.  And while Marco Antonio has been performing since he was a young boy, he knows that there’s no secret to his or anyone else’s success.  And one of the things he says — these are his words — he says, “Inspiration comes from hard work.  You can’t always wait for the muse.”

 

And that’s why he and all the folks up here spend so much time honing their craft.  They spend hours and hours every week, probably every day, practicing their songs, rewriting their melodies and fine-tuning their performances.  It doesn’t happen overnight.  And those are the kind of things that all of you will have to keep in mind and do as you work on pursuing whatever dreams you have.  The real message here is that it all takes hard work — it really does.

 

I can tell you now that the President spends hours — above and beyond what you see him do every day, he spends hours reading briefings and being advised.  And when he is not reading briefings and going over issues, he is reading whatever he can get his hands on so that he can stay on top of knowing everything he has to know about what’s going on in the world.  He works every day.  And he has always been that — well, I shouldn’t say always.  He was a little trifling as a young student.  (Laughter.)  He will even admit that.

 

But he woke up as a young man and decided, I have to get my act together.  And from then on, he has been a pretty serious, hardworking person.  The same is true for me.  Whenever I have to give a speech I spend a lot of time with my team working it over so that it looks good and it looks natural and that I understand what I’m saying.  It all takes hard work.

 

Any business leader that you see who is running a company, let me tell you, they spend a lifetime working on presentations and studying market trends.  Athletes, as you know, they bust their tails in the gym before, during, and after the games and off seasons.  Everybody is putting some work in.  If you are a scientist making great discoveries, let me tell you it will take decades of experimenting and researching before you’ll even get a glimmer of a breakthrough.

 

So, again, if there’s one thing I want you to take away from all of this is that if you find something that you’re passionate about — and that’s all us grownups wish for our kids, is that you find the thing that gives you passion — that when you find it, that you know that the next step is working hard.  There is no shortcut to pursuing your dreams — than hard work.  And you have everything you need right now, right this very second, to achieve what you want to achieve.

 

If you commit yourselves, and more importantly, if you commit yourselves to your education, there is nothing more important that you can be doing for yourselves right now than taking your education seriously and practicing that hard work on your books and your studies and your homework — being engaged, opening your mouth, raising your hand, making mistakes, getting over it when you do.  All of that stuff is preparation for the success that I hope all of you all see in the years to come.

 

And if you do all of that and don’t make excuses, don’t let excuses stand in the way of your success — if you do all of that I know that you might just one day either be performing or living right here in the White House.  You have what it takes.

 

So keep it up.  We are proud of you.  We love you all.  That’s one of the reasons why it’s so important for us to share these experiences with you, because you may just take away the thing that you need to spark that sense of possibility in yourselves or maybe pass it on to someone else.

 

So loosen up.  Breathe.  And take advantage of these folks who are spending this time with you today.  And I hope you have fun, and thanks for coming.  And good luck this year in school.  You all take care.  (Applause.)

 

END
11:07 A.M. EDT

 

 

TheObamaCrat™ Wake Up Call

 

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Charlie Rose Interviews Syrian President Bashar Assad


 

By Jueseppi B.

PBS talk show host Charlie Rose, right, interviewed Syrian President Bashar al-Assad Sunday in Damascus. His interview will air on PBS at 9 p.m. EDT Monday. PBS NewsHour Weekend's Hari Sreenivasan spoke to Rose Sunday. Listen to their conversation below.

PBS talk show host Charlie Rose, right, interviewed Syrian President Bashar al-Assad Sunday in Damascus. His interview will air on PBS at 9 p.m. EDT Monday. PBS NewsHour Weekend’s Hari Sreenivasan spoke to Rose Sunday. Listen to their conversation below.

 

 

Charlie Rose Interviews Syria’s Bashar Al-Assad In Damascus, Face The Nation

 

 

Published on Sep 8, 2013

Charlie Rose interviews Bashar Assad ” I had nothing to do with the chemical weapons attacks “
Charlie Rose interviewed Syrian President Bashar Assad at the presidential palace in Damascus on Sunday morning.

 

The interview, Assad’s first with an American television network in nearly two years, will air in its entirety on PBS’s “Charlie Rose” show on Monday night, the same day that President Obama sits down with six television networks for recorded interviews.

 

In the interview, which Rose previewed on CBS’s “Face The Nation” on Sunday morning, Assad denied that he had anything to do with the chemical weapons attack that took place on Aug. 21, 2013. Rose also said the Syrian president would not confirm or deny that the regime has chemical weapons.

 

Portions of the interview will be broadcast beginning Monday on “CBS This Morning,” where Rose is a co-host. Excerpts will then be available across all CBS News platforms, including cbsnews.com and the CBS Evening News.

 

(QUIZ: How well do you know Bashar Assad?)

 

The interview will air in its entirety on “The Charlie Rose Show” on PBS television stations Monday night.

 

UPDATE (11:05 a.m.): Rose’s preview of the interview as relayed by phone from Beirut, Lebanon, on CBS’s “Face The Nation” on Sunday (bold mine): [Assad] denied that he had anything to do with the attack. He denied that he knew there was a chemical attack, notwithstanding what has been said and notwithstanding the videotape. He said there’s not enough evidence to make a conclusive judgment. He would not say even, even though I read him the lead paragraph of the New York Times today in the story about their chemical weapons supply.

 

And he said I cannot confirm or deny that we do have them. He did however say that if in fact we do have them and I am not going to say yes or no, they are in centralized control and no one else has access to them. He suggested as he has before that perhaps the rebels had something to do with it, he made some reference to Aleppo. The most important thing he said there has been no evidence that I used chemical weapons against my own people and that there is no evidence of that. And if in fact the administration had evidence of that they should show that evidence and make their case. I then obviously repeated the fact that Secretary Kerry is in the process of making the case and that in fact that information is being shown to members of congress as they begin to come back to Washington and consider an authorization for the President to make a military strike.

 

He said that he did not necessarily know whether there was going to be a military strike. He said that they were obviously as prepared as they could be for a strike. He said there would be, suggested that there would be, among people that are aligned with him some kind of retaliation if a strike was made that that would be, what would be, that he would not even talk about the nature of the response. He had a message to the American people that it had not been a good experience for them to get involved in the Middle East in wars and conflicts in the Middle East, that the results had not been good and they should not get involved and that they should communicate to their congress and to their leadership in Washington not to authorize a strike. [...] Bob, that was the very first question I asked: Do you expect an attack? He said, I don’t know. He said we prepared as best we can.

 

He did not say that he assumed there was going to be an attack in Syria because of the chemical weapons. I also pursued the question of whether there was anything that he was prepared to do anything to stop the attack, for example to give up chemical weapons, if that would stop the attack. I also raised the question with him did he fear that if there was an attack, it would degrade his own military, and therefore make it more likely that it might tip the balance. He’s very, very concerned about that as an issue. He talked about his father, and the lessons that he learned from his father, that war was ruthless, and that after Homma, his father went all out to destroy, at the time, the Muslim brotherhood.

 

So he was calm, he knew the situation he was in, in fact, Damascus seemed relatively calm, the places that I was today but there is a clear sense that they are closely watching what is happening in Washington. I think the reason they did this interview today, we’ve been trying for a long time, but we did it today because they’re watching what happens in Washington.

 

 

Syria: Syrian President Bashar al Assad Charlie Rose Interview September 9, 2013

 

Published on Sep 9, 2013

Syria: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad – Charlie Rose Interview – September 9, 2013

PBS’ Charlie Rose interviews Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Monday, September 9, at 9 p.m. in a special presentation of CHARLIE ROSE. In this global television exclusive, Assad gives his only television interview since President Barack Obama asked Congress to approve the use of force against the Syrian regime for alleged use of chemical weapons against the Syrian people.

 

 

 

 

Bashar Assad tells Charlie Rose U.S. should “expect every action” in response to Syria strikes

 

 

Published on Sep 9, 2013

Bashar Assad tells Charlie Rose U.S. should “expect every action” in response to Syria strikes Charlie Rose interviewed Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad in Damascus on Sunday.

 

CBS News’ Bob Schieffer announced the news on “Face the Nation” Sunday. The full interview will air on the “Charlie Rose Show” Monday night — the same day as President Obama’s recorded interviews with six networks. Portions of the interview will also air on Monday’s “CBS This Morning,” and other platforms across CBS News.

 

Rose previewed the interview on Sunday, speaking on the phone from Beirut. He told Schieffer that Assad “denied that he had anything to do with the attack.”

 

Rose traveled to the palace in Damascus for the sit-down. He was accompanied by Jeff Fager, chairman of CBS News and executive producer of “60 Minutes.” The interview comes as the White House attempts to make the case for U.S. military intervention in Syria.

 

It is the first interview that Assad has given to an American news network in two years. Barbara Walters sat down with him in Syria in 2011. The conflict in Syria has been notoriously difficult and dangerous for journalists to cover. Twenty-eight journalists were killed in Syria in 2012, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists, while kidnapping remains a persistent threat.

 

 

 

Syrian President Bashar Al Assad Hints at Another 9/11 If Attacked By U S to Charlie Rose

 

Published on Sep 9, 2013

Syrian President Bashar Al Assad Hints at Another 9/11 If Attacked By U S to Charlie Rose Bashar Assad tells Charlie Rose U.S. should “expect every action” in response to Syria strikes Charlie Rose interviewed Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad in Damascus on Sunday.

 

 

Charlie Rose interviews Syrian President Bashar Assad at the Presidential Palace in Damascus, Sept. 8, 2013. / CBS/PBS

Charlie Rose interviews Syrian President Bashar Assad at the Presidential Palace in Damascus, Sept. 8, 2013. / CBS/PBS

 

 

Read More:

 

Thank you CBS News & PBS NEWSHOUR.

 

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Now Is The Time: They Deserve A Vote. Remembering 12/14


 

By Jueseppi B.

 

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60 Minutes Newtown Parents EMOTIONAL Interview Part 1

 

 

 

 

 

CBS News‘ 60 Minutes aired a powerful interview with seven of the families Sunday night, all members of the group Sandy Hook Promise. Many of the parents spoke wrenchingly of the moments leading up to the discovery of their children’s fates, and discussed what they would like to see happen on Capitol Hill. While background checks seem to have the most public support, it was magazine sizes that many of the Newtown parents saw as most important.

 

The parents of Sandy Hook children Dylan Hockley, Ana Marquez-Greene, Benjamin Wheeler, Daniel Barden, and Jesse Lewis, as well as the mother of slain teacher Lauren Rousseau and the husband of school psychologist Mary Sherlach, began by introducing interviewer Scott Pelley to their lost loved ones. Jimmy Greene told Pelley that it was an honor to have known his six year-old, Ana, and that he cries every day. Ben Wheeler’s mom, Francine, revealed that her other son, Nate, “was hiding when he heard Ben and his classmates and educators get shot.”

 

Mark Barden said, of his late son, Daniel, “He was known as the kid that would talk to somebody sitting alone. He was genuinely an old soul.”

 

Nicole Hockley fought tears as she held a photo of her son, Dylan, and told Pelley “He was always smiling, and always laughing. And he was very pure, possibly because of his age — he was six — and possibly because he was autistic.”

 

Neil Heslin said his son, Jesse Lewis, “was my best friend and my buddy. He’d introduce himself as Jesse and daddy. He was my whole life.”

 

Bill Sherlach said that his late wife, school psychologist Mary Sherlach, felt that Sandy Hook “was the place that she was meant to be, doing what she would call ‘God’s work.’”

 

Terri Rousseau, teacher Lauren Rousseau’s mom, said that Lauren “had a sort of innocence about her, a kind of denial of all the ugly things in the world. We had no idea that some ugly thing would come and take her from us.”

 

The group then spoke about their experience lobbying the Connecticut legislature, with, perhaps, some messages for the lawmakers they’ll see today. Asked why they’d handed legislators photos of the children, Nicole Hockley responded, “They need to not just look us in the eyes, but look at our children, and the lost ones and… and see those faces, see what’s gone, and remember this isn’t just about political parties, this isn’t just about careers; this is about people, and this is about making change to save people. And it’s important to remember the people you are doing this for.”

 

Later in the interview, Mark Barden told Pelley that his message to Congress is that “They have to be our government and vote up or down. They have to vote.”

 

Asked what changes they thought were most important, Mark Barden said “The universal background check is very important,” while Bill Sherlach pointed to magazine sizes. “You can have a million bullets,” he said, “but if you have to put them in one at a time, the ability to do any kind of real damage is significantly reduced.”

 

Sherlach countered the argument that reloading only takes a few seconds by revealing that, at one point during the shooting, 11 children were able to escape when the shooter was reloading. “It’s just a simple arithmetic,” he added. “If you have to change magazines 15 times instead of five times, you have three times as many incidents as where something could jam, something could be bobbled. You just increase the time for intervention. You increase the time frame where kids can get out. And there’s 11 kids out there today that… that are still running around on the playground pretty much now at lunchtime.”

 

Mark Barden added that such arguments ignore chilling realities. “When you’re in that situation, if you want to picture yourself murdering children in a classroom, the police are coming in to… to kill you, and then you’re about to commit suicide, your brain is in another place. You’re not neatly and effectively changing that magazine.”

 

Nicole Hockley noted that search warrants indicate that the shooter left the standard size magazines at home, in favor of the 30-round ones he used in the killings. “That was a choice the shooter made,” she said. “He knew that the larger capacity magazine clips were more lethal.

 

David Wheeler said that “There is a place for 30-round magazines– in the military, on the battlefield, at a range. if they stay at the range, they stay at the range.”

 

 

 

60 Minutes Newtown Parents Emotional Interview Part 2

 

 

 

 

In the second part of the interview, some of the parents recounted, to Pelley, the slow-motion heartbreak of finding out what had happened to their kids on December 14. Nicole Hockley, Jimmy Greene, and Nelba Marquez-Greene each had a child who survived the shooting, and one who didn’t. “Someone said to me, you know, ‘I’ve seen Jake. He’s in… he’s in one of the other rooms,’” Nicole Hockley remembered, “and that was a relief, you know, a moment of, ‘he’s okay, and that’s okay that he’s okay,’ and… and a woman asked me, ‘What… what classroom was your other child in?’ and I said, ‘Ms. soto.’ and she said, ‘I heard she got shot.’ and I got… I got really angry at her, and I remember very clearly saying, ‘Don’t you dare say that to me if you don’t know it’s true.’”

 

Jimmy Greene remembered being reunited with his son, Isaiah. “I just went and grabbed him and held him,” Greene said, “and he was just crying, ‘daddy,’ you know, ‘there were so many gunshots and,’ you know, ‘I saw this and I saw that.’ So, I just took my son in my arms. He’s a big kid; I took him like he was two years old again and held him on my shoulder and was just running from room to room, trying to locate Ana’s class.”

 

But neither parent would be reunited with their other child. Governor Dannel Malloy eventually appeared to tell the remaining family members that “if we were in that room, that our child or adult wasn’t coming back to us.”

 

There was some more discussion of the changes they’d like to see from Congress, but the real power of this interview was in the way these families remember their lost loved ones, as they described, for Pelley, the ways in which they keep them alive, and keep themselves alive. Mark Barden summed it up, wistfully and poetically, by telling Pelley “So, here we are. We’re left with pictures and dreams and memories, and any little shred of evidence of their physical time with us. And we just have to ask people to remember that. To please think about that always, because now is the time to turn this tragedy into the place where we evolve as a society, and look to any possible way you can do that.”

 

 

 

Dylan Hockley’s parents: ‘We’ll stay in Newtown’

 

Published on Jan 16, 2013

The parents of a British-born boy killed in the Sandy Hook school shooting have said they plan to stay in Newtown despite the death of their son.

Six-year-old Dylan Hockley was one of 20 children who lost their lives when Adam Lanza opened fire at the Connecticut primary school in December.

Dylan’s mother Nicole wept as she described the moment she heard her boy was among the victims.

Her husband Ian Hockley, formerly of Eastleigh, Hampshire, told the BBC’s Steve Kingstone: “The unthinkable has happened…how could it possibly get worse.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandy Hook Elementary Shooting: Remembering the Victims That Died in Newtown, Connecticut

 

Published on Dec 16, 2012

Amy Robach describes the impact of the tragedy on the local community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Obama emotional comment on Newtown Connecticut elementary school massacre

 

Published on Dec 14, 2012

Being a father of 2 daughters himself, Mr. President got very emotional, choke up and have tear in his eyes, he has to pause, wipe his eye to continue his speech.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Maddow. SANDY HOOK EPIC RANT!!! Gun Control. TEARS Into Ted Cruz.

 

Published on Mar 15, 2013

maddow ted cruz sandy hook epic rant. An incensed Rachel Maddow tore into Republican senator Ted Cruz and called for further gun control on her Thursday show.
Maddow started the show by telling anyone with a connection to the massacre in Newtown that they might not want to watch the segment. She then shared new details of the shooting that were uncovered by the Hartford Courant. The one that seemed most chilling to her was that Adam Lanza took just five minutes to shoot 152 bullets and kill 26 people.

 

“Had he only had access to ten-round magazines instead of 30-round magazines he would have had to reload 14 times,” she said. “He would have needed 14 spare magazines beyond the one in the gun with the extra round in the chamber. Reloading 14 times. You think he would have still pulled off the whole thing in less than five minutes?

 

She then turned to Cruz, who had an extremely bitter exchange with Democratic senator Dianne Feinstein about guns. Feinstein –who came to political prominence after the assassination of San Francisco supervisor Harvey Milk and George Moscone — grew so angry at Cruz that she accused him of treating her like a sixth-grader.

 

“Let the record show that you can be a United States Senator for 21 years, you can be 79-years-old, you can be the chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and one of the most recognizable and widely respected veteran public servants in your nation, but if you are female while all of other those things, men who you defeat in arguments will still respond to you by calling you hysterical and telling you to calm down,” Maddow said.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newtown mother to Conn. legislature: “Don’t give up”

 

Published on Jan 30, 2013

Nicole Hockley, whose six-year-old son Dylan was killed in the Newtown attack, speaks before the Connecticut state legislature about changing laws to address violence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut school massacre parents’ emotional appeal to end gun violence

 

Published on Jan 14, 2013

The grieving parents of children killed in the Connecticut school massacre call for action top prevent similar tragedies, saying “this can happen in any community”.

 

Nicole Hockley’s son Dylan was among the 20 schoolchildren and six adults killed by a gunman a month ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Originally from Rhode Island, Ms Hockley had lived in the UK with her husband for nearly 18 years before deciding to move back to Connecticut in search of a better life for her son.

 

“It’s been one month since I lost my son, Dylan and 25 other families lost their loved ones. At times it feels like only yesterday and other times it feels as if many years have past,” she said.

 

The Sandy Hook group says it wants to hold open-minded discussions about a range of issues, including guns, mental health and safety in schools and other public places.

 

“The Sandy Hook promises the start of our change. It’s a promise we make for our community, but we need a nation of communities to join us in making and delivering on these promises if we are going to achieve true transformation. I don’t know yet what these changes are. I come with no preconceived agenda,” Ms Hockley said.

 

 

 

 

 

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Friday’s Potpourri: Too Much To List……A Little Of This & A Lot Of That


By Jueseppi B.

 

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What’s Up, Camera Man?”

 

This week, the President honored our nation’s top scientists and innovators, nominated a new Secretary of the Interior, and worked toward reducing gun violence, enacting immigration reform, and reducing our deficit in a balanced way.

 

 

West Wing Week: 02/08/13 or “What’s Up, Camera Man?

 

This week, the President honored our nation’s top scientists and innovators, nominated a new Secretary of the Interior, and worked toward reducing gun violence, enacting immigration reform, and reducing our deficit in a balanced way.

 

 

 

 

Friday, February 1st

  • The winners of the 2011 National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation received their awards at the White House.

 

 

Sunday, February 3rd

  • The President sat down with CBS News to discuss a range of issues currently facing our nation.

 

 

Monday, February 4th

  • In Minneapolis, Minnesota, the President met with men and women who are on the front line of the fight to prevent gun violence.

 

 

Tuesday, February 5th

  • The President hosted a meeting with progressive and labor leaders to discuss the ways in which immigration reform would strengthen the economy in communities across the country.
  • In the Press Briefing Room, the President addressed the sequester.
  • The President called up the coach of the Baltimore Ravens to congratulate them on their Superbowl victory.
  • Business leaders met with the President to discuss ways in which immigration reform would benefit their businesses.
  • Speechwriter Cody Keenan gave an update on the progress of next week’s address to the Joint Session of Congress.

 

 

Wednesday, February 6th

  • The President announced Sally Jewell as his nomination to head up the Department of the Interior, and congratulated outgoing Secretary Ken Salazar.

 

 

Thursday, February 7th

  • The President, Vice President and First Lady attended the annual Prayer Breakfast.
  • The President met with his Cabinet to talk about immigration reform.
  • Magic Johnson visited the White House.

Here’s a quick glimpse at what happened this week on WhiteHouse.gov:

Common-sense reforms: On Monday, President Obama traveled Midwest to Minneapolis to speak with local police, community leaders and folks who have experienced gun violence in their family. The President firmly believes “law enforcement and other community leaders must have a seat at the table.”

 

With mounting support for universal background checks, President Obama is driving Congress to listen and take action. While pressing for background checks, the President did not let up.

 

“We shouldn’t stop there. We should restore the ban on military-style assault weapons and a 10-round limit for magazines,” said President Obama. “And that deserves a vote in Congress — because weapons of war have no place on our streets, or in our schools, or threatening our law enforcement officers.”

 

Watch the full speech here and read our blog post tracking the two weeks since President Obama released his plan for reducing gun violence.

 

Sequester Delay: On Tuesday, President Obama talked about the sequester and urged Congress to act before automatic spending cuts are put into place starting March 1. If a new deal is not struck by March 1, automatic spending cuts, which are known as the sequester will begin.

 

Billions of dollars in cuts would hinder education and research, along with defense spending to name a few. President Obama called for “a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms” as he is prepared to work with republicans to strike a deal for the American people.

 

 

Newest Cabinet Nominee: On Wednesday, President Obamanominated Sally Jewell to head the Interior Department. If the current CEO of the outdoor retail giant REI is confirmed, she will play a critical role in protecting our country’s land and natural resources. Along with an enthusiasm for the outdoors, she carries with her experience as a former oil engineer and commercial banker, which will be vital in dealing with our energy sector and creating jobs for Americans.

 

Jewell is very excited to work with the Interior and “sharing their hopes and their dreams for our public lands, our resources, our people — especially our first people — our history and our culture.”

 

 

Revamped Immigration Page: On Wednesday, the White House released a new issue section laying out what is at stake for comprehensive immigration reform. The President’s proposal calls for the strengthening of our borders, cracking down on companies that hire undocumented workers, creating a path to earned citizenship and streamlining our legal immigration system.

 

 

National Prayer Breakfast: On Thursday, President Obamaattended the National Prayer Breakfast at the Washington Hilton. Citing the importance of faith in his life, the President discussed the comfort Scripture gave President Abraham Lincoln and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “I thought about their humility, and how we don’t seem to live that out the way we should, every day, even when we give lip service to it,” said the President.

 

The biggest hope from the breakfast was Americans, especially our public servants, should embrace cooperation and humility to avoid the constant bipartisan rhetoric in Washington. Watch the full speech here.

 

SOTU Preparation: This Tuesday, the President will speak to the country through the annual State of the Union address. President Obama will discuss the most demanding issues facing our country and offer solutions to tackle these challenges. On February 12, at 9 pm ET head to our State of the Union page to watch a live enhanced version with charts, graphs, and data to coincide with his address. Before Tuesday, check out our page to view the 2012 enhanced version and discover new ways you can participate in this year’s State of the Union.

 

President Obama to Honor Recipients of the 2012 Citizens Medal

 

Last April, President Obama called on the public to help identify outstanding Americans for the 2012 Citizens Medal, the nation’s second-highest civilian honor. After receiving more than 6,000 submissions from the public, the President has selected 18 outstanding Americans to receive the award for performing “exemplary deeds of service for their country and their fellow citizens.”

 

Each winner is called, and told that the President has personally selected them to receive the Citizens Medal:

 

 

The 2012 Presidential Citizens Medal: Informing the recipients

 

Published on Feb 8, 2013

Members of the White House Office of Public Engagement place calls to inform the recipients of the 2012 Citizens Medal that they will be receiving the honor. The ceremony will be on Friday February 15th, and you can learn more about the award at whitehouse.gov/citizensmedal.

 

 

 

 

On Friday, February 15, 2013, President Obama will welcome the recipients of the 2012 Citizens Medal to the White House for a special ceremony to recognize their efforts to serve their communities, and inspire others to do the same.

 

Take a moment to read the incredible stories of this year’s Citizens Medal recipients. If you know someone like the recipients below, please take a moment to nominate him or her by Sunday, March 31, 2013.

 

 

Dr. Terry Brazelton (Boston, MA)
Brazelton is one of the foremost authorities on pediatrics and child development as well as an author, and professor. One of Brazelton’s best known achievements was the development of the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS), which is now used worldwide to recognize the physical and neurological responses of newborns, as well as emotional well-being and individual differences. In 1993, he founded the Brazelton Touchpoints Center® (BTC) at Boston Children’s Hospital where he continues to promote strengths-based, family-centered care in pediatric and early education settings around the world.

 

 

Adam Burke (Jacksonville, FL)
Burke is an Iraq combat veteran and recipient of the Purple Heart which he received for injuries occurred by a mortar attack while running combat operation in Iraq. In 2009 he opened “Veterans Farm,” a 19 acre handicap-accessible farm that helps teach veterans of all ages how to make a living from the find healing in the land. He has been awarded numerous accolades for his work, including the 2011 Good Person of the Year award from the Good People Foundation and the Star of Honor from Work Vessels for Veterans.

 

 

Mary Jo Copeland (Minneapolis, MN)
Copeland founded Sharing and Caring Hands in 1985, which has served as a safety net to those in the Minneapolis area through the provision of food, clothing, shelter, transportation, medical and dental assistance. Sharing and Caring Hands assists thousands of people a month, and is staffed almost entirely by volunteers. Copeland, who currently receives no salary for her work, has served as its director since its opening and still greets every client entering the center and conducts intake interviews.

 

 

Michael Dorman (Fuquay-Varina, NC)
Dorman is the founder and executive director of Military Missions in Action, a North Carolina-based non-profit that helps veterans with disabilities, both physical and mental, achieve independent living. All veterans who have served are eligible to receive services including home modification, rehabilitation and family assistance. Since 2008, the organization has completed more than 100 home modification projects and shipped thousands care packages to soldiers.

 

 

Maria Gomez (Baltimore, MD)
Gomez founded, Mary’s Center 25 years ago with the mission to build better futures through the delivery of health care, family literacy and job training. Mary’s Center is part of the working group launching First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Read Let’s Move Campaign.” Prior to establishing Mary’s Center, Maria was a public health nurse with the D.C. Department of Health. She has also worked for the Red Cross, directing community education programming and disaster services, and with the Visiting Nurses Association. She currently serves as Regional Representative for the South East to the National Council of la Raza, and previously served two terms on the board of the Nonprofit Roundtable of Greater Washington.

 

 

Pamela Green Jackson (Albany, GA)
Green Jackson is the Founder and CEO of the Youth Becoming Healthy Project (YBH), a non-profit organization committed to reducing the epidemic of childhood obesity through nutrition, fitness education and physical activity programs. YBH was created in memory of Pamela Green Jackson’s only brother, Bernard Green, who died in 2004 from obesity-related illnesses. YBH provides resources for during and after school wellness programs for elementary and middle school students as well as a summer wellness camp where the students learn about exercise, nutrition and can participate in martial arts, walking club and dance programs.

 

 

Janice Jackson (Baltimore, MD)
Jackson is the creator and program director of Women Embracing Abilities Now, (W.E.A.N.) a nonprofit mentoring organization servicing women and young ladies with varying degrees of disabilities. She is also a professor at The University of Baltimore. Jackson has actively advocated on behalf of people with disabilities and currently serves on the board of directors for The League for People with Disabilities, the Hoffberger Center for Professional Ethics at the University of Baltimore, and The Image Center of Maryland. She also serves on the Community Advisory Council at the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities at Kennedy Krieger Institute, and is a counselor at Kernan Rehabilitation Center. She has also founded two support groups, We Are Able People (W.R.A.P.) and Women On Wheels & Walking (W.O.W.W.).

 

 

Patience Lehrman (Philadelphia, PA)
Lehrman is an immigrant from Cameroon and the National Director of Project SHINE (Students Helping in the Naturalization of Elders), an immigrant integration initiative at the Intergenerational Center of Temple University. SHINE partners with 18 institutions of higher learning, community-based organizations, and county and city governments across the country. SHINE engages college students and older adults to provide language and health education, citizenship and civic participation lessons to immigrant communities. Lehrman also mentors inner-city high school students, provides free meals to low-income children in the summer and serves as an election official. She holds three Masters Degrees from Temple University.

 

 

Jeanne Manford (New York, NY)
Manford and her husband, Jules, co-founded in 1972 a support group for parents of gay children that grew into the national organization known as Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG). Manford had always supported her son Morty, but was inspired to act after the police failed to intervene while Morty was beaten and hospitalized during a Gay Activists Alliance demonstration in April 1972. In the years that followed, Manford continued to march and organize, even after losing Morty to AIDS in 1992. Today, PFLAG focuses on creating a network of support and advancing equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. Manford passed away in early January at the age of 92.

 

 

Billy Mills (Alexandria, VA)
Mills co-founded and serves as the spokesman for Running Strong for American Indian Youth, an organization that supports cultural programs and provides health and housing assistance for Native American communities. Mills gained prominence during the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, when he unexpectedly won a Gold Medal in the 10,000 meter run. Today, he remains the only American to ever win this event. At the time Mills competed in the Olympics, he was a First Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. After the Olympics, Mills, an Oglala Lakota, was made a warrior by his tribe. In 1986, Mills and Eugene Krizek, president of Christian Relief Services, joined forces to found Running Strong.

 

 

Terry Shima (Gaithersburg, MD)
Shima was drafted into the US Army on October 12, 1944 as a replacement for the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This unit was composed of Japanese Americans who volunteered for combat duty. In November 2011, the US Congress awarded the Congressional Gold Medal collectively to the 442nd RCT, the 100th Battalion and the Military Intelligence Service. Shima served as Executive Director of the Japanese American Veterans Association (JAVA), a nonprofit organization that publicizes and assists Japanese American military veterans and their families, from 2004 to 2012 and is now chair of its Outreach and Education Committee.

 

 

Harris Wofford (Washington, DC)
Wofford served as a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania from 1991 to 1995, and from then to 2001 was the chief executive officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service. From 1970 to 1978 he served as the fifth president of Bryn Mawr College. He is a noted advocate of national service and volunteering. He began his public service career as counsel to the Rev.Theodore Hesburgh on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and was an early supporter of the Civil Rights movement in the South in the late 1950s. He became a volunteer advisor and friend of Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1961, Kennedy appointed him as special assistant to the President for civil rights. He was instrumental in the formation of the Peace Corps and served as the Peace Corps’ special representative to Africa and director of operations in Ethiopia. On his return to Washington in 1964, he was appointed associate director of the Peace Corps. In 1966 he became the founding president of the State University of New York’s College at Old Westbury.

 

 

Rachel Davino, Anne Marie Murphy, Lauren Rousseau, Victoria Soto, Mary Sherlach and Dawn Hochsprung (Newtown, CT)
On December 14, 2012, the names of six courageous women were forever etched into the heart of our Nation as unthinkable tragedy swept through Newtown, Connecticut. Some of these individuals had joined Sandy Hook Elementary School only weeks before; others were preparing to retire after decades of service. All had dedicated themselves to their students and their community, working long past the school bell to give the children in their care a future worthy of their talents.

 

 

 

Update from Bruce Reed on the President’s Plan to Reduce Gun Violence

 

Vice President Biden’s Chief of Staff Bruce Reed sat down with us to give us a quick update on the work the President and Vice President have been doing since the President released his plan to reduce gun violence.

 

The Administration is making good progress — and legislation is already working its way through Congress — but as Bruce Reed says: “We’re going to need your help, because we’re only going to get this done if you make your voice heard.”

 

 

Uploaded on Feb 7, 2013

Chief of Staff to Vice President Biden Bruce Reed shares an update on the President and the Vice President’s work in the three weeks since President Obama released his plan to reduce gun violence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statements and Releases

 

February 08, 2013

Statement by the President on the Lunar New Year

 

 

February 08, 2013

Fact Sheet: Examples of How the Sequester Would Impact Middle Class Families, Jobs and Economic Security

 

 

 

February 07, 2013

Presidential Nominations Sent to the Senate

 

 

 

February 07, 2013

Presidential Nominations Sent to the Senate

 

 

 

February 07, 2013

President Obama Nominates Two to Serve on the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

 

 

p020813ps-0950President Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, joined by Sylvia Panetta, review troops during the Armed Forces Farewell Tribute in honor of Secretary Panetta, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson in Arlington, Va., Feb. 8, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

 

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Alabama Standoff Is Over. Kidnapper Dykes Is Dead, Little Ethan Is Safe.


By Jueseppi B.

 

 

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Jimmy Lee Dykes (Source: Dale Co. Sheriff’s Dept.)

 

 

CBS/AP) MIDLAND CITY, Ala. – A U.S. official tells CBS News that a nearly week-long hostage standoff in which a 5-year-old was being held captive in southeast Alabama has ended in the kidnapper’s death. The child is said to be okay.

 

 

Authorities said 65-year-old Jimmy Dykes gunned down a school bus driver Tuesday and abducted a 5-year-old boy from the bus before taking him to an underground bunker on his rural property. The driver, 66-year-old Charles Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

 

Dykes, a decorated Vietnam-era veteran described as a loner who railed against the government, lived up a dirt road just off the main road north to the state capital of Montgomery, about 80 miles away.

 

 

CBS radio affiliate WSB says reporters heard what may have been a concussion grenade before ambulance and fire vehicles went to and from Dykes’ property about 4:00 P.M. Eastern Time Monday.

 

 

Authorities say growing speculation on the mental state of Jimmy Lee Dykes, 65, was the main concern and reasoning for the invasion of the bunker at this time today.

 

 

Jim Lee Dykes, 65 — a decorated Vietnam-era veteran known as Jimmy to neighbors — gunned down a school bus driver and abducted a 5-year-old boy from the bus, taking him to an underground bunker on his rural property. The driver, 66-year-old Charles Albert Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

Dykes, described as a loner who railed against the government, lives up a dirt road outside this tiny hamlet north of Dothan in the southeastern corner of the state. His home is just off the main road north to the state capital of Montgomery, about 80 miles away.

 

 

Dykes grew up in the Dothan area. Mel Adams, a Midland City Council member who owns the lot where reporters are gathered, said he has known Dykes since they were ages 3 and 4.

 
He said Dykes has a sister and a brother, but that he is estranged from his family.
Adams said he didn’t know what caused the falling-out, but that he knew Dykes “had told part of his family to go to hell.”

 

 

Government records and interviews with neighbors indicate that Dykes joined the Navy in Midland City, serving on active duty from 1964 to 1969. His record shows several awards, including the Vietnam Service Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. Dykes was trained in aviation maintenance and at one point was based in Japan. It was unclear if he saw combat in Vietnam.

 

 

At some point after his time in the Navy, Dykes lived in Florida, where he worked as a surveyor and a long-haul truck driver. It’s unclear how long he stayed there.

 

He had some scrapes with the law in Florida, including a 1995 arrest for improper exhibition of a weapon. The misdemeanor was dismissed. He also was arrested for marijuana possession in 2000.
He returned to Alabama about two years ago, moving onto the rural tract about 100 yards from his nearest neighbors, Michael Creel and his father, Greg.

 

Neighbors described Dykes as a man who once beat a dog to death with a lead pipe, threatened to shoot children for setting foot on his property, and patrolled his yard at night with a flashlight and a firearm. Michael Creel said Dykes had an adult daughter, but the two lost touch years ago.

 

 

Here’s how the siege was ended:

 

At 3:12 PM State FBI along with assistance from State police, ended the hostage situation. Fearing emanate danger, after observing Dykes with a weapon, the FBI entered the underground bunker on his rural property and shot dead Jimmy Lee Dykes and rescued little Ethan. This move by the Alabama State FBI was orchestrated after negotiations deteriorated.

 

 

All praise and thanks to all who worked tirelessly to resolve this situation with the desired results of saving the life of little Ethan who has Asperger’s syndrome and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

 

Our prayers, hearts and gratitude go out to the family of hero bus driver, 66-year-old Mr. Charles Albert Poland Jr., who gave his life to protect the other children on that bus. Mr. Charles Albert Poland Jr., was buried Sunday.

 

In the nearby community of Ozark on Sunday, more than 500 people filed into the Civic Center to pay a final tribute to Poland, who was being hailed as a hero for protecting the other children on the school bus before he was shot Tuesday.

 

Poland is now “an angel who is watching over” the little boy, said Dale County School Superintendent Donny Bynum, who read letters written by three students who had ridden on Poland’s bus. “You didn’t deserve to die but you died knowing you kept everyone safe,” one child wrote.

 

Outside the funeral, school buses from several counties lined the funeral procession route. The buses had black ribbons tied to their side mirrors.

 

 

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Charles Albert Poland Jr., 66, has been identified as the bus driver who was shot after refusing to hand over children from his school bus. The ongoing crisis continues in Alabama; but one must not forget Poland, who died while defending 21 children.

 

When the gunman came onto the bus, he said he “wanted two boys 6 to 8 years old,” as reported by CBS News. He started down the aisle and the children “scrambled” toward the back of the bus. That is when Poland “put his arm out to grab a pole near the front steps of the vehicle, trying to block the suspect.” He was shot four times at that point and the gunman randomly grabbed a five-year-old boy and fled.

 

Thank you Mr. Poland, for giving your life so 21 children could live.

 

 

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