It’s That Time Of Year, When We Care About The Homeless Hungry & Poor.


Jueseppi B. AKA...  Mr MilitantNegro™

Jueseppi B. AKA…
Mr MilitantNegro™

Invisible-People-Teev

 

Invisible People. We ARE Visible. Visit both web sites please.

 

I once heard a story about a homeless man on Hollywood Blvd who really thought he was invisible. But one day a kid handed the man a Christian pamphlet. The homeless guy was shocked and amazed, “what! You can see me? How can you see me? I’m invisible!”

 

It isn’t hard to comprehend this man’s slow spiral into invisibility. Once on the street, people started to walk past him, ignoring him as if he didn’t exist… much like they do a piece of trash on the sidewalk. It’s not that people are bad, but if we make eye contact, or engage in conversation, then we have to admit they exist and that we might have a basic human need to care. But it’s so much easier to simply close our eyes and shield our hearts to their existence.

 

I not only feel their pain, I truly know their pain. I lived their pain. You’d never know it now but I was a homeless person. Fourteen years ago, I lived on Hollywood Blvd. But today, I find myself looking away, ignoring the faces, avoiding their eyes — and I’m ashamed when I realize I’m doing it. But I really can feel their pain, and it is almost unbearable, but it’s just under the surface of my professional exterior.

 

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About Invisible People

For years I’ve used the lens of a television camera to tell the stories of homelessness and the organizations trying to help. That was part of my job. The reports were produced well and told a story, but the stories you see on this site are much different. These are the real people, telling their own, very real stories… unedited, uncensored and raw.

 

The purpose of this vlog is to make the invisible visible. I hope these people and their stories connect with you and don’t let go. I hope their conversations with me will start a conversation in your circle of friends.

 

After you get to know someone by watching their story, please pause for a few moments and write your thoughts in the comments section, or maybe email them to a friend and link back to this vlog . By keeping this dialog open we can help a forgotten people.

 

The invisible guy didn’t intend to become homeless. I didn’t plan on living on the street. Everyone on the streets has their own story, some made bad decisions, others were victims, but none of them deserve what they have been left with, and it is a reflection of our own society that we just leave them there.

 

Please always remember, the homeless people you’ll ignore today were much like you not so long ago.

 

@home Trailer

 

 

Invisible People Project Trailer

 

 

55 year old Homeless Man carries 2 Masters Degrees ( Maurice Johnson )

 

 

@home: Housing First – Solution to End Homelessness

 

Since its launch in November 2008, InvisiblePeople.tv has leveraged the power of video and the massive reach of social media to share the compelling, gritty, and unfiltered stories of homeless people from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. The vlog (video blog) gets up close and personal with veterans, mothers, children, layoff victims and others who have been forced onto the streets by a variety of circumstances. Each week, their on InvisiblePeople.tv, and high traffic sites such as YouTube, Twitter and Facebook, proving to a global audience that while they may often be ignored, they are far from invisible.

 

InvisiblePeople.tv goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages can understand, and can’t ignore. The vlog puts into context one of our nation’s most troubling and prevalent issues through personal stories captured by the lens of Mark Horvath – its founder – and brings into focus the pain, hardship and hopelessness that millions face each day. One story at a time, videos posted on InvisiblePeople.t shatter the stereotypes of America’s homeless, force shifts in perception and deliver a call to action that is being answered by national brands, nonprofit organizations and everyday citizens now committed to opening their eyes and their hearts to those too often forgotten.

 

Contact:
info@invisiblepeople.tv

 

We Are Visible

 

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YouTube Fights Homelessness With Mark Horvath & InvisiblePeople.tv

 

 

Johnny

 

 

Randy and Dina

 

 

Your donations help keep Invisible People going

The lives that have been impacted through the Invisible People have ranged far beyond expectation. Many of you have gained a new perspective on the struggle of others, and at the same time our efforts have brought a new hope to people who are in the midst of the struggle with homelessness across America. Our work has not only made invisible people visible to world, but once again to themselves for many who had stopped even thinking they mattered, and now they have a new hope for their own lives.

 

This important journey cannot continue without YOUR help. Telling each story — reaching out in each city– helping each person we can, takes donations from people who will give what they can to make a difference — will you please help me continue this essential work.

 

Your $100, or $50 or $25 or anything you can give right now helps us get another story, stay on the road another day, or reach another person… Don’t just watch the story and follow along wondering what is next — help create the story and change it for each person we encounter.

 

Please give now — join us, be the one helping tell how the story turns out for so many

 

Michael #Homeless #InvisiblePeople

 

 

 Invisible People

Invisible People is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to changing the way we think about people experiencing homelessness

 

In Your Back Yard

 

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Your donations help keep Invisible People going

 

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Kwanzaa 2014


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It is December, which means it will soon be time for the most under-celebrated holiday ever known to man: Kwanzaa! I know what you’re thinking. Who the hell celebrates Kwanzaa? These seven principles comprise Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity), Imani (Faith)

 

Time for Kwanzaa! Hello?

 

Kwanzaa celebration with its founder, Maulana Karenga, and others

Kwanzaa celebration with its founder, Maulana Karenga, and others

Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration held in the United States and also celebrated in the Western African Diaspora in other nations of the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles (Nguzo Saba). It was created by Maulana Karenga, and was first celebrated in 1966–67.

 

History and etymology

Maulana Karenga created Kwanzaa in 1965 as the first specifically African-American holiday. According to Karenga, the name Kwanzaa derives from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits of the harvest”. The choice of Swahili, an East African language, reflects its status as a symbol of Pan-Africanism, especially in the 1960s, although most East African nations were not involved in the Atlantic slave trade that brought African people to America.

 

Kwanzaa is a celebration that has its roots in the black nationalist movement of the 1960s, and was established as a means to help African Americans reconnect with their African cultural and historical heritage by uniting in meditation and study of African traditions and Nguzo Saba, the “seven principles of African Heritage” which Karenga said “is a communitarian African philosophy”.

 

During the early years of Kwanzaa, Karenga said that it was meant to be an “oppositional alternative” to Christmas. However, as Kwanzaa gained mainstream adherents, Karenga altered his position so that practicing Christians would not be alienated, then stating in the 1997 Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community, and Culture, “Kwanzaa was not created to give people an alternative to their own religion or religious holiday.”

 

Many African Americans who celebrate Kwanzaa do so in addition to observing Christmas.

 

Principles and symbols

Kwanzaa celebrates what its founder called the seven principles of Kwanzaa, or Nguzo Saba (originally Nguzu Saba—the seven principles of African Heritage), which Karenga said “is a communitarian African philosophy,” consisting of what Karenga called “the best of African thought and practice in constant exchange with the world.” These seven principles comprise *Kawaida, a Swahili term for tradition and reason. Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of the following principles, as follows:

 

  • Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.
  • Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.
  • Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems, and to solve them together.
  • Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.
  • Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
  • Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
  • Imani (Faith): To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

 

Kwanzaa symbols include a decorative mat (Mkeka) on which other symbols are placed, corn (Muhindi) and other crops, a candle holder kinara with seven candles (Mishumaa Saba), a communal cup for pouring libation (Kikombe cha Umoja), gifts (Zawadi), a poster of the seven principles, and a black, red, and green flag. The symbols were designed to convey the seven principles.

 

Observance

A woman lighting kinara candles

A woman lighting kinara candles

Families celebrating Kwanzaa decorate their households with objects of art; colorful African cloth such as kente, especially the wearing of kaftans by women; and fresh fruits that represent African idealism. It is customary to include children in Kwanzaa ceremonies and to give respect and gratitude to ancestors. Libations are shared, generally with a common chalice,Kikombe cha Umoja, passed around to all celebrants. Non-African Americans also celebrate Kwanzaa. The holiday greeting is “Joyous Kwanzaa”.

 

A Kwanzaa ceremony may include drumming and musical selections, libations, a reading of the African Pledge and the Principles of Blackness, reflection on the Pan-African colors, a discussion of the African principle of the day or a chapter in African history, a candle-lighting ritual, artistic performance, and, finally, a feast (karamu). The greeting for each day of Kwanzaa is Habari Gani which is Swahili for “What’s the News?”

 

At first, observers of Kwanzaa avoided the mixing of the holiday or its symbols, values, and practice with other holidays, as doing so would violate the principle of kujichagulia (self-determination) and thus violate the integrity of the holiday, which is partially intended as a reclamation of important African values. Today, many African American families celebrate Kwanzaa along with Christmas and New Year’s. Frequently, both Christmas trees and kinaras, the traditional candle holder symbolic of African American roots, share space in Kwanzaa-celebrating households. For people who celebrate both holidays, Kwanzaa is an opportunity to incorporate elements of their particular ethnic heritage into holiday observances and celebrations of Christmas.

 

Cultural exhibitions include the Spirit of Kwanzaa, an annual celebration held at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts featuring interpretive dance, African dance, song and poetry.

 

The holiday has also spread to Canada, and is celebrated by Black Canadians in a similar fashion as in the United States.

 

Popularity

In 2004, BIG Research conducted a marketing survey in the United States for the National Retail Foundation, which found that 1.6% of those surveyed planned to celebrate Kwanzaa. If generalized to the US population as a whole, this would imply that around 4.7 million people planned to celebrate Kwanzaa in that year. In a 2006 speech, Ron Karenga asserted that 28 million people celebrate Kwanzaa. He has always claimed it is celebrated all over the world. Lee D. Baker puts the number at 12 million. The African American Cultural Center claimed 30 million in 2009. In 2011, Keith Mayes said that 2 million people participated in Kwanzaa.

 

According to University of Minnesota Professor Keith Mayes, the author of Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition,the popularity within the US has “leveled off” as the black power movement there has declined, and now between half and two million people celebrate Kwanzaa in the US, or between one and five percent of African Americans. Mayes adds that white institutions now celebrate it.

 

The holiday has also spread to Canada, and is celebrated by Black Canadians in a similar fashion as in the United States. According to the Language Portal of Canada, “this fairly new tradition has [also] gained in popularity in France, Great Britain, Jamaica and Brazil”, although this information has not been confirmed with authoritative sources from these countries.

 

In Brazil, in recent years the term Kwanzaa has been applied by a few institutions as a synonym for the festivities of the Black Awareness Day, commemorated on November 20 in honor of Zumbi dos Palmares, having little to do with the celebration as it was originally conceived.

 

In 2009, Maya Angelou narrated the documentary The Black Candle, a film about Kwanzaa.

 

The Black Candle A Kwanzaa Celebration

Published on Feb 10, 2013

The Black Candle is a landmark, vibrant documentary film that uses Kwanzaa as a vehicle to explore and celebrate the African-American experience.

 

 

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2014 Theme: “Practicing the Culture of Kwanzaa: Living The Seven Principles”

 

THE
OFFICIAL KWANZAA
WEBSITE

The Founder’s Welcome
Dr. Maulana Karenga

 

As an African American and Pan-African holiday celebrated by millions throughout the world African community, Kwanzaa brings a cultural message which speaks to the best of what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense. Given the profound significance Kwanzaa has for African Americans and indeed, the world African community, it is imperative that an authoritative source and site be made available to give an accurate and expansive account of its origins, concepts, values, symbols and practice.

 

Moreover, given the continued rapid growth of Kwanzaa and the parallel expanded discussion of it and related issues, an authoritative source which aids in both framing and informing the discussion is likewise of the greatest importance. Therefore, the central interest of this website is to provide information which reveals and reaffirms the integrity, beauty and expansive meaning of the holiday and thus aids in our approaching it with the depth of thought, dignity, and sense of specialness it deserves.

The holiday, then will of necessity, be engaged as an ancient and living cultural tradition which reflects the best of African thought and practice in its reaffirmation of the dignity of the human person in community and culture, the well-being of family and community, the integrity of the environment and our kinship with it, and the rich resource and meaning of a people’s culture. It is within this understanding, then, that the Organization Us, the founding organization of Kwanzaa and the authoritative keeper of the tradition, has established and maintains this website.

 

THE OFFICIAL KWANZAA WEBSITE

 

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Happy Thanksgiving? HELL No.


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Happy Thanksgiving? If you’re caucasian. And accepted for who you are. If you’re wealthy and have food to eat. If you’re a racist and express hatred toward those unlike you. Yes, I guess today would be a Happy Thanksgiving.

 

Not a Happy Thanksgiving for me. Or The Michael Brown Family. The Trayvon Martin Family. The Sean Bell Family. The Oscar Grant Family. The Michelle Cusseaux Family. The Miriam Carey Family. The Renisha McBride Family. The John Crawford Family. The Kajieme Powell Family. The Clinton Allen Family. The Ezell Ford Family. The Eric Garner Family. The Roshad McIntosh Family. The Vonderrit Myers Family. The Kendrick Johnson Family. The Jordan Davis Family.

 

There are literally thousands I am not listing here this morning, mostly because I can’t recall them all, and that shames me but also makes me violently angry that a list of Black Americans, Black human beings, have been executed by AmeriKKKan Law Enforcement. The largest gang of true thugs on the planet. So well organized a gang are they, that they all have unions to protect their legalized murder of Black  Life.

The REAL Thugs In AmeriKKKa...The Police.

The REAL Thugs In AmeriKKKa…The Police.

I offer my sincere apologies to all the families of victims of The Black Genocide. I am sorry I can’t remember each and every dead Black man & woman, each slaughtered Black child, at the hands of those we pay to “Serve & Protect” us. I am saddened the total number of those murdered by police is not tracked or documented by anyone in AmeriKKKa. I am pissed that there is no agency policing the police.

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I am also very angry with the multitude of caucasians who criticize the reactions in Ferguson, Missouri, to Darren Wilson being exonerated for murdering UNARMED Michael Brown. 

 

 

The issue isn’t the reaction to the . The issue IS the .

 

Lets get to the rioting in Ferguson. This image says it all: From Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King…..I took the liberty of writing this quote from MLK so those who condemn the reaction in Ferguson by asking the dumbass question “what would Dr. King do”, can read his words.

 

 

Just in case you can’t see the words………

 

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contigent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. Ans I must say tonight that a riot  is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promise of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King.

 

I have come across many many many dumbass caucasians, some racist and some not racist, with all types of opinions on what is happening not only in Ferguson, Missouri, but nationwide in cities and towns….protest against the no indict decision by the Ferguson Grand Jury. Racist or not, many caucasians just don’t get it, simply don’t understand. 

 

Until you experience racism, until your caucasian race starts to die for being caucasian, until a caucasian POTUSA gets the racial hatred Barack Hussein Obama has received just for having skin like mine, until you get racially profiled in a store when inside your pocket is 7 times the cash of anyone else in that store, your judgement of the violence in Ferguson means jack shit. I love how people sitting comfortably in their homes pass judgement on people reacting to Black Genocide in Ferguson, Missouri. Racism is the problem, racism is the cause and racism requires a response. The response in Ferguson is appropriate.

 

Black Americans are tired. Fed up. Angry. Hurt. Insulted. Disrespected. All because of a beautiful skin tone given them by DNA missing in caucasians. YOU mad cause you lack Melanin in your skin. Then you turn around and attempt to judge a people who bear the brunt of racial discrimination, racial profiling, racial hatred and being singled out as a thug every time a Black man stands up and reacts to violence with violence.

 

Then there’s this bull shit miscarriage of justice: From Lawrence O’Donnell’s Rewrite…..

 

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MSNBC  host Lawrence O’Donnell blasted St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh on Wednesday for taking weeks to tell the grand jury in the Darren Wilson case she made a major mistake regarding police officers’ right to use legal force.

 

“With prosecutors like this, Darren Wilson never really needed a defense lawyer,” he said.

 

O’Donnell said that early on in the jurors’ deliberations, Alizadeh handed them a copy of a 1979 Missouri statute saying police were “justified in the use of such physical force as he or she reasonably believes is immediately necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape from custody.” However, he explained, the Supreme Court found those kinds of statutes to be unconstitutional six years later.

 

NBC host Lawrence O’Donnell blasted St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh on Wednesday for taking weeks to tell the grand jury in the Darren Wilson case she made a major mistake regarding police officers’ right to use legal force.

 

“With prosecutors like this, Darren Wilson never really needed a defense lawyer,” he said.

 

O’Donnell said that early on in the jurors’ deliberations, Alizadeh handed them a copy of a 1979 Missouri statute saying police were “justified in the use of such physical force as he or she reasonably believes is immediately necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape from custody.” However, he explained, the Supreme Court found those kinds of statutes to be unconstitutional six years later.

 

Thank you NBC host Lawrence O’Donnell.

 

In 1985 the Supreme court found the statute that had allowed police to shoot a suspect for running away, unconstitutional. This old outdated law, struck down as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court was handed out to the Ferguson, Missouri Grand Jury by St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh…..as fact and jury instruction.

 

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As of 1985, American law enforcement is no longer allowed by law to just shoot a suspect, or any American citizen, for running away. That police action was deemed Unconstitutional by The U.S. Supreme Court. Yet St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh, handed out that outdated law, that unconstitutional law, as a guideline in considering Darren Wilson actions in murdering Michael Brown.

 

Darren Wilson testifies before the Grand Jury

 

A Closer Look at Darren Wilson, Cop who Murdered Michael Brown – Lawrence O’Donnell

 

You can see from the contents of this post, how this Thanksgiving is not Happy for me. Or for any Black family missing their loved ones due to Black Genocide.

 

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Help Right Now In Ferguson. Michael Brown’s Parents React To Darren Wilson’s First TV Interview “How Can Your Conscience Be Clear After Killing Someone?”


 

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Here’s a way to do something for Ferguson right now: Join me in donating to one of the Ferguson-area classroom projects below.

-Rachel Sklar

 

 

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i is for iPad Mini

Hearing a book read aloud helps my students see how the words on the page can come alive in a fluid, expressive way. It provides a model of fluent reading! My students are in need of more… more

My students need 2 mini iPads and cases to have access to technology. This will allow them to listen to reading in order to implement the Common Core Standards.

 

 

#FergusonStrong with iPads for Autism

A normal day in my classroom begins when my five students with autism walk in and give me a bright “good morning!” We work hard to practice social skills, math, reading, and communication in small… more

My students need two iPads to increase engagement and communication throughout the school day.

 

 

Building A Technology Classroom in Ferguson

My classroom is a place were students can experience things that they never knew they would enjoy. They can work cooperatively to build free-standing structures out of unusual materials, design… more

My students need 6 Chrome books to complete a classroom set.

 

 

Hear All Our Voices in Ferguson

By the time they finish 3rd grade, I want my students to have a strong, unwavering writing voice. Children need to know that their stories matter. They need to know that everyone has a story, and… more

My students need 10 laptops for a classroom writing program that includes an after-school community collaborative writing group.

 

 

All About That Bass – Round Three!

My students walk into my classroom excited about learning how to play a string instrument. Some students are trying out the instruments for the very first time; others have been playing for up to… more

My students need a 1/4 sized upright string bass, a bass stand, humidifier to help eliminate potential repairs due to weather and back up strings should any break.

 

 

Promoting Success for All Students in Ferguson

From childhood the belief that ‘education is the one thing that can’t be taken from you’ has been instilled in me. People can take your fortune, home, freedom, but they cannot take your education… more

My students need stability balls to replace their classroom chairs. Studies show that when both sides of the brain are simultaneously stimulated students greatly benefit.

 

 

Tablet For Flipping The Classroom

I recently started to use the flipped classroom strategy for my science classes. The students are able to watch the lectures at their own pace and as many times as needed prior to the actual class… more

My students need a tablet that has stylus technology.

 

 

All About That Bass – Round Four!

My students walk into my classroom excited about learning how to play a string instrument. Some students are trying out the instruments for the very first time; others have been playing for up to… more

My students need a 1/4 sized upright string bass, a bass stand, humidifier to help eliminate potential repairs due to weather and back up strings should any break.

 

 

Tablets For Tots

Every morning we start the day by singing along to Will.i.am’s Sesame Streets song “What I Am”. We call this our “pump it up jam.” Much like athletes have a song to get them ready to give their… more

My students need 5 IPad mini’s, protective covers and cases

 

 

Kindergarten Confidence Through Technology!

Our classroom is a place of safety, honesty, laughter, stability and most of all equality for all my kids. Equality is not only race or gender but giving each child the opportunity to learn using…more

My students need two iPad minis with Wi-Fi.

See More

 

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Michael Brown’s Parents React To Darren Wilson’s First TV Interview “How Can Your Conscience Be Clear After Killing Someone?”

 

 

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An Open Letter to White America

By 

I am sending out a call for compassion. I am sending out a call for reason. I am sending out a call for an expansion of our presence with one another. This morning, a Black woman tweeted that she thought she was okay, until she saw a group of children walking to school and burst into tears. I don’t know what it is like to live inside that sort of fear, anguish, grief, and pain.

 

I am not a parent, frightened that a child might not make it home from the store. I am not a man who knows that just walking out the door might get me shot. I am not a woman – cis or trans – who knows that asking for help from police might just get me raped or killed.

 

The rallying cry of “Black Lives Matter” is important because, within these systems, they clearly don’t. Black lives, in the United States, only matter to the systems of capitalism and imperialism as resources to be exploited and cast off. 

We have got to turn this around. Black. Lives. Matter.

Someone on my Facebook feed commented this week that all life is sacred, and we shouldn’t preference Black people as being special. I replied that all life is indeed sacred, but some life is more endangered. Black lives are more endangered. This is simple reality. In this, I’m not appealing to empathy or emotion, I’m drawing upon facts.

This is not something over which we can “agree to disagree.” This is a truth.

Taken from:

An Open Letter to White America

 

By 

Check put the entire article…..

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Staples You Suck: Printed Copy Of Petition To Be Delivered To Staples Corporate Today!


 

By Jueseppi B.

download

 

 

Printed copy of Petition to be Delivered to Staples Corporate Today!

 

By Sue Whistleblower

 

This is it! The day where all our hard work pays off! A 10 lb box of printed signatures was sent to Staples Corporate Headquarters and is scheduled to be delivered today!

 

If Staples doesn’t respond within a week, I would like to schedule a Call-In to the Office of the President on Monday February 3rd.

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Thanks again for your continued support!
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The following letter was included with the petition signatures:
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Sue Whistleblower
1660 Soldiers Field Road
Brighton, MA 02135
January 18, 2014
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Ron Sargent
Chief Executive Officer
Staples
500 Staples Drive
Framingham, MA 01702
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Dear Ron Sargent:
I am a part-time employee of your company, Staples. I have served Staples faithfully for many years, and have earned your company far more income than you have paid me over that time. On January 4th, 2014, a policy was enacted at your retail stores that limited part-time employees to 25 hours a week. I have worked over 25 hours a week for the entirety of my employment at your company, as have a vast majority of your part-time staff. I inquired about the reason of the policy up the chain of command, and was not given a straight answer at every level.
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It is for this reason, that we the part-time employees of Staples, hereby petition your company for the following actions:
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1. Amend your policy to at least 35 hours a week for part-time employees or abolish said policy.
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2. If there are reasons this cannot be done, Staples is to make an honest and truthful public statement as to why.
You are probably wondering under what authority we as employees have the right to demand such changes from the CEO of a company. As Customer Service Representatives, it is not only our duty to represent the company to the customer, it is also our duty to represent the customer to the company. Enclosed is a printed copy of over 200,000 signatures of people who disagree with your current actions and demand you change your policy. Most of them are your customers and have pledged not to shop at your stores until you take corrective action.
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We know that thousands of other companies have been enacting similar policies for one reason, the Affordable Health Care Act. We also know that the medical insurance you currently offer through Aetna does not meet the minimum standards of the law. The ACA states that any employee working over 30 hours a week is entitled to health insurance, or the company faces steep fines. We understand that paying those fines would be an unacceptable cost to your corporation. However, we encourage Staples to be more open as to why this company is enacting such changes. If complying with the law would cost Staples hundreds of millions of dollars, then speak out!
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If you truly need to enact such policies to avoid hefty fees, and to give you time to research ways to comply with the law that meet the needs of both the company and its employees, then please make this known in a public statement!
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We also hereby inform you that we will use all lawful means to petition your company until we receive an answer, and that this letter will be distributed to all petition signers.
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Sincerely,
Sue Whistleblower
Petition Executor
Enclosed: 201,751 petition signatures from Change.org
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free70
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Staples_store
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