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The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, President Obama announced his intent to appoint the following individuals to key Administration posts:

 

  • Patricia Welbourn Lorsch – Member, Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Rusty Rueff – Member, Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Orlan Boston – Member, Board of Governors of the United Service Organizations, Incorporated
  • John D. Goldman – General Trustee, Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Amalia Perea Mahoney – General Trustee, Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Alyssa Mastromonaco – General Trustee, Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Reginald Van Lee – General Trustee, Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
  • Danielle Gray – Member, Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States
  • Barry Thom – United States Commissioner, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission
  • Allan Holt – Member, United States Holocaust Memorial Council

 

President Obama said, “The extraordinary dedication these men and women bring to their new roles will greatly serve the American people.  I am grateful they have agreed to serve in this Administration and I look forward to working with them in the months and years to come.”

 

Read More.

 

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Statement by Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Lisa Monaco on Attempted Rescue Operation

As the Department of Defense has now announced, earlier this summer the President authorized an operation to attempt the rescue of American citizens who were kidnapped and held by ISIL against their will in Syria. The President authorized action at this time because it was the national security team’s assessment that these hostages were in danger with each passing day in ISIL custody. The U.S. Government had what we believed was sufficient intelligence, and when the opportunity presented itself, the President authorized the Department of Defense to move aggressively to recover our citizens. Unfortunately, that mission was ultimately not successful because the hostages were not present.

 

Given the need to protect our military’s operational capabilities, we will not be able to reveal the details of this operation. But the President could not be prouder of the U.S. forces who carried out this mission and the dedicated intelligence and diplomatic professionals who supported their efforts. Their effort should serve as another signal to those who would do us harm that  the United States will not tolerate the abduction of our people, and will spare no effort to secure the safety of our citizens and to hold their captors accountable.

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with the remaining hostages’ families and their loved ones during this difficult time.  We continue to call for their immediate release. On behalf of all Americans, we keep these individuals and their families in our thoughts and prayers.

 

 

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President Obama: James Foley’s Life “Stands in Stark Contrast to His Killers”

 

 

 

This afternoon, the President made a statement on the killing of journalist James Foley by the terrorist group ISIL. He was 40 years old.

 

“The entire world is appalled by the brutal murder of Jim Foley,” President Obama said. “Jim was a journalist, a son, a brother, and a friend. He reported from difficult and dangerous places, bearing witness to the lives of people a world away.”

 

Foley was taken hostage in Syria almost two years ago while reporting on the conflict there. The President made clear in today’s statement that Foley’s life “stands in stark contrast to his killers”:

 

[ISIL has] rampaged across cities and villages — killing innocent, unarmed civilians in cowardly acts of violence.  They abduct women and children, and subject them to torture and rape and slavery.  They have murdered Muslims — both Sunni and Shia — by the thousands.  They target Christians and religious minorities, driving them from their homes, murdering them when they can for no other reason than they practice a different religion.  They declared their ambition to commit genocide against an ancient people.

So ISIL speaks for no religion.  Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents.  No just God would stand for what they did yesterday, and for what they do every single day.  ISIL has no ideology of any value to human beings.  Their ideology is bankrupt.  They may claim out of expediency that they are at war with the United States or the West, but the fact is they terrorize their neighbors and offer them nothing but an endless slavery to their empty vision, and the collapse of any definition of civilized behavior.

 

“People like this ultimately fail,” the President said. “They fail, because the future is won by those who build and not destroy and the world is shaped by people like Jim Foley, and the overwhelming majority of humanity who are appalled by those who killed him.”

 

President Barack Obama speaks about the killing of American journalist James FoleyPresident Barack Obama speaks about the killing of American journalist James Foley by the terrorist group ISIL, during a statement in Edgartown, Mass., Aug. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

 

The President also reiterated that the U.S. will continue to do whatever is necessary to protect the American people.

“We will be vigilant and we will be relentless,” he said. “When people harm Americans, anywhere, we do what’s necessary to see that justice is done.  And we act against ISIL, standing alongside others.”

The people of Iraq, who with our support are taking the fight to ISIL, must continue coming together to expel these terrorists from their communities.  The people of Syria, whose story Jim Foley told, do not deserve to live under the shadow of a tyrant or terrorists.  They have our support in their pursuit of a future rooted in dignity.

From governments and peoples across the Middle East there has to be a common effort to extract this cancer, so that it does not spread.  There has to be a clear rejection of these kind of nihilistic ideologies.  One thing we can all agree on is that a group like ISIL has no place in the 21st century.

Friends and allies around the world, we share a common security and a common set of values that are rooted in the opposite of what we saw yesterday.  And we will continue to confront this hateful terrorism, and replace it with a sense of hope and civility.

“That’s what Jim Foley stood for,” President Obama said. “A man who lived his work; who courageously told the stories of his fellow human beings; who was liked and loved by friends and family.”

Today, the American people will all say a prayer for those who loved Jim.  All of us feel the ache of his absence.  All of us mourn his loss.  We keep in our prayers those other

Americans who are separated from their families.  We will do everything that we can to protect our people and the timeless values that we stand for.

May God bless and keep Jim’s memory, and may God bless the United States of America.

Read the full statement here.

 

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The Attorney General’s Message to the People of Ferguson

 

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is traveling to Ferguson, Missouri today to review the Department of Justice’s ongoing independent investigation into the tragic death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

 

In an op-ed in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Attorney General Holder pledged to help find justice for a community that is rightfully hurting and looking for answers:

 

Today, I will be in Ferguson to be briefed on the federal civil rights investigation that I have closely monitored since I launched it more than one week ago. I will meet personally with community leaders, FBI investigators and federal prosecutors from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office to receive detailed briefings on the status of this case.

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The full resources of the Department of Justice have been committed to the investigation into Michael Brown’s death. This inquiry will take time to complete, but we have already taken significant steps. Approximately 40 FBI agents and some of the Civil Rights Division’s most experienced prosecutors have been deployed to lead this process, with the assistance of the United States Attorney in St. Louis. Hundreds of people have already been interviewed in connection with this matter. On Monday, at my direction, a team of federal medical examiners conducted an independent autopsy.

 

We understand the need for an independent investigation, and we hope that the independence and thoroughness of our investigation will bring some measure of calm to the tensions in Ferguson. In order to begin the healing process, however, we must first see an end to the acts of violence in the streets of Ferguson. Although these acts have been committed by a very small minority — and, in many cases, by individuals from outside Ferguson — they seriously undermine, rather than advance, the cause of justice. And they interrupt the deeper conversation that the legitimate demonstrators are trying to advance.

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The Justice Department will defend the right of protesters to peacefully demonstrate and for the media to cover a story that must be told. But violence cannot be condoned. I urge the citizens of Ferguson who have been peacefully exercising their First Amendment rights to join with law enforcement in condemning the actions of looters, vandals and others seeking to inflame tensions and sow discord.

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Attorney General Holder offered a pledge to the Ferguson community:

 

This is my pledge to the people of Ferguson: Our investigation into this matter will be full, it will be fair, and it will be independent. And beyond the investigation itself, we will work with the police, civil rights leaders, and members of the public to ensure that this tragedy can give rise to new understanding — and robust action — aimed at bridging persistent gaps between law enforcement officials and the communities we serve. Long after the events of Aug. 9 have receded from the headlines, the Justice Department will continue to stand with this community.

 

Read the full op-ed here.

 

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The President Speaks on Iraq and Ferguson

 

August 18, 2014 | 26:55 | Public Domain

President Obama discusses the latest developments with U.S. operations in Iraq, as well as the ongoing situation in Ferguson, Missouri.

 

 

 

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A Day in the Life: Austraberta from Houston

 

Ed. note: This is cross-posted on the U.S. Department of Labor’s blog. See the original post here.

 

Leading up to Labor Day 2014, Secretary Tom Perez is traveling across the country to talk with Americans about how we can help more people succeed in the workplace and at home. Follow him along the way with live updates at www.dol.gov/LaborDay.

 


Meet Austraberta.

 

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71-year-old Austraberta Rodriguez has been a janitor for more than 30 years. For most of those years, she could only dream about vacation days and paid time off. She was making $5.15 per hour and she had small children and grandchildren. All of her money was going to the bare essentials. Looking back, she doesn’t know how she survived. In 2006, all of that changed.

 

Austraberta led her co-workers to strike to form a union and raise their families out of extreme poverty. When they first discussed organizing to form a union, there was resounding reluctance. People were scared. “We work in quiet, empty offices. We were used to being hidden away,” she said. “It was a challenge to decide to go public and to tell everybody we were fighting for something better for our families.”

 

They began rallying in 2006, and eventually won wage increases, vacation time, paid holiday time, and affordable health care. But eight years later, Austraberta is still fighting for an equal voice at the table.

 

Today, Secretary Tom Perez is traveling to Houston to meet with her. This is the second of five “day in the life” visits Secretary Perez will be making over the next week during his travel across the country – a chance to talk directly with the people the Labor Department works for every day.

 

We want to make sure you see what he sees, too. Follow along for updates from his trip.

 

Read More.

 

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Day One: Mikey Dickerson, U.S. Digital Service Administrator

 

Ever wondered what a first day as a new employee at the White House looks like?

 

What about a first day as the very first employee of a brand-new government service designed to remake the way people and businesses interact with their government online?

 

From parking forms to press conferences, from orientation to setting a new BlackBerry password to meeting with senior advisors, follow along as Mikey Dickerson, Administrator of the newly created U.S. Digital Service, makes his way through Day One.

 

Take a look, and then pass this one on.

 

Introducing the U.S. Digital Service

 

Published on Aug 20, 2014

Follow along with Mikey Dickerson — the administrator of the newly launched U.S. Digital Service — on his first day on the job, where he’ll be leading a team responsible for remaking the digital experience that people and businesses have with their government.. Take a look, and pass it on: http://wh.gov/lSi0k

 

 

 

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Vice President Biden Congratulates Winners of National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition

Yesterday afternoon, Vice President Joe Biden welcomed the University of Central Florida’s cyber defense team to the White House to congratulate them on their victory in the 2014 National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. Beating out more than 2,000 students from over 180 schools, the Central Florida team members demonstrated their ability to protect complex networks from skilled cyber criminals.

 

Joined by the Director of the Secret Service, the President’s Cyber Coordinator, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Director for National Security and International Affairs, the Vice President underscored the vital national security and economic need to prepare Americans for jobs in cyber security.

 

Read More

 

 

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Chart of the Week: Auto Production at Its Highest Rate Since 2002

 

The American auto industry remains a cornerstone of the American economy — a key source of our ability to export, innovate, and create jobs. During the economic turmoil of the Great Recession, the auto sector shed hundreds of thousands of jobs, and production dropped to the lowest level recorded in data going back to the 1960s. In 2009, President Obama took decisive action to rescue the industry from imminent collapse, saving more than 1 million jobs across the country.

 

Now, our auto industry is once again a source of economic strength, with more and more of the world’s top-of-the-line, fuel-efficient vehicles being made by American workers in American factories. In fact, the number of cars coming off our assembly lines just reached its highest level in 12 years.

 

Check out how fast the American auto industry has bounced back under President Obama — then share this chart with everyone who needs to see this progress:

 

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GRAPHIC: Witness video of deadly St. Louis police shooting

 

Published on Aug 21, 2014

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department has released mobile phone footage that seems to be at odds with parts of its story surrounding the officer-involved shooting of Kajieme Powell in the weeks after Michael Brown’s death. FULL STORY:http://on.rt.com/uernn7

 

 

 

Police Brutality | Jesse Ventura Off The Grid

 

Published on Aug 21, 2014

The cops are supposed to protect us… but who can protect us from the cops? Today on #OffTheGrid, Jesse Ventura takes on the tragic rash of police brutality that has struck the United States in Ferguson, Missouri, New York City, and even small town Ohio. Are badge cameras the answer? Or is accountability only the beginning of a deeper issue? Tell the Governor what you think at http://www.ora.tv/offthegrid/askjesse.

 

 

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BvX9O3fIEAAwdkW Protesters chant as they ride in a car during a peaceful demonstration as communities continue to react to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri Protesters chant during a peaceful demonstration as communities continue to react to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri BvWCku1IcAAPeH-

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Vanity Fair: What Combat Veterans See In Ferguson, Missouri.


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What Combat Veterans See in Ferguson, Missouri

 

by Matthew Farwell & Vanity Fair:

 

Watching the tragedy-turned-drama of this week unfold in Ferguson, Missouri—five hours up the road from my home in Arkansas—an eight-year-old scene kept replaying in my mind.

 

It was a little after dawn on Thanksgiving morning when the Afghan National Army soldiers and the Afghan National Police officers pointed their AK-47s and rocket propelled grenades at each other, jabbering threats in angry Pashto and Dari. They were about 30 feet away from where I was monitoring the radios in the passenger seat of my gun-truck. Suddenly, the hot turkey dinner my infantry platoon had been promised that afternoon at our remote outpost in the middle of Taliban-country in Ghazni province seemed pretty far away, given the inevitable turkey shoot. It had happened before, the A.N.A. and A.N.P. shooting at each other.

 

I set down the magazine I was reading and walked over to the tent reeking of farts and feet where the rest of my infantry platoon was sleeping to wake up my lieutenant.

 

“Uh, sir, the A.N.A and A.N.P. are. . . . well, you should get out here.”

 

Next I woke up our interpreter, who took one look at our poorly trained, trigger-happy, likely-stoned allies and said, “Fuck this shit, I go get my body armor first,” in his Hollywood-meets-Afghanistan voice. I walked back to the up-armored Humvee, shut the heavy steel-plated door as quietly as I could, got on the radio and told headquarters the fireworks would begin, oh, any minute.

 

My lieutenant, a jacked 24-year-old Puerto Rican guy from Queens, marched between the two groups, wearing nothing more than a t-shirt, fatigue pants and flip-flops, and pushed the barrels of the lead AK-47s to the ground. Then he grabbed an R.P.G. from the hands of a policeman, pointed, and shouted some choice phrases in universally understood English until the two factions dispersed, embarrassed and chagrined.

 

There’s a stale old joke—the difference between the Boy Scouts and the Army is that the Scouts have adult supervision—but on Thanksgiving Day, 2006, my Lieutenant proved that wasn’t true. As I observed the chaos in Missouri this week, I kept wondering where the adults were.

 

I couldn’t get past the fact that the police in Ferguson were wearing better battle-rattle and carrying more tricked-out weapons than my infantry platoon used in one of the most dangerous parts of Afghanistan. Looking at the lines of cops facing off against angry protesters, I was alarmed at their war-like paramilitary posturing.

 

In Afghanistan, as infantrymen facing a determined and dangerous, though largely faceless foe, our business was killing people and business was good that year. When people shot at us, we shot back until they were dead or their heads were down, then we got on the radio and dropped bombs or mortars on those heads until nothing remained but bits and pieces of bodies stuck in trees that still stood among the craters, black birds alighting on their branches for an easy meal. When people weren’t shooting at us, we passed out backpacks and sacks of rice and tried to win friends, which turned out to be a pretty hard thing to do for some reason.

 

To my eyes the police, whose business is peace, have no business strutting through the streets carrying M-4 carbines with reflexive-fire sights on top, surefire tactical flashlights on barrel-mounted rail systems slung from three-point harnesses, or white zip-tie flex cuffs over black-body armor, their eyes and faces obscured by gas masks and their heads covered with Kevlar helmets. A bunch of other combat veterans I stay in touch with online agreed. Indeed, besides black Americans, to whom these kind of disturbing images are hardly new, these veterans seemed the most irate, but also the most attuned to the danger posed by the cognitive dissonance of peace officers dressed for war—and not just in Ferguson, but in Boston in the wake of the marathon bombing.

 

I sent a message to a former Special Forces friend in Oregon.

 

“I was wondering what would happen if a bunch of us vets kitted up without weapons and stood in-between the cops and civs.”

 

His message came back: “I’m doing that this weekend! I’m kitting fully up armor helmet everything. And showing police what they look like. I fully support you!”

 

With another infantry veteran in Oklahoma on Wednesday night, I joked about “kitting up and going to Ferguson” to watch things unfold.

 

“No. I’m out now and I don’t do stuff that could get me killed anymore. I have, however, donated to the ACLU.”

 

***I called an old friend from the Army, Justin, who’d served with me in Afghanistan, as part of the 10th Mountain Division’s Delta Company, 2-87 Infantry (Catamounts!). Justin’s been a cop in a town in Iowa roughly the size of Ferguson for the past four years. I wanted his opinion as a cop planning to make it a career following his stint as the self-described “worst soldier in the Army.” (He wasn’t, he just didn’t give a hoot about the dog and pony show aspects of spit-and-polish soldiering.)

 

“The trend nowadays is thinking we’re in a police state, and we’re not,” he said. “Why are these cops lined up like Stalingrad?” That said, he is glad the equipment is available to those who have to serve high-risk warrants and respond to mass shootings. “We didn’t have this kind of gear 10 years ago because we didn’t need it then, but now, you’d be surprised what is out on the streets—we’re dealing with cartels, sophisticated criminals who didn’t exist on small-town radars before—there are SAWs [the same type of belt-fed, small caliber machine gun that killed Pat Tillman] missing from military arsenals.”

 

I asked him if he thought there was a difference between wearing the military style gear and the regular blue or brown police uniform and shield in how the officers regarded themselves—whether, in essence, the clothes make the man.

 

“Why they’re wearing woodland camo is beyond me,” he said, much less pointing their weapons at people. We’d both been well-trained that when you aimed your rifle at a person, that meant you were prepared to kill them. “If someone tells me what to do without telling me the reason, I’m liable to be resistant too. So, when I’m dealing with people I try to let them understand why, show them some compassion. If you don’t treat people like savages, you can get people to do anything.”

 

Justin has grown up quite a bit since the Army.

 

“Sometimes, it seems that everyone likes to imagine being a part of the military. . . . It must be great fun to imagine yourself a soldier without the risk of physical, mental, or moral damage,” wrote Paul Fussell, a veteran of infantry combat in World War II, in a chapter on “Weirdos” in his book, Uniforms: You are What You Wear.

 

“These people, having missed World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, never tasted the thrill of being machine-gunned and mortared and thus escaped, unlike former ground troops, lifelong bodily and spiritual damage,” Fussell wrote. “Not having endured real military experience, they get excited by faking it.” Fussell’s scorn was directed not at the police but at people dressing like G.I. JOE with far less serious repercussions: war re-enactors, couture design wearing models strutting down the runway in military-derived designs, hipsters wearing surplus Eisenhower jackets at coffee shops.

 

What would Fussell have made of all this? Boys with toys, I thought, dressing like Delta force wannabes, I thought, reading hyperventilating posts about police militarization on Wednesday and Thursday. Being a contrarian and an experience snob, I wasn’t sure what to make of all the outrage from people who’ve never had handcuffs slapped around their wrists and double locked. I didn’t have a seamless transition to civilian life after leaving the military and found myself wearing a jail jumpsuit a couple of times for non-violent misdemeanors. I’ve been arrested by cops that were assholes, and cops that were not, and it makes a difference.

 

As Fussell writes, “Playing soldiers used to be appropriate only among small boys.”

 

Many actual solders wish it had stayed that way.

 

Thank you Matthew Farwell & Vanity Fair.

 

 

 

 

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised (Full Band Version)

It Will Be Live Streamed!!

 

 

 

Civil Liberties Under Assault in Ferguson As Police Attack Peaceful Protesters

 

Published on Aug 20, 2014

Attorney Jessica Lee describes witnessing police launch unprovoked attacks on peaceful protesters and Glen Ford explains why discord in Ferguson is about more then the killing of Mike Brown

 

 

 

Police Continue to Violate Press Freedom In Ferguson

 

Published on Aug 20, 2014

With 11 journalists arrested thus far, Truthout.org investigative reporter Mike Ludwig describes how Ferguson police are using intimidation tactics against journalists

 

 

 

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The St. Louis Post Dispatch Op-Ed: Attorney General Eric Holder, A Message To The People Of Ferguson.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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A Message To The People Of Ferguson

 

The St. Louis Post Dispatch:

 

Since the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown, the nation and the world have witnessed the unrest that has gripped Ferguson, Mo. At the core of these demonstrations is a demand for answers about the circumstances of this young man’s death and a broader concern about the state of our criminal justice system.

 

At a time when so much may seem uncertain, the people of Ferguson can have confidence that the Justice Department intends to learn — in a fair and thorough manner — exactly what happened.

 

Today, I will be in Ferguson to be briefed on the federal civil rights investigation that I have closely monitored since I launched it more than one week ago. I will meet personally with community leaders, FBI investigators and federal prosecutors from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office to receive detailed briefings on the status of this case.

 

The full resources of the Department of Justice have been committed to the investigation into Michael Brown’s death. This inquiry will take time to complete, but we have already taken significant steps. Approximately 40 FBI agents and some of the Civil Rights Division’s most experienced prosecutors have been deployed to lead this process, with the assistance of the United States Attorney in St. Louis. Hundreds of people have already been interviewed in connection with this matter. On Monday, at my direction, a team of federal medical examiners conducted an independent autopsy.

 

We understand the need for an independent investigation, and we hope that the independence and thoroughness of our investigation will bring some measure of calm to the tensions in Ferguson. In order to begin the healing process, however, we must first see an end to the acts of violence in the streets of Ferguson. Although these acts have been committed by a very small minority — and, in many cases, by individuals from outside Ferguson — they seriously undermine, rather than advance, the cause of justice. And they interrupt the deeper conversation that the legitimate demonstrators are trying to advance.

 

The Justice Department will defend the right of protesters to peacefully demonstrate and for the media to cover a story that must be told. But violence cannot be condoned. I urge the citizens of Ferguson who have been peacefully exercising their First Amendment rights to join with law enforcement in condemning the actions of looters, vandals and others seeking to inflame tensions and sow discord.

 

Law enforcement has a role to play in reducing tensions, as well. As the brother of a retired law enforcement officer, I know firsthand that our men and women in uniform perform their duties in the face of tremendous threats and significant personal risk. They put their lives on the line every day, and they often have to make split-second decisions.

 

At the same time, good law enforcement requires forging bonds of trust between the police and the public. This trust is all-important, but it is also fragile. It requires that force be used in appropriate ways. Enforcement priorities and arrest patterns must not lead to disparate treatment under the law, even if such treatment is unintended. And police forces should reflect the diversity of the communities they serve.

 

Over the years, we have made significant progress in ensuring that this is the case. But progress is not an endpoint; it is a measure of effort and of commitment. Constructive dialogue should continue — but it must also be converted into concrete action. And it is painfully clear, in cities and circumstances across our great nation, that more progress, more dialogue, and more action is needed.

 

This is my pledge to the people of Ferguson: Our investigation into this matter will be full, it will be fair, and it will be independent. And beyond the investigation itself, we will work with the police, civil rights leaders, and members of the public to ensure that this tragedy can give rise to new understanding — and robust action — aimed at bridging persistent gaps between law enforcement officials and the communities we serve. Long after the events of Aug. 9 have receded from the headlines, the Justice Department will continue to stand with this community.

 

As we move forward together, I ask for the public’s cooperation and patience. And I urge anyone with information related to the shooting to contact the FBI by dialing 800-CALL-FBI, option 4.

 

Eric H. Holder Jr. is attorney general of the United States.

 

Thank you The St. Louis Post Dispatch.

 

 

Michael Brown Funeral Planned for Monday

 

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The funeral for Michael Brown Jr. will be on Monday, August 25, a lawyer for his family announced on Tuesday. Attorney Benjamin Crump said more details would follow.

 

 

Brown’s fatal shooting by a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer on August 9 has touched off over a week of angry protests in the community.

Brown’s parents, Michael Sr. and Lesley McSpadden, say prosecution of the officer who shot their unarmed son is the only thing that can bring peace to the streets of Ferguson. “Justice will bring peace,” McSpadden told TODAY’s Matt Lauer Tuesday.

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I Don’t Have The Words. The Ferguson, Missouri Images Will Have To Do.

 

 

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

Trayvon Martin’s mom speaks out on #MichaelBrown

 

Published on Aug 19, 2014

The mother of slain teen Trayvon Martin Sybrina Fulton speaks out on the shooting and killing of Michael Brown .

 

 

 

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St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch, Recuse Yourself.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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Appoint a Special Prosecutor to Investigate the Murder of Michael Brown.

 

Petition by Jamilah Nasheed

 

To be delivered to Robert P. McCulloch, St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney

 

Please SIGN THIS PETITION

 

The death of Michael Brown at the hands of Ferguson, MO police has stoked tensions and caused unrest across our community, state and nation. This racially charged climate demands an independent, impartial investigation that the St. Louis County Prosecutor’s office simply cannot provide.

 

There are currently 27,505 signatures. NEW goal – We need 30,000 signatures!

 

PETITION BACKGROUND

 

Bob McCulloch must fully recuse himself and his office from the investigation related to the murder of Michael Brown.

 

McCulloch’s decision not to charge officers who murdered two unarmed African American men in 2000 by shooting into their car 20 times, especially in the face the U.S. Attorney Office’s independent investigation that those officers lied about their actions, gives us no confidence that his office can provide a fair and impartial investigation into this current matter.

 

That failure, coupled with McCulloch’s recent participation in one of the most racially-polarizing elections in the history of St. Louis County means that his office’s continued oversight of this tragedy will only sow further distrust and discord in our community.

 

For the good of the entire St. Louis region and the nation as a whole, we call on Robert P. McCulloch to recuse himself and his office from this matter, and appoint a special prosector to investigate the murder of Michael Brown.

 

SIGN THIS PETITION

 

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20,000 sign petitions seeking special prosecutor in Michael Brown shooting

 

 

Organizers said Sunday that more than 20,000 people had signed online petitions seeking a special prosecutor to investigate the death of Michael Brown.

 

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch is in charge of the investigation. The petition asks him to step aside.

 

“Many community members don’t believe he can be fair and impartial,” state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, said. She launched the petition drive with the goal of gathering 50,000 signatures. “We will continue to put pressure on him to resign,” she said.

 

Nasheed cited McCulloch’s investigation into the actions of two undercover drug detectives who killed a suspect and his passenger in a car on the parking lot of the Jack in the Box restaurant in Berkeley in 2000.

 

Grand jury proceedings are secret. McCulloch, in telling the public what the grand jury had found, repeatedly insisted that “every witness” had testified that the two detectives fired to defend themselves after the suspect tried to run them over with his car.

 

The Post-Dispatch reviewed the previously secret grand jury tapes and found that McCulloch’s public statements were untrue.

Only three of the 13 detectives who testified said the suspect’s car had moved forward, in the direction of the two officers who shot him and his passenger. Two of those were the shooters themselves. The third was a detective who McCulloch later said he considered charging with perjury because his account was so at odds with the facts.

 

Contrary to McCulloch’s public statements, the grand jury tapes showed that four other detectives testified that they never saw the suspect’s car travel toward the officers.

 

McCulloch never brought independent evidence before the grand jury to sort out who was right.

 

Nor did he request the testimony of a nationally noted collision expert who investigated the case for the Justice Department. He determined that the suspect’s car had always been in reverse — added proof that it did not move toward the detectives.

 

Another controversial case involving McCulloch’s use of the grand jury was dubbed “Kinkogate.”

 

In 1997, McCulloch used a grand jury subpoena to identify a whistleblower who contacted the FBI and reported what he said was improper behavior by a member of then St. Louis County Executive George “Buzz” Westfall’s cabinet. The whistleblower was Russ Signorino, then an employee of the St. Louis County Economic Council. He sent an anonymous fax to the media from a Kinko’s store in Creve Coeur.

 

Without telling the grand jury what he was doing, McCulloch gave the subpoena to the St. Louis County police, who used it to obtain a video recording from Kinko’s showing who sent the fax. After he was identified, Signorino was forced to quit his county job.

 

McCulloch at first claimed that he had issued the grand jury subpoena because the fax contained a “threat.”

 

He later admitted that there never had been any threat and conceded that no crime was involved. He denied that he had abused the grand jury process to identity a whistleblower who was acting lawfully.

 

According to the Missouri attorney general’s office, only an order from a judge can remove McCulloch from the case; he can also step aside himself. Nasheed said the petition would put pressure on McCulloch to step down voluntarily.

 

McCulloch did not respond to a request for comment. On Saturday, he said the county grand jury would begin hearing evidence in the Brown shooting case this week.

 

Manuel Blair, 41, of Florissant, said he is supporting the petition drive for a special prosecutor. He noted that McCulloch’s father was a police officer who was killed in the line of duty. McCulloch’s father, brother, nephew and cousin all served with the St. Louis Police Department; his mother was a clerk there.

 

“I don’t think he will effectively prosecute a police officer,” Blair said.

 

Denise Hollinshed of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

 

Thank you St. Louis Post Dispatch.

 

 

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Objectivity of prosecutor in Missouri shooting of Michael Brown is questioned

 

By Kimberly Kindy & Washington Post:

 

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley on Friday said he is leading an effort to remove the county prosecutor from investigating the Michael Brown case because he thinks the prosecutor’s personal experiences and recent statements have tainted his ability to act objectively.

 

Brown, a black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by Officer Darren Wilson last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. Wilson is white.

 

Dooley’s spokeswoman, Pat Washington, said there have been long-standing concerns among many black leaders in the community regarding County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch’s ability to handle such cases because his father was killed in the line of duty when McCulloch was 12 years old. The man who shot his father was black.

 

Most recently, she said, Dooley feels McCulloch crossed a line when he publicly criticized a decision this week by Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) to bring in the State Highway Patrol to lead efforts to quell the violent street protests that erupted after the shooting of Brown.

 

“He injected himself in a matter in a way that further exacerbates the community distrust of him,” Washington said. “Rather than stay focused on the investigation, the prosecuting attorney decided to wade over into a whole other area and challenge the governor. He inflamed the community, which already distrusts him.”

Washington said Dooley had called the state attorney general’s office to determine how a special prosecutor could be appointed in place of McCulloch and was told there was a petition process for doing so, which he is looking into. Dooley was planning to meet Friday night with several local and state elected officials who Washington said have voiced similar concerns about McCulloch, but she declined to identify who would be at the private meeting.

 

Ed Magee, a McCulloch spokesman, said his office believes the county prosecutor cannot be removed from the case.

 

“There is no petition process,” Magee said. “We are working with the county police. We will continue to work with them if it proceeds to the grand jury and beyond if necessary.”

 

Magee declined to comment further about Dooley’s accusations.

 

McCulloch has been the St. Louis County prosecutor for more than 20 years, and during that time has been involved with a support group called BackStoppers, which helps the families of police officers killed in the line of duty.

 

The prosecutor’s father, Paul McCulloch, was a St. Louis police officer when he was gunned down July 2, 1964, at age 37 while trying to arrest a kidnapper. He had answered a call by an officer in need of assistance at a housing complex and died in a shootout. One of the shooters was wounded and was later convicted of murder.

 

This is not the first time McCulloch’s objectivity has been questioned because of how his father died.

In July 2000, questions were raised about his leading an investigation into two white police officers who fatally shot two black men. The two officers, undercover drug agents, shot Earl Murray and Ronald Beasley, both unarmed, on June 12, 2000, in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant in the St. Louis suburb of Berkeley. A county grand jury declined to indict the officers; McCulloch said he agreed with the decision.

 

“My father was killed many, many years ago, and it’s certainly not something you forget, but it’s certainly not something that clouds my judgment in looking at a case,” McCulloch told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at the time. “It certainly makes you more aware of the severity of it.”

 

Alice Crites, Mark Berman, Carol Leonnig and Manuel Roig-Franzia contributed to this report.

 

Kimberly Kindy is a government accountability reporter at The Washington Post.

 

Thank you Kimberly Kindy & Washington Post.

 

 

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Is The Prosecutor In The Michael Brown Case Biased?

 

Some say that county prosecutor Bob McCulloch has an unsettling history of siding with the police

 

By  & Salon.com

 

A grand jury could begin to hear evidence regarding 18-year-old Michael Brown’s fatal shooting as soon as Wednesday, according to the office of the county prosecutor in St. Louis. “We’re going to attempt to present evidence to the grand jury on Wednesday,” said Ed Magee, a spokesman for St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch. McCulloch is the only one who has the power to actually charge Darren Wilson with murder, if he sees fit, but some object to McCulloch being the prosecuting attorney in the case given its extremely high profile and his potential bias.

 

Rep. William Lacy Clay, (D-St. Louis) has been outspoken in his disapproval of the prosecutor: “We don’t have any confidence in the St. Louis County prosecuting attorney’s office… I have no faith in him, but I do trust the FBI and the justice department.”

 

The prosecutor has received criticism for his disapproval of Gov. Jay Nixon’s decision to put the Highway Patrol in control of keeping the peace in Ferguson, with some arguing that he disapproved of the decision to put Capt. Ron Johnson in charge. “It appears like the county police and the Ferguson police were upset because they put a black man in charge,” said Judy Jones, a St. Louis resident. “And in this country, white people don’t like black people telling them anything. That’s why they have problems with Obama.”

 

The prosecutor has also been criticized for his role in a 2000 case in which two black men were fatally shot by two white undercover drug officers in the parking lot of a Jack in the Box chain restaurant. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, McCulloch agreed with a grand jury’s decision not to press charges because of evidence that the two men had attempted to escape and drove toward the officers. A federal investigation later showed that the men were unarmed and that their car had not moved when the officers fired 21 shots, although because the officers feared for their safety, the shootings were legal.

 

McCulloch later said of the two slain men, “These guys were bums.”

 

Other critics point to the fact that McCulloch has deep ties to the police: his brother, nephew and cousin have also served as police officers in St. Louis, and his father, also a police officer, was killed in the line of duty by a kidnapper who also happened to be black.

 

Civil rights activist Martin Luther King III has said, “He has displayed so much bias that he needs to remove himself from the case. That would be a victory for this community.”

 

McCulloch’s political relationships make it even more difficult to determine where his allegiances lie. St. Louis Public Radio reports:

 

“The governor and I have known each other since he was a state senator,” McCulloch recalled. As for their relationship, he added drily, “We’ve had our ups and downs.”

 

The two, both Democrats, tangled occasionally during Nixon’s 16 years as Missouri’s attorney general. But McCulloch said Saturday that he wasn’t going to replay any of those old disputes.

 

McCulloch appears to have a more amiable relationship with current Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, who the prosecutor called a friend. McCulloch said they’ve been talking regularly since the unrest in Ferguson began…

 

McCulloch contends that [St. Louis County Executive Charlie] Dooley’s call for a special prosecutor may be related to McCulloch’s active campaigning on behalf of County Councilman Steve Stenger, who handily defeated Dooley in the Aug. 5 primary.

 

Regardless of public opinion, McCulloch will not be replaced unless he steps down because he is an elected official.

 

Joanna Rothkopf is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on sustainability. Follow @JoannaRothkopf or email jrothkopf@salon.com.

 

Thank you  & Salon.com.

 

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Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch talks about Mike Brown shooting

 

CLAYTON, MO (KTVI) – St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch addresses reporters about the investigation into the police shooting death of Michael Brown.  He says that his office is still collecting evidence and is looking for witnesses.  They are working in parallel  to a federal civil rights violation investigation.  The two offices have been in contact and are working on coordinating their efforts.

 

Evidence will not be released to the public until after the Grand Jury makes a ruling.  The investigation is expected to last more than two weeks.

 

Screenshot (350)

 

 

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Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

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I Don’t Have The Words. The Ferguson, Missouri Images Will Have To Do.


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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!difference

Ferguson, Missouri For ALL To See

 

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Screenshot (254)

 

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

Trayvon Martin’s mom speaks out on #MichaelBrown

 

Published on Aug 19, 2014

The mother of slain teen Trayvon Martin Sybrina Fulton speaks out on the shooting and killing of Michael Brown .

 

 

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standourground

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