February Is Black History Month. Why It’s Still Necessary.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Some History About Black History Month

 

 

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Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month, is an annual observance in the United StatesCanada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African American diaspora. This is the month that all of the hard work of the people who put in for African Americans to be free is celebrated. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada in February and the United Kingdom in October.

 

 

History

Black History Month had its beginnings in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be ”Negro History Week”. This week was chosen because it marked the birthday of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Woodson created the holiday with the hope that it eventually be eliminated when black history became fundamental to American history.

 

Negro History Week was met with enthusiastic response; it prompted the creation of black history clubs, an increase in interest among teachers, and interest from progressive whites. In 1976, the federal government acknowledged the expansion of Black History Week to Black History Month by the leaders of the Black United Students at Kent State University in February of 1969. The first celebration of Black History Month occurred at Kent State in February of 1970.

 

Six years later during the bicentennial, the expansion of Negro History Week to Black History Month was recognized by the U.S. government. Gerald Ford spoke in regards to this, urging Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

 

 

 

Criticism

Black History Month sparks an annual debate about the continued usefulness and fairness of a designated month dedicated to the history of one race. Many people hold concerns about black history being delegated to a single month and the “hero worship” of some of the historical figures often recognized. Morgan Freeman, a critic of Black History Month, said: “I don’t want a black history month. Black history is American history.”

 

As usual Mr. Morgan Freeman does not know his asshole from a gopher hole. Black History is most definitely NOT American History. Especially when Black History is NOT taught correctly in the American educational system. That silly opinion by Mr. Freeman makes me wonder if he knows his Black History.

 

The History of Black History

by Elissa Haney

Americans have recognized black history annually since 1926, first as “Negro History Week” and later as “Black History Month.” What you might not know is that black history had barely begun to be studied-or even documented-when the tradition originated. Although blacks have been in America at least as far back as colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a respectable presence in the history books.

 

 

Blacks Absent from History Books

We owe the celebration of Black History Month, and more importantly, the study of black history, to Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Born to parents who were former slaves, he spent his childhood working in the Kentucky coal mines and enrolled in high school at age twenty. He graduated within two years and later went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. The scholar was disturbed to find in his studies that history books largely ignored the black American population-and when blacks did figure into the picture, it was generally in ways that reflected the inferior social position they were assigned at the time.

 

This is why Mr. Morgan Freeman’s statement above is garbage.

 

 

Established Journal of Negro History

Woodson, always one to act on his ambitions, decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation’s history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History) in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week as an initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history.

 

Woodson chose the second week of February for Negro History Week because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. However, February has much more than Douglass and Lincoln to show for its significance in black American history. For example:

 

February 23, 1868:
W. E. B. DuBois, important civil rights leader and co-founder of the NAACP, was born.

 

 

February 3, 1870:
The 15th Amendment was passed, granting blacks the right to vote.

 

 

February 25, 1870:
The first black U.S. senator, Hiram R. Revels (1822-1901), took his oath of office.

 

 

February 12, 1909:
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded by a group of concerned black and white citizens in New York City.

 

February 1, 1960:
In what would become a civil-rights movement milestone, a group of black Greensboro, N.C., college students began a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter.

 

 

February 21, 1965:
Malcolm X, the militant leader who promoted Black Nationalism, was shot to death by three Black Muslims.

 

Black History Month is observed every February in the United States. Learn about the history of Black History Month, read biographies of famous African Americans, try our quizzes and crosswords, find stats and facts about African Americans, and more.

 

History & Timelines

Learn about famous firsts by black Americans, read the history of black history, and find information about milestones in black history.

 

 

 

Contemporary Issues & Facts

Find out about recent developments in civil rights cases, milestones in affirmative action, population statistics regarding African Americans, and more.

 

 

Biographies & Special Features

Brush up on the Harlem Renaissance and Negro League Baseball, read biographies of famous African Americans, such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Muhammad Ali, and more.

 

 

 

Holidays

Learn about the history, traditions, and significance of Kwanzaa, Juneteenth, and Martin Luther King Jr Day.

 

 

 

Education

Find information about the best colleges for African Americans, historically black colleges, milestones in education, and more.

 

 

 

Awards

Learn about awards exclusively for African Americans, including the NAACP Image Awards, the Spingarn Medal, and the Coretta Scott King Award, and see a full list of winners.

Thank you Info Please for this vitally important information.

 

 

500 Notable African American Biographies

 

Entertainers

 

Athletes

 

 

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WHY Black History Month IS Necessary

 

I’ll answer that much asked question: Black History Month is only necessary because racist caucasian America, which controls the state level legislatures, has deemed it necessary to erase Black contributions from the fabric of American history.

 

Some southern states have started drives to erase all mention of slavery. Other states have decided to rewrite American history books to minimize contributions made by Black Americans. America’s classroom curriculum has been designed to maximize the factual truth about our past history and replace those facts & truths with a “white” washed misinformation campaign.

 

Lastly, we have Black Americans, such as Mr. Morgan Freeman, among others, who call for a move to abolish Black History Month based on their belief that a month of Black History is unnecessary if we teach Black History EVERY month.

 

That is the problem Morgan….racist caucasians can NOT be trusted to teach factual Black History.

 

For those who say there is no Jewish Black History Month, or no Native American History Month…..Why Not?

 

Get Busy.

 

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Celebrating Black History Month is practiced daily in Black households all across this globe, not just in America.  Until there is no racist efforts to remove contributions by Black America in our American History…..this month of 28 days where Black American efforts to move America forward are highlighted…. will be necessary.

 

 

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Black History Moment: William “Mo” Cowan


By Jueseppi B.

 

 

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William “Mo” Cowan (born April 1969) is an American lawyer and politician. He is the United States Senator-designate from Massachusetts. He previously served as legal counsel and chief of staff to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick. Patrick appointed him on January 30, 2013, to fill the Senate vacancy created by John Kerry, who resigned from the Senate effective February 1 to become Secretary of State. He is scheduled to take office on February 1.

 

Upon being sworn in, Cowan will become the eighth African-American United States Senator and the second from Massachusetts after Edward Brooke. He will also be one of two African-American Senators in the 113th Congress, along with Republican South Carolina Senator Tim Scott.

 

 

 

Early life and education

Raised in rural Yadkinville, North Carolina, Cowan is the son of a machinist and a seamstress. His father died when he was 16 years old.

 

Cowan graduated from Forbush High School, and became the first graduate of his high school to attend Duke University. He originally planned to become a doctor, but changed his career plans and graduated from Duke with a degree in sociology. He then earned a law degree from Northeastern University School of Law in Boston in 1994. His assignments in Northeastern’s cooperative program, which provides students with work experience as part of its educational program, included stints in the office of a state trial court, at North Carolina Prison Legal Services, and with the Palm Beach County Public Defender’s Office.

 

 

Professional career

In 1997, Cowan joined the law firm of Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky, and Popeo as an associate. There he practiced civil litigation and became a partner. He helped Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney identify African-American candidates for judgeship’s after Romney was criticized for his appointees’ lack of diversity.

 

Cowan left Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky, and Popeo to join Deval Patrick‘s administration in 2009. As Patrick’s counsel, Cowan was responsible for the legal operations of the executive branch and oversaw the governor’s judicial nominations, including that of Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court Roderick Ireland. His principal projects as staff included legislation to contain the growth of health care costs and to expand gaming, as well as investigating and reorganizing the state Parole Board.

 

Cowan served as Patrick’s chief legal counsel for two years and then as chief of staff from January 2011 until November 2012, when he announced plans to return to the private sector. He continued to serve the governor as a senior adviser until his Senate appointment. When appointed to the Senate, he said he had no intention of seeking public office once his interim appointment expired. He said: “This is going to be a very short political career. I am not running for office. I’m not a candidate for public service at any time today or in the future.” Until his appointment, the U.S. Senate had never had more than one African-American member at one time.

 

In 2003, Boston Business Journal named him to its list of “40 under 40″, a select group of younger business and civic leaders. He is the former president of the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. He serves on the Board of Trustees of Northeastern University.

 

 

Personal

He is married to Stacy Cowan. She also is a lawyer. They have two sons and live in Stoughton, Massachusetts.

 

 

 

William “Mo” Cowan
United States Senator-designate
from Massachusetts
Taking office
February 1, 2013
Appointed by Deval Patrick
Succeeding John Kerry
Personal details
Born April 1969 (age 43)
YadkinvilleNorth Carolina,
U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Stacy Cowan
Alma mater Duke University
Northeastern University

 

 

United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
February 1, 2013
Served alongside: Elizabeth Warren

 

 

With the appointments of Tim Scott from South Carolina and William “Mo” Cowan of Massachusetts, the U.S. Senate has seen 8 African American senators. In 2004 Barack Obama became the third and most recent popularly elected black senator. Until 2013, however, the senate has never had more than one black senator serving at a time.

 

 

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William “Mo” Cowan served as Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick’s chief of staff since 2009. He was appointed to the senate on Jan. 30, replacing John Kerry who is now Sec. of State.

 

 

Next Up……

 

Jackie Wilson

 

 

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WHY Black History Month IS Necessary


By Jueseppi B.

 

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I’ll answer that unasked question up front: Black History Month is only necessary because racist caucasian America, which controls the state level legislatures, has deemed it necessary to erase Black contributions from the fabric of American history.

 

Some southern states have started drives to erase all mention of slavery. Other states have decided to rewrite American history books to minimize contributions made by Black Americans. America’s classroom curriculum has been designed to maximize the factual truth about our past history and replace those facts & truths with a “white” washed misinformation campaign.

 

Lastly, we have Black Americans, such as Mr. Morgan Freeman, among others, who call for a move to abolish Black History Month based on their belief that a month of Black History is unnecessary if we teach Black History EVERY month.

 

That is the problem Morgan….racist caucasians can NOT be trusted to teach factual Black History.

 

 

For those who say there is no Jewish Black History Month, or no Native American History Month…..Why Not?

Get Busy.

 

 

 

black_history_month_poster1

 

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month is practiced daily in Black households all across this globe, not just in America.  Until there is no racist efforts to remove contributions by Black America in our American History…..this month of 28 days where Black American efforts to move America forward are highlighted…. will be necessary.

 

 

To Start Off Black History Month, I present some Black History in the making:

 

 

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As William “Mo” Cowan spoke at the news conference, seated at left were his wife, Stacy, and his sons Miles, 8, and Grant, 4.

 

 

From Boston.com:

 

William ‘Mo’ Cowan is Governor Deval Patrick’s pick to serve as interim US senator

 

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has picked William “Mo” Cowan, his former chief of staff, to serve as the state’s interim US senator until the successor to John F. Kerry is chosen by the voters in a June 25 special election.

 

“He has been a valued ally to me and our work on behalf of the people of the Commonwealth,” Patrick said at a news conference. “In every step, he has brought preparation, perspective, wisdom, sound judgment, and clarity of purpose.”

 

Cowan said he was “honored and humbled” to get the temporary post, which will make him the first African-American to represent Massachusetts in the Senate since Edward Brooke held the seat as a Republican from 1966 to 1978.

 

He said he would “go to work every day with the needs and aspirations” of Massachusetts residents on his mind and would push for jobs, education, and affordable, high-quality health care.

 

Addressing the governor, he said, “You and the Commonwealth should be assured that I now go to the nation’s capital ever mindful of what matters to the people of Massachusetts.”

 

 

Read the rest of the story at Boston.com.

 

 

 

 

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Cowan is a graduate of Duke and Northeastern University. | AP Photo

 

 

From POLITICO:

 

10 facts about Mo Cowan

 

By BREANNA EDWARDS

 

 

His name has been ringing in political ears since Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick selected him Wednesday to fill soon-to-be Secretary of State John Kerry’s Senate seat. But who exactly is William “Mo” Cowan? Here are 10 facts that you need to know about Massachusetts’s interim U.S. senator.

 

1. Cowan is close to the governor. He served as Patrick’s legal counsel when he was hired in 2009, before being promoted a year later to chief of staff. He stepped down from the position this month, announcing his intention to leave late last year. However, he was still a senior adviser to Patrick.

 

2. The 43-year-old will be the second African-American to ever serve Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate. His predecessor was Edward Brooke, who served 1967-1979 and was the first African-American elected to Senate by popular vote.

 

 

3. Cowan has no prior elected government experience at all. However, he is active in his community, serving on several local school boards.

 

 

4. When Gov. Mitt Romney was being criticized for the lack of diversity in appointing judges, Cowan helped the Republican find minority lawyers to fill the positions. He aided Middlesex District Attorney Gerard T. Leone Jr. in similar appointments and is also credited with helping to attract more black lawyers to the prominent law firm Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo.

 

 

5. At the law firm, Cowan gave etiquette lessons to summer associates. He was a partner at the law firm from 1997 to 2009.

 

 

6. Cowan is married and has two young sons. His wife, Stacy, is also a lawyer.

 

 

7. He originally wanted to become a doctor, before taking freshman chemistry at Duke University in Durham, N.C. He was the first person from his high school to attend the university.

 

 

8. After Cowan graduated from Duke, he moved to Boston to attend Northeastern Law University Law School in the early 1990s.

 

 

9. As a lawyer he practiced civil litigation, where he was chairman of the Anti-Money Laundering Compliance and Counseling practice group, according to his LinkedIn account.

 

 

10. Cowan, the son of a machinist and a seamstress, is originally from Yadkinville, N.C., which was segregated during his boyhood. He witnessed Ku Klux Klan activities.

 

Black History Month has started off with a very historical bang.

 

 

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