MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.


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I have been a supporter of President Barack Hussein Obama since 1995. I will continue to support him and his family and most of his administration. I am however very disappointed and saddened by his response to the cold blooded murder of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson, Missouri on Saturday the 9th of August, 2014. I am so hurt by how he has handled this slaughter of yet another Black male, that I have not had the heart to blog about him since this happened, except for his return to Washington D.C. today.

 

John Crawford, murdered by police in an Ohio Walmart for holding a toy BB gun.

 

Eric Garner choked to death by police for selling cigarettes in NYC

 

Ezell Ford shot to death on a LA street by cops, for what I have no clue.

 

Michael Brown shot down by 6 bullets for walking down the middle of the street in Ferguson, Missouri, by police.

 

Four (4) Black men, THAT WE KNOW OF, murdered since July 17th, 2014. Thats 31 days.

 

And here’s MY POTUSA‘s response……

 

President Obama returns from vacation

 

Published on Aug 18, 2014

President Obama returned to D.C. just after midnight Monday for a two-day break from a summer vacation, interrupted by airstrikes in Iraq and violent clashes in a St. Louis suburb.

 

 

 

President Obama discusses advances in Iraq and his concerns about Ferguson, Missiouri

 

Published on Aug 18, 2014

President Obama announced on Monday that Attorney General Eric Holder would travel to Ferguson, Missouri to meet with Department of Justice and FBI personnel there, overseeing a federal investigation into the death of Michael Brown. The President also gave an update on progress in Iraq, announcing that U.S. forces had enabled Iraqis to retake a dam near Mosul.

 

 

 

Transcript of the President remarks on the situation in Ferguson

 

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 Earlier this afternoon, I spoke with Governor Nixon as well as Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill. I also met with Attorney General Eric Holder.

 

The Justice Department has opened an independent federal civil rights investigation into the death of Michael Brown. They are on the ground and along with the FBI, they are devoting substantial resources to that investigation.

 

The attorney general himself will be travelling to Ferguson on Wednesday to meet with the FBI agents and DOJ personnel conducting the federal criminal investigation and he will receive an update from them on their progress.

 

He will also be meeting with other leaders in the community who’s support is so critical to bringing about peace and calm in Ferguson.

 

Ronald Davis, the director of the DOJ’s Office of Community- oriented Policing Services, or COPS, is also traveling to Ferguson tomorrow to work with police officials on the ground. We’ve also had experts from the DOJ’s community relations service, working in Ferguson since the days after the shooting to foster conversations among the local stake holders and reduce tensions among the community.

 

So, let me close just saying a few words about the tensions there. We have all seen images of protesters and law enforcement in the streets. It’s clear that the vast majority of people are peacefully protesting. What’s also clear is that a small minority of individuals are not.

 

While I understand the passions and the anger that arise over the death of Michael Brown, giving into that anger by looting or carrying guns, and even attacking the police only serves to raise tensions and stir chaos. It undermines rather than advancing justice.

 

Let me also be clear that our constitutional rights to speak freely, to assemble, and to report in the press must be vigilantly safeguarded: especially in moments like these. There’s no excuse for excessive force by police or any action that denies people the right to protest peacefully.

 

Ours is a nation of laws: of citizens who live under them and for the citizens who enforce them. So, to a community in Ferguson that is rightly hurting and looking for answers, let me call once again for us to seek some understanding rather than simply holler at each other. Let’s seek to heal rather than to wound each other.

 

As Americans, we’ve got to use this moment to seek out our shared humanity that’s been laid bare by this moment. The potential of a young man and the sorrows of parents, the frustrations of a community, the ideals that we hold as one united American family.

 

I’ve said this before. In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement. In too many communities, too many young men of color are left behind and seen only as objects of fear. And through initiatives like My Brother’s Keeper, I’m personally committed to changing both perception and reality. And already, we’re making some significant progress, as people of good will of all races are ready to chip in. But that requires that we build, and not tear down. And that requires we listen, and not just shout. That’s how we’re going to move forward together — by trying to unite each other and understand each other, and not simply divide ourselves from one another. We’re going to have to hold tight to those values in the days ahead. And that’s how we bring about justice, and that’s how we bring about peace.

 

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ANN COMPTON: Let me ask you. This is an interesting time in your presidency …. and one of the things that you have so emphasized in the last few months, the last year or so, is this reach-out to Brothers — My Brother’s Keeper and to a generation that doesn’t feel that it has much chance. Sending the attorney general to Ferguson is a step. Has anyone there asked you, or have you considered going yourself? Is there more that you personally can do, not just for Ferguson, but for communities that might also feel that kind of tension and see it erupt in the way it has in Ferguson?

 

PRESIDENT: Well, Ann, obviously, we’ve seen events in which there’s a big gulf between community perceptions and law enforcement perceptions around the country. This is not something new. It’s always tragic when it involves the death of someone so young. I have to be very careful about not prejudging these events before investigations are completed. Because, although these are, you know, issues of local jurisdiction — you know, the DOJ works for me. And then when they’re conducting an investigation, I’ve got to make sure that I don’t look like I’m putting my thumb on the scales one way or the other.

 

So, it’s hard for me to address a specific case, beyond making sure that it’s conducted in a way that isn’t (ph) transparent, where there’s accountability, where people can trust the process, hoping that, as a consequence of a fair and just process, you end up with a fair and just outcome.

 

But, as I think I’ve said in some past occasions, part of the ongoing challenge of perfecting our union has involved dealing with communities that feel left behind, who, as a consequence of tragic histories, often find themselves isolated, often find themselves without hope, without economic prospects.

 

You have young men of color in many communities who are more likely to end up in jail or in the criminal justice system than they are in a good job or in college.

 

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And, you know, part of my job, that I can do, I think, without any potential conflicts, is to get at those root causes.

 

Now, that’s a big project. It’s one that we’ve been trying to carry out now for a couple of centuries. And we’ve made extraordinary progress, but we have not made enough progress.

 

And so, the idea behind something like My Brother’s Keeper is can we work with cities and communities and clergy and parents and young people themselves, all across the country, school superintendents, business, corporations, and can we find models that work, that move these young men on — on a better track?

 

Now part of that process is also looking at our criminal justice system to make sure that it is upholding the basic principle of everybody’s equal before the law.

 

And — and one of the things that we’ve looked at during the course of where we can make — during the course of investigating where we can make a difference is that there’re patterns that start early.

 

Young African American and Hispanic boys tend to get suspended from school at much higher rates than other kids, even when they’re in elementary school. They tend to have much more frequent interactions with the criminal justice system at an earlier age.

 

Sentencing may be different. How trials are conducted may be different.

 

And so, you know, one of the things that we’ve done is to include Department of Justice in this conversation under the banner of my brother’s keeper to see where can we start working with local communities to inculcate more trust, more confidence in the criminal justice system.

 

And — and I want to be — I want to be clear about this because sometimes I think there’s confusion around these issues and this dates back for — for decades.

 

There are young black men that commit crime. And — and — and we can argue about why that happens because of the poverty they were born into or the lack of opportunity or the school systems that failed them or what have you, but if they commit a crime, then they need to be prosecuted because every community has an interest in public safety.

 

And if you go into the African American community or the Latino community, some of the folks who are most intent on making sure that criminals are dealt with are people that have been preyed upon by them.

 

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So, this is not an argument that there isn’t real crime out there and that law enforcement doesn’t have a difficult job. And you know, that they — you know, they have to be honored and respected for the danger and difficulty of law enforcement. But what is also true is that given the history of this country, where we can make progress in building up more confidence, more trust, making sure that our criminal justice system is acutely aware of the possibilities of disparities in treatment, there are safeguards in place to avoid those disparities where, you know, training and assistance is provided to local law enforcement who, you know, may just need more information in order to avoid potential disparity. All those things can make a difference.

 

One of the things I was most proud of when I was in the state legislature, way back when I had no grey hair and none of you could pronounce my name was, you know, I passed legislation requiring videotaping of interrogations and confessions. And I passed legislation dealing with racial profiling in Illinois.

 

And in both cases, we worked with local law enforcement. And the argument was that you can do a better job as a law enforcement official if you have built up credibility and trust. And there’s some basic things that can be done to promote that kind of trust, and you know, in some cases, it’s just a lack of information. And we want to make sure that we get that information to law enforcement.

 

So, there are things that can be done to improve the situation, but short term, obviously, right now what we have to do is make sure that the cause of justice and fair administration of the law is being brought to bear in Ferguson. In order to do that, we’ve got to make sure that we are able to distinguish between peaceful protesters who may have some legitimate grievances, and maybe longstanding grievances, and those who are using this tragic death as an excuse to engage in criminal behavior and tossing Molotov cocktails or looting stores. And that is a small minority of folks, and it may not even be residents of Ferguson, but they are damaging the cause. They are not advancing it.

 

All right? Thank you very much everybody.

 

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No Mr. President, It’s NOT Alright.

 

I don’t care about Iraq. Let Iraq handle it’s own war, remember, we just left an Iraqi war. We should be taking care of our American citizens, making sure THEY are safe as they walk the streets of America. YOUR very first concern should NOT be Iraq and some damn dam. I fully understand and concur with your duty to protect those innocents trapped on the mountain by ISIS forces. Humanitarian aid and protection must be a priority there, understood.

 

I do NOT understand why speaking of a dam in Iraq BEFORE addressing Michael Brown Jr. and his murder, was your strategy. You have asked not one thing that must be asked. Why was Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson allowed to leave Ferguson AFTER murdering unarmed 18 year old Michael Brown Jr.? Why was the body of Michael Brown Jr. allowed to lay in the middle of the street for an estimated 4 hours? Why was there no checking of Michael Brown Jr.’s vitals  to ensure he was indeed dead? Why were there no emergency medical personnel on scene immediately following the murder of Michael Brown Jr.? WHY was it the top priority of Ferguson police chief Jackson to protect and shelter the man who murdered Michael Brown Jr., and not care for the emotions and concerns of  Michael Brown Jr.’s parents?

 

You, sir, have two daughters, imagine if one of your children had been treated in this disrespectful manner by Ferguson, Missouri police. You are The Comforter-In-Chief for flood victims, tornado victims, hurricane victims, victim families massacred by insane mass killers. WHY no comfort for these men and their families….

 

John Crawford, murdered by police in a n Ohio Walmart for holding a toy BB gun.

 

Eric Garner choked to death by police for selling cigarettes in NYC

 

Ezell Ford shot to death on a LA street by cops for, what I have no clue.

 

Michael Brown shot down by 6 bullets for walking down the middle of the street in Ferguson, Missouri, by police.

 

Four (4) Black men, THAT WE KNOW OF, murdered since July 17th, 2014. Thats 31 days.

 

Clearly The United States Of America has a serious policing problem with regards to Black Men. Clearly there is NO Justice for us. There is only Just “US.”

 

I am A Nobody and not nearly intelligent enough to second guess the President Of The United States Of America, a man I voted for twice, and would vote for again if possible.

 

I am smart enough to recognize we have a problem with America’s police system. Local law enforcement agencies are systematically murdering unarmed Black men.

 

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Enough is enough Mr. President. When will you visit Ferguson, Missouri. When will you Stand Up for us Black Men. When will you represent and comfort Black Men murdered by law enforcement?

 

You’re not the President of red states, blue states, Caucasian America, Black America, Pink America, Purple America…but the entire United States Of America.

 

That includes Black men murdered by law enforcement.

 

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The Press Is NOT Allowed Their 1st Amendment Rights By Ferguson Law Enforcement…….

 

WATCH: Cops Physically Push CNN’s Don Lemon During Tense Ferguson Protest

 

 

 

Freedom-of-press

 

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Michael Brown Jr.

Michael Brown Jr.

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.


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Comments by me will appear throughout this piece as bold italics.

 

Michael Brown’s Parents Give Powerful, Tearful First Interview to CNN 

 

Published on Aug 11, 2014

The parents of slain 18-year-old Michael Brown spoke out tonight on CNN. As she spoke with Don Lemon, Brown’s mother Lesley McSpadden broke down crying on camera as she mourned the tragic loss of her son. She talked about how her son was going off to college and now her family has been robbed of seeing that progression of his life.

 

 

 

Themuthafuckingospel

 

The Shooting of Michael Brown

 

A police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old African-American man in Ferguson, Missouri, United States, on August 9, 2014. The incident sparked protests and acts of vandalism in the St. Louis suburb as well as national calls for an investigation into the incident.

 

Michael Brown was NOT a “man” as stated above, Michael Brown was an 18 year old youth, teen, teenager, but by no means was Michael brown a man.

 

Shooting

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar reported that a scuffle began when a Ferguson police officer encountered two men on the street. Reports describe the event as starting after 2:00 p.m. with an initial scuffle within the police car where a shot was fired, and then the police officer shot Brown multiple times as he was fleeing. According to police, Brown, who was unarmed, shoved and hit a police officer, and reached for the officer’s handgun, prompting him to shoot Brown. Some witnesses disputed this account, alleging that Brown had his hands in the air when he was shot by police. Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden, reported that her son was shot eight times.

 

According to the Ferguson Police Department, dashboard cameras are not used in Ferguson police cars.

 

Dorian Johnson tells News 4 he was walking with Brown when the officer confronted them and drew his weapon: 

 

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Dorian Johnson

 

“He (the officer) shot again and once my friend felt that shot, he turned around and put his hands in the air,” said Dorian Johnson, a friend Brown’s. “He started to get down and the officer still approached with his weapon drawn and fired several more shots.”

 

St. Louis County NAACP President Esther Haywood told News 4 that Brown was shot once by the officer and then an additional nine times as he lie in the street. Police have not confirmed that account.

 

 

Michael Brown’s parents: ‘He was my best friend…

 

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Michael Brown’s mother, Ms. Lesley McSpadden

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Michael Brown’s mother, Ms. Lesley McSpadden

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Michael Brown’s mother, Ms. Lesley McSpadden, lays rose petals on the spot her son was murdered by Ferguson, Missouri, police.

 

Published on Aug 11, 2014

CNN’s Don Lemon conducts an emotional interview with the parents of Michael Brown, the teen shot by police in Missouri.

 

 

 

Investigations

On the afternoon of Sunday, August 10, Jon Belmar, chief of the St. Louis County Police Department, gave a press conference at which he reported that Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson had requested the St. Louis County Bureau of Crimes Against Persons Unit to investigate the shooting. The St. Louis County Police Department was then placed in charge of the investigation. Meanwhile the St. Louis County branch of the civil rights group NAACP said they would request an FBI investigation.

 

On August 11, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) opened a parallel civil rights investigation into the incident.

 

On August 11, the U.S. Justice Department announced that United States Attorney General Eric Holder had instructed Justice Department staff to monitor developments.

 

 

Aftermath

On August 10, Reverend Al Sharpton and the National Action Network announced their plans to travel to St. Louis.

 

The family announced that Benjamin Crump, one of the lawyers in the Trayvon Martin case, would represent the family.

 

 

Vigils

Local pastors held a vigil on the morning of Sunday, August 10. Another vigil was planned on the same day, at 8:00 p.m. in the area where Brown was killed.

 

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Cop in Missouri teen fatal shooting on paid leave

 

Published on Aug 12, 2014

The FBI has initiated an investigation into a case involving a teen’s death by a Missouri police officer.

 

 

 

Police: Black Teen Shot After Altercation

 

Published on Aug 10, 2014

A local police chief police says Saturday’s fatal shooting of a black teenager in suburbanSt. Louis, Missouri came after an altercation with police. The shooting has prompted protests, and the officer has been placed on administrative leave. (Aug. 10)

 

 

Why is the Ferguson Police Chief, of the Ferguson Police officer who shot Michael Brown TEN times, not out front giving us an explanation why this murder took place? Why is this bogus explanation vastly different from several witnesses who were on scene? Why does the eyewitness testimony of Black youth Dorian Johnson not being treated the exact same as eyewitness testimony of any caucasian would be treated?

 

 

The following video link MUST be viewed to see the injustice of this entire incident/murder/slaughter of Michael Brown.

 

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Click the link below to be taken to this vitally important video….

 

Michael Brown, Killed for no reason.

 

This video is shameful to anyone who is human.

 

 

Eyewitness to Michael Brown shooting recounts his friend’s death

 

By Trymaine Lee

 

Dorian Johnson, 22, the closest witness to the shooting of Michael Brown on Saturday afternoon, spoke exclusively to MSNBC about the fatal police shooting that claimed his friend's life. Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

Dorian Johnson, 22, the closest witness to the shooting of Michael Brown on Saturday afternoon, spoke exclusively to MSNBC about the fatal police shooting that claimed his friend’s life. Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

 

FERGUSON, Missouri — The last moments of Michael Brown’s life were filled with shock, fear and terror, says a witness who stood just feet away as a police officer shot and killed the unarmed teen.

 

“I saw the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” said Dorian Johnson, 22. “Then I saw the fire come out of the barrel.”

 

Johnson, in an exclusive interview with msnbc, said what began as an order by a police officer to ‘get the f— onto the sidewalk’ quickly escalated into a physical altercation and then, gunfire.

 

“I could see so vividly what was going on because I was so close,” said Johnson, who said he was within arm’s reach of both Brown and the officer when the first of several shots was fired at the teen. Johnson says he feared for his life as he watched the officer squeezing off shot after shot.

 

Brown’s killing on Saturday afternoon has sparked protests and rioting in this small, hardscrabble suburb of St. Louis, where tensions continue to rise between the police and the largely black, mostly poor community. Brown’s shooting lifted the lid on a pot that had long been bubbling .

 

The police say the officer shot Brown after the teen shoved the officer and tried to wrestle the officer’s gun from him. But a number of witnesses, including Johnson, refute those claims. And in the wake of the shooting, the Ferguson Police Department has asked the St. Louis County police to step in and take over the investigation.

 

Meanwhile, the identity of the police officer involved in the shooting has not yet been identified. It is known, however, that the officer who shot Brown has been placed on paid administrative leave.

 

But as darkness fell over Ferguson on Monday, ongoing protests were stifled by rubber bullets and tear gas fired at protesters by officers, according to witnesses.

 

Local branches of the NAACP have called on the Justice Department and federal and state law enforcement officials to take over the investigation from local police. The FBI has joined the investigation and the Justice Department has said it is keeping an eye on the case. Attorney General Eric Holder on Monday said that the FBI will help local authorities undertake a “thorough, fair investigation.”

 

For its part, Brown’s family has hired local attorney Anthony Gray and Benjamin Crump, a civil rights attorney who represented the family of Trayvon Martin.

 

“That baby was executed in broad daylight,” Crump said during a press conference Monday afternoon, standing beside Brown’s mother and father. Crump told a crowd of several dozen that Brown was shot and left in the road like an animal.

 

“He was a good boy who didn’t deserve any of this,” said Michael Brown Sr., the teen’s father.

 

“I just wish I could have been there to help my son,” the boy’s mother, Leslie McSpadden said through tears.

 

“We can’t even celebrate because we have to plan a funeral.” LESLIE MCSPADDEN, MOTHER OF MICHAEL BROWN

 

On Monday, McSpadden and Brown’s father had planned to drop Brown off at a nearby technical college for the start of his freshman year. Instead, the family is making burial arrangements.

 

“We can’t even celebrate because we have to plan a funeral,” McSpadden said.

 

Johnson, who said he moved into the neighborhood about eight months ago, said he met Brown three months ago and the two became fast friends.

 

“Everyone else’s mentality be on some nonsense, silliness,” Johnson said. “But Mike had his mind set on more than that, helping others. I just got a good feeling from being around him.”

 

About 20 minutes before the shooting, Johnson said he saw Brown walking down the street and decided to catch up with him. The two walked and talked. That’s when Johnson says they saw the police car rolling up to them.

 

The officer demanded that the two “get the f—k on the sidewalk,” Johnson says. “His exact words were get the f—k on the sidewalk.”

 

After telling the officer that they were almost at their destination, Johnson’s house, the two continued walking. But as they did, Johnson says the officer slammed his brakes and threw his truck in reverse, nearly hitting them.

 

Now, in line with the officer’s driver’s side door, they could see the officer’s face. They heard him say something to the effect of, “what’d you say?” At the same time, Johnson says the officer attempted to thrust his door open but the door slammed into Brown and bounced closed. Johnson says the officer, with his left hand, grabbed Brown by the neck.

 

Desuirea Harris, the grandmother of Michael Brown, the unarmed teen fatally shot by police on Saturday was over come with grief following a press conference where her family addressed the media.   Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

Desuirea Harris, the grandmother of Michael Brown, the unarmed teen fatally shot by police on Saturday was over come with grief following a press conference where her family addressed the media.
Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

 

“I could see the muscles in his forearm,” Johnson said. “Mike was trying to get away from being choked.”

 

“They’re not wrestling so much as his arm went from his throat to now clenched on his shirt,” Johnson explained of the scene between Brown and the officer. “It’s like tug of war. He’s trying to pull him in. He’s pulling away, that’s when I heard, ‘I’m gonna shoot you.’”

 

At that moment, Johnson says he fixed his gaze on the officer to see if he was pulling a stun gun or a real gun. That’s when he saw the muzzle of the officer’s gun.

 

“I seen the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” he said. “He had it pointed at him and said ‘I’ll shoot,’ one more time.”

 

A second later Johnson said he heard the first shot go off.

 

“I seen the fire come out of the barrell,” he said. “I could see so vividly what was going on because I was so close.”

 

Johnson says he was within arm’s reach of both Brown and the officer. He looked over at Brown and saw blood pooling through his shirt on the right side of the body.

 

“The whole time [the officer] was holding my friend until the gun went off,” Johnson noted.

 

Brown and Johnson took off running together. There were three cars lined up along the side of the street. Johnson says he ducked behind the first car, whose two passengers were screaming. Crouching down a bit, he watched Brown run past.

 

“Keep running, bro!,” he said Brown yelled. Then Brown yelled it a second time. Those would be the last words Johnson’s friend, “Big Mike,” would ever say to him.

 

Brown made it past the third car. Then, “blam!” the officer took his second shot, striking Brown in the back. At that point, Johnson says Brown stopped, turned with his hands up and said “I don’t have a gun, stop shooting!”

 

By that point, Johnson says the officer and Brown were face-to-face. The officer then fired several more shots. Johnson described watching Brown go from standing with his hands up to crumbling to the ground and curling into a fetal position.

 

“After seeing my friend get gunned down, my body just ran,” he said. He ran to his apartment nearby. Out of breath, shocked and afraid, Johnson says he went into the bathroom and vomited. Then he checked to make sure that he hadn’t also been shot.

 

Five minutes later, Johnson emerged from his apartment to see his friend Mike dead and in the middle of the street. Neighbors were gathering, some shouting, some taking pictures with their cell phones.

 

Freeman Bosley, Johnson’s attorney, told msnbc that the police have yet to interview Johnson. Bosley said that he offered the police an opportunity to speak with Johnson, but they declined.

 

“They didn’t even want to talk to him,” said Bosley, a former mayor of St. Louis. “They don’t want the facts. What they want is to justify what happened … what they are trying to do now is justify what happened instead of trying to point out the wrong. Something is wrong here and that’s what it is.”

 

Johnson says he understands why the tension has boiled over into violence. As the protests seeking justice in Brown’s death have grown larger and more volatile, Johnson says he has joined them.

 

“There are two crowds. An older crowd that wants justice but there’s anger. Then it’s the younger crowd that wants revenge but there’s anger there, too,” Johnson said.  “What do you expect when something is steadily occurring and its hurting the community and nobody is speaking out or doing anything about it. I feel their anger, I feel their disgust.”

 

Thank you MSNBC and Trymaine Lee

 

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Desuirea Harris, the grandmother of Michael Brown, the unarmed teen fatally shot by police on Saturday was over come with grief following a press conference where her family addressed the media.   Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

Desuirea Harris, the grandmother of Michael Brown, the unarmed teen fatally shot by police on Saturday was over come with grief following a press conference where her family addressed the media.
Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

Dorian Johnson, 22, the closest witness to the shooting of Michael Brown on Saturday afternoon, spoke exclusively to MSNBC about the fatal police shooting that claimed his friend's life. Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

Dorian Johnson, 22, the closest witness to the shooting of Michael Brown on Saturday afternoon, spoke exclusively to MSNBC about the fatal police shooting that claimed his friend’s life. Photo by Trymaine Lee for MSNBC

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People marching to the #Ferguson Police Dept headquarters following the killing of a 17-year-old boy.

People marching to the #Ferguson Police Dept headquarters following the killing of a 17-year-old boy.

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FBI opens investigation into shooting of Michael Brown

 

The FBI has opened an investigation into the shooting of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old killed in suburban St. Louis over the weekend.

 

Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed in Ferguson, a small city outside St. Louis, on Saturday afternoon. His death prompted a series of protests and vigils, with some protests taking a violent turn on Sunday night as people looted in the Ferguson area.

 

“We have initiated a civil rights investigation,” Cheryl Mimura, spokeswoman for the FBI in St. Louis, told The Washington Post on Monday morning.

 

This does not mean that the FBI is taking over the investigation, as was reported earlier in the day by the Associated Press. Rather, this is a separate investigation to see if there were any civil rights violations, Mimura said.

 

The FBI will continue to monitor the investigation that is being carried out by the St. Louis County Police Department. That department was asked by the police in Ferguson to handle the investigation into the shooting.

 

Police fire tear gas at protesters in Ferguson, Missouri

 

Published on Aug 12, 2014

Violence broke out in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson Monday, after community anger over the shooting of an African-American teenager boiled over. At least 10 shots were reportedly fired, and police – some of whom wore anti-riot armour – also used tear gas and rubber bullets.

 

Eighteen-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer Saturday in Ferguson. Brown was allegedly unarmed at the time of the daylight shooting. While the identity of the officer remains unknown, witnesses say he was white.

 

The incident has ignited racial tensions in Ferguson. Three of the Ferguson Police Department’s 53 members are black, while according to U.S. Census statistics nearly 70 percent of Ferguson’s 21,000 population are black.

 

 

 

The Ferguson, Missouri, police have a solution to angry, fed up citizens protesting against watching their own die from a caucasian police agenda toward Black genocide…fire tear gas pellets into the crowd.

 

 

Dad of Slain Unarmed Missouri Teen Michael Brown: ‘We Need Justice for Our Son’

 

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The mother and father of the unarmed Missouri teen Michael Brown, who was gunned down by a police officer over the weekend, called today for justice for their son.

 

Brown, who was African American, was shot multiple times and killed during a scuffle with a police officer Saturday afternoon in Ferguson, Mo., a suburb of St. Louis. Shell casings matched the officer’s gun and he was placed on administrative leave, authorities said.

 

Brown’s family, their lawyers and NAACP leaders met with reporters today to discuss the case and the violence that it has sparked in the community.

 

“It was my first-born son. I just wish I could have been there for him. He didn’t deserve that,” said Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden.

 

Said his father, Michael Brown Sr.: “He was a good boy, he didn’t deserve none of this. We need justice for our son.”

 

NAACP CEO Cornell William Brooks said they were there to “honor [Brown's] memory by seeking justice through non-violence.”

 

Attorney Benjamin Crump said that Brown’s parents were supposed to drop their son off at a technical college today, but instead they are planning his funeral. “It is not about getting angry, it is about us getting justice for Michael Brown,” he said. “Their baby was executed in broad daylight.”

 

Brown’s family, he added, “rejects what the police said at their press conference how this played out.”

 

Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson told ABC News he would be holding a press conference to announce the name of the officer involved in the shooting sometime within the next 24 hours, by 2 p.m. Tuesday.

 

Earlier today the FBI announced it had opened its own investigation into the case, in addition to the investigation being led by St. Louis County police.

 

“The FBI has initiated a federal investigation into a potential civil rights violation that will supplement the St. Louis Co PD inquiry. We will continue to work closely with the PD and coordinate efforts as appropriate,” a spokesperson for the FBI told ABC.

 

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder confirmed the FBI probe and said in a statement, “The shooting incident in Ferguson, Missouri, this weekend deserves a fulsome review.” He said the FBI would be working with attorneys from the department’s civil rights division.

 

The FBI is “reviewing” the shooting death of an unarmed teenager by a police officer, federal authorities said today.

 

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Witness Says Missouri Teen’s Hands Were Up When Cop Shot Him

 

Brown’s death sparked outrage in the community and across the nation. One witness, Piaget Crenshaw, told ABC News that Brown was facing the officer with his hands raised in the air when the officer shot him.

 

The struggle began when the officer encountered two men, one of whom was Brown, in the street outside of an apartment complex, and one of the men pushed the office back toward his squad car, according to police. A shot was fired inside the squad car and then multiple shots were fired at Brown outside the car, killing him, authorities said.

 

A candlelight vigil was held Sunday night in Brown’s honor.

 

Related Reading

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Less Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

If You Are Black, Open Carry Is NOT YOUR Right. YOUR Tan Stops YOU From Open Carrying.

 

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Rights Peace2 000000000000000000obama-forward3

AMBER ALERT: FBI Offers $20,000 For Return Of Missing 2-year-old Toddler Myra Lewis.


 

By Jueseppi B.

amberMyraLewisAMBERALERT

 

 

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said. She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

 

Anyone with knowledge that could be useful to the case should call the FBI at (601) 948-5000 or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department at (601) 859-2345.

 

The FBI also said they are offering a $20,000 reward to anyone with information about Myra’s whereabouts, according to Madison County, Miss. Sheriff Randy Tucker.

 

Myra-Lewis (2)

 

From CNN:

 

(CNN) – More than a week ago, a 2-year-old girl with a wide grin and butterfly barrettes in her hair vanished in Mississippi.

 

Authorities hope she’s still alive, and are offering a $20,000 reward for her return.

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said.

 

She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

 

Myra-Lewis

 

“Since her disappearance was reported, multiple state, local, and federal law enforcement agencies have participated in a massive, collaborative search effort,” the FBI Office in Jackson said.

 

“Significant resources have been dedicated to this investigation, including extensive ground and air searches, and utilization of specially trained search teams.”

 

Despite the effort, the toddler remains missing, and the FBI is offering the money incentive for her return.

 

“We are confident that information will be uncovered which will lead to Myra’s return, and we continue to solicit the public’s assistance in locating this little girl,” said Daniel McMullen, the FBI special agent in charge.

 

Madison County Sheriff Randy Tucker told CNN affiliate WAPT that he believes the little girl is in the area.

 

Myra-Lewis--2-pictures-

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said. She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

Anyone with knowledge that could be useful to the case should call the FBI at (601) 948-5000 or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department at (601) 859-2345.

The FBI also said they are offering a $20,000 reward to anyone with information about Myra’s whereabouts, according to Madison County, Miss. Sheriff Randy Tucker.

 

Myra Lewis Amber Alert

 

UPDATE: Sheriff speaks about search for Myra Lewis

 

By WJTV Staff & By Perrise Thomas

 

MADISON COUNTY – CAMDEN -

Update – 3/10/14, 3:13pm: The FBI & Madison County Sheriff’s Office has announced that there is a $20,000 reward available for information leading to finding Myra Lewis. Officials also stated they believe that Myra is still alive.

 


 

“We have kind of regrouped, we have come up with new leads, new strategies, and things that we’re going to be looking at this week.”

 

Madison County sheriff Randy Tucker says they’re following any and all leads.

 

“I don’t care what it is. If there’s a possibility it’s going to help find Myra, that’s what I’m going to do.” says Tucker

 

When asked if the focus of the investigation was on Myra’s parents, Sheriff Tucker responded with: “I don’t have any specific suspects at this time. We’re still treating this as a missing child, we still need to find her.”

 

Myra’s father, Gregory Lewis tells us off camera, he and his wife, and other family members have taken polygraph tests.

 

We asked the sheriff about the results.

 

“I’m not going to get into any investigative techniques that have taken place.” says Tucker

 

Friday, authorities took an SUV from the family’s home to see if there was a connection to Myra’s disappearance.

 

“One of the scenarios is Myra may have been run over by the truck.” Tucker tells us that is under investigation.

 

Myra’s mother, Ericka Lewis was arrested last week on an unrelated probation violation. She is charged with being a felon in possession of a concealed weapon.

 

Sheriff Tucker says Lewis is on probation for welfare fraud.

 

Lewis’ family questions the timing of her arrest.

 

“They should have waited because that even took their mind off Myra for a moment.” says Martha Samders, Ericka Lewis’ mother

 

Sheriff Tucker says the Department of Human Services became involved after Lewis was arrested.

 

Family members say Lewis’ other children are in their care while she remains behind bars.

 

“They can pressure Erica, but she’ll never give in. She’ll never give in because she didn’t do anything.” says Sanders.

 

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Original post:

Madison County Sheriff Randy Tucker just finished briefing the media on the search for two-year-old Myra Lewis.  She has been missing since last Saturday, March 1.

 

Sheriff Tucker says Lewis is still missing, and he believes she is in the immediate area. When asked if he believes Myra is alive, Sheriff Tucker says he is hoping for the best.

 

Investigators are following any and all leads.

 

Friday, we watched as a tow truck carried away an SUV from the Lewis’ home. Sheriff Tucker says there was talk Myra may have been run over, and they processed the SUV to search for evidence of that. He says they found nothing.

 

We also learned more about the arrest of Myra’s mother, Ericka Lewis. Sheriff Tucker says Ericka was on probation for welfare fraud. Investigators found guns in the home, and Ericka was arrested on a probation violation for being a felon carrying a concealed weapon. She was still in jail Sunday afternoon.

 

We are piecing together all the information from the sheriff.  We also talked with relatives of Myra Lewis and will have an update for you on News Channel 12 at 5:30.

 

MyraLewisAMBERALERT

 

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said. She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

 

Anyone with knowledge that could be useful to the case should call the FBI at (601) 948-5000 or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department at (601) 859-2345.

 

The FBI also said they are offering a $20,000 reward to anyone with information about Myra’s whereabouts, according to Madison County, Miss. Sheriff Randy Tucker.

 

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Missing toddler case now being treated as an abduction

 

MADISON COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

We are being told that the missing Madison County toddler case is now being treated as an abduction.

 

The search was called off Monday after the case classification changed.

 

Madison County Sheriff Randy Tucker met with members of the FBI Monday.

 

Myra Lewis was last seen at her parents’ home on Mount Pilgrim Road in Camden Saturday morning.

 

“Parents stated they last saw the two year old around 10 am yesterday (Saturday) morning there were several kids there. The father was watching an infant child inside the other children went outside to play and the two year old wandered off,” said Sheriff Randy Tucker, Madison County Sheriff’s Office. “We’ve searched approximately four square miles around this residence and unfortunately have not been able to locate Myra.”

 

Myra-Lewis--2-pictures-

 

 

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said. She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

 

Anyone with knowledge that could be useful to the case should call the FBI at (601) 948-5000 or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department at (601) 859-2345.

 

The FBI also said they are offering a $20,000 reward to anyone with information about Myra’s whereabouts, according to Madison County, Miss. Sheriff Randy Tucker.

 

Myra-Lewis (2)

 

Ten days into the search: Where is Myra Lewis?

 

From the outside looking in, it appears that law enforcement are actually as perplexed about the whereabouts of missing toddler Myra Lewis as they say they are.

 

In the 10 days since the two-year-old disappeared, reportedly from her yard in Camden, the investigation has taken several turns, but they all lead back to the same question: Where is Myra?

 

Throughout the case, Madison County Sheriff Randy Tucker says he’s remaining optimistic, and that he thinks the case will have a “positive outcome.” At the same time Tucker says he believes the child is alive, he says he does not have reason to believe she has been kidnapped.

 

 

“We’re very hopeful and continue to be very optimistic. The sheriff is a very spritual and optimistic person and that’s the way he runs the sheriff’s office and the way he continues to run it,” said Sheriff’s Department spokesman Heath Hall. “There’s no reason to believe anything other that than she’s alive. That’s why we continue to look for her and why we have put up the reward.”

 

Saturday, Mar. 1 – Monday, Mar. 3: The child’s family reports her missing after her mother, Ericka Lewis, saw her and one of her sisters in the yard. Ericka Lewis told police she was on her way to the store and told the two children to go inside the house, where Gregory Lewis, Ericka’s husband was looking after their one-month-old.

 

Officials are tight-lipped on what happened between the time Ericka Lewis claims to have seen her daughter, and when police were called about the missing child.

 

“I don’t want to get into too much what transpired that day. There are statements from everyone involved that are pretty accurate with one another,” Tucker said. “We’ve put together a timeline of events based on those statements. We feel pretty comfortable that Myra was last seen about the hours of 10 and 11 a.m., so that’s what we’re going on until anything changes it.”

 

Gregory Lewis tells reporters that he had looked for Myra on an ATV, and that he had tried to track her with the family dogs.

 

The search begins on the property at least four to five hours after the toddler disappeared. An Amber Alert is issued, and officers from several agencies begin to comb the four square miles surrounding the child’s home, including a pond across the street.

 

Air support is brought in from Metro One, and the FBI brings in several different resources, including scientific and investigative personnel. Temperatures drop into the 30s and low 40s over Monday and Tuesday.

 

Tuesday, March 4: Authorities hold a press conference to ask for the public’s help in the case. In spite of saying police do not necessarily believe the toddler had been kidnapped, Tucker said they believed she was out there, alive somewhere.

 

The FBI’s special response team can be seen carrying brown paper bags of evidence from the home, but authorities won’t comment on what was in the bags.

 

Wednesday, March 5: State and federal response teams comb the area in a new grid search, looking for places they might have missed in their initial searches.

 

Thursday, March 6: Authorities focus less on grid searches and more on questioning residents. They spend the day going door-to-door and stopping traffic, asking questions about the child’s whereabouts.

 

The specialized state response teams do not search the area on Thursday.

 

Friday, March 7: Specialized teams return to the area. Mt. Pilgrim Road is closed to everyone except residents and law enforcement. Dozens of official vehicles line either side of the road. Heavy machinery can be seen digging on the property investigating a spot where some recent septic work was done, according to Tucker.

 

Sheriff’s Department spokesman Heath Hall says the heavy machinery carries “no implication” as to whether officials believe the toddler could be buried on the property.

 

Ericka Lewis is arrested on a probation violation for felon with a firearm charges stemming from some weapons found inside the home. Authorities say the weapons were in plain sight. It is unclear if those weapons were found as early in the search as Tuesday when the bagged evidence was removed from the home.

 

“Obviously anytime someone has a felony warrant for their arrest, I’m charged with this office to make that arrest. It’s unfortunate, the timing of it,” Tucker said. “I won’t get into too much further detail at this time, but it is unrelated to the child’s disappearance at this time.”

 

When asked if he thinks Ericka Lewis had something to do with Myra’s disappearance, Tucker says, “I’m not going to answer that.”

 

Sunday, March 9: Tucker calls a press conference to inform the public that there are no updates in the case, and to answer questions from reporters.

 

Monday, March 10: FBI announces a $20,000 reward. Officials say they believe Myra is still alive.

 

“We believe there is someone out there who has information as to where little Myra is. We certainly hope by offering this reward, we’ll receive that information,” Special Agent in Charge Daniel McMullen said.

 

At some point during the investigation, the other children in the home have been removed by authorities.

 

Tuesday, March 11: Hall says officials expect call volumes to go up as a result of the reward money. He says every time there has been a press conference, tips have gone up.

 

“We track all those leads, we take every one of them seriously,” Hall said.

 

Ericka Lewis remains in jail under $5,000 bond.

 

Myra Lewis was reported missing by her family on March 1 after playing with her sister outside their home in Camden, the FBI said. She was last seen about 11 a.m. the same day wearing white or khaki pants, a turquoise sweater adorned with a bear, and pink tennis shoes. Myra is 37 inches tall and weighs 27 pounds.

 

Anyone with knowledge that could be useful to the case should call the FBI at (601) 948-5000 or the Madison County Sheriff’s Department at (601) 859-2345.

 

The FBI also said they are offering a $20,000 reward to anyone with information about Myra’s whereabouts, according to Madison County, Miss. Sheriff Randy Tucker.

 

MyraLewisAMBERALERT

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President Barack Hussein Obama Welcomes James Comey As FBI Director


 

By Jueseppi B.

Fbi_logo

 

 

Megan Slack
Megan Slack

October 28, 2013
04:47 PM EDT

 

President Barack Obama and FBI Deputy Director Sean Joyce, center, applaud FBI Director James Comey, left, during his installation ceremony at the J. Edgar Hoover BuildingPresident Barack Obama and FBI Deputy Director Sean Joyce, center, applaud FBI Director James Comey, left, during his installation ceremony at the J. Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C., Oct. 28, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

Today, President Obama welcomed James Comey to his new post as the seventh Director of the FBI. Comey previously worked as an attorney and later served as deputy attorney general at the Department of Justice. At the FBI Headquarters, the President praised Comey’s dedication, judgment, and commitment to the ideals of the FBI.

 

“Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity: That’s your motto,” the President told the men and women of the FBI.  “And today, we’re here to welcome a remarkable new leader for this remarkable institution, one who lives those principles out every single day: Mr. Jim Comey.”

 

President Obama reiterated Comey’s qualifications for the job.. “It’s just about impossible to find a matter of justice he has not tackled, and it’s hard to imagine somebody who is not more uniquely qualified to lead a bureau that covers all of it — traditional threats like violent and organized crime to the constantly changing threats like terrorism and cyber-security,” he said.

 

President Obama Speaks at the Installation of FBI Director James Comey (Just The POTUS Remarks)

October 28, 2013 | 9:01 |Public Domain

 

President Obama says that new FBI Director James Comey has “dedicated his life to defending our laws — to making sure that all Americans can trust our justice system to protect their rights and their well-being.”

 

 

 

James Comey, New F.B.I. Director, Is Introduced (Full Ceremony)

 

Published on Oct 28, 2013

Subscribe on YouTubehttp://bit.ly/U8Ys7n
President Obama welcomes James Comey, the newly sworn-in head of the F.B.I.

 

 

 

The President also said he’d keep fighting to restore FBI funding that was cut by the sequester.

The FBI joins forces with our intelligence, our military, and homeland security professionals to break up all manner of threats — from taking down drug rings to stopping those who prey on children, to breaking up al Qaeda cells to disrupting their activities, thwarting their plots. And your mission keeps expanding because the nature of the threats are always changing.

Unfortunately, the resources allotted to that mission has been reduced by sequestration. I’ll keep fighting for those resources because our country asks and expects a lot from you, and we should make sure you’ve got the resources you need to do the job. Especially when many of your colleagues put their lives on the line on a daily basis, all to serve and protect our fellow citizens — the least we can do is make sure you’ve got the resources for it and that your operations are not disrupted because of politics in this town.

 

 

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President Barack Obama makes remarks during a ceremonial swearing-in of FBI Director James Comey at the FBI Headquarters in Washington

President Barack Obama makes remarks during a ceremonial swearing-in of FBI Director James Comey at the FBI Headquarters in Washington

President Barack Obama pats new FBI Director James Comey on the back as they arrive for Comey’s installation ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

President Barack Obama pats new FBI Director James Comey on the back as they arrive for Comey’s installation ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

FBI Director James Comey is sworn in at a ceremony at the FBI Headquarters. Comey was officially sworn in as director of FBI on September 4 to succeed Robert Mueller, who had served as director for 12 years.

FBI Director James Comey is sworn in at a ceremony at the FBI Headquarters. Comey was officially sworn in as director of FBI on September 4 to succeed Robert Mueller, who had served as director for 12 years.

President Obama & The New FBI Director, James Comey during a swearing in ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

President Obama & The New FBI Director, James Comey during a swearing in ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

FBI Director James Comey speaks during a swearing in ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

FBI Director James Comey speaks during a swearing in ceremony at the FBI Headquarters

President Barack Obama talks with FBI Director James Comey during the installation ceremony for Comey as FBI director

President Barack Obama talks with FBI Director James Comey during the installation ceremony for Comey as FBI director

President Barack Obama attends the swearing-in of FBI Director James Comey at the FBI headquarters

President Barack Obama attends the swearing-in of FBI Director James Comey at the FBI headquarters

 

Related Links: C-SPAN

Remarks by the President and FBI Director James Comey (Transcript)

 

Remarks by the President and FBI Director James Comey

12:34 P.M. EDT
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THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  Thank you, FBI.  (Applause.) Thank you so much.  Please, everybody, be seated — those of you who have seats.  (Laughter.)
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Well, good afternoon, everybody.  I am so proud to be here and to stand once again with so many dedicated men and women of the FBI.  You are the best of the best.  Day in and day out, you work tirelessly to confront the most dangerous threats our nation faces.  You serve with courage; you serve with integrity.  You protect Americans at home and abroad.  You lock up criminals.  You secure the homeland against the threat of terrorism.  Without a lot of fanfare, without seeking the spotlight, you do your jobs, all the while upholding our most cherished values and the rule of law.
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Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity:  That’s your motto.  And today, we’re here to welcome a remarkable new leader for this remarkable institution, one who lives those principles out every single day:  Mr. Jim Comey.
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Before I get to Jim, I want to thank all the predecessors who are here today.  We are grateful for your service.  I have to give a special shout-out to Bob Mueller, who served longer than he was supposed to, but he was such an extraordinary leader through some of the most difficult times that we’ve had in national security.  And I consider him a friend and I’m so grateful for him and Ann being here today.  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)
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Now, Jim has dedicated his life to defending our laws — to making sure that all Americans can trust our justice system to protect their rights and their well-being.  He’s the grandson of a beat cop.  He’s the prosecutor who helped bring down the Gambinos.  He’s the relentless attorney who fought to stem the bloody tide of gun violence, rub out white-collar crime, deliver justice to terrorists.  It’s just about impossible to find a matter of justice he has not tackled, and it’s hard to imagine somebody who is not more uniquely qualified to lead a bureau that covers all of it — traditional threats like violent and organized crime to the constantly changing threats like terrorism and cyber-security.  So he’s got the resume.
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
But, of course, Jim is also a famously cool character — the calmest in the room during a crisis.  Here’s what a fellow former prosecutor said about him.  He said, “You know that Rudyard Kipling line — ‘If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs’– that’s Jim.”
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There’s also a story from the time during his prosecution of the Gambino crime family.  One of the defendants was an alleged hit man named Lorenzo.  And during the trial, Jim won an award from the New York City Bar Association.  When the court convened the next morning, everybody was buzzing about it, and suddenly, a note was passed down from the defendant’s table, across the aisle to the prosecutor’s table.  It was handed to Jim, and it read:  “Dear Jim, congratulations on your award.  No one deserves it more than you.  You’re a true professional.  Sincerely, Lorenzo.”  (Laughter.)
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
“Sincerely, Lorenzo.”  Now, we don’t know how sincere he was.  (Laughter.)  We don’t know whether this was a veiled threat, or a plea for leniency, or an honest compliment.  But I think it is fair to say that Jim has won the respect of folks across the spectrum — including Lorenzo.  (Laughter.)
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
He’s the perfect leader for an organization whose walls are graced by the words of a legendary former director:  “The most effective weapon against crime is cooperation.”  Jim has worked with many of the more than 35,000 men and women of the FBI over the course of his long and distinguished career.  And it’s his admiration and respect for all of you, individually, his recognition of the hard work that you do every day — sometimes under extraordinarily difficult circumstances — not just the folks out in the field, but also folks working the back rooms, doing the hard work, out of sight — his recognition that your mission is important is what compelled him to answer the call to serve his country again.
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
The FBI joins forces with our intelligence, our military, and homeland security professionals to break up all manner of threats — from taking down drug rings to stopping those who prey on children, to breaking up al Qaeda cells to disrupting their activities, thwarting their plots.  And your mission keeps expanding because the nature of the threats are always changing.
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
Unfortunately, the resources allotted to that mission has been reduced by sequestration.  I’ll keep fighting for those resources because our country asks and expects a lot from you, and we should make sure you’ve got the resources you need to do the job.  Especially when many of your colleagues put their lives on the line on a daily basis, all to serve and protect our fellow citizens — the least we can do is make sure you’ve got the resources for it and that your operations are not disrupted because of politics in this town.  (Applause.)
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
Now the good news is things like courage, leadership, judgment, and compassion — those resources are, potentially, at least, inexhaustible.  That’s why it’s critical that we seek out the best people to serve — folks who have earned the public trust; who have excellent judgment, even in the most difficult circumstances; those who possess not just a keen knowledge of the law, but also a moral compass that they — and we — can always count on.
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And that’s who we’ve got in Jim Comey.  I’ll tell you I interviewed a number of extraordinary candidates for this job, all with sterling credentials.  But what gave me confidence that this was the right man for the job wasn’t his degrees and it wasn’t his resume; it was in talking to him and seeing his amazing family, a sense that this somebody who knows what’s right and what’s wrong, and is willing to act on that basis every single day.  And that’s why I’m so grateful that he’s signed up to serve again.
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I will spare you yet another joke about how today, no one stands taller.  (Laughter.)  I simply want to thank Jim for accepting this role.  I want to thank Patrice and the five remarkable children that they’ve got — because jobs like this are a team effort, as you well know.
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And I want to thank most all the men and women of the FBI.  I’m proud of your work.  I’m grateful for your service.  I’m absolutely confident that this agency will continue to flourish with Jim at the helm.  And if he gets lost in the building, I want you guys to help him out.  (Laughter.)  Because I guarantee you that he’s going to have your back, make sure you’ve got his back as well.
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Thank you very much, everybody.  God bless you.  (Applause.)
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MR. JOYCE:  And now, ladies and gentlemen, it is my honor to introduce the seventh Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation — James B. Comey.  (Applause.)
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MR. COMEY:  Thank you, Sean.  Thank you, Mr. President.  Thank you so much for gracing us with your presence, for honoring us, and for speaking so eloquently about the mission of the FBI and its great people.
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Thank you also to my friends and family who are gathered here today.  My entire life is literally represented in this crowd, and it is a pretty picture.  These are the people that I have known and loved literally my entire life and from whom I have learned so much.
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I’m especially grateful that my dad and my sister and my brothers could be here today.  I wish so much that Mom could be here to enjoy this amazing day.  I can still hear ringing in my entire teenage years her voice as she snapped open the shades every single morning and said, “Rise and shine and show the world what you’re made of.”  I found it less inspiring at the time — (laughter) — but it made us who we are.  And I’ll never forget that.
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And to my five troops and my amazing bride, who talked me into being interviewed for this job — of course, with the caveat that she’d be okay because the President would never pick me.  (Laughter.)  I got to tell you, this is your last chance to talk to him about it.  (Laughter.)
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Mr. President, I am so grateful for this honor and this opportunity to serve with the men and women of the FBI.  They are standing all around this great courtyard, and standing on duty all around this country and around this world at this moment.  I know already that this is the best job I have ever had and will ever have.
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That’s because I have a front row seat to watch the work of a remarkable group of people who serve this country, folks from all walks of life who joined the FBI for the same reason — they were teachers and soldiers, and police officers and scholars, and software engineers, and people from all walks of life who wanted to do good for a living.  They wanted jobs with moral content, and so they joined this great organization.
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I thought about them as I stood in this courtyard just a week ago and showed a visiting foreign leader the statue that overlooks this ceremony.  It’s an artist’s depiction of the words from our shield that the President mentioned:  Fidelity, Bravery, and Integrity. And as I thought about that statue and those words and this ceremony, I thought I would take just a couple of minutes and tell you what those words mean and why I think they belong on our shield.
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First, fidelity.  The dictionary defines fidelity as a strict and continuing faithfulness to an obligation, trust, or duty.  To my mind, that word on our shield reminds us that the FBI must abide two obligations at the same time.  First, the FBI must be independent of all political forces or interests in this country.  In a real sense, it must stand apart from other institutions in American life.  But, second, at the same time, it must be part of the United States Department of Justice, and constrained by the rule of law and the checks and balances built into our brilliant design by our nation’s founders.
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There is a tension reflected in those two aspects of fidelity, those two values that I see in that word, and I think that tension is reflected in the 10-year term that I’ve just begun.  The term is 10 years to ensure independence.  But it is a fixed term of years to ensure that power does not become concentrated in one person and unconstrained.  The need for reflection and restraint of power is what led Louis Freeh to order that all new agent classes visit the Holocaust Museum here in Washington so they could see and feel and hear in a palpable way the consequences of abuse of power on a massive almost unimaginable scale.  Bob Mueller continued that practice.  And I will again, when we have agents graduating from Quantico.
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The balance reflected in my term is also a product of lessons hard learned from the history of this great institution.  Our first half-century or so was a time of great progress and achievement for this country, and for the Bureau.  But it also saw abuse and overreach — most famously with respect to Martin Luther King and others, who were viewed as internal security threats.
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As I think about the unique balance represented by fidelity to independence on the one hand, and the rule of law on the other, I think it also makes sense for me to offer those in training a reminder closer to our own history.  I’m going to direct that all new agents and analysts also visit the Martin Luther King Memorial here in Washington.  I think it will serve as a different kind of lesson — (applause) — one more personal to the Bureau, of the dangers in becoming untethered to oversight and accountability.
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 That word fidelity belongs on our shield.
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 Next, bravery.  We have perpetrated a myth in our society that being brave means not being afraid, but that’s wrong.  Mark Twain once said that bravery “is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”  If you’ve ever talked to a special agent that you know well and you ask he or she about a dangerous encounter they were involved in, they’ll almost always give you the same answer, “yeah, I did it, but I was scared to heck the whole time.”  But that’s the essence of bravery.
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Only a crazy person wouldn’t fear approaching a car with tinted windows during a late-night car stop, or pounding up a flight of stairs to execute a search warrant, or fast-roping from a helicopter down into hostile fire.  Real agents, like real people, feel that fear in the pit of their stomachs.  But you know the difference between them and most folks?  They do it anyway, and they volunteer to do that for a living.  402528_176619879142958_864642698_n
What makes the bravery of the men and women of the FBI so special is that they know exactly what they’re in for.  They spend weeks and weeks in an academy learning just how hard and dangerous this work is.  Then they raise their right hands and take an oath, and do that work anyway.  They have seen the Wall of Honor — that I hope so much my friends and guests and family will get to see inside this building — with pictures and links to the lives of those who gave the last full measure of devotion for their country as FBI employees.
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Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman said this:  “I would define true courage to be a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger and a mental willingness to endure it.”
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I called a special agent a few weeks ago after he had been shot during an arrest.  I knew before I called him that he had already been injured severely twice in his Bureau career, once in a terrorist bombing and once in a helicopter crash.  Yet when I got him on the phone, I got the strong sense he couldn’t wait to get me off the phone.  He was embarrassed by my call.  “Mr. Director, it was a through and through wound.  No big deal.”  He was more worried about his Bureau car, which he had left at the scene of the shooting.  (Laughter.)  He felt okay, though, because his wife — also a special agent — was going to go get the car, so everything was fine.  (Laughter.)
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The men and women of this organization understand perfectly the danger they’re in every day and choose to endure it because they believe in this mission.  That’s why bravery belongs on our shield.
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And, finally, integrity.  Integrity is derived from the Latin word “integer,” meaning whole.  A person of integrity is complete, undivided.  Sincerity, decency, trustworthy are synonyms of integrity.  It’s on our shield because it is the quality that makes possible all the good that we do.  Because everything we do requires that we be believed, whether that’s promising a source that we will protect her, telling a jury what we saw or heard, or telling a congressional oversight committee or the American people what we are doing with our power and our authorities.  We must be believed.
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Without integrity, all is lost.  We cannot do the good that all of these amazing people signed up to do.  The FBI’s reputation for integrity is a gift given to every new employee by those who went before.  But it is a gift that must be protected and earned every single day.  We protect that gift by making mistakes and admitting them, by making promises and keeping them, and by realizing that nothing — no case, no source, no fear of embarrassment — is worth jeopardizing the gift of integrity.  Integrity must be on the FBI shield.
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So, you see, those three words — Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity — capture the essence of the FBI and its people.  And they also explain why I am here.  I wanted to be here to work alongside those people, to represent them, to help them accomplish their mission, and to just be their colleague.
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It is an honor and a challenge beyond description.  I will do my absolute best to be worthy of it.  Thank you very much. (Applause.)
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 END
12:55 P.M.

 

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A Monday Potpourri: Naval Yard Shooter Identified. President Obama Responds To Naval Yard Tragedy.


 

By Jueseppi B.

Potpourri NMNSignUpLP

 

 

 

 

 

breakingnews

 

 

Aaron Alexis Identified As Alleged Navy Yard Shooter

 

 

 

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Aaron Alexis has been identified by police as the dead Washington Navy Yard shooter, NBC News reports.

 

Alexis, 34, originally of Fort Worth, Texas, recently began working at the Navy yard as a civilian contractor, the station reported.USA Today and CBS News also report that an unnamed source identified Alexis as the shooter, who was confirmed dead by police earlier today.

 

At least 13 people were killed — including Alexis — and more were wounded at the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters building after at least one gunman opened fire after 8:20 a.m. Monday, a Defense Department official said.

 

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier said at a press conference that a Metropolitan Police officer is among those who have been shot, among other “multiple victims inside who are deceased.” There were other reports that a naval security guard was reportedly among the wounded.

 

The suspect was reportedly killed at that location, but few details about the death were immediately available. One other person of interest is still on the loose. He’s described as a black male, 50, with an olive military-style uniform who may be in possession of a long gun.

 

A third person of interest was cleared.

 

The FBI released a photo and description of Alexis, asking the public for any information about the deceased suspect:

 

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FBI Posts Photos Of Gunman

 

Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office, said at a press conference that the FBI has posted photos of Aaron Alexisconfirmed by an FBI official as the dead gunman. Parlave asked the public for information on Alexis. Anyone with knowledge should call 1-800-CALL-FBI.

 

White House press secretary Jay Carney was reluctant to reopen a debate on gun control Monday after 13 people were killed in a mass shooting at Washington Navy Yard.

Carney was pressed during his daily briefing with reporters on whether President Barack Obama would use the incident to renew his push for stricter gun laws.

“This is an ongoing investigation, it’s an ongoing situation on the ground,” Carney responded. “There are law enforcement officials right now dealing with this, doing everything they can to make sure people here in Washington are safe [and] people around the incident are safe.”

“So it would be inappropriate to try to put in context something about which we have so few facts,” he added.

 

Read more about the White House response from Sabrina Siddiqui

 

 

The death toll has now been increased to 13 dead and as many as 12 injured.

 

 

D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said authorities were seeking a potential second suspect, described as a black male, approximately 40 to 50 years old, 5 foot 10, 180 pounds, medium complexion with gray sideburns, wearing an olive military-style uniform and carrying “a long gun.”

 

Before a scheduled economic speech at the White House, President Barack Obama deplored “yet another mass shooting” — this one targeting military and civilian personnel.

 

“These are men and women who were going to work, doing their job, protecting all of us,” Obama said. “They’re patriots, and they know the dangers of serving abroad. But today they faced the unimaginable: violence that they wouldn’t have expected here at home.”

 

“We will do everything in our power to make sure that whoever carried out this cowardly act is held responsible,” the president added. “I want the investigation to be seamless.”

 

At Least 12 Dead, Several Others Injured In Shooting At D.C. Navy Yard

 

Full coverage: Washington Navy Yard shooting

 

 

Statements and Releases/Speeches and Remarks

 

September 16, 2013

 

President Obama Marks the Five-Year Anniversary of the Financial Crisis & On The Naval Yard Shooting

 

Published on Sep 16, 2013

After making a statement about the situation at the Washington Navy Yard, President Obama marks the anniversary of the financial crisis and the efforts over the last five years to stabilize the economy and get it growing and creating jobs again. September 16, 2013.

 

 

 

Remarks by the Presideent at the Five-Year Anniversary of the Financial Crisis

 

 

The White House to Host Convening on Food Marketing to Children

 

 

Statement by the NSC Spokesperson Caitlin Hayden on the Presidential Determination with Respect to Syria

 

 

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Remarks by the First Lady at the Música Latina Workshop

 

Remarks by the First Lady at the Música Latina Workshop

State Dining Room

10:56 A.M. EDT

 

MRS. OBAMA:  Good morning, everyone.

 

AUDIENCE: Good morning.

 

MRS. OBAMA:  And buenos dias.

 

AUDIENCE:  Buenos dias.

 

MRS. OBAMA:  That’s about all I got.  (Laughter.)  You guys, sit, rest.  It’s good to have you here.  How is everybody doing?  Did you get in easily?  Nobody got too wet?  It’s exciting.  You’re in the White House!  How does it feel?  (Applause.)

 

I want to start by introducing the wonderful people on stage with me.  Of course, we have Gloria and Emilio Estefan, who are just legends — (applause) — legends and dear, dear friends.  They have been here quite often, and they feel like family.  They’re used to this place, and we are so glad to have them back and — taking the time to do this.

 

We have Lila Downs — Lila.  (Applause.)  Romeo Santos we have, as well.  (Applause.)  Marco Antonio Solis.  (Applause.)  And my wonderful friend, Bob Santelli from the Grammy Museum, who has just been so instrumental in making these workshops happen.  Bob, thank you, as always, for being here.  (Applause.)

 

But our very special, most important guests today are all of you.  You guys come from the area — we’ve got Woodrow Wilson High School and the Columbia Heights Educational Campus here from D.C.  You guys, whoop it up.  Give yourselves a round of applause.  (Applause.)  We have students from Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring — (applause) — see, that’s what you do.  All right, we can go back to Woodrow Wilson and Columbia Heights, because you guys didn’t do that for yourselves.  (Applause.)  And Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Virginia.  (Applause.)  Way to go, well done.  (Laughter.)

 

And I really want you all to know that today and every day, this is your house.  So I want you guys to relax, to loosen up, to take a deep breath.  Because I want to make sure that you get everything you can get out of this experience, and you can do that if you kind of breathe in and stop thinking about being in the State Room, but actually — using this as an opportunity to learn and ask questions.  So make yourselves at home.  That’s what this workshop is all about.  And it is one of the most important traditions that our family has started here at the White House.

 

Whenever we have musicians or artists or movie stars come here to perform — which these folks will be doing these evening for a bunch of rich people and fancy people and all of that, right — the most fun is when we invite young people like all of you here during the day so that you get a chance to talk to these folks and learn from them.  It’s a very special part of sharing what we do here at the White House with young people all over the country.

 

And we’ve held workshops from everything from classical music, we’ve done Motown, we’ve done country music.  We’ve even done some modern dance workshops, as well as workshops on civil rights.  We’re going to be doing some things with film in the coming month.

 

So today, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re here to celebrate some of the most fun, dynamic rhythmic melodies you’ll ever hear in your entire life, and that’s Latin music.  Me encanta la musica Latina!  (Applause.)  I’m trying, I’m trying.  Both the girls are taking Spanish, and they think we’re pretty pathetic.  (Laughter.)

 

Now, the percussive beats and the buoyant melodies from these songs come just — from just about everywhere.  You’ll learn they come from the Caribbean and Mexico, and from Central and South America, and also even from Africa and Europe.  And when you put all of that together, you can’t help but move to the music — even the President, you will see tonight, will shake his groove thing every now and then.  (Laughter.)

 

And over the past few decades, more and more people across America have experienced this music for themselves — stars like Gloria and Ritchie Valens and Ricky Martin have not only helped Latin music move into the mainstream, but they have produced some of the biggest hits this world, this country has ever seen.

 

So in a little bit, I’m going to turn it over to Bob, and these wonderful people up here are going to talk to you about their music, but also about how they got where they are today, which is always so cool to hear.  So as you listen to their stories, I want you to think about how the lessons they’ve learned in their lives can apply to your own lives.  Because the truth is, I want you to remember that when all of us were your age, I’m sure that none of us imagined that we would be here in the White House — none of us.

 

I grew up on the South Side of Chicago.  My parents were working class.  I was a good student.  But no one could have told me that I would be the First Lady of the United States.

 

Romeo was just a shy kid from the Bronx who didn’t start singing until he joined his church choir when he was 13 years old.  And then, I hear that was just because he wanted to meet girls.  (Laughter.)  And Gloria still remembers growing up on meals of Spam and cheese.  Emilio first emigrated to the United States — when he did, he lived in an apartment, a little apartment in Miami with 15 cousins.  And Lila spent time working in her mom’s auto parts store in Mexico before her career got going.  And while Marco Antonio has been performing since he was a young boy, he knows that there’s no secret to his or anyone else’s success.  And one of the things he says — these are his words — he says, “Inspiration comes from hard work.  You can’t always wait for the muse.”

 

And that’s why he and all the folks up here spend so much time honing their craft.  They spend hours and hours every week, probably every day, practicing their songs, rewriting their melodies and fine-tuning their performances.  It doesn’t happen overnight.  And those are the kind of things that all of you will have to keep in mind and do as you work on pursuing whatever dreams you have.  The real message here is that it all takes hard work — it really does.

 

I can tell you now that the President spends hours — above and beyond what you see him do every day, he spends hours reading briefings and being advised.  And when he is not reading briefings and going over issues, he is reading whatever he can get his hands on so that he can stay on top of knowing everything he has to know about what’s going on in the world.  He works every day.  And he has always been that — well, I shouldn’t say always.  He was a little trifling as a young student.  (Laughter.)  He will even admit that.

 

But he woke up as a young man and decided, I have to get my act together.  And from then on, he has been a pretty serious, hardworking person.  The same is true for me.  Whenever I have to give a speech I spend a lot of time with my team working it over so that it looks good and it looks natural and that I understand what I’m saying.  It all takes hard work.

 

Any business leader that you see who is running a company, let me tell you, they spend a lifetime working on presentations and studying market trends.  Athletes, as you know, they bust their tails in the gym before, during, and after the games and off seasons.  Everybody is putting some work in.  If you are a scientist making great discoveries, let me tell you it will take decades of experimenting and researching before you’ll even get a glimmer of a breakthrough.

 

So, again, if there’s one thing I want you to take away from all of this is that if you find something that you’re passionate about — and that’s all us grownups wish for our kids, is that you find the thing that gives you passion — that when you find it, that you know that the next step is working hard.  There is no shortcut to pursuing your dreams — than hard work.  And you have everything you need right now, right this very second, to achieve what you want to achieve.

 

If you commit yourselves, and more importantly, if you commit yourselves to your education, there is nothing more important that you can be doing for yourselves right now than taking your education seriously and practicing that hard work on your books and your studies and your homework — being engaged, opening your mouth, raising your hand, making mistakes, getting over it when you do.  All of that stuff is preparation for the success that I hope all of you all see in the years to come.

 

And if you do all of that and don’t make excuses, don’t let excuses stand in the way of your success — if you do all of that I know that you might just one day either be performing or living right here in the White House.  You have what it takes.

 

So keep it up.  We are proud of you.  We love you all.  That’s one of the reasons why it’s so important for us to share these experiences with you, because you may just take away the thing that you need to spark that sense of possibility in yourselves or maybe pass it on to someone else.

 

So loosen up.  Breathe.  And take advantage of these folks who are spending this time with you today.  And I hope you have fun, and thanks for coming.  And good luck this year in school.  You all take care.  (Applause.)

 

END
11:07 A.M. EDT

 

 

TheObamaCrat™ Wake Up Call

 

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