Enough Is Enough! Secure Justice For Mike Brown & Advance Police Reform.


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Enough is Enough! Secure Justice for Mike Brown & Advance Police Reform

Mothers should never have to fear that our children could come to harm at the hands of those charged with protecting them.  And yet, today’s refusal by a St. Louis County grand jury to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the killing of Mike Brown is an apparent miscarriage of justice. It reinforces the all too familiar narrative of lives cut down by those entrusted with protecting and serving – a story of racial profiling and police brutality.

 

The numbers do not lie:  Black people are three times more likely than White people to be killed when they encounter the police in the US, and Black teenagers are far likelier to be killed by police than White teenagers.

Across the country, we need a higher standards of policing, with strengthened accountability mechanisms, and critical reforms that end biased racial profiling, police brutality, and militarized policing targeting African American and Latino youth, families, and communities.

 

*Join us — and ColorOfChange — in calling on the U.S. Department of Justice to take action by signing on our open letter. Just fill out the form to add your name. You can also add a personal comment using the box provided.

 

Here’s the open letter we’ll send to the Obama administration and US Department of Justice.

 

Dear President Barack Obama and US Attorney General Eric Holder,

 

I urge you to do everything in your power to secure justice for Mike Brown and an end to the nationwide crisis of discriminatory police violence. A St. Louis Grand Jury has refused to indict Officer Darren Wilson who targeted and killed 18-year-old Black teenager, Mike Brown, more than 3 months ago.

 

Numerous eye-witnesses say Mike Brown was brutally murdered — fatally shot more than 6 times as the 18-year-old teenager stood with his hands in the air. His family called it an execution. Now, Missouri Governor Nixon, County Attorney Robert McCulloch, and Missouri law enforcement have failed our country.

 

I call on you to arrest and prosecute Officer Darren Wilson to the fullest extent of federal law, and to defend protesters 1st amendment right to free speech. Unless you take action, Officer Wilson will remain free and law enforcement across the country will be vindicated in their discriminatory and violent targeting of Black Americans.

 

No parent should ever experience the agony of losing a child to discriminatory police violence — only to be denied justice for their devastating loss. But according to FBI statistics, law enforcement kill Black Americans at nearly the same rate of Jim Crow Era lynching. This devastating crisis cannot continue.

 

We are in a historic time; Mike Brown’s death has inspired a powerful, youth led movement to end the nationwide crisis of police brutality and what you do in this moment will have a major impact on the future of racial profiling and police brutality in America. As President and US Attorney General, you have both the power and responsibility to secure justice for Mike Brown and systemic reforms to law enforcement. I urge you to take definitive action to indict Officer Darren Wilson and to overhaul the policies and practices that led to Mike Brown’s death, as well as those that perpetuate the nationwide crisis of discriminatory policing.

 

Sincerely,

[YOUR NAME]

 

BREAKING – No indictment. Enough is enough.

MomsRising.org

Just last Thursday, days before a grand jury failed to indict the killer of 18-year-old Michael Brown and just 6 miles from my home, unarmed Akai Gurley was shot and killed without warning by the New York Police Department. The officer who shot Akai told police officials that he was “nervous.” Akai’s 2-year-old daughter will never see her father again, and neither will his family.

 

Mothers should never have to fear that our loved ones could come to harm at the hands of those charged with protecting them. And yet, the reality is that 18-year-old Michael Brown’s death is just one chapter in the ongoing and growing narrative of lives impacted by racial profiling and police brutality.

 

The numbers don’t lie: Studies show that, even though White Americans outnumber Black Americans fivefold, Black people are three times more likely than White people to be killed when they encounter the police in the US, and Black teenagers are far likelier to be killed by police than White teenagers.

 

*Make your voice heard! In the wake of the failure to indict the police officer who shot and killed unarmed teen Michael Brown, we call on the Department of Justice and President Obama to take definitive action

 

It’s now up to the Department of Justice and President Obama to take definitive action to indict Officer Darren Wilson, as well as to advance higher standards of policing, with strengthened accountability mechanisms, and critical reforms that end racial profiling, police brutality, and militarized policing targeting African American and Latino youth, families, and communities.

 

All over the country, there have been a slew of unarmed African American and Latino youth and parents killed by police, including:

 

  • Eric Garner, husband and father, who was choked to death in New York.
  • John Crawford, who was shot to death when he picked up a toy gun that was for sale in an Ohio Walmart.
  • Seventeen-year-old unarmed Jesús Huerta was shot to death while handcuffed in the back of a police car.
  • Eighteen-year-old unarmed Ramarley Graham who was shot to death in Bronx, NY

 

Racially-motivated police violence has no place in law enforcement. Yet the St. Louis Post Dispatch‘s editorial board found that all too often racial profiling is done by Missouri law enforcement and the stats are getting worse over time. Here’s what the St. Louis Post Dispatch’s editorial board wrote:

 

“Last year, for the 11th time in the 14 years that data has been collected, the disparity index that measures potential racial profiling by law enforcement in the state got worse. Black Missourians were 66 percent more likely in 2013 to be stopped by police, and blacks and Hispanics were both more likely to be searched, even though the likelihood of finding contraband was higher among whites.

 

…In Ferguson, the city where Michael died, the police in 2013 pulled over blacks at a 37 percent higher rate than whites compared to their relative populations. Black drivers were twice as likely to be searched and twice as likely to be arrested compared to white drivers.”

 

Racial profiling and excessive use of force by the police in Missouri, and in other communities across the nation, must end and perpetrators must be held accountable.

 

Enough is enough.

 

At the national level, we need higher standards of policing, strengthened accountability mechanisms, and critical reforms to end: Racial profiling, police brutality, and militarized policing targeting African American and Latino youth, families, and communities throughout our country.

 

*Don’t forget to sign on with us to say: Families call on the U.S. Department of Justice and the Obama administration to take action now: MomsRising.org

 

Together, we are a strong voice for women and families

 

- Monifa, Kristin, Felicia, Nate, Donna, Anita, and the MomsRising Team

 

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ColorOfChange.org: Memo To Reporters Covering The Protests In Ferguson.


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Memo to Reporters Covering the Protests in Ferguson

 

ColorOfChange.org calls for fair and honest media coverage of Michael Brown protests

 

November 24, 2014

For Immediate Release

 

Contact:

 

Madison Donzis, madison@fitzgibbonmedia.com, 210.488.6220

 

CJ Frogozo, cj@fitzgibbonmedia.com, 310.570.2622

 

New York, NY — ColorOfChange.org, the nation’s largest online civil rights organization, is urging both local and national media to be particularly mindful of their coverage of the protests in Ferguson, Missouri and across the country in the wake of the grand jury’s impending decision regarding Officer Darren Wilson.

 

Recognition of the dangers posed by a hostile media climate for Black people is crucial at this very important juncture in our nation’s history. In the wake of yet another young life lost to police violence, hundreds of thousands have taken to the streets to express their outrage and demand better of law enforcement, as well as our justice system. This is a constitutional right. Our media should aid in the protection of those rights, rather than contribute to a racist drumbeat against them.

 

It is also important to recognize how our media impacts the perceptions of its audience. Research shows there are dire consequences when stereotypical images of Black people rule the day; less attention from doctors, harsher sentences from judges, and abusive treatment by police, just to name a few. Rather than feeding into the hostile media climate that contributed to the deaths of Michael Brown, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner, and so many others, we should use this opportunity to forge a fair and humanizing media landscape for Black people.

 

We ask that any journalists reporting on the important events in Ferguson and across the country take the following into consideration:

 

Cultural bias in our media and society persistently excuses the name calling of people of color, resulting in very real, sometimes deadly consequences. We must be vigilant in rooting out the use of coded, racialized language in news coverage. To be clear, the protesters in Ferguson are exercising their constitutional rights. More importantly, they are human beings, not the “thugs,” “rioters,” “criminals,” or “animals” our media has routinely described them as. Yet, when a predominantly white mob erupted into a full scale riot during a pumpkin festival in New Hampshire last month, the media called them “rowdy, mischievous revelers.” The double standard would be laughable if weren’t so incredibly dangerous.

 

Name calling on the part of our news media spinsa narrative of dehumanization and degradation that threatens the lives of communities of color, one not unlike that which led to the Michael Brown and Eric Garner tragedies in the first place. The demonization of Black folks and their allies contributes to a hostile, dangerous media landscape that actually threatens lives.

 

The state violence on display in Ferguson against protesters is inexcusable, and should concern us all. The over-militarized police there waved and pointed guns at protesters and drove through neighborhoods in tanks, unnecessarily heightening an already-tense situation. But too often, journalists and news organizations turn Black communities into enemy combatants in their own neighborhoods by focusing almost exclusively on alleged acts of violence perpetrated by a small minority of protesters, crafting a deceptive narrative that vilifies Black people and their allies, and threatens their lives.

 

Here’s the truth: for years, Department of Defense programs have supplied local law enforcement in places like Ferguson with the same weaponry used by US Armed Forces in war zones. Rather than devoting their energies to building a healthy relationship with the communities they serve, precincts across the country are loading up on armored tanks and tear gas. It’s an incredibly dangerous, unhealthy state of affairs that deserves a prominent place in any substantive conversation about the unrest in Ferguson.

 

Black people are not to blame for police brutality, nor do they deserve it. Yet, media outlets, and talking heads like former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, point to so-called “black-on-black crime” as an excuse for the consequence-less murder of Black people by law enforcement. As Michael Eric Dyson eloquently explained to Mayor Giuliani on Meet the Press last Sunday, the issue at hand is that America has a serious problem with letting white people get away with the murder of Black people, especially agents of the state like Officer Darren Wilson. To somehow point the finger at Black people and blame them for their own oppression and injustice is not a valid critique. Rather, as Dyson asserted, it only exemplifies “the defensive mechanism of white supremacy.”

 

The VAST majority of Ferguson protesters are peaceful. Yet somehow, the stories coming out of many major media outlets paints a picture of total lawlessness, undermining the real work being done on the ground to bring attention to the very legitimate concerns of hundreds of thousands of people. The implication is that these efforts are largely violent, senseless, and deserve to be dealt with harshly. This could not be further from the truth. These stereotypical portrayals of Black people shape perceptions that, when acted upon, can mean real life harm for Black people.

 

Ferguson protesters have taken to the streets to assert that Black lives matter; that Black folks cannot be killed with impunity. The suggestion that these motivations lack legitimacy are unacceptable and contribute to a hostile media climate for Black people.

 

The opinions of protesters, activists, and Michael Brown’s parents matter, too. The situation in Ferguson has ignited an intense, national conversation around a host of very important topics. It is imperative that our news media present fair, even-handed coverage. The marginalization or complete shutting out of the voices and opinions of those sympathetic to the concerns of protestors or victims of police violence is all too common, and totally unacceptable.

 

Structural racism tells the FULL story. Yet, oftentimes our media conversation begins and ends with individual acts of racism, outright dismissals of racism, or the notion that racism now exists in our cultural rearview, and is no longer relevant to today’s world. According to a recent report from Race Forward, the majority of today’s news media is not systemically aware, ignoring or omitting engagement with the policies and practices that lead to the racial disparities at the heart of situations like the one in Ferguson. It is critical that we inject the realities of structural racism into the national conversation, and hold media outlets that refuse to do so accountable.

 

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With over 900,000 members, ColorOfChange.org is the nation’s largest online civil rights organization.

 

Thank you ColorOfChange.org

 

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Two More Black Males Murdered In Three Days By Local PD. Barack Hussein Obama Is Silent As A Church Mouse.


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The MilitantNegro SoapBox™: Why Is OUR President Of The United States Silent On The Black Genocide In AmeriKKKa?

 

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In three times days Mr. Akai Gurley was shot to death as he and his girlfriend of seven years walked up her apartment stairwell in New York City Friday evening…by NYC cops. Mr. Gurley was unarmed. Yesterday young Tamir Rice was gunned down as he sat in a playground swing, because he was playing with an Airsoft toy BB gun. Remember John Crawford? He was murdered for holding a toy BB gun inside a Walmart store. Oh….grandfather Eric Garner was choked to death on a public NY City street, for allegedly selling loose cigarettes…..also unarmed.

 

I can/could do this for days,  listing the entire amount of names of Black males killed by racist hateful law enforcement officers across AmeriKKKa. The list of names is endless. Unarmed Black men and boys. Massacred. Unarmed. Kajieme Powell had a pocket knife and was shot to death in St. Louis by 2 cops at least 25 feet away. Ezell Ford, killed in California, by cops, and of course he was unarmed.

 

Do you remember who James Holmes is? A caucasian boy who walked into a theater in Aurora, Colorado, and slaughtered 12 humans, injured 70 others. He walked out to his car to reload and was taken ALIVE. He was armed to the teeth. Not ONE round fired at him during his capture. NOT ONE.

 

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I have had the unfortunate experience of coming across a few racist dumbasses on social media who have the lamest excuses for why racist killer cops are justified for the Black Genocide that is perpetrated on Americans of Color. By the end of these exchanges, these racist cracka asses are sorry they woke up that morning. Online, as in real life, I am nothing nice when fucked with by idiots.

 

Now onto this guy……..

 

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This is President Barack Hussein Obama. You know him. You Love Him. You Respect Him. At least I used to respect him. He’s not to blame for racist law enforcement on a local level murdering Black males. He is to blame foe standing by and doing nothing. Now I’ve had it explained to me that it was vital The President did nothing to divide the Democratic Party before or during the 2014 mid terms. See, it was told to me that Barack had to unify the party in order for election night victory to be realized. EPIC FAILURE. He lost his ass and still pissed off loyal supporters such as myself, by remaining silent and playing politics with this Black Genocide.

 

A Leader can never afford to turn his/her back on any section of the population, no matter what the time of year happens to be….election time or not. Barack has had more time, and more concern for Syria, Iraq, China, TPP, Keystone XL, anything but Ferguson, NYC, LA, Ohio, Chicago, D.C. (Miriam Carey, remember her?). It seems that our 44th President, being a Black man with Black children, has more important things to consider than the systematic murder of unarmed Black males in HIS America.

 

OK. The mid terms are over and it’s a “safe” time politically. You lost all you could possibly lose on “NO”vember 4th, 2014. So why in hell are you still silent as more young, old, Black males are slaughtered in the streets, on the playgrounds, while shopping in Walmart, walking up a dark stairwell with a girlfriend?

 

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Every week there is a Black male murdered by racist “shoot to kill right now” cops.

 

As We Wait on Ferguson Grand Jury Decision, How Ferguson showed us the truth about police.

 

 

 

Police Are the Problem – Anonymous

 

 

 

Fighting to tell the story in Ferguson

 

 

Barack Obama has remained silent on the fad sweeping the nation, the fad of shooting unarmed Black males, with little or no provocation what so ever. Barack has stood by, busy elsewhere, while Gov. Jay Nixon has mobilized the National Guard, The FBI and tons of local law enforcement agencies, all to “combat” peaceful protesters. Barack is silently watching a Grand Jury take over 100 days to decide if Darren Wilson was justified in shooting unarmed Michael Brown, 6 times…shooting AT Michael Brown at least 10 times….or if Wilson is guilty of unlawfully discharging his service weapon. 

 

Not one word from our President, as American Black males are shot down at least 3 a week, by law enforcement that is charged with serving & protecting. Barack sent Eric Holder, Attorney General at The Department Of Justice, in the days immediately after Michael Brown was murdered by Darren Wilson, to Ferguson…..for a photo-op. The FBI has been on the ground in Ferguson, but this is the same FBI who asked MLK to commit suicide. Not a lot of trust there, now is there?

 

I am disappointed in Barack Hussein Obama and to be honest, the Democratic Party has lost my vote forever. Jay Nixon, the Governor of Missouri, is a Democrat. Barack has failed me on this issue and it’s a very important issue as more unarmed innocent Black males are killed by racist caucasian cops. I no longer support Barack Hussein Obama. No longer care for him or his administration, or his First Family. The First Family are safely behind the White House walls while the rest of Black America are open to instant death at any time of the day.

 

Not being one to ever bite my tongue or hold my words, this administration has been disgraced by this Black Genocide, by Stop & Frisk and by the war on People Of Color. I am ashamed to be an American, and plan to leave & renounce my American citizenship in 2016.

 

I have had enough of The United States of AmeriKKKa. She does not give a fuck about me. Or MY kind.

 

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President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Election Results.


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President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Elections.

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Following Republicans’ big wins in the Senate and House on election night, President Barack Obama and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they would try to avoid the gridlock that has gripped the government lately.

“To everyone that voted — I hear you,” Obama said in news conference Wednesday. “To the two-thirds who didn’t participate, I hear you too.”

 

 

Yesterday, millions of Americans cast their ballots. Republicans had a good night, and I congratulate all the candidates who won.

 

But what stands out to me is that the message Americans sent yesterday is one you’ve sent for several elections in a row now. You expect the people you elect to work as hard as you do. You expect us to focus on your ambitions — not ours — and you want us to get the job done. Period.

 

I plan on spending every moment of the next two years rolling up my sleeves and working as hard as I can for the American people. This country has made real and undeniable progress in the six years since the 2008 economic crisis. But our work will not be done until every single American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most: in your own lives.

 

While I’m sure we’ll continue to disagree on some issues that we’re passionate about, I’m eager to work with Congress over the next two years to get the job done. The challenges that lay ahead of us are far too important to allow partisanship or ideology to prevent our progress as a nation.

 

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As we make progress, I’ll need your help, too. Over the weeks and months ahead, I’ll be looking to Americans like you, asking you to stay engaged.

 

I am optimistic about our future. Because for all the maps plastered across our screens today, for all the cynics who say otherwise, we are more than a simple collection of red and blue states. We are the United States.

 

And yesterday, millions of Americans — Democrats and Republicans, women and men, young and old, black and white — took the time out of their day to perform a simple, profound act of citizenship. That’s something we shouldn’t forget amid the din of political commentary. Because making progress starts with showing up.

 

Let’s get to work.

President Barack Obama

 

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Remarks by the President in a Press Conference

East Room

2:57 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everybody.  Have a seat.

Today, I had a chance to speak with John Boehner and congratulated Mitch McConnell on becoming the next Senate Majority Leader.  And I told them both that I look forward to finishing up this Congress’ business, and then working together for the next two years to advance America’s business.  And I very much appreciated Leader McConnell’s words last night about the prospect of working together to deliver for the American people. On Friday, I look forward to hosting the entire Republican and Democratic leadership at the White House to chart a new course forward.

Obviously, Republicans had a good night, and they deserve credit for running good campaigns.  Beyond that, I’ll leave it to all of you and the professional pundits to pick through yesterday’s results.  What stands out to me, though, is that the American people sent a message, one that they’ve sent for several elections now.  They expect the people they elect to work as hard as they do.  They expect us to focus on their ambitions and not ours.  They want us to get the job done.

All of us, in both parties, have a responsibility to address that sentiment.  Still, as President, I have a unique responsibility to try and make this town work.  So, to everyone who voted, I want you to know that I hear you.  To the two-thirds of voters who chose not to participate in the process yesterday, I hear you, too.  All of us have to give more Americans a reason to feel like the ground is stable beneath their feet, that the future is secure, that there’s a path for young people to succeed, and that folks here in Washington are concerned about them.  So I plan on spending every moment of the next two-plus years doing my job the best I can to keep this country safe and to make sure that more Americans share in its prosperity.

This country has made real progress since the crisis six years ago.  The fact is more Americans are working; unemployment has come down.  More Americans have health insurance.  Manufacturing has grown.  Our deficits have shrunk.  Our dependence on foreign oil is down, as are gas prices.  Our graduation rates are up.  Our businesses aren’t just creating jobs at the fastest pace since the 1990s, our economy is outpacing most of the world.  But we’ve just got to keep at it until every American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most, and that’s in their own lives.

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Obviously, much of that will take action from Congress.  And I’m eager to work with the new Congress to make the next two years as productive as possible.  I’m committed to making sure that I measure ideas not by whether they are from Democrats or Republicans, but whether they work for the American people.  And that’s not to say that we won’t disagree over some issues that we’re passionate about.  We will.  Congress will pass some bills I cannot sign.  I’m pretty sure I’ll take some actions that some in Congress will not like.  That’s natural.  That’s how our democracy works.  But we can surely find ways to work together on issues where there’s broad agreement among the American people.

So I look forward to Republicans putting forward their governing agenda.  I will offer my ideas on areas where I think we can move together to respond to people’s economic needs.

So, just take one example.  We all agree on the need to create more jobs that pay well.  Traditionally, both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure — our roads, bridges, ports, waterways.  I think we can hone in on a way to pay for it through tax reform that closes loopholes and makes it more attractive for companies to create jobs here in the United States.

We can also work together to grow our exports and open new markets for our manufacturers to sell more American-made goods to the rest of the world.  That’s something I’ll be focused on when I travel to Asia next week.

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We all share the same aspirations for our young people.  And I was encouraged that this year Republicans agreed to investments that expanded early childhood education.  I think we’ve got a chance to do more on that front.  We’ve got some common ideas to help more young people afford college and graduate without crippling debt so that they have the freedom to fill the good jobs of tomorrow and buy their first homes and start a family.

And in the five states where a minimum wage increase was on the ballot last night, voters went five for five to increase it. That will give about 325,000 Americans a raise in states where Republican candidates prevailed.  So that should give us new reason to get it done for everybody, with a national increase in the minimum wage.

So those are some areas where I think we’ve got some real opportunities to cooperate.  And I am very eager to hear Republican ideas for what they think we can do together over the next couple of years.  Of course, there’s still business on the docket that needs attention this year.  And here are three places where I think we can work together over the next several weeks, before this Congress wraps up for the holidays.

First, I’m submitting a request to Congress for funding to ensure that our doctors, scientists, and troops have the resources that they need to combat the spread of Ebola in Africa and to increase our preparedness for any future cases here at home.

Second, I’m going to begin engaging Congress over a new Authorization to Use Military Force against ISIL.  The world needs to know we are united behind this effort, and the men and women of our military deserve our clear and unified support.

Third, back in September, Congress passed short-term legislation to keep the government open and operating into December.  That gives Congress five weeks to pass a budget for the rest of the fiscal year.  And I hope that they’ll do it in the same bipartisan, drama-free way that they did earlier this year.  When our companies are steadily creating jobs — which they are — we don’t want to inject any new uncertainty into the world economy and to the American economy.

The point is it’s time for us to take care of business.  There are things this country has to do that can’t wait another two years or another four years.  There are plans this country has to put in place for our future.

And the truth is I’m optimistic about our future.  I have good reason to be.  I meet Americans all across the country who are determined, and big-hearted, and ask what they can do, and never give up, and overcome obstacles.  And they inspire me every single day.  So the fact is I still believe in what I said when I was first elected six years ago last night.  For all the maps plastered across our TV screens today, and for all the cynics who say otherwise, I continue to believe we are simply more than just a collection of red and blue states.  We are the United States.

And whether it’s immigration or climate change, or making sure our kids are going to the best possible schools, to making sure that our communities are creating jobs; whether it’s stopping the spread of terror and disease, to opening up doors of opportunity to everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility — the United States has big things to do.  We can and we will make progress if we do it together.  And I look forward to the work ahead.

So, with that, let me take some questions.  I think that our team has got my list.  And we’re going to start with Julie Pace at Associated Press.

 

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The question & answer session can be found here: Press Conference Q & A

 

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The Day After The Last 24™: Complete 2014 Mid Term Election Results

 

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Ferguson To Geneva.


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#FERGUSONTOGENEVA

 

Police Violence In America Is A Human Rights Issue. Ferguson Is An Example. Ferguson To Geneva Is Part Of The Solution.

 

THE GOAL

We are ready to take our case before the global community.

In the absence of justice from the local, state, and federal government, the family of Michael Brown and Ferguson protesters are ready to take our case before the global community. We have submitted a brief to the United Nations (UN), and we will formally present it on November 12th and 13th in Geneva, Switzerland. The goal is not only to achieve justice in Ferguson, but to unite governments around the world against the human rights violations that result from racial profiling and police violence.

 

HOW YOU CAN HELP

The #FergusonToGeneva contingent is comprised of:

 

The remaining cost of this trip for the contingent is $11,000, which includes airfare, room and board, and per diem from November 9-14th.

 

Please donate directly via PayPal here:

 

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Read The Full Report Here: Written Statement On The Execution Of Michael Brown By Ferguson PD

 

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COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS


Notice of Public Meeting of the Missouri Advisory Committee for a 
Meeting on a Project Proposal on Civil Rights and Law Enforcement in 
Missouri

AGENCY: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

ACTION: Notice of meeting.

 

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the 
rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights 
(Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act that the Missouri 
Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a meeting on Monday, November 
17, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. for the purpose of discussing and voting on a 
project proposal on civil rights and law enforcement in Missouri. The 
proposal arose in the aftermath of recent events in Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Members of the public can listen to the discussion. This meeting is 
available to the public through the following toll-free call-in number: 
888-539-3696, conference ID: 6728111. Any interested member of the 
public may call this number and listen to the meeting. Callers can 
expect to incur charges for calls they initiate over wireless lines, 
and the Commission will not refund any incurred charges. Callers will 
incur no charge for calls they initiate over land-line connections to the 
toll free telephone number. Persons with hearing impairments may also follow
 the proceedingsby first calling the Federal Relay Service at 1-800-977-8339
 and providing the Service with the conference call number and conference ID number.


Members of the public are also entitled to submit written comments; 
the comments must be received in the regional office by December 17, 
2014. Written comments may be mailed to the Midwestern Regional Office, 
U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 55 W. Monroe St., Suite 410, Chicago, 
IL 60615. They may also be faxed to the Commission at (312) 353-8324, 
or emailed to Administrative Assistant, Carolyn Allen at 
callen@usccr.gov. Persons who desire additional information may contact 
the Midwestern Regional Office at (312) 353-8311.

 

Records generated from this meeting may be inspected and reproduced 
at the Midwestern Regional Office, as they become available, both 
before and after the meeting. Records of the meeting will be available 
via www.facadatabase.gov under the Commission on Civil Rights, Missouri 
Advisory Committee link. Persons interested in the work of this 
Committee are directed to the Commission's Web site, 
http://www.usccr.gov, or may contact the Midwestern Regional Office at the 
above email or street address.

 

Agenda

Welcome

12:00 p.m. to 12:05 p.m.
    S. David Mitchell, Chairman, Missouri Advisory Committee

Presentation of Project Proposal on Civil Rights and Law Enforcement in 
Missouri

12:05 p.m. to 12:20 p.m.
    Melissa Wojnaroski, Civil Rights Analyst, USCCR

Deliberation and Vote on Proposal

12:20 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
    Missouri Advisory Committee

Planning Next Steps

12:45 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Adjournment

1:00 p.m.

DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, November 17, 2014, at 12:00 
p.m. CST.
 Public Call Information: Dial: 888-539-3696, Conference ID: 
6728111.

    Dated: October 30, 2014.
David Mussatt,
 Chief, Regional Programs Unit.
[FR Doc. 2014-26147 Filed 11-3-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6335-01-P

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