Does Immigration Matter? It’s A “Big Fuckin Deal.”


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President Barack Obama signs two presidential memoranda associated with his actions on immigration in his office on Air Force One as he arrives at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas

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President Obama Speaks on Immigration at Del Sol High School

 

Published on Nov 21, 2014

On November 21, 2014, President Obama followed up on his new steps to fix our broken immigration system at Del Sol high School in Las Vegas, Nevada.

 

 

 

The President Speaks on Fixing America‘s Broken Immigration System

November 20, 2014 | 15:05 | Public Domain

In an address to the nation, President Obama lays out the executive action he’s taking to fix our nation’s broken immigration system.

 

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes Video: 100 Minutes: Countdown to a Presidential Address

 

November 21, 2014 | 3:12 | Public Domain

Go inside the mind of the President in the final moments before he addresses the nation on the action he chose to take to fix our broken immigration system. http://www.whitehouse.gov/immigration-action

 

 

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It’s A “Big Fuckin Deal.”

 

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Weekly Address: Immigration Accountability Executive Action

 

Published on Nov 22, 2014

In this week’s address, the President laid out the steps he took this past week to fix our broken immigration system. Enacted within his legal authority, the President’s plan focuses on cracking down on illegal immigration at the border; deporting felons, not families; and accountability through criminal background checks and taxes.

 

 

 

Mensaje De La Casa Blanca

 

Published on Nov 22, 2014

En el mensaje de la Casa Blanca de esta semana, Denis McDonough, Jefe de Estado de la Casa Blanca expuso las medidas que el Presidente tomó la semana pasada para arreglar nuestro sistema de inmigración que no funciona. Promulgada dentro de sus facultades legales, el plan del Presidente se centra en tomar medidas enérgicas contra la inmigración ilegal en la frontera; la deportación de criminales, no las familias; y la rendición de cuentas a través de la verificación de antecedentes penales y de los impuestos. Estos son pasos de sentido común, pero sólo el Congreso puede terminar el trabajo. Como actúa el Presidente, que continuará trabajando con el Congreso en un proyecto de ley bipartidista integral – como lo que el Senado aprobó hace más de un año – que puede sustituir a estas acciones y fijar el conjunto del sistema

 

 

 

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West Wing Week: 11/21/14 or, “Mingalarbar!”

November 21, 2014 | 5:04 | Public Domain

This week, the President visited Burma for the second time in his presidency, attended the G20 Summit in Australia, worked to expand access to broadband and 21st century technology in our schools, and addressed the nation about the steps he is taking to fix our broken immigration system. That’s November 14th to November 20th or, “Mingalarbar!”

 

 

 

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Obama’s Action Marks Historic Victory for Immigrant Rights, But Activists Warn of a Long Way to Go

 

 

 

How immigrants are reacting to Obama’s action

 

 

 

Defending President Obama – Nancy Pelosi – La Raza- Luis Gutierrez – MSNBC – O’Reilly

 

 

 

House GOP sues White House over Obamacare

 

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Published on Nov 21, 2014

Republicans in the House of Representatives have sued the White House over Obamacare

 

 

 

Boehner on Obama’s Immigration Action: ‘The House Will Act’

 

 

 

Boehner: Obama ‘Damaging the Presidency’

 

 

 

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The Last 24™


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Obama to announce immigration executive action

 

 

Tune In: The President Addresses the Nation on Immigration Reform

 

Our immigration system has been broken for decades — and every minute we fail to act, millions of people who live in the shadows but want to play by the rules and pay taxes have no way to live right by the law and contribute to our country.

 

So tomorrow night, President Obama will address the nation to lay out the executive actions he’s taking to fix our broken immigration system. You can watch the President live tomorrow night at 8 p.m. ET at WhiteHouse.gov/Live.

 

 

We Were Strangers Once, Too”: The President Announces New Steps on Immigration

 

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The President Speaks on Fixing America’s Broken Immigration System

 

Published on Nov 20, 2014

In an address to the nation, President Obama lays out the executive action he’s taking to fix our nation’s broken immigration system, November 20, 2014.

 

 

“Scripture tells us that we shall not oppress a stranger, for we know the heart of a stranger — we were strangers once, too. My fellow Americans, we are and always will be a nation of immigrants. We were strangers once, too.”

– President Obama, November 20, 2014

 

Since the founding of our nation, we’ve weaved a tradition of welcoming immigrants into the very fabric of who we are. It’s what keeps us dynamic, entrepreneurial, and uniquely American.

But, as we know all too well, America’s immigration system is broken. So tonight, President Obama addressed the nation on the executive actions he is taking to help fix what he can:

 

1. We will build on our progress at the border with additional resources for our law enforcement personnel. 

Today, we have more agents and technology deployed to secure our southern border than at any time in our history. And over the past six years, illegal border crossings have been cut by more than half. Although this summer, there was a brief spike in unaccompanied children being apprehended at our border, the number of such children is now actually lower than it’s been in nearly two years. Overall, the number of people trying to cross our border illegally is at its lowest level since the 1970s.  Those are the facts.

 

2. We will make it easier and faster for high-skilled immigrants, graduates, and entrepreneurs to stay and contribute to our economy, as so many business leaders have proposed. 

 

3. We will take steps to deal responsibly with the millions of undocumented immigrants who already live in our country.

 

Families who enter our country the right way and play by the rules watch others flout the rules. Business owners who offer their workers good wages and benefits see the competition exploit undocumented immigrants by paying them far less. All of us take offense to anyone who reaps the rewards of living in America without taking on the responsibilities of living in America. And undocumented immigrants who desperately want to embrace those responsibilities see little option but to remain in the shadows, or risk their families being torn apart.

 

We are a nation of immigrants, and we are a nation of laws. We must hold accountable those who broke the law, while understanding that the mass deportation of millions of Americans is neither possible nor in keeping with who we are as Americans. That is why the President is focusing enforcement resources on actual threats to our security: “Felons, not families. Criminals, not children. Gang members, not a mom who’s working hard to provide for her kids.”

 

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“I continue to believe that the best way to solve this problem is by working together to pass that kind of common-sense law.”

 


 

So here is the deal the President put forward tonight:

 

If you’ve been in America for more than five years; if you have children who are American citizens or legal residents; if you register, pass a criminal background check, and you’re willing to pay your fair share of taxes — you’ll be able to apply to stay in this country temporarily, without fear of deportation. You can come out of the shadows and get right with the law.

 

Here is what this deal is not: Amnesty. Amnesty is the immigration system we have now, in which millions of people live here without paying their taxes or playing by the rules, and politicians use this issue to scare and divide Americans.

 

That’s the real amnesty — leaving this broken system the way it is. Mass amnesty would be unfair. Mass deportation would be both impossible and contrary to our character. What I’m describing is accountability — a common-sense, middle ground approach: If you meet the criteria, you can come out of the shadows and get right with the law. If you’re a criminal, you’ll be deported. If you plan to enter the U.S. illegally, your chances of getting caught and sent back just went up.

 

The best and most definitive way to fix the system is to pass comprehensive and common-sense immigration reform in Congress. Last year, 68 Democrats, Republicans, and independents in the Senate came together to do just that. That bipartisan bill would have doubled the number of Border Patrol agents; given undocumented immigrants a pathway to citizenship if they pay a fine, start paying taxes, and go to the back of the line; and boosted our economy while shrinking the deficit.

 


“What makes us Americans is our shared commitment to an ideal — that all of us are created equal, and all of us have the chance to make of our lives what we will.”


 

But more than 500 days later, Republicans in the House continue to block the bipartisan bill from a vote. “Had the House of Representatives allowed that kind of a bill a simple yes-or-no vote, it would have passed with support from both parties, and today it would be the law,” the President noted.

 

So the President had to act, just as every president since President Eisenhower has over this last half century.

 

To those Members of Congress who question my authority to make our immigration system work better, or question the wisdom of me acting where Congress has failed, I have one answer: Pass a bill.

 

At the heart of the President’s actions is a commitment to who we are as a nation. We are a nation that values families and works together to keep them together. We are a nation that educates the world’s best and brightest, and encourages them to stay and create jobs here.

 

 

We are a nation that welcomes the tired, the poor, and the huddled weary who yearn to breathe free and build a better life for their children.

 

As the President said:

 

Scripture tells us that we shall not oppress a stranger, for we know the heart of a stranger — we were strangers once, too.

 

My fellow Americans, we are and always will be a nation of immigrants. We were strangers once, too. And whether our forebears were strangers who crossed the Atlantic, or the Pacific, or the Rio Grande, we are here only because this country welcomed them in, and taught them that to be an American is about something more than what we look like, or what our last names are, or how we worship.  What makes us Americans is our shared commitment to an ideal – that all of us are created equal, and all of us have the chance to make of our lives what we will.

 

 

American Immigration Rejoice

 

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Read more about the details of the President’s actions at WhiteHouse.gov/Immigration-Action.

 

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Here’s What the President Is Doing to Fix Our Broken Immigration System:

 

Tonight at 8 p.m. ET, the President will address the nation on the new steps he’s taking to increase accountability and fix what he can in our immigration system. You can watch his address live here.

 

As everyone knows, our immigration system has been broken for decades, and the President is doing his job to address the problems that he can with his executive authority. He will continue to work with Congress to pass comprehensive and common-sense immigration reform that will offer a long-term and much-needed solution.

 

So what exactly is the President’s plan for immigration? Take a look at what the President plans to do:

 

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Every U.S. president since President Eisenhower has used his executive authority to address immigration issues. However, President Obama cannot fix the system on his own — Congress must pass comprehensive immigration reform in order to enact a long-term solution. The U.S. Senate passed a bipartisan immigration bill more than 500 days ago, but House Republicans are still refusing to bring it up for a vote.

 

The President is doing his job, and it’s time for Republicans in Congress to do theirs so we can build a system that lives up to our history as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants.

 

To learn more about the President’s actions, watch his address live tonight at 8 p.m. ET here: WhiteHouse.gov/Immigration-Action

 

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The President Awards the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation

 

November 20, 2014 | 29:37 | Public Domain

President Obama delivers remarks at the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation awards ceremony.

 

 

 

President Obama Honors America’s Top Scientists and Engineers, Launches New Steps to Cultivate Tomorrow’s Innovators

 

Today, in the East Room of the White House, President Obama awarded National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation to 19 of our nation’s top thinkers, discoverers, and innovators — marveling both at the amount of brainpower packed into the room and the magnitude of the laureates’ achievements.

“The results of the work of the people we honor today have transformed our world,”President Obama said.

 

The medals are the nation’s highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology. This year’s class of laureates includes individuals with groundbreaking accomplishments that have improved lives and pushed forward the boundaries of human understanding — from contributions including the commercialization of thumb drives and invention of minimally invasive medical devices, to new insights about insect-plant interactions and how heart valves operate, to the fundamental research that has made HPV vaccines a reality.

In remarks honoring the awardees, President Obama noted that to continue this legacy of scientific discovery and technological innovation, we must do all that we can to lift our game in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education:

We have to remind ourselves constantly that so much of what has set us apart economically, culturally, is our commitment to science. And we have to continue to broaden opportunities for young scientists, especially girls and minority students, to enter into the field, and we have to remind them of how exciting it is to be able to shape the world, unlock its secrets, make new stuff. That’s who we are.

President Barack Obama presents the National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Eli Harari, SanDisk Corporation, Calif. in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama presents the National Medal of Technology and Innovation to Eli Harari, SanDisk Corporation, Calif. in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

At today’s ceremony, the President announced a series of important new commitments and announcements to advance his Educate to Innovate initiative, an all-hands-on-deck campaign to help more girls and boys be inspired to excel in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) subjects. The campaign reflects the President’s core conviction that far more needs to be done in giving students the critical skills needed to succeed in STEM fields, and that success requires action not just from the federal government, but also the broader community of educational leaders, foundations, companies, non-profits, and science and technology professionals. Steps announced by the President and Educate to Innovate partners today include:

  • 100kin10, a network of more than 200 partners, announced that it has raised another $28 million in support of the goal of preparing 100,000 excellent STEM teachers over a decade.
  • Change the Equation, a coalition of leading CEOs, committed to expanding high-quality STEM programs to more than 1 million students by 2016.
  • Discovery Communications will launch a new show next year to inspire students in STEM fields, highlighting “All-American Makers.”
  • Ongoing progress from a range of partners, with full details here.

Noting the achievements of today’s medalists and the promise and potential of a new generation of scientific discoverers, explorers, builders, and makers, President Obama remarked:

That’s one of the things that makes America exceptional — this sense that we push against limits and that we’re not afraid to ask questions. And when that spirit, that sense of possibility, is truly unleashed, then you get the remarkable men and women that you see here today.

The White House warmly congratulates all of today’s National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation laureates. Tomorrow’s laureates are sitting in classrooms across the country today, and the world awaits the incredible discoveries and inventions to come.

President Barack Obama presents the National Medal of Science posthumously to David Blackwell, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

President Barack Obama presents the National Medal of Science posthumously to David Blackwell, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

 

November 20th 2014: Photo of the Day

 

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama have lunch with youth from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at We The Pizza/Good Stuff Eatery in Washington, D.C., Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama have lunch with youth from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at We The Pizza/Good Stuff Eatery in Washington, D.C., Nov. 20, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

Speeches and Remarks

 

Remarks by the President in Address to the Nation on Immigration

 

Remarks by Vice President Joe Biden to the Global Entrepreneurship Summit

 

Remarks by the President at National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation Award Ceremony

 

 

Statements and Releases

 

Readout of the Vice President’s Call with Latvian Prime Minister Laimdota Straujuma

 

President Obama Presents the National Medals of Science & National Medals of Technology and Innovation

 

FACT SHEET: Global Entrepreneurship Summit

 

 

Travel Journal of the Vice President’s Trip to Morocco, Ukraine, Turkey

November 20, 2014     Dates and Milk Welcome Vice President and Dr. Biden to Morocco

November 20, 2014 Dates and Milk Welcome Vice President and Dr. Biden to Morocco

Welcome to your one-stop shop for everything you need to know about Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden’s three-country, five-day visit to Morocco, Ukraine, and Turkey.

 

The first stop on the Vice President and Dr. Biden’s three-country trip was Morocco. The Vice President and Dr. Biden’s visit started on a sweet note, as they were greeted at the airport with dates and milk, a traditional Moroccan welcome.

 

Morocco has a special place in the history and hearts of Americans because it was the first nation in the world to recognize the United States nearly 237 years ago. The Vice President’s visit, the first by a sitting U.S. Vice President in decades, marked the latest chapter in a long and storied friendship.

 

After arriving, the Vice President met with His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco. The two reaffirmed our countries’ alliance and enduring friendship. The Vice President and King discussed a range of issues, including:

 

  • Achieving a secure, stable, and prosperous Magreb, Africa, and Middle East
  • The two countries’ efforts together as part of the international coalition against ISIL
  • Non-military aspects to combat violent extremism
  • Morocco’s important role as a gateway for trade and investment in sub-Saharan Africa.

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On Thursday, the Vice President addressed the Global Entrepreneurship Summit, an annual gathering of entrepreneurs and business, government, and thought leaders.

In his remarks, the Vice President announced that the U.S. government has committed to a bold new goal to expand economic opportunity by sparking $1 billion in new private investments for entrepreneurs worldwide. In fact, half of these investments will be generated by women and young entrepreneurs.

 

“When I travel the region and the entire world, I see young people with limitless promise to make not only their countries but the whole world better…That is the reality. That’s the world we live in,” Vice President Biden said.

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Next stop on the trip: Kyiv, Ukraine. Stay tuned for more updates from the road.

 

In the afternoon, the Vice President and Dr. Biden will depart Marrakech en route Kyiv, Ukraine.

 

Friday, November 21st

In the morning, the Vice President will hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk at the Cabinet of Ministers Club.  In the afternoon, the Vice President will attend a working lunch with President Poroshenko at the House of Chimeras. Following their lunch, the Vice President and President Poroshenko will deliver a joint statement to the press at the Presidential Administration Building.

Afterwards, the Vice President will attend a roundtable discussion on anti-corruption efforts. In the evening, the Vice President and Dr. Biden will depart Kyiv en route Istanbul, Turkey.

Later in the evening, the Vice President will attend a working dinner with Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu.

 

 

Saturday, November 22nd

In the morning, the Vice President will deliver remarks and participate in a moderated discussion with the Atlantic Council Energy Conference.

Afterwards, the Vice President will attend a meeting of the National Democratic Institute “Checks and Balances Networ.”

Later, the Vice President will attend a working lunch with President Erdogan at the Beylerbeyi Palace.

 

 

Sunday, November 23rd

In the morning, the Vice President will meet with His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.

In the afternoon, the Vice President and Dr. Biden will depart Istanbul en route Washington, DC.

 

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President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Election Results.


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President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Elections.

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Following Republicans’ big wins in the Senate and House on election night, President Barack Obama and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they would try to avoid the gridlock that has gripped the government lately.

“To everyone that voted — I hear you,” Obama said in news conference Wednesday. “To the two-thirds who didn’t participate, I hear you too.”

 

 

Yesterday, millions of Americans cast their ballots. Republicans had a good night, and I congratulate all the candidates who won.

 

But what stands out to me is that the message Americans sent yesterday is one you’ve sent for several elections in a row now. You expect the people you elect to work as hard as you do. You expect us to focus on your ambitions — not ours — and you want us to get the job done. Period.

 

I plan on spending every moment of the next two years rolling up my sleeves and working as hard as I can for the American people. This country has made real and undeniable progress in the six years since the 2008 economic crisis. But our work will not be done until every single American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most: in your own lives.

 

While I’m sure we’ll continue to disagree on some issues that we’re passionate about, I’m eager to work with Congress over the next two years to get the job done. The challenges that lay ahead of us are far too important to allow partisanship or ideology to prevent our progress as a nation.

 

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As we make progress, I’ll need your help, too. Over the weeks and months ahead, I’ll be looking to Americans like you, asking you to stay engaged.

 

I am optimistic about our future. Because for all the maps plastered across our screens today, for all the cynics who say otherwise, we are more than a simple collection of red and blue states. We are the United States.

 

And yesterday, millions of Americans — Democrats and Republicans, women and men, young and old, black and white — took the time out of their day to perform a simple, profound act of citizenship. That’s something we shouldn’t forget amid the din of political commentary. Because making progress starts with showing up.

 

Let’s get to work.

President Barack Obama

 

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Remarks by the President in a Press Conference

East Room

2:57 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everybody.  Have a seat.

Today, I had a chance to speak with John Boehner and congratulated Mitch McConnell on becoming the next Senate Majority Leader.  And I told them both that I look forward to finishing up this Congress’ business, and then working together for the next two years to advance America’s business.  And I very much appreciated Leader McConnell’s words last night about the prospect of working together to deliver for the American people. On Friday, I look forward to hosting the entire Republican and Democratic leadership at the White House to chart a new course forward.

Obviously, Republicans had a good night, and they deserve credit for running good campaigns.  Beyond that, I’ll leave it to all of you and the professional pundits to pick through yesterday’s results.  What stands out to me, though, is that the American people sent a message, one that they’ve sent for several elections now.  They expect the people they elect to work as hard as they do.  They expect us to focus on their ambitions and not ours.  They want us to get the job done.

All of us, in both parties, have a responsibility to address that sentiment.  Still, as President, I have a unique responsibility to try and make this town work.  So, to everyone who voted, I want you to know that I hear you.  To the two-thirds of voters who chose not to participate in the process yesterday, I hear you, too.  All of us have to give more Americans a reason to feel like the ground is stable beneath their feet, that the future is secure, that there’s a path for young people to succeed, and that folks here in Washington are concerned about them.  So I plan on spending every moment of the next two-plus years doing my job the best I can to keep this country safe and to make sure that more Americans share in its prosperity.

This country has made real progress since the crisis six years ago.  The fact is more Americans are working; unemployment has come down.  More Americans have health insurance.  Manufacturing has grown.  Our deficits have shrunk.  Our dependence on foreign oil is down, as are gas prices.  Our graduation rates are up.  Our businesses aren’t just creating jobs at the fastest pace since the 1990s, our economy is outpacing most of the world.  But we’ve just got to keep at it until every American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most, and that’s in their own lives.

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Obviously, much of that will take action from Congress.  And I’m eager to work with the new Congress to make the next two years as productive as possible.  I’m committed to making sure that I measure ideas not by whether they are from Democrats or Republicans, but whether they work for the American people.  And that’s not to say that we won’t disagree over some issues that we’re passionate about.  We will.  Congress will pass some bills I cannot sign.  I’m pretty sure I’ll take some actions that some in Congress will not like.  That’s natural.  That’s how our democracy works.  But we can surely find ways to work together on issues where there’s broad agreement among the American people.

So I look forward to Republicans putting forward their governing agenda.  I will offer my ideas on areas where I think we can move together to respond to people’s economic needs.

So, just take one example.  We all agree on the need to create more jobs that pay well.  Traditionally, both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure — our roads, bridges, ports, waterways.  I think we can hone in on a way to pay for it through tax reform that closes loopholes and makes it more attractive for companies to create jobs here in the United States.

We can also work together to grow our exports and open new markets for our manufacturers to sell more American-made goods to the rest of the world.  That’s something I’ll be focused on when I travel to Asia next week.

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We all share the same aspirations for our young people.  And I was encouraged that this year Republicans agreed to investments that expanded early childhood education.  I think we’ve got a chance to do more on that front.  We’ve got some common ideas to help more young people afford college and graduate without crippling debt so that they have the freedom to fill the good jobs of tomorrow and buy their first homes and start a family.

And in the five states where a minimum wage increase was on the ballot last night, voters went five for five to increase it. That will give about 325,000 Americans a raise in states where Republican candidates prevailed.  So that should give us new reason to get it done for everybody, with a national increase in the minimum wage.

So those are some areas where I think we’ve got some real opportunities to cooperate.  And I am very eager to hear Republican ideas for what they think we can do together over the next couple of years.  Of course, there’s still business on the docket that needs attention this year.  And here are three places where I think we can work together over the next several weeks, before this Congress wraps up for the holidays.

First, I’m submitting a request to Congress for funding to ensure that our doctors, scientists, and troops have the resources that they need to combat the spread of Ebola in Africa and to increase our preparedness for any future cases here at home.

Second, I’m going to begin engaging Congress over a new Authorization to Use Military Force against ISIL.  The world needs to know we are united behind this effort, and the men and women of our military deserve our clear and unified support.

Third, back in September, Congress passed short-term legislation to keep the government open and operating into December.  That gives Congress five weeks to pass a budget for the rest of the fiscal year.  And I hope that they’ll do it in the same bipartisan, drama-free way that they did earlier this year.  When our companies are steadily creating jobs — which they are — we don’t want to inject any new uncertainty into the world economy and to the American economy.

The point is it’s time for us to take care of business.  There are things this country has to do that can’t wait another two years or another four years.  There are plans this country has to put in place for our future.

And the truth is I’m optimistic about our future.  I have good reason to be.  I meet Americans all across the country who are determined, and big-hearted, and ask what they can do, and never give up, and overcome obstacles.  And they inspire me every single day.  So the fact is I still believe in what I said when I was first elected six years ago last night.  For all the maps plastered across our TV screens today, and for all the cynics who say otherwise, I continue to believe we are simply more than just a collection of red and blue states.  We are the United States.

And whether it’s immigration or climate change, or making sure our kids are going to the best possible schools, to making sure that our communities are creating jobs; whether it’s stopping the spread of terror and disease, to opening up doors of opportunity to everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility — the United States has big things to do.  We can and we will make progress if we do it together.  And I look forward to the work ahead.

So, with that, let me take some questions.  I think that our team has got my list.  And we’re going to start with Julie Pace at Associated Press.

 

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The question & answer session can be found here: Press Conference Q & A

 

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The Day After The Last 24™: Complete 2014 Mid Term Election Results

 

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The Day After The Last 24™


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Election Results

Last updated Nov 5 at 4:14 AM

 

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From Reuters:

 

Tough road ahead for Obama after Republicans seize Senate

 

BY STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES

 

(Reuters) – Republicans rode a wave of voter discontent to seize control of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, dealing a punishing blow to President Barack Obama that will limit his legislative agenda and may force him to make a course correction for his last two years in office.

 

The Republican rout was wide and deep in what was bound to be seen as a sharp rebuke to Obama, who has lurched from crisis to crisis all year and whose unpopularity made him unwelcome to Democratic candidates in many contested states.

 

The Republicans also strengthened their grip on the House of Representatives. When the new Congress takes power in January, they will be in charge of both chambers of Congress for the first time since elections in 2006.

 

The Republican takeover in the Senate will force Obama to scale back his ambitions to either executive actions that do not require legislative approval, or items that might gain bipartisan support, such as trade agreements and tax reform.

 

It will also test his ability to compromise with newly empowered political opponents who have been resisting his legislative agenda since he was first elected. And it could prompt some White House staff turnover as some exhausted members of his team consider departing in favor of fresh legs.

 

Obama, first elected in 2008 and again in 2012, called Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress to the White House on Friday to take stock of the new political landscape.

 

He watched election returns from the White House, and saw little to warm his spirits.

 

Before the election results, the White House had signaled no major changes for Obama. Officials said Obama would seek common ground with Congress on areas like trade and infrastructure.

 

“The president is going to continue to look for partners on Capitol Hill, Democrats or Republicans, who are willing to work with him on policies that benefit middle-class families,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday.

 

Obama, a one-term senator before he became president, has often been faulted for not developing closer relations with lawmakers.

 

He will find one familiar face in a powerful new position.

 

Republican Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who won a tough re-election battle against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, will replace Democrat Harry Reid as Senate majority leader. Reid has been one of Obama’s top political allies and helped him steer the president’s signature healthcare law through the Senate in 2010.

 

“Some things don’t change after tonight. I don’t expect the president to wake up tomorrow and view the world any differently than he did when he woke up this morning. He knows I won’t either. But we do have an obligation to work together on issues where we can agree,” McConnell said in his victory speech in Louisville.

 

TOSS-UPS BECOME REPUBLICAN WINS

In Tuesday’s comprehensive rout, Republicans won in places where Democrats were favored, taking a Senate race in North Carolina, pulled out victories where the going was tough, like a Senate battle in Kansas, and swept a number of governors’ races in states where Democrats were favored, including Obama’s home state of Illinois.

 

Of eight to 10 Senate seats that were considered toss-ups, Republicans won nearly all of them. They needed six seats to win control of the 100-member Senate, and by late evening they had seven.

 

The winning margin came when Iowa Republican Joni Ernst was declared the winner over Democrat Bruce Braley and Republican Thom Tillis defeated incumbent Democratic Senator Kay Hagan in North Carolina.

 

The Iowa race was particularly indicative of Republican fortunes. Ernst came from behind and surged in recent weeks despite herculean efforts by powerful Democratic figures to save Braley, including a campaign visit by Obama’s wife, Michelle.

 

Republican Senate candidates also picked up Democratic seats in Montana, Colorado, West Virginia, South Dakota and Arkansas.

 

‘RESPONSIBILITY … TO LEAD’

Once the euphoria of their victory ebbs, Republicans will be under pressure to show Americans they are capable of governing after drawing scorn a year ago for shutting down the government in a budget fight. That will be a factor in their ambitions to take back the White House in 2016.

 

Republican Senator Ted Cruz, a conservative firebrand who may run in 2016, told CNN: “The American people, they’re frustrated with what’s happening in Washington, but now the responsibility falls on us to lead.”

 

While there was talk of conciliation, no major breakthrough in Washington’s chilly climate is expected soon.

 

Partisan battles could erupt over immigration reform, with Obama poised to issue executive actions by year’s end to defer deportations of some undocumented immigrants, and over energy policy, as Republican press the president to approve the Keystone XL pipeline carrying oil from Canada.

 

Jay Carney, Obama’s former spokesman, said he expects Obama to make an “all-out push” on his priorities regardless of the makeup of Congress.

 

Whatever the case, Obama will face pressure to make changes at the White House. A Reuters/Ipsos poll showed 75 percent of respondents believe the administration needs to “rethink” how it approaches major issues facing the United States (bit.ly/1ph8sLs). Sixty-four percent said Obama should replace some of his senior staff after the election.

 

The Republican victory had been widely predicted ahead of Tuesday’s voting to elect 36 senators, 36 state governors and all 435 members of the House of Representatives.

 

Obama and other White House officials blamed the electoral map – noting that many key Senate races took place in conservative states that Obama lost in 2012.

 

Election Day polling by Reuters/Ipsos found a dour mood among the electorate with less than one-third of voters believing the country is headed in the right direction.

 

Roughly 40 percent of voters said they approved of the job Obama is doing as president, though they were split over whether they expected the economy to improve or worsen in the coming year.

 

In a consolation for Democrats, Jeanne Shaheen won re-election over Republican Scott Brown in New Hampshire in what polls had forecast as a tight race.

 

In Virginia, heavily favored Democratic incumbent Senator Mark Warner found himself in a surprisingly close fight against Republican challenger Ed Gillespie, with much of the vote counted. By late evening, he claimed victory but Gillespie had not yet conceded.

 

In the most closely watched governors’ races, Florida’s Republican Governor Rick Scott edged out Democrat Charlie Crist, and Republican Scott Walker survived a challenge from Democrat Mary Burke in Wisconsin.

 

(Additional reporting by Jeff Mason, Susan Heavey, Tim Ryan and Ian Simpson in Washington; Marti Maguire in Raleigh, North Carolina; David Beasley in Atlanta; Steve Bittenbender in Louisville, Kentucky; Barbara Liston in Orlando, Bill Cotterell in Tallahassee and Zachary Fagenson in Miami Beach; Colleen Jenkins in Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Jonathan Kaminsky in New Orleans; Editing by Frances Kerry)

 

Thank you Reuters & STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES.

 

Joni Ernst makes history in Iowa

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Joni Ernst addresses supporters after becoming the first female senator in Iowa state history.

 

 

 

Why Democrats Lost

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

“Resurgent Republicans captured Democratic seats in Arkansas and West Virginia and bid for control of the U.S. Senate and a tighter grip on the House Tuesday in elections shaped by deep voter discontent with President Barack Obama.

 

 

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From POLITICO:

 

4 indicted N.Y. pols win reelection

 

Takeaways from the GOP romp

 

Big win for conservative big money

 

LePage survives Maine 3-way race

 

After drubbing, all eyes on Clinton

 

Minimum wage hikes win

 

Filibuster-proof majority for Keystone

 

Upsets of the night

 

Kansas Gov. Brownback edges Democratic foe

 

No Obama pivot after midterms

 

Walker victory humiliates labor

 

Coakley falls short again in Mass.

 

How Clintons’ candidates did

 

How Mitch did it

 

Cruz won’t commit to McConnell

 

Senate flips, GOP ready to rule

 

Election results: 2014 takeaways

 

D.C. approves pot legalization

 

Personhood movement loses twice

 

Reid to run for minority leader

 

Ernst beats Braley in Iowa

 

Election results 2014: Gubernatorial analysis

 

Tillis clinches GOP Senate majority

 

Rauner ousts Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn

 

 

Thank you POLITICO.

 

Click On Graphics Below To Enlarge

 

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Mediaite FULL LIST: 2014 Midterm Election Senate Results

 

The 2014 midterm elections have finally arrived and voting is underway in all 50 states. There are plenty of major gubernatorial and congressional races — not to mention some crucial ballot referendums — all across the country, but all anyone in the political media really seems to care about is one thing: the Senate.

 

Conventional wisdom seems to be that Republicans will win the six seats needed to take over the Senate from Democrats, giving them control of both house of Congress for PresidentBarack Obama’s final two years in office. But if you ask Vice President Joe Biden, Democrats are going to maintain a two-seat lead in the Senate, so you never know until polls have closed. And even then, potential run-offs in Georgia and Louisiana have some pundits predicting we won’t know which party really controls the Senate until January 2015.

 

Below are the 11 12 most competitive races of the cycle — the ones that will determine which way the Senate falls. We will be updating the winners throughout the evening as they are called so keep checking back here for the most complete picture of where things stand.

 

Alaska

Mark Begich* (Democrat)
Dan Sullivan (Republican)
Mark Fish (Libertarian)
Ted Gianoutsos (No Party Affiliation)

 

Arkansas

Mark Pryor* (Democrat)
Tom Cotton (Republican)
Nathan LaFrance (Libertarian)
Mark Swaney (Green)

 

Colorado

Mark Udall* (Democrat)
Cory Gardner (Republican)
Raul Acosta (Unaffiliated)
Bill Hammons (Unity)

 

Georgia

Michelle Nunn (Democrat)
David A. Perdue (Republican)
Amanda Swafford (Libertarian)

 

Iowa

Bruce Braley (Democrat)
Joni Ernst (Republican)
Douglas Butzier (Libertarian)
Bob Quast (Other)

 

Kansas

Pat Roberts* (Republican)
Greg Orman (Independent)
Randall Batson (Libertarian)

 

Kentucky

Mitch McConnell* (Republican)
Alison Lundergan Grimes (Democrat)
David Patterson (Libertarian)

 

Louisiana

Mary Landrieu* (Democrat)
Bill Cassidy (Republican)
Rob Maness (Republican)

Run-off projected, scheduled for December 6th.

 

New Hampshire

Jeanne Shaheen* (Democrat)
Scott Brown (Republican)

 

North Carolina

Kay Hagan* (Democrat)
Thom Tillis (Republican)
Sean Haugh (Libertarian)

 

South Dakota

Rick Weiland (Democrat)
Mike Rounds (Republican)
Larry Pressler (Independent)
Gordon Howie (Independent)

 

Virginia

Mark Warner* (Democrat)
Ed Gillespie (Republican)

*Incumbent

Bold = Projected winner

Current Senate Breakdown:

Democrats: 45
Republicans: 52

51 seats needed for a majority; Republicans must pick up 6 seats.

 

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From The Grio:

 

What last night’s election results mean for Obama’s final 2 years

 

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by

 

The 2014 midterm election results are in.  And in keeping with the expectations and conventional wisdom, the Republicans have taken control of the U.S. Senate from Harry Reid and the Democrats.  For the President, the results lay the groundwork for a very interesting final two years in office.  With no possibility of common ground with a GOP-controlled Congress, expect Obama to use his veto pen often, and go it alone through the use of executive orders.

 

With 36 Senate seats in play, mostly in red states, the deck was stacked against the Democrats from the outset.  Sen. Mary Landrieu—who faces a runoff election because no candidate broke through the required 50 percent threshold–created controversy when she suggested the obvious, which is that the South has a problem with Obama because of his race.

 

“I’ll be very, very honest with you. The South has not always been the friendliest place for African-Americans,” Landrieu said. “It’s been a difficult time for the president to present himself in a very positive light as a leader.”

 

Meanwhile, with Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) winning his race against challenger Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, the GOP lawmaker is poised to become majority leader of the upper chamber of Congress.  Grimes—who attempted to distance herself from the president in a state where he is unpopular— was faulted for refusing to say whether she voted for Obama.

 

Compounding the problem for Democrats this election cycle was the issue of lower turnout by the base in midterms, when President Obama was not on the ballot, and the specter of voter suppression efforts such as voter ID, purges and the gutting of the Voting Rights Act making an impact in key races.

 

Among the more high profile races, North Carolina incumbent Senator Kay Hagan (D-North Carolina) lost to Republican Thom Tillis.  In Georgia, Republican David Purdue beat Democrat Michelle Nunn, and Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) held on to his seat, while incumbent Senator Mark Pryor (D-Arkansas) lost his reelection bid to Tom Cotton. In the New Hampshire race, incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire) defeated challenger Scott Brown, while Cory Gardner, a Republican, bested incumbent Mark Udall in Colorado.

 

The two African-American U.S. senators, Tim Scott (R-South Carolina) and Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) will return to the legislative body.  Booker is the first black senator elected in New Jersey.  Scott, who had been appointed by Gov. Nikki Haley in 2012 to finish the term of resigning Senator Jim DeMint, is the first black senator elected to the South since Reconstruction.

 

Republicans also maintained control of the House of Representatives, with its 435 seats at stake.  Looking at races for governors, a number of Republican incumbents, such as Scott Walker (R-Wisconsin), Rick Scott (R-Florida) and Rick Snyder (R-Michigan) won reelection, while the unpopular Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett lost as expected to Tom Wolf.  In Maryland, Anthony Brown, the African-American lieutenant governor, lost in his gubernatorial bid to Republican Larry Hogan.

 

With a Republican controlled Senate and Congress, Americans can expect more gridlock.  It is all but certain that the GOP—emboldened and full of hubris—will interpret their victory as a mandate to jam through all types of Tea Party-anointed pieces of legislation.  In the short term, conservative lawmakers are likely to pursue matters such as corporate tax reform, Keystone XL Pipeline and gutting the Affordable Care Act.

 

President Obama is expected to use his veto pen frequently, with continued, futile attempts by Republicans to repeal Obamacare.  Further, we should expect some intra-party strife within the GOP, as presidential aspirants such as Senators Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul position themselves for the 2016 contest, and Cruz expected to make things difficult for Mitch McConnell with calls to investigate the president.

 

Further, a Republican takeover of the Senate could result in a constitutional crisis over the president’s future appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court.  If there is a vacancy on the high court during Obama’s lame duck presidency, it is conceivable that the Senate simply will not hold hearings on a judicial candidate that fails to meet the GOP ultraconservative litmus test.  In addition, whether the Senate will stall on a replacement for Attorney General Eric Holder remains to be seen.

 

In the midst of partisan gridlock and a perpetually broken Senate that refuses to act on important matters, President Obama has the option to use executive orders on issues such as comprehensive immigration reform and amnesty for undocumented immigrants.  One could argue that the president should have pursued such an effort on immigration before the election—as he had promised—as a means to further energize Latinos and the rest of the Democratic base.  Certainly, such an executive move today would anger Obama’s opponents and may be interpreted as overreach.  But he is still the president, and the legislature does not pass legislation these days, mostly to make a black president look bad.

 

And in light of his GOP detractors who have sabotaged the government for political gain, maintaining a legislative logjam only to blame him for the mess, it would seem Obama has little choice.

 

Thank you The Grio & 

 

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The White House Blog Updates™: Immigration Reform. Working Families. World Cup. Slide Show.


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The Urgency Of Immigration Reform: Attracting The World’s Best And Brightest. 

A Conversation About Working Families’ Issues With Labor Secretary Tom Perez.

 

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The Urgency of Immigration Reform: Attracting the World’s Best and Brightest

 

 

It has been nearly a year since the Senate passed a strongly bipartisan immigration reform bill that would fix our broken immigration system, reduce federal deficits by nearly $850 billion, and increase GDP by $1.4 trillion over the next two decades. As the economic costs of inaction continue to grow, now is the time for the House of Representatives to do its part to get a commonsense immigration reform bill to the President’s desk. Simply put: The House can and should act before August.

 

Throughout this week, we will highlight the urgency and importance of attracting the best and brightest talent from around the world, especially in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The Senate bill would effectively “staple” a green card to the diplomas of advanced STEM graduates from U.S. universities, so that these talented researchers have a chance to stay and contribute to our economy.

 

Every foreign-born graduate with an advanced STEM degree is associated with, on average, 2.6 jobs for American workers. By some estimates, immigration was responsible for one-third of the growth in patenting in past decades, and these innovations contributed to increasing U.S. GDP by 2.4 percent.

 

When President Obama delivered the commencement address at the University of California, Irvine this past weekend, he told the story of just one of these talented graduates:

 

There are people here who know what it means to dream.  When Mohamad Abedi was a boy, the suffering he saw in refugee camps in Lebanon didn’t drive him into despair — it inspired him to become a doctor.  And when he came to America, he discovered a passion for engineering.  So here, at UC Irvine, he became a biomedical engineer to study the human brain.  And Mohamad said, “Had I never come to the United States, I would have never had the ability to do the work that I’m doing.”  He’s now going to CalTech to keep doing that work.

 

Today’s advanced STEM graduate could be tomorrow’s world-class, world-changing scientist. After all, one recent study looked at all U.S.-based Nobel laureates over the past 50 years, and found that 26 percent were foreign born.

 

When the President recently met with America’s nine most recently minted Nobel laureates in the Oval Office, we asked them to share their perspective on the importance of immigration reform. As you might imagine, these pioneering biologists, chemists, and economists had a great deal to say about the importance of maintaining America’s competitive advantage as a magnet for global talent:

 

 

As the President has repeatedly emphasized, America needs a 21st century immigration system — one that strengthens border security, cracks down on employers that hire and exploit undocumented workers, creates a pathway to earned citizenship for undocumented immigrants, and removes obstacles to legal immigration. A system that welcomes the best and brightest scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs from around the world to innovate here in America.

 

It doesn’t take a Nobel Prize winner to understand that the time is now.

 

 

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Tune In: A Conversation About Working Families’ Issues With Labor Secretary Tom Perez

 

 

Untitled

 

This Wednesday, June 18, at 10:30 a.m. Eastern, Secretary of Labor Tom Perez will be joining a digital conversation about how working families’ issues — from paid leave to other policies that offer more flexibility in the workplace — uniquely impact low-wage workers.

 

The conversation, which will be hosted and moderated by HuffPost Live, will include business leaders who have instituted these policies, workers whose lives they are helping, and business leaders who are advoacting on behalf of them.

 

Have a question that you’d like to ask the Secretary about workplace policies that can help more working families succeed?

 

You can submit a video question or comment here.

 

And if you’ve got a story to tell about how your family would be helped by 21st-century workplace policies, you can share it here.

 

Wednesday’s conversation is the digital completement to a series of regional roundtable events that have been happening across the country, leading up to the White House Summit on Working Families on June 23, 2014.

 

 

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Statements and Releases – June 16th, 2014

 

Statement by the Press Secretary on the War Powers Resolution Report for Iraq

 

Background Conference Call on the Vice President’s Upcoming Trip to Brazil, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic

 

Presidential Nominations Sent to the Senate

NOMINATIONS SENT TO THE SENATE:

 

Wendy Beetlestone, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, vice Michael M. Baylson, retired.

 

Victor Allen Bolden, of Connecticut, to be United States District Judge for the District of Connecticut, vice Janet Bond Arterton, retiring.

 

Mark A. Kearney, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, vice J. Curtis Joyner, retired.

 

Joseph F. Leeson, Jr., of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, vice Eduardo C. Robreno, retired.

 

Gerald J. Pappert, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, vice Stewart R. Dalzell, retired.

 

 

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Behind the Scenes: Inside the U.S. National Team Locker Room

 

 

 

US Soccer Fans Celebrate Their Win

 

 

 

Sterling hires firms to investigate NBA

 

 

 

Republicans Seek War, Spread Fear & Blame Obama For Everything

 

 

 

Dead Woman Parties At Her Own Funeral

 

 

 

Sex Slaves Found In Florida Home

 

 

 

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A Slide Show For Your Enjoyment

 

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