The 118th Boston Marathon, Monday The 21st Of April, 2014. #BostonStrong.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From Reuters:

 

Boston Marathon looks to emerge from shadow of 2013 bombing

 

BY SCOTT MALONE

 

 

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(Reuters) – Runners from the world’s elite racers to first-timers will step to the Boston Marathon starting line on Monday for the first time the race has been held since last year’s deadly bombing attack.

 

Some 36,000 people, the second-largest field in the race’s 118-year history, will set out from Hopkinton, a town west of Boston, for the 26.2-mile race that finishes on Boston’s Boylston Street, where two homemade pressure-cooker bombs last year killed three people and injured 264.

For the top men and women runners, including 2013 winners Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa and Kenya’s Rita Jeptoo, the focus will be entirely on the competition.

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The fans, hundreds of thousands of whom are expected to line the course, will also be rooting for top U.S. entrants including Ryan Hall of California and Desiree Linden of Michigan. Either could be the first American to stand atop the podium in three decades, breaking a long domination of the event by African athletes.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick on Sunday told CBS’s “Face the Nation” that added security measures, including a higher than usual police presence, would assure a “very safe” atmosphere at the race.

“Somebody said it may be the safest place in America tomorrow,” Patrick said.

STRIKE A BALANCE

While more police tactical units and undercover operatives will be stationed along the route, Patrick said there was an effort to provide adequate security while retaining the race’s traditional atmosphere so that it does not become “a race through a militarized zone.”

Racers and supporters will face new restrictions including a ban on backpacks, which the ethnic Chechen brothers accused in the April 15, 2013, attack were believed to have used to carry the bombs.

While the memory of the attacks has hung heavy over Boston through a week of events leading up to the race, Linden said it wouldn’t affect her thinking come race day.

“That’s a backward thought process,” said Linden, who in 2011 finished in second place, missing victory by two seconds. “I don’t need a terrorist event to be motivated. I’m inspired by the city and the people and I’ll honor that … Boston is such a big event in itself that you don’t need extra motivation, especially not that kind.”

The Boston Athletic Association, which organizes the race, allowed an additional 9,000 runners this year, in part to ensure that the roughly 5,000 people who were on the course when the blasts occurred get a chance to cross this finish line.

Many runners train for years to post the fast, age-graded qualifying times needed to earn a spot, while others commit to raising thousands of dollars for charity.

Runners and marathon workers who attended Easter Mass at the cathedral on Sunday were invited to the front to be blessed by Boston cardinal Sean O’Malley.

BACKBACK INCIDENT

Memories of last year’s attack were stirred after a memorial service on Tuesday, when a shoeless man in a black veil, shouting “Boston Strong” dropped a backpack on the street near the finish line.

Police said the backpack contained a rice cooker. The man was arrested and charged with possession of a hoax device.

Joseph Tecce, an associate professor of psychology at Boston College, said seeing the race go off smoothly could help people overcome their memories of the attack.

“There will be fears, nagging doubts and insecurities, but there will also be an anticipation that it’s all going to go away if we just wait until April 21, when people start hitting the street again.”

One runner on Monday will be Lukman Faily, the Iraqi ambassador to the United States, who will take part to show solidarity with the people of Boston and the United States. It will not be his first marathon, as he also ran after the 2011 Fukushima tsunami while stationed in Japan.

“We will stand with each other in defying terrorism and making a pure sporting event, a sporting statement that terrorism will never prevail,” Faily said. “If the marathon was stopped because of last year’s event, then they would have won.”

(Reporting by Scott Malone in Boston, Additional reporting by Brian Snyderin Boston and Bill Trott in Washington; Editing by Paul Thomasch, Gunna Dickson and Frances Kerry)

 

Joel (L) and Jackie Dalton leave mementos for Martin Richard, one of the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, at a memorial for all the victims at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014. CREDIT: REUTERS/BRIAN SNYDER

Joel (L) and Jackie Dalton leave mementos for Martin Richard, one of the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, at a memorial for all the victims at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014.
CREDIT: REUTERS/BRIAN SNYDER

A man pauses in front of a memorial for the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014.  CREDIT: REUTERS/BRIAN SNYDER

A man pauses in front of a memorial for the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014.
CREDIT: REUTERS/BRIAN SNYDER

A woman pauses in front of a memorial for the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

A woman pauses in front of a memorial for the victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings at the site of the first bomb blast in Boston, Massachusetts April 20, 2014.
REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Beth (2nd L) and Michael (C) Bourgault, 2013 Boston Marathon bombing survivors, cross the marathon finish line during a Tribute Run for survivors and first responders in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014. The 118th running of the Boston Marathon will be held on April 21.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Beth (2nd L) and Michael (C) Bourgault, 2013 Boston Marathon bombing survivors, cross the marathon finish line during a Tribute Run for survivors and first responders in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014. The 118th running of the Boston Marathon will be held on April 21.
REUTERS/Brian Snyder

2013 Boston Marathon bombing survivor Crisci (C) gets a high five as she crosses the marathon finish line in the arms of fellow survivor Doug Julian (R) during a Tribute Run for survivors and first responders in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

2013 Boston Marathon bombing survivor Crisci (C) gets a high five as she crosses the marathon finish line in the arms of fellow survivor Doug Julian (R) during a Tribute Run for survivors and first responders in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014.
REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Runners compete in the Boston Athletic Association's 5K race in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Runners compete in the Boston Athletic Association’s 5K race in Boston, Massachusetts April 19, 2014.
REUTERS/Brian Snyder

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Boston Prepares To Commemorate Year Anniversary Of Marathon Bombing

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Boston Prepares To Commemorate One Year Anniversary Of Marathon Bombing

People stand at the site of the first Boston Marathon bombing nearly one year later at. Boston Commemorates Marathon Bombing Anniversary

People stand at the site of the first Boston Marathon bombing nearly one year later at. Boston Commemorates Marathon Bombing Anniversary

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AP BOSTON MARATHON BOMBING PHOTO SHOOT A S RUN ATH USA MA

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On April 7, the Boston Public Library opened an exhibit featuring items left at the makeshift memorials after the bombings at last year’s Boston Marathon. The free exhibit, called “Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial,” is open to the public until May 11.

 

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The memorial, which originally began forming on police barricades on Boylston and Berkeley Streets, was moved to Copley Square when the roads reopened on April 23, 2013. In June, the memorial was dismantled, and the items were stored in the Boston City Archives.

 

Bostonian Rainey Tisdale, the curator of the exhibition, started organizing the thousands of items in early February. From shoes to posters to finisher’s medals, Tisdale said she realized a common thread: “Each of these pieces that was left in Copley Square was a message, a form of communication from one human being to other human beings at this time of great loss.”

 

Unlike other projects she has worked on, Tisdale said, “Dear Boston” weighed heavily on her emotionally.

 

“It was very intense as anyone could imagine,” said Tisdale, who watched her husband run the Boston Marathon in 2012. “I think there’s a way in which all of the emotion that was embedded in those objects had to move through me to end up here in the exhibition. Because we were moving so quickly, we had two months to do what normally takes us a year, there wasn’t time to decompress from that.”

 

The space in the library moves visitors through three stages: the initial, raw reactions of sadness and compassion; the more profound reflections about the attacks; and finally the messages of hope that look toward a brighter future. At the end of the exhibit, guests are encouraged to leave their own message on tags to hang on one of four trees that resemble those found in Copley Square.

 

“Normally, I’m helping city residents make meaning from the place that they live,” said Tisdale. “This was an event where I knew my city was going to have a lot of trouble making meaning, a very hard, complicated thing. I felt like I had resources and expertise to bring to this and my city needs it.”

 

Once the “Dear World” exhibit closes, the items will be returned to the Boston City Archives. The funder of the exhibit, Iron Mountain, is working to digitize the entire collection. Some objects are already available online in the Our Marathon collection hosted by Northeastern University.

The exhibit is part of a city-wide effort between cultural institutions called “#BostonBetter” that will feature concerts and talks surrounding the first anniversary of the attacks. To learn more, check out the website.

 

 

Boston Marathon Bombing Memorial -Copley Square 6/1/2013

 

Published on Jun 1, 2013

A look during the day…..of moving, large Memorial! Nice to see people are still paying respects! Crowded Saturday. We’ll NEVER FORGET!!!

 

 

 

Boston Marathon

 

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in Greater Bostonin eastern Massachusetts. It is always held on Patriots’ Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, inspired by the success of the first modern-day marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics, the Boston Marathon is the world’s oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world’s best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors.

Since 1897, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) has managed this event. Amateur and professional runners from all over the world compete in the Boston Marathon each year, braving the hilly New England terrain and varying weather to take part in the race.

The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year, making it New England’s most widely viewed sporting event. Though starting with 18 participants in 1897, the event now attracts an average of about 20,000 registered participants each year, with 26,839 people entering in 2013. The Centennial Boston Marathon in 1996 established a record as the world’s largest marathon with 38,708 entrants, 36,748 starters, and 35,868 finishers.

Boston Marathon
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The Boston Marathon logo
Date Third Monday of April

(Patriots’ Day)

Location Eastern Massachusetts,

ending in Boston

Event type Road
Distance Marathon
Established 1897
Course records Men: 2:03:02 (2011)
Geoffrey Mutai
Women: 2:20:43 (2002)
Margaret Okayo
Official site www.bostonmarathon.org

History

The Boston Marathon was first run in April 1897, inspired by the revival of the marathon for the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens. It is the oldest continuously running marathon, and the second longest continuously running footrace in North America, having debuted five months after the Buffalo Turkey Trot.

On April 19, 1897, ten years after the establishment of the B.A.A., the association held the 24.5 mile (39.4 km) marathon to conclude its athletic competition, the B.A.A. Games. The event was scheduled for the recently established holiday of Patriots Day, with the race linking the Athenian and American struggles for liberty. The race, which became known as the Boston Marathon, has been held every year since then, making it the world’s oldest annual marathon. In 1924, the starting line was moved from Metcalf’s Mill in Ashland to Hopkinton Green and the course was lengthened to 26 miles 385 yards (42.195 km) to conform to the standard set by the 1908 Summer Olympics and codified by the IAAF in 1921.

The Boston Marathon was originally a local event, but its fame and status have attracted runners from all over the world. For most of its history, the Boston Marathon was a free event, and the only prize awarded for winning the race was a wreath woven from olive branches. However,corporate-sponsored cash prizes began to be awarded in the 1980s, when professional athletes began to refuse to run the race without cash awards. The first cash prize for winning the marathon was awarded in 1986.

Walter A. Brown was the President of the Boston Athletic Association from 1941 to 1964. In 1951, during the height of the Korean War, Brown denied Koreans entry into the Boston Marathon. He stated: “While American soldiers are fighting and dying in Korea, every Korean should be fighting to protect his country instead of training for marathons. As long as the war continues there, we positively will not accept Korean entries for our race on April 19.”

Women were not allowed to enter the Boston Marathon officially until 1972. Roberta “Bobbi” Gibb is recognized, by the race organizers, as the first woman to run the entire Boston Marathon (in 1966). In 1967, Kathrine Switzer, who had registered as “K. V. Switzer”, was the first woman to run and finish with a race number. She finished despite a famous incident in which race official Jock Semple tried to rip off her numbers and eject her from the race. In 1996 the B.A.A. retroactively recognized as champions the unofficial women’s leaders of 1966 through 1971. In 2011, about 43 percent of the entrants were female.

Rosie Ruiz scandal

Scandal came to the Boston Marathon in 1980 when amateur runner Rosie Ruiz came from out of nowhere to win the women’s race. Marathon officials became suspicious when it was discovered Ruiz did not appear in race videotapes until near the end of the race. A subsequent investigation concluded that Ruiz had skipped most of the race and blended into the crowd about one mile (1.6 km) from the finish line, where she then ran to her apparent victory. Ruiz was officially disqualified, and the winner was proclaimed to be Canadian Jacqueline Gareau.

Deaths

In 1996, a 62-year-old Swedish man died of a heart attack during the 100th anniversary event.[15] In 2002, Cynthia Lucero, 28, died of hyponatremia.

 

 

2011 Boston Marathon

On Monday, April 18, 2011 Geoffrey Mutai of Kenya won the Boston Marathon in a time of 2:03:02. In recognizing Mutai’s mark as the “fastest Marathon ever run”, the International Association of Athletics Federations noted that the performance was not eligible for world record status given that the course does not satisfy rules regarding elevation drop and start/finish separation (the latter requirement being intended to prevent advantages gained from a strong tailwind, as was the case in 2011).

 

The Associated Press reported that Mutai has the support of other runners who describe the IAAF’s rules as “flawed”. According to the Boston Herald, race director Dave McGillivray said he was sending paperwork to the IAAF to have Mutai’s mark ratified as a world record. The AP also indicated that the attempt to have the mark certified as a world record “would force the governing bodies to reject an unprecedented performance on the world’s most prestigious marathon course”.

 

2013 bombings

During the 2013 Boston Marathon, on April 15, 2013 at 2:49 p.m. EDT, nearly three hours after the winners crossed the finish line, two explosions occurred about 200 yards (180 m) apart on Boylston Street, in approximately the last 225 yards (205 m) of the course. The race was halted, preventing many from finishing. Three spectators were killed and more than 200 people were injured. Entrants who completed at least half the course and did not finish due to the bombings are to get automatic entry in 2014.

Race

Qualifying

The Boston Marathon is open to runners 18 or older from any nation, but they must meet certain qualifying standards. To qualify, a runner must first complete a standard marathon course certified by a national governing body affiliated with the International Association of Athletics Federations within a certain period of time before the date of the desired Boston Marathon (usually within approximately 18 months prior).

 

Boston Marathon
Qualifying Standards

(effective for 2014 race)
Age Men Women
18–34 3hrs 5min 3 hrs 35min
35–39 3hrs 10min 3 hrs 40min
40–44 3hrs 15min 3 hrs 45min
45–49 3hrs 25min 3 hrs 55min
50–54 3hrs 30min 4 hrs 0min
55–59 3hrs 40min 4 hrs 10min
60–64 3hrs 55min 4 hrs 25min
65–69 4hrs 10min 4 hrs 40min
70–74 4hrs 25min 4 hrs 55min
75–79 4hrs 40min 5 hrs 10min
80+ 4hrs 55min 5 hrs 25min

 

In the 1980s and 1990s, membership in USA Track & Field was required of all runners, but this requirement has been eliminated.

 

Qualifying standards for the 2013 race were tightened on February 15, 2011, by five minutes in each age-gender group for marathons run after September 23, 2011. Prospective runners in the age range of 18–34 must run a time of no more than 3:05:00 (3 hours and 5 minutes) if male, or 3:35:00 (3 hours and 35 minutes) if female; the qualifying time is adjusted upward as age increases. In addition, the 59-second grace period on qualifying times has been completely eliminated; for example, a 40- to 44-year-old male will no longer qualify with a time of 3:15:01. For many marathoners to qualify for Boston (to “BQ”) is a goal and achievement in itself.

 

An exception to the qualification times is for runners who receive entries from partners. About one-fifth of the marathon’s spots are reserved each year for charities, sponsors, vendors, licensees, consultants, municipal officials, local running clubs, and marketers. In 2010, about 5,470 additional runners received entries through partners, including 2,515 charity runners. The marathon currently allocates spots to two dozen charities who in turn are expected to raise more than $10 million a year.

 

On October 18, 2010, the 20,000 spots reserved for qualifiers were filled in a record-setting eight hours and three minutes. The speed of registration prompted the B.A.A. to change its qualifying standards for the 2013 marathon onward. In addition to lowering qualifying times, the change includes a rolling application process, which gives faster runners priority. Organizers decided not to significantly adjust the number of non-qualifiers.

 

 

Race day

The race has traditionally been held on Patriots’ Day, a state holiday in Massachusetts, and until 1969 that was every April 19, whichever day of the week that fell on. Starting in 1969, the holiday was observed on the third Monday in April and so the marathon date was correspondingly fixed to that Monday, often referred to by local residents as “Marathon Monday.”

Starting times

Through 2005, the race began at noon (wheelchair race at 11:25 am, and elite women at 11:31 am), at the official starting point in Hopkinton, Massachusetts. Beginning with the 2006 event, the race has used a staggered “wave start,” where (in 2006) top seeded runners (the elite men’s group) and a first batch of up to 10,000 runners started at noon, with a second group starting at 12:30. Beginning in 2007 the starting times for the race were moved up, allowing runners to take advantage of cooler temperatures and enabling the roads to be reopened earlier. The marathon later added a third wave to help further stagger the runners and reduce congestion.

 

As of 2013, the starting times are:

  • 9:00 a.m.: Mobility Impaired Program
  • 9:17 a.m.: Push Rim Wheelchair Division
  • 9:22 a.m.: Handcycle Participants
  • 9:32 a.m.: Elite Women
  • 10:00 a.m.: Elite Men and Wave One
  • 10:20 a.m.: Wave Two
  • 10:40 a.m.: Wave Three

Course

The course runs through 26 miles 385 yards (42.195 km) of winding roads, following Route 135Route 16Route 30 and city streets into the center of Boston, where the official finish line is located at Copley Square, alongside the Boston Public Library. The race runs through eight Massachusetts cities and towns: HopkintonAshlandFraminghamNatick,WellesleyNewtonBrookline, and Boston.

 

The Boston Marathon is considered to be one of the more difficult marathon courses because of the Newton hills, which culminate in Heartbreak Hill near Boston College. While the three hills on Commonwealth Avenue (Route 30) are better known, a preceding hill on Washington Street (Route 16), climbing from the Charles River crossing at 16 miles (26 km), is regarded by Dave McGillivray, the long-term race director, as the course’s most difficult challenge. This hill, which follows a 150-foot (46 m) drop in a half-mile stretch, forces many lesser-trained runners to a walking pace.

 

Heartbreak Hill

Heartbreak Hill is an ascent over 0.4-mile (600 m) between the 20 and 21-mile (32 and 34 km) marks, near Boston College. It is the last of four “Newton hills”, which begin at the 16-mile (26 km) mark and challenge contestants with late (if modest) climbs after the course’s general downhill trend to that point. Though Heartbreak Hill itself rises only 88 feet (27 m) vertically (from an elevation of 148 feet (45 m) to 236 feet (72 m)), it comes in the portion of a marathon distance where muscle glycogen stores are most likely to be depleted—a phenomenon referred to by marathoners as “hitting the wall.”

 

It was on this hill that, in 1936, defending champion John A. “Johnny” Kelley overtook Ellison “Tarzan” Brown, giving him a consolatory pat on the shoulder as he passed. This gesture renewed the competitive drive in Brown, who rallied, pulled ahead of Kelley, and went on to win—thereby, it was said, breaking Kelley’s heart.

Records

Because the course drops 459 feet (140 m) from start to finish and the start is quite far west of the finish, allowing a helpful tailwind, the Boston Marathon does not satisfy two of the criteria necessary for the ratification of world or American records.

On April 18, 2011, Geoffrey Mutai of Kenya ran the fastest marathon ever in a time of 2:03:02 at the 2011 Boston Marathon. Margaret Okayo, also from Kenya, set the women’s course record with a 2:20:43 performance in 2002.

Other course records include:

  • Men’s Masters: John Campbell (New Zealand), 2:11:04 (set in 1990)
  • Women’s Masters: Mary Hannah (United States), 2:27:58 (set in 2012)
  • Men’s Push Rim Wheelchair: Joshua Cassidy (Canada), 1:18:25 (set in 2012)
  • Women’s Push Rim Wheelchair: Jean Driscoll (United States), 1:34:22 (set in 1994)

On only four occasions have world record times for marathon running been set in Boston. In 1947, the men’s record time set was 2:25:39, by Suh Yun-Bok of South Korea. In 1975, a women’s world record of 2:42:24 was set by Liane Winter of West Germany, and in 1983, Joan Benoit Samuelson of the United States ran a women’s world record time of 2:22:43. In 2012 Joshua Cassidy of Canada set a men’s wheelchair marathon world-record time of 1:18:25.

The race’s organizers keep a standard time clock for all entries, though official timekeeping ceases after the six-hour mark.

Notable features

Spectators

With approximately 500,000 spectators, the Boston Marathon is New England‘s most widely viewed sporting event. About 1,000 media members from more than 100 outlets received media credentials in 2011.

 

For the entire distance of the race, thousands line the sides of the course to cheer the runners on, encourage them, and provide free water and snacks to the runners.

 

It is a tradition that at Mile 21 Boston College students drink to the accomplishments of the runners and enthusiastically cheer them on.

 

 

Scream Tunnel

Scream Tunnel...Participants in the Boston Marathon in Wellesley, just after the halfway mark.

Scream Tunnel…Participants in the Boston Marathon in Wellesley, just after the halfway mark.

 

At Wellesley College, a women’s college, it is traditional for the students to cheer on the runners in what is referred to as the Scream Tunnel. For about a quarter of a mile (400 m), the students line the course, scream, and offer kisses. The Scream Tunnel is so loud runners claim it can be heard from a mile away. The tunnel is roughly half a mile (0.8 km) prior to the halfway mark of the course.

 

 

Boston Red Sox

Every year, the Boston Red Sox play a home game at Fenway Park, starting at 11:05 am. When the game ends, the crowd empties into Kenmore Square to cheer as the runners enter the final mile. This tradition started in 1903. In the 1940s, the American League and National League teams in the city would alternate yearly as to which would play the morning game. (Boston had teams in both leagues from 1903 to 1952.) In 2007, the game between the Red Sox and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim was delayed until 12:18 pm due to heavy rain. The marathon, which had previously been run in a wide variety of weather conditions, was not delayed.

 

 

Dick and Rick Hoyt

 

Team Hoyt at 12.5 miles on the Marathon course just past Wellesley College on April 16, 2012

Team Hoyt at 12.5 miles on the Marathon course just past Wellesley College on April 16, 2012

 

One of the most recognized duos each year at the Boston Marathon is Dick and Rick Hoyt. Dick is the father of Rick, who has cerebral palsy. While doctors said he would never have a normal life and thought that institutionalizing Rick was the best option, Dick and his wife disagreed and raised him as an ordinary child. Eventually a computer device was developed that helped Rick communicate with his family, and they learned that one of his biggest passions was sports. “Team Hoyt” (Dick and Rick) started competing in charity runs, with Dick pushing Rick in a wheelchair. Dick and Rick have competed in 66 marathons and 229 triathlons (as of August 2008). Their top marathon finish was 2:40:47. The team completed their 30th Boston Marathon in 2012, when Dick was 72 and Rick was 50.

Bandits

Unlike many other races, the Boston Marathon tolerates bandits, or runners who do not register and pay an entry fee. They are held back until after all the registered runners have left the starting line, and then are released in an unofficial fourth wave. They are also not pulled off the course and are allowed to cross the finish line.

Given the increased field that is planned for the 2014 Marathon, however, organizers plan to discourage bandits from running “more than ever.”

Costumes

A number of people choose to run the course in a variety of costumes each year. During the 100th running in 1997, one runner wore a scale model of the Old North Church steeple on his back. Old North Church is where the signal that set Paul Revere off on his midnight ride was lit, and which is commemorated each year on the same day as the Marathon.

 

 

A photo taken by Sharon Kent shows Phil Kent, Jennifer Hartman, and Renee Opell, at the 2013 Boston Marathon. (Sharon Kent)

A photo taken by Sharon Kent shows Phil Kent, Jennifer Hartman, and Renee Opell, at the 2013 Boston Marathon. (Sharon Kent)

Los Angeles-area runners are returning to Boston to finish something bigger than a race.

Los Angeles-area runners are returning to Boston to finish something bigger than a race.

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February Is Black History Month. Why It’s Still Necessary.


 

By Jueseppi B.

blackhistorymonth

 

 

Some History About Black History Month

 

 

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Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month, is an annual observance in the United StatesCanada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African American diaspora. This is the month that all of the hard work of the people who put in for African Americans to be free is celebrated. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada in February and the United Kingdom in October.

 

 

History

Black History Month had its beginnings in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be ”Negro History Week”. This week was chosen because it marked the birthday of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Woodson created the holiday with the hope that it eventually be eliminated when black history became fundamental to American history.

 

Negro History Week was met with enthusiastic response; it prompted the creation of black history clubs, an increase in interest among teachers, and interest from progressive whites. In 1976, the federal government acknowledged the expansion of Black History Week to Black History Month by the leaders of the Black United Students at Kent State University in February of 1969. The first celebration of Black History Month occurred at Kent State in February of 1970.

 

Six years later during the bicentennial, the expansion of Negro History Week to Black History Month was recognized by the U.S. government. Gerald Ford spoke in regards to this, urging Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

 

 

 

Criticism

Black History Month sparks an annual debate about the continued usefulness and fairness of a designated month dedicated to the history of one race. Many people hold concerns about black history being delegated to a single month and the “hero worship” of some of the historical figures often recognized. Morgan Freeman, a critic of Black History Month, said: “I don’t want a black history month. Black history is American history.”

 

As usual Mr. Morgan Freeman does not know his asshole from a gopher hole. Black History is most definitely NOT American History. Especially when Black History is NOT taught correctly in the American educational system. That silly opinion by Mr. Freeman makes me wonder if he knows his Black History.

 

The History of Black History

by Elissa Haney

Americans have recognized black history annually since 1926, first as “Negro History Week” and later as “Black History Month.” What you might not know is that black history had barely begun to be studied-or even documented-when the tradition originated. Although blacks have been in America at least as far back as colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a respectable presence in the history books.

 

 

Blacks Absent from History Books

We owe the celebration of Black History Month, and more importantly, the study of black history, to Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Born to parents who were former slaves, he spent his childhood working in the Kentucky coal mines and enrolled in high school at age twenty. He graduated within two years and later went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. The scholar was disturbed to find in his studies that history books largely ignored the black American population-and when blacks did figure into the picture, it was generally in ways that reflected the inferior social position they were assigned at the time.

 

This is why Mr. Morgan Freeman’s statement above is garbage.

 

 

Established Journal of Negro History

Woodson, always one to act on his ambitions, decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation’s history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History) in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week as an initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history.

 

Woodson chose the second week of February for Negro History Week because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. However, February has much more than Douglass and Lincoln to show for its significance in black American history. For example:

 

February 23, 1868:
W. E. B. DuBois, important civil rights leader and co-founder of the NAACP, was born.

 

 

February 3, 1870:
The 15th Amendment was passed, granting blacks the right to vote.

 

 

February 25, 1870:
The first black U.S. senator, Hiram R. Revels (1822-1901), took his oath of office.

 

 

February 12, 1909:
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded by a group of concerned black and white citizens in New York City.

 

February 1, 1960:
In what would become a civil-rights movement milestone, a group of black Greensboro, N.C., college students began a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter.

 

 

February 21, 1965:
Malcolm X, the militant leader who promoted Black Nationalism, was shot to death by three Black Muslims.

 

Black History Month is observed every February in the United States. Learn about the history of Black History Month, read biographies of famous African Americans, try our quizzes and crosswords, find stats and facts about African Americans, and more.

 

History & Timelines

Learn about famous firsts by black Americans, read the history of black history, and find information about milestones in black history.

 

 

 

Contemporary Issues & Facts

Find out about recent developments in civil rights cases, milestones in affirmative action, population statistics regarding African Americans, and more.

 

 

Biographies & Special Features

Brush up on the Harlem Renaissance and Negro League Baseball, read biographies of famous African Americans, such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Muhammad Ali, and more.

 

 

 

Holidays

Learn about the history, traditions, and significance of Kwanzaa, Juneteenth, and Martin Luther King Jr Day.

 

 

 

Education

Find information about the best colleges for African Americans, historically black colleges, milestones in education, and more.

 

 

 

Awards

Learn about awards exclusively for African Americans, including the NAACP Image Awards, the Spingarn Medal, and the Coretta Scott King Award, and see a full list of winners.

Thank you Info Please for this vitally important information.

 

 

500 Notable African American Biographies

 

Entertainers

 

Athletes

 

 

black-history-month

 

WHY Black History Month IS Necessary

 

I’ll answer that much asked question: Black History Month is only necessary because racist caucasian America, which controls the state level legislatures, has deemed it necessary to erase Black contributions from the fabric of American history.

 

Some southern states have started drives to erase all mention of slavery. Other states have decided to rewrite American history books to minimize contributions made by Black Americans. America’s classroom curriculum has been designed to maximize the factual truth about our past history and replace those facts & truths with a “white” washed misinformation campaign.

 

Lastly, we have Black Americans, such as Mr. Morgan Freeman, among others, who call for a move to abolish Black History Month based on their belief that a month of Black History is unnecessary if we teach Black History EVERY month.

 

That is the problem Morgan….racist caucasians can NOT be trusted to teach factual Black History.

 

For those who say there is no Jewish Black History Month, or no Native American History Month…..Why Not?

 

Get Busy.

 

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Celebrating Black History Month is practiced daily in Black households all across this globe, not just in America.  Until there is no racist efforts to remove contributions by Black America in our American History…..this month of 28 days where Black American efforts to move America forward are highlighted…. will be necessary.

 

 

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President Barack Hussein Obama’s Positive Message To Organizing for Action Members: The Phone Call.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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President Obama’s Message To OFA Supporters On ObamaCARES

 

President Obama reassured his supporters on Monday evening that the fight to spread the truth & facts about his health-care law would succeed, while also enlisting their help in spreading word about the importance of signing up Americans for The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES).

 

In a conference call with thousands of supporters hosted by Organizing for Action, President Obama said the problems with Healthcare.gov have led to “misinformation” about the health-care law.

 

“Frankly, there have been problems with the Web site that have created and fed this misinformation,” The President told what OFA said was an audience of more than 200,000 supporters. OFA was created out of the Obama 2012 campaign in the hopes of advancing the President’s agenda.

 

President Obama an exclusive call with OFA supporters 11/18/2013

 

 

President Obama is experiencing one of the biggest strikes against  his Presidency as his administration struggles to implement the health-care law against racist wealthy business interest from the Reich wing as well as greedy politicians in the pocket of big insurance corporations, not to mention professional hackers hell bent on crashing the marketplace website. In his remarks, the President said he and his supporters knew it would be a difficult process and referenced Republicans and their refusal to help make sure the law prospers for the millions of uninsured Americans.

 

“We knew it was going to be hard because change is hard, and there are a lot of vested interests,” the President said. “And obviously we haven’t gotten a lot of cooperation from the other party.”

 

Still, President Obama said, he wouldn’t stop working to ensure the law succeeds. “I’ve got one more campaign in me, and that’s making sure this law works,” he said.

 

The President told his supporters that his main message was that he needs their help in reminding people to sign up for health care through the law – whether on the Web site or through other separate marketplace venues.

 

“This law is going to be one that lasts for generations to come,” he said. “And people will see why we fought so hard to do it.”

 

In providing reassurance to his supporters, President Obama cast last week’s news that just over 100,000 people successfully signed up for the Affordable Care Act as a victory, noting that 400,000 other people obtained Medicaid coverage and many more expressed interest.

 

The actual National figures for October, released this month can be found here…..

 

The HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACE: NOVEMBER ENROLLMENT REPORT

 

President Obama said he is confident that, by the end of the month, HealthCare.gov would be working for the vast majority of Americans, which the administration has defined as 80 percent of those seeking to sign up. “In fact, eventually, it’s going to be the easiest place to shop for healthcare.”

 

HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACE: NOVEMBER ENROLLMENT REPORT

 

Read The Complete Report From The Department Of Health & Human Services.

 

November 13, 2013
This issue brief highlights national and state-levelenrollment-related information for the first month of theHealth Insurance Marketplace (Marketplace hereafter) initial open enrollment period that began October 1, 2013 for coverage beginning January 1, 2014 (see Appendix A for state-level data).

 

It also provides an overview of the methodology that was used in compiling these data (see Appendix B), and includes information about strategies to reach consumers.

 

These data represent a “snapshot” of Marketplace enrollment that uses comparable definitions for the data elements across states, and between states that are implementing their own Marketplaces (also known as State-Based Marketplaces or SBMs) and states with Marketplaces that are supported by or fully-run by the Department of Health and Human Services (including
those run in partnership with states, also known as the Federally-facilitated Marketplace or FFM).

 

Data related to Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility in this report are based on applications submitted through the Marketplaces. Enrollment based on applications submitted through state Medicaid/CHIP agencies will be released in a subsequent report.

 

 

The following are highlights of Marketplace enrollment-related information for the first month.
Marketplace Monthly Enrollment-Related Information, 10-1-13 to 11-2-13
Number of completed applications through the Marketplaces 846,184

 
Total number of individuals included in completed Marketplace applications 1,509,883

 
Number of individuals determined eligible to enroll in a Marketplace plan 1,081,592

 
Number of individuals who have selected a Marketplace plan 106,185

 
(1) Oct 1- Nov 2 most closely represents the first month of operations since state based Marketplaces generally compile enrollment-related metrics on a weekly basis.

 

 

The first month enrollment experience in the Marketplace exceeds comparable first month enrollment in theCommonwealth Care program in the MassachusettsHealth Connector. In Massachusetts, the number of premium-paying enrollees who signed up during the first month of enrollment was 123 or 0.3 percent of the total enrollment of 36,167 at the end of the year.

 

 

Department of Health and Human Services 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

http://aspe.hhs.gov

 

 

Marketplace plan selection of 106,185 is 1.5 percent of the estimated enrollees at the end of the 2014 open enrollment period (Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimate, May 2013). (See Appendix C for more information on enrollment experiences in other programs.)

 

 

Marketplace Website and Call Center Activity:
Unique Visitors on the SBM and FFM websites: 26,876,527
Calls to the SBM and FFM call centers: 3,158,436

 

 

Overview of Enrollment to Date

 

To date, 106,185 persons have enrolled and selected a Marketplace plan—this includes those who have paid a premium and those who have not yet paid a premium.

 

Based on available data, 846,184 completed applications were submitted to Marketplaces during the first month of the initial open enrollment period (10-1-13 to 11-2-13), including applications that were submitted to the SBMs and FFM.

 

These completed applications correspond to a total of 1,509,883 million individuals (persons) who have applied for coverage through the Marketplaces during this time period. This represents 22 percent of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated 7 million Marketplace enrollment in 2014.

 

The Marketplaces have helped a total of 1,477,853 persons by determining or assessing3that  they are either eligible to enroll in a Marketplace plan (used throughout this report—also known as Qualified Health Plans or QHPs) with or without financial assistance, or in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

 

To date, 106,185 persons have selected a Marketplace plan—this includes 79,391 in SBMs and 26,794 in FFM. An additional 975,407
persons who have been determined eligible have not yet selected a plan through the Marketplace.

 

To date, the Marketplaces have processed eligibility determinations and assessments for 98 percent (1,477,853) of the 1,509,883 persons who have applied for coverage – including:

 

1,081,592 persons (73 percent of the total number of persons with processed eligibility determinations / assessments) have been determined eligible to enroll in a Marketplace plan, (including 326,130 persons who have been determined eligible to enroll in a
Marketplace plan with financial assistance).

 

106,185 (10 percent) of the 1,081,592 total Marketplace plan eligible persons have already selected a plan by clicking a button on the website page.

 

Enrollment includes those who have selected a plan including those who have paid their first month premium and those who have not yet done so

 

396,261 persons (27 percent of the total number of persons with processed eligibility determinations / assessments) who have been determined or assessed eligible for Medicaid or CHIP.

 

A total of 502,446, or 1 in 3 of the 1,477,853 people whose eligibility determinations / assessments have been processed, have either been determined or assessed eligible for Medicaid or CHIP or have selected a plan in the Marketplaces. Meanwhile, 722,391 (49 percent) of the 1,477,853 whose eligibility determinations / assessments have been processed are either eligible
for financial assistance through the Marketplaces, or have been determined or assessed eligible for Medicaid or CHIP.

 

An additional 201,137 persons who applied for coverage through the Marketplaces have eligibility determinations that are either pending, not captured in the Marketplace plan and Medicaid/CHIP eligibility counts for a given state, or negative (meaning that they have not been determined eligible to enroll in a Marketplace plan).

 

The available data on completed applications, eligibility determinations and assessments, and Marketplace plan selection represents a subset of the total number of Americans who have begun exploring the coverage options that are available through the new Marketplaces. There is considerable interest in the new Marketplaces as measured by unique visitors on the SBM and FFM websites (26,876,527), and calls to the SBM and FFM call centers (3,158,436).

 

These early enrollment-related statistics suggest that, in spite of recent information system and website issues, interest in the Marketplaces is high. For example a Commonwealth Fund survey conducted Oct. 9-275 polled adults (ages 19-64) who are uninsured or have individual market coverage and found that most (60 percent) are aware of the Marketplace.

 

Further, the Commonwealth Fund found that 53 percent are aware that financial support is available for Marketplace coverage and 17 percent have visited the Marketplace. Most (58 percent) said they are very likely or somewhat likely to go or go back to visit the Marketplace to enroll in a plan or to apply for the premium tax credit or for Medicaid/CHIP before the open enrollment period
ends on March 31, 2014. (See Appendix D for more information).

 

Marketplace enrollment is expected to increase as technical issues are resolved.

 

Read The Complete Department of Health and Human Services HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACE: NOVEMBER ENROLLMENT REPORT

 

 

HEALTH CARE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

 

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This holiday season, millions of Americans have a chance to get quality, affordable health insurance—many for the first time. If you have family members who are uninsured, you can play a big part in helping them find coverage that works for them. It might not always seem like it, but your family listens to you. So have the talk.

 

 

SEND A PACKING LIST

Use this list to make sure your family members have what they need to shop on the new health insurance marketplace.

 

SEND A PACKING LIST

Are your family members traveling home for the holidays? There are a few things they’ll need to sign up for health coverage. Make sure they bring the following items with them before they head home.

 

PACKING LIST

In order to shop on the new health insurance marketplace, you’ll need to have a few basic pieces of information with you:

  1. Your Social Security Number
  2. Information about your employer and income— either a pay stub or a copy of your most recent W-2 tax form
  3. If you currently have health insurance, you’ll need your health insurance card or paperwork that includes a health policy number

DOUBLE CHECK

Here are some common things to think about before getting started:

  1. Your budget: What is your budget? How much can you afford to pay each month for health coverage?
  2. Existing insurance: Is health insurance currently offered through your job?
  3. Current costs: If you do currently have coverage, what are your costs?
  4. Coverage Goals: What kind of coverage are you looking for? There are lots of options based on what you want and how much you want to pay.

 

 

PLAN YOUR TALK

Take a moment to plan when, where, and how you’ll talk to your family about health insurance.

 

PLANNING YOUR HEALTH CARE TALK

Make sure you have a plan for when, where, and how you’ll talk to your family about health insurance. Here are a few tips to help you prepare.

 

 

Clock

PICK A TIME

Start early: Don’t wait until the last minute—be sure to start the conversation early!

Integrate the talk into family time:Take advantage of downtime after meals or between holiday activities to start your talk.

 

 

 

Talk

THINK ABOUT HOW YOU’LL BRING IT UP

Make it personal: Be honest about your feelings and why this is important to you.

Be persistent, but keep it positive: Tell them you care about their health, and focus on the benefits that come from knowing that you have health insurance.

 

 

Place

CHOOSE A PLACE

Get creative: Think about what matters to your family member. Make it memorable!

Find a Quiet Place to Shop: You can start your conversation anywhere, but to shop for health coverage, you will want a more quiet, private place to make a phone call or use the internet.

 

 

 

START THE CONVERSATION

Here are some tips on talking to your family about how to sign up and how to answer common questions.

 

CONVERSATION TIPS

 

Start by asking: “Have you thought about signing up for health insurance on the new marketplace?”

 

Offer to walk them through it: “Would you like to take some time with me to sign up right now?”

 

Ask them to make a plan, and commit to it:“When do you plan on signing up?”

 

Don’t forget to follow up: “Have you signed up yet?”

 

 

WHAT’S IMPORTANT TO COMMUNICATE:

  • Being covered helps you stay healthy and protects you in an emergency.
  • You can find a plan that fits your budget—financial assistance is available for those who qualify.
  • You get to choose the plan that’s right for you.
  • All the health insurance plans on the new marketplace provide free preventive care—including routine checkups, vaccinations and screenings.
  • You can’t be denied insurance because of a preexisting condition, and lifetime limits are now banned, so your insurance will be there when you need it.
  • For your coverage to start January 1, you’ll need to sign up by December 15.
  • Open enrollment for plans in the marketplace is now through March, but getting started sooner is better.

 

 

PLEDGE TO HAVE THE TALK

Make a pledge to have a conversation with your family about health insurance this holiday season.

 

PLEDGE TO HAVE THE TALK

Make a pledge to have a conversation with your family about health insurance this holiday season.

 

Get ready to have the talk

 

Published on Oct 31, 2013

This holiday season, be ready to talk to your loved ones about getting covered. These conversations don’t have to be tough — OFA can help. Check out barackobama.com/talk to learn more.

 

 

ObamaCARES Works So Lets Get Out There And Spread The Word.

 

Join the team that’s helping make sure the new health care law is a success. Be part of Team Obamacare.

 

 

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HEALTH CARE FOR THE HOLIDAYS


 

By Jueseppi B.

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This holiday season, millions of Americans have a chance to get quality, affordable health insurance—many for the first time. If you have family members who are uninsured, you can play a big part in helping them find coverage that works for them. It might not always seem like it, but your family listens to you. So have the talk.

 

SEND A PACKING LIST

Use this list to make sure your family members have what they need to shop on the new health insurance marketplace.

 

SEND A PACKING LIST

Are your family members traveling home for the holidays? There are a few things they’ll need to sign up for health coverage. Make sure they bring the following items with them before they head home.

 

PACKING LIST

In order to shop on the new health insurance marketplace, you’ll need to have a few basic pieces of information with you:

  1. Your Social Security Number
  2. Information about your employer and income— either a pay stub or a copy of your most recent W-2 tax form
  3. If you currently have health insurance, you’ll need your health insurance card or paperwork that includes a health policy number

DOUBLE CHECK

Here are some common things to think about before getting started:

  1. Your budget: What is your budget? How much can you afford to pay each month for health coverage?
  2. Existing insurance: Is health insurance currently offered through your job?
  3. Current costs: If you do currently have coverage, what are your costs?
  4. Coverage Goals: What kind of coverage are you looking for? There are lots of options based on what you want and how much you want to pay.

 

 

PLAN YOUR TALK

Take a moment to plan when, where, and how you’ll talk to your family about health insurance.

 

PLANNING YOUR HEALTH CARE TALK

Make sure you have a plan for when, where, and how you’ll talk to your family about health insurance. Here are a few tips to help you prepare.

 

 

Clock

PICK A TIME

Start early: Don’t wait until the last minute—be sure to start the conversation early!

Integrate the talk into family time:Take advantage of downtime after meals or between holiday activities to start your talk.

 

 

 

Talk

THINK ABOUT HOW YOU’LL BRING IT UP

Make it personal: Be honest about your feelings and why this is important to you.

Be persistent, but keep it positive: Tell them you care about their health, and focus on the benefits that come from knowing that you have health insurance.

 

 

Place

CHOOSE A PLACE

Get creative: Think about what matters to your family member. Make it memorable!

Find a Quiet Place to Shop: You can start your conversation anywhere, but to shop for health coverage, you will want a more quiet, private place to make a phone call or use the internet.

 

 

START THE CONVERSATION

Here are some tips on talking to your family about how to sign up and how to answer common questions.

 

CONVERSATION TIPS

 

Start by asking: “Have you thought about signing up for health insurance on the new marketplace?”

 

Offer to walk them through it: “Would you like to take some time with me to sign up right now?”

 

Ask them to make a plan, and commit to it:“When do you plan on signing up?”

 

Don’t forget to follow up: “Have you signed up yet?”

 

 

WHAT’S IMPORTANT TO COMMUNICATE:

  • Being covered helps you stay healthy and protects you in an emergency.
  • You can find a plan that fits your budget—financial assistance is available for those who qualify.
  • You get to choose the plan that’s right for you.
  • All the health insurance plans on the new marketplace provide free preventive care—including routine checkups, vaccinations and screenings.
  • You can’t be denied insurance because of a preexisting condition, and lifetime limits are now banned, so your insurance will be there when you need it.
  • For your coverage to start January 1, you’ll need to sign up by December 15.
  • Open enrollment for plans in the marketplace is now through March, but getting started sooner is better.

 

 

PLEDGE TO HAVE THE TALK

Make a pledge to have a conversation with your family about health insurance this holiday season.

 

PLEDGE TO HAVE THE TALK

Make a pledge to have a conversation with your family about health insurance this holiday season.

 

Get ready to have the talk

 

Published on Oct 31, 2013

This holiday season, be ready to talk to your loved ones about getting covered. These conversations don’t have to be tough — OFA can help. Check out barackobama.com/talk to learn more.

 

 

If you have family members who are uninsured, you can play a big part in helping them find coverage that works for them.

LEARN MORE

 

President Obama’s OFA call – Nov 18, 2013

 

 

ObamaCARES Works So Lets Get Out There And Spread The Word.

 

Join the team that’s helping make sure the new health care law is a success. Be part of Team Obamacare.

 

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Single Payer: For Those Who Don’t Know….Now You Know.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Why single-payer?

In a single-payer system, one entity would act as an administrator or payer. This entity would collect all health care fees and pay out all health costs, and all providers (e.g., hospitals, physicians and other practitioners) would bill one entity for their services. Patients would have a choice over their providers, who would remain as independent as they are today. Thus the single entity would be responsible for paying for health care, but, except in unusual circumstances such as the Veterans Administration hospitals or the Indian Health Service, would not actually deliver that care.

 

A single-payer system would greatly streamline administration, thereby cutting back on paperwork and allowing more money to go towards actual medical services. In addition, improved databases would allow better monitoring of utilization patterns, allowing the identification of geographical areas in which services are over- or under-utilized. This system has been estimated to reduce administrative services from the current 25-30 percent of the premium dollar under private insurance to approximately 5 percent.

 

Single-payer health care is a system in which the government, rather than private insurers, pays for all health care costs. Single-payer systems may contract for healthcare services from private organizations (as is the case in Canada) or may own and employ healthcare resources and personnel (as is the case in the United Kingdom). The term “single-payer” thus only describes the funding mechanism—referring to health care financed by a single public body from a single fund—and does not specify the type of delivery, or for whom doctors work. Although the fund holder is usually the state, some forms of single-payer use a mixed public-private system.

 

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES) is the beginning to Single Payer and insurance companies and their paid political whores know after The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES) becomes a success….single payer is next.

 

Barack Hussein Obama is smart enough to have realized he couldn’t get a Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) passed that included single payer. What he did was remove it from the original The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act bill in order to get healthcare reform started and cover the 40 plus million uninsured Americans.

 

Very smart move.

 

Ever really imagine why the wealthy greedy politician on both sides of the Congressional aisle are so against The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)? Think about it and consider exactly why so many elected politicians have made it their life’s mission to repeal ObamaCARES….besides overt racism I mean.

 

Corporate Insurance company profits….is why.

 

Now for some facts & truth that the average too lazy and uneducated American does not comprehend….Let me break it down for you who don’t know. Racist ass caucasians, and the hand full of house niggers who follow behind, sucking their nasty sweaty balls, do not want Barack Hussein Obama to be a success because he is Black. ObamaCARES is something that will put Barack Hussein Obama in the history books for much more than being the first Black human to be elected President Of The United States.

 

The Affordable Health Care Act elevates Barack Hussein Obama into the history books with The Presidents who implemented Social SecurityMedicareMedicaid, The G.I. Bill. It secures a legacy no other caucasian POTUS has had since those great men who started the above mentioned social services.

 

Can you imagine an America without Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, SNAP, Veterans Benefits? In 30 years, Barack Hussein Obama will be known as the Father Of American Health Care. Now what racist ass cracka caucasian wants THAT?

 

Think it any coincidence the U.S. Government was shut down by racist caucasian slaves of the Koch Brothers and Grover Norquist on the VERY SAME DAY ObamaCARES opens it’s enrollment?

 

What were the headlines on October 1st…… Government Shutdown or the start of ObamaCARES Open Enrollment?

 

They could NOT allow The Affordable Health Care Act to be a success. I mean how can some Harvard educated Black dude be mentioned in the same breath as  President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Social Security Act of 1935. They could not possibly “let” a Negro be thought of in the same way we think of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Medicare…heaven forbid!!

 

SO, the TeaTardedRepubliCANTS devised a plan to make Barack Hussein Obama the shame of the 44 Presidents. Make his signature legislation, legislation that saves lives and insures millions of Americans for the very FIRST time in their lives, The Affordable Health Care Act aka ObamaCARES, the single reason for shutting down the United States Government.

 

It’s ALL about race. P.E.R.I O.D.

 

And insurance profits. Lets not forget Corporate Insurance company profits.

 

Background

Single-payer health insurance collects all medical fees, then pays for all services, through a “single” government (or government-related) source. In wealthy nations, this kind of publicly managed insurance is typically extended to all citizens and legal residents. Examples include the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, Australia’s Medicare, Canada’s Medicare, and Taiwan’s National Health Insurance.

 

The standard usage of the term “single-payer health care” refers to health insurance, as opposed to healthcare delivery, operating as a public service and offered to citizens and legal residents towards providing near-universal or universal health care. The fund can be managed by the government directly or as a publicly owned and regulated agency. Some writers describe publicly administered health care systems as “single-payer plans”. Some writers have described any system of health care which intends to cover the entire population, such as voucher plans, as “single-payer plans”, although this is uncommon usage.

 

 Worldwide health care systems

 

Learn more about Single-Payer

 

 

Tell The Truth America: This Government Shutdown Is ALL About Corporate Insurance Profits AND R.A.C.E. And Reich wingnuts will go to great lengths to stop The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES) …….

 

Here are some Facts & Truth……

 

The “Racist Reich Wing” Drama Against ObamaCARES Continues: Hackers Attack Healthcare.gov

 

House Homeland Security Committeepublished a video on their Youtube page highlighting a portion of the committee questioning Roberta Stempfley, acting assistant secretary of the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Cyber-security and Communications, who confirmed at least 16 attacks on the Affordable Care Act’s portal Healthcare.gov website in 2013.

 

Roberta Stempfley highlighted one successful attack that is designed to deny access to the website called a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. A DDoS attack is designed to make a network unavailable to intended users, generally through a concerted effort to disrupt service such as repeatedly accessing the servers, saturating them with more traffic than the website is designed to handle.

 

 

The HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETPLACE: NOVEMBER ENROLLMENT REPORT

 

November 13, 2013
This issue brief highlights national and state-levelenrollment-related information for the first month of theHealth Insurance Marketplace (Marketplace hereafter) initial open enrollment period that began October 1, 2013 for coverage beginning January 1, 2014 (see Appendix A for state-level data).

 

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President Obama Announces New Steps To Help Americans Receiving Insurance Cancellation Notices

 

Published on Nov 14, 2013

President Obama announced a solution to address the cancellation notices that some people in the individual health insurance market have received in recent weeks, keeping with his pledge to make adjustments and improvements where they’re warranted as the Affordable Care Act takes effect. November 14, 2013.

 

 

President Obama Reveals New Proposal To Help Consumers Facing Insurance Cancellations

 

The new Health Insurance Marketplace will help millions of hard-working Americans find affordable health insurance.  Premiums are, on average, 16 percent below what was originally projected.  Nearly one in four insurers offeringhealth plans through the Marketplace are selling to individuals for the first time.  And a recent study found that an estimated 17 million Americans can get discounts on their premiums through the Marketplace, through tax credits.

 

 

Spineless Democrats: Take A Lesson From Governor Deval Patrick, The Next Black President

 

Meet a man who uses common sense, logic and critical thinking as a politician. Very uncommon traits to find in politicians today.
Meet Honorable Governor Deval Patrick.
Now meet his forward thinking on The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).
Letter From Governor Patrick to the Massachusetts Congressional Delegation on the Affordable Care Act.

 

Wake Up America.

 

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