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8 Million People Have Signed Up For Private Health Coverage Thanks To The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES).


 

By Jueseppi B.

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President Obama: 8 Million People Have Signed Up for Private Health Coverage

 

Speaking from the White House Briefing Room this afternoon, President Obama announced that 8 million Americans have signed up for private health coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act.

 

 

 

 

President Obama Speaks to the Press

 

Published on Apr 17, 2014

Before taking questions from the press in the White House Press Briefing Room, President Obama announces that 8 million people signed up for private health coverage in the Health Insurance Marketplace. April 17, 2014.

 

 

 

 

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He noted that 35 percent of those people are under 35 years old.

 

What’s more, costs associated with expanding coverage under the Affordable Care Act are lower than expected:

 

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And health care costs are growing at the slowest level on record. That slower growth in spending is reflected across Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance:

 

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Take a look at a few more important numbers, from a fact sheet released today:

 

  • 8 million people signed up for private insurance in the Health Insurance Marketplace. For states that have Federally-Facilitated Marketplaces, 35 percent of those who signed up are under 35 years old, and 28 percent are between 18 and 34 years old, virtually the same youth percentage that signed up in Massachusetts in its first year of health reform.

 

  • 3 million young adults gained coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act by being able to stay on their parents’ plan.

 

  • 3 million more people were enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP as of February, compared to before the Marketplaces opened. Medicaid and CHIP enrollment continues year-round.

 

  • 5 million people are enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards outside the Marketplace, according to a CBO estimate. When insurers set premiums for next year, they are required to look at everyone who enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards, both inside and outside the Marketplace.

 

  • 5.7 million people will be uninsured in 2016 because 24 states have chosen not to expand Medicaid — even though this expansion would be of no cost to states, as the President pointed out in today’s briefing.

 

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The bottom line, as the President said: “This thing is working.

 

#8Million#8Million#8Million#8Million#8Million#8Million#8Million#8Million

 

FACT SHEET: Affordable Care Act by the Numbers

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The Affordable Care Act is working.  It is giving millions of middle class Americans the health care security they deserve, it is slowing the growth of health care costs and it has brought transparency and competition to the Health Insurance Marketplace.

HEALTH CARE BY THE NUMBERS

  • 8 million people signed up for private insurance in the Health Insurance Marketplace. For states that have Federally-Facilitated Marketplaces, 35 percent of those who signed up are under 35 years old and 28 percent are between 18 and 34 years old, virtually the same youth percentage that signed up in Massachusetts in their first year of health reform.

 

  • 3 million young adults gained coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act by being able to stay on their parents plan.

 

  • 3 million more people were enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP as of February, compared to before the Marketplaces opened. Medicaid and CHIP enrollment continues year-round.

 

  • 5 million people are enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards outside the Marketplace, according to a CBO estimate. When insurers set premiums for next year, they are required to look at everyone who enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards, both on and off the Marketplace.

 

  • 5.7 million people will be uninsured in 2016 because 24 States have not expanded Medicaid.

 

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HEALTH CARE COST GROWTH IS LOWEST IN DECADES

  • Health care costs are growing at the slowest level on record:Since the law passed, real per capita health care spending is estimated to have grown at the lowest rate on record for any three-year period and less than one-third the long-term historical average stretching back to 1960. This slower growth in spending is reflected in Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance.

 

  • CBO projects the deficit will shrink more and premiums will be lower than expected: CBO previously estimated that the ACA will reduce the deficit by $1.7 trillion over two decades, and, just this week, CBO concluded that lower-than-expected Marketplace premiums and other recent developments will cut $104 billion from our deficit over the next ten years. The CBO report also projects that lower-than-expected premiums will help to save $5 billion this year, and that lower premiums will persist in the years ahead, remaining 15 percent below projections by 2016 (the only year in which CBO provides a precise estimate).

 

  • Medicare spending growth is down: Medicare per capita spending is growing at historically low rates.  This week, for the fifth straight year, the CBO reduced its projections for Medicare spending over the next 10 years – this time by $106 billion.  CBO projects that Medicare and Medicaid costs in 2020 will be $180 billion below its 2010 estimates.  Recent economic research suggests that the ACA’s reforms to Medicare may have “spillover effects” that reduce costs and improve quality across the health care system, not just in Medicare.

 

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THE SECURITY OF HEALTH INSURANCE FOR MILLIONS OF MIDDLE CLASS FAMILIES

  • Up to 129 million Americans with pre-existing conditions – including up to 17 million children – no longer have to worry about being denied health coverage or charged higher premiums because of their health status.

 

  • 71 million Americans with private insurance have gained coverage for at least one free preventive health care service such as mammograms, birth control, or immunizations in 2011 and 2012.

 

  • In 2013, 37 million people with Medicare received at least one preventive service at no out of pocket cost.

 

  • Approximately 60 million Americans have gained expanded mental health and substance use disorder benefits and/or federal parity protections.

 

  • Since the health care law was enacted, almost 8 million seniors havesaved nearly $10 billion on prescription drugs as the health care law closes Medicare’s “donut hole.”

 

  • 105 million Americans no longer have to worry about having their health benefits cut off after they reach a lifetime limit.

 

@BarackObama The Affordable Care Act is working—for millions of Americans.

@BarackObama
The Affordable Care Act is working—for millions of Americans.

 

Eight Million Joey B.

Eight Million Joey B.

Can Ya'll Haters Please Kiss My Entire Black Ass?

Can Ya’ll Haters Please Kiss My Entire Black Ass?

Eight Million.....And Counting.

Eight Million…..And Counting.

#8Million #8Million #8Million  #8Million  #8Million  #8Million  #8Million  #8Million  #8Million  #8Million #8Million

#8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million #8Million

Lets give a hand for eight million.

Lets give a hand for eight million.

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New ObamaCARES Projections Released Monday By The Congressional Budget Office.*


 

By Jueseppi B.

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*GOP picked another loser.

 

 

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From Business Insider:

 

This CBO Report Is Another Big Win For Obamacare

 

By 

 

More than 12 million people will gain health insurance under the Affordable Care Act this year, according to new projections released by the Congressional Budget Office Monday. And millions more stand to benefit from the law over the next decade.

 

 

At the same time, the law’s costs to the federal government are shrinking. According to the new projections, the federal government will spend more than $100 billion less on Obamacare’s coverage provisions through 2024 than previously projected. That includes a downward estimate of about $5 billion this year. Overall, spending on the federal and state insurance exchanges are projected to cost 14% less than originally forecast.

 

 

The CBO said plans offered through the exchanges are narrower, allowing companies to keep premiums low and the federal government to pay less in subsidies. The lower spending projections on the Affordable Care Act will help shrink deficits overall. The CBO said the federal government will now run a deficit of $492 billion in fiscal year 2014, which is almost a 33% decrease from 2013.

 

 

Through both the federal and state insurance exchanges and the expansion of the federal Medicaid program under the law, the CBO projects more than 12 million people now have insurance who wouldn’t have normally been covered in the absence of the law. The CBO also projects 19 million people will gain coverage by 2015, 25 million more by 2016, and 26 million more by 2026.

 

 

In 2014, according to the CBO, about 6 million people gained insurance from the exchanges and close to 7 million people benefitted from the Medicaid expansion. Those gains reduced the number of uninsured in the U.S. to 42 million —16% of the population. By 2024, the CBO projects, about 89% of U.S. residents will have health insurance.

 

 

Here’s a chart from the CBO showing the parallel universe between a U.S. with the Affordable Care Act in 2024 and one without it:

screen shot 2014-04-14 at 11.48.19 am

 

There’s one key difference between the CBO’s projections and a study released last week by RAND Corp., which said a net 9.3 million people had gained insurance coverage from September through March: The RAND study said most of those who gained coverage did so through employer-sponsored coverage, something the CBO said did not contribute to any relative gains in coverage.

The Obama administration has spent much of the past two weeks trumpeting the law in spite of a disastrous rollout. Former Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, who resigned last week, said 7.5 million people had enrolled in plans through the exchanges by the end of the law’s first open enrollment period on March 31.

Thank you Business Insider.

 

Updated Budget Projections: 2014 to 2024

 

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Updated Budget Projections: 2014 to 2024

 

Summary
As it usually does each spring, the Congressional Budget
Office (CBO) has updated the baseline budget projections
that it released earlier in the year.1 CBO now
estimates that if the current laws that govern federal taxes
and spending do not change, the budget deficit in fiscal
year 2014 will be $492 billion. Relative to the size of the
economy, that deficit—at 2.8 percent of gross domestic
product (GDP)—will be nearly a third less than the
$680 billion shortfall in fiscal year 2013, which was equal
to 4.1 percent of GDP.

This will be the fifth consecutive
year in which the deficit has declined as a share of GDP
since peaking at 9.8 percent in 2009 (see Figure 1).
But if current laws do not change, the period of shrinking
deficits will soon come to an end. Between 2015 and
2024, annual budget shortfalls are projected to rise substantially
from a low of $469 billion in 2015 to about
$1 trillion from 2022 through 2024—mainly because
of the aging population, rising health care costs, an
expansion of federal subsidies for health insurance, and
growing interest payments on federal debt. CBO expects
that cumulative deficits during that decade will equal
$7.6 trillion if current laws remain unchanged (see
Table 1). As a share of GDP, deficits are projected to rise
from 2.6 percent in 2015 to about 4 percent near the end
of the 10-year period. By comparison, the deficit averaged
3.1 percent of GDP over the past 40 years and
2.3 percent in the 40 years before fiscal year 2008, when
the most recent recession began.

From 2015 through
2024, both revenues and outlays are projected to be
greater than their 40-year averages as a percentage of
GDP. In CBO’s baseline projections, federal debt held by the
public reaches 78 percent of GDP by 2024, up from
72 percent at the end of 2013 and twice the 39 percent
average of the past four decades (see Figure 3 on page 5).
As recently as the end of 2007, federal debt equaled just
35 percent of GDP.

Such high and rising debt would have serious negative
consequences. Federal spending on interest payments
would increase considerably when interest rates rose to
more typical levels. Moreover, because federal borrowing
would eventually raise the cost of investment by businesses
and other entities, the capital stock would be
smaller, and productivity and wages lower, than if federal
borrowing was more limited. In addition, high debt
means that lawmakers would have less flexibility than
they otherwise would to use tax and spending policies to
respond to unexpected challenges. Finally, high debt
increases the risk of a fiscal crisis in which investors
would lose so much confidence in the government’s
ability to manage its budget that the government would
be unable to borrow at affordable rates.

CBO’s estimate of the deficit for this year is $23 billion
less than its February estimate, mostly because the agency
now anticipates lower outlays for discretionary programs
and net interest payments. The projected cumulative deficit
from 2015 through 2024 is $286 billion less than it
was in February: Though projected revenues are slightly
below the amounts that were previously reported, projected
outlays have dropped by more, largely because of
lower subsidies for health insurance under the Affordable
Care Act (ACA).

 

Read The Entire CBC Report.

 

 

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About This Document

 
This document is one of a series of reports on the state of the budget that the Congressional Budget
Office (CBO) issues each year. It satisfies the requirement of section 202(e) of the Congressional
Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 that CBO submit to the Committees on the
Budget periodic reports about fiscal policy and its baseline projections of the federal budget.

 
Jared Brewster and Amber Marcellino of CBO’s Budget Analysis Division prepared the report with
assistance from Mark Booth and with guidance from Jeffrey Holland, Theresa Gullo, Holly Harvey,
Peter Fontaine, and David Weiner. The estimates described here were the work of more than
100 people at CBO and many people on the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation.

 

In keeping with CBO’s mandate to provide objective, impartial analysis, this report makes no recommendations.
Robert Sunshine reviewed the report, Benjamin Plotinsky edited it, and Maureen Costantino and
Jeanine Rees prepared it for publication. An electronic version is available on CBO’s website
(www.cbo.gov/publication/45229).

 
Douglas W. Elmendorf

 
Director
April 2014

 

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When "We The People" Stand Umoja As One....We Become The Big Fish.

When “We The People” Stand Umoja As One….We Become The Big Fish.

Wealthy racist greedy caucasian males are thieves.

Wealthy racist greedy caucasian males are thieves.

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Rand Corp. Study Of ObamaCARES Effect On Health Insurance: 9.3 Million New Insured And Counting.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From The…….logoSmall

 

 

Rand’s Obamacare stats: 9.3 million new insureds, and counting

 

By Michael Hiltzik

 

The long-awaited Rand Corp. study of Obamacare’s effect on health insurance coverage was released Tuesday and confirmed the numbers that had been telegraphed for more than a week: At least 9.3 million more Americans have health insurance now than in September 2013, virtually all of them as a result of the law.

 

 

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

Just the start? President Obama announces preliminary Affordable Care Act signups. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images / April 1, 2014)

 

That’s a net figure, accommodating all those who lost their individual health insurance because of cancellations. The Rand study confirms other surveys that placed the number of people who lost their old insurance and did not or could not replace it — the focus of an enormous volume of anti-Obamacare rhetoric — at less than 1 million. The Rand experts call this a “very small” number, less than 1% of the U.S. population age 18 to 64.

 

 

The Rand study was eagerly anticipated in part because of the dearth of hard information from other sources, including the federal and state governments, which are still compiling their statistics and may not have a full slate for months.

 

Rand acknowledges that its figures have limitations — they’re based on a survey sampling, meaning that the breakdowns are subject to various margins of error, and they don’t include much of the surge in enrollments in late March and early April. Those 3.2-million sign-ups not counted by Rand could “dramatically affect” the figures on total insureds, the organization said.

A few other important takeaways:

–The number of people getting insurance through their employers increased by 8.2 million. Rand said the increase is likely to have been driven by a decline in unemployment, which made more people eligible for employer plans, and by the incentives in the Affordable Care Act encouraging more employer coverage. The figure certainly undermines the contention by the healthcare law’s critics that the legislation gave employers an incentive to drop coverage.

–Of the 3.9 million people counted by Rand as obtaining insurance on the individual exchange market, 36% were previously uninsured. That ratio is expected to rise when the late signups are factored in. Medicaid enrollment increased by 5.9 million, the majority of whom did not have insurance before signing up.

–These figures are only the leading edge of a long-term trend. “It’s still early in the life of the ACA,” Rand said. Its experts expect more enrollments “as people become more familiar with the law, the individual mandates increase to their highest levels, the employer mandate kicks in, and other changes occur.” But their bottom line is that the law already has led to “a substantial increase in insurance coverage.”

 

 

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The Obamacare success stories you haven’t been hearing about

 

Last summer Ellen Holzman and Meredith Vezina, a married gay couple in San Diego County, got kicked off their long-term Kaiser health plan, for which they’d been paying more than $1,300 a month. The cause wasn’t the Affordable Care Act, as far as they knew. They’d been living outside Kaiser’s service area, and the health plan had decided to tighten its rules.

 

That’s when they discovered the chilly hazards of dependence on the individual health insurance market. When they applied for a replacement policy with Anthem Blue Cross of California, Ellen, 59, disclosed that she might have carpal tunnel syndrome. She wasn’t sure–her condition was still being diagnosed by Kaiser when her coverage ended. But the possibility was enough to scare Anthem. “They said, ‘We will not insure you because you have a pre-existing condition,’” Holzman recalls.

 

But they were lucky, thanks to Obamacare. Through Covered California, the state’s individual insurance marketplace, they’ve found a plan through Sharp Healthcare that will cover them both for a total premium of $142 a month, after a government subsidy based on their income. They’ll have a higher deductible than Kaiser’s but lower co-pays. But their possible savings will be impressive.

 

More important than that was knowing that they couldn’t be turned down for coverage come Jan. 1. “We felt we didn’t have to panic, or worry,” Holzman says. “If not for the Affordable Care Act, our ability to get insurance would be very limited, if we could get it at all.”

 

Holzman and Vezina are exactly the type of people Obamacare is designed to help–indeed, rescue from the cold, hard world of individual health insurance of the past. That was a world where even an undiagnosed condition might render you uninsurable. Where your insurance could be canceled after you got sick or had an accident. Where your financial health was at risk as much as your physical well-being.

 

These are the stories you’re not hearing amid the pumped-up panic over canceled individual policies and premium shocks–many of which stories are certainly true, but the noise being made about them leads people to think they’re more common than they are.

 

We’ve compiled several alternative examples for this post. They’re anecdotes, sure, just like the anecdotes you’ve been seeing and reading about people learning they’ll be paying more for coverage next year.

 

The difference is that Americans learning that they’ll be eligible for coverage perhaps for the first time, or at sharply lower cost, are far more typical of the individual insurance market. Two-thirds of the 30 million Americans who will be eligible for individual coverage next year are uninsured today, whether because they can’t afford it now or because they’re barred by pre-existing condition limitations, which will no longer be legal. And more than three-quarters will be eligible for subsidies that will cut their premium costs and even co-pays and deductibles substantially.

 

Let’s hear from a few more of them.

 

David Shevlino, 51, is an artist in Delaware. Between the COBRA policy that extends the coverage his wife, Kathy, received at a former job and the bare-bones policy that covers himself and their 15-year-old son, they’ve been laying out $1,000 a month in premiums. Next year they’ll pay $650 a month, after the government subsidy, for a plan through Blue Cross of Delaware that covers the entire family and provides many services that have been excluded up to now.

 

That makes a big difference, especially for Kathy, who is still dealing with injuries she suffered in a cycling accident and that would have made her uninsurable once her COBRA ran out less than a year from now. “She had already been turned down by Aetna and Blue Cross, the very company that will now insure her,” Shevlino says. “This is a really significant thing–to me, the fact that insurance companies could turn you down didn’t make sense in terms of what healthcare is supposed to be for.”

 

And Judith Silverstein, 49, a Californian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2007. Her family helps her pay the $750 monthly cost of her existing plan–which she only had because of federal law requiring that insurers who provide employer-based insurance continue to offer coverage if the employer goes out of business, as hers did. Next year she’ll get a subsidy that will get her a good “silver” level plan for $50.

 

For Silverstein that coverage is indispensable. Her case is relatively mild, but MS is a progressive condition that typically has made its sufferers pariahs of the individual insurance market in the past. “I researched the options,” she says. “Nobody’s going to sell you insurance in the individual market if you have MS.” But these customers can’t be excluded or saddled with big premium markups any more.

 

It’s not only recipients of subsidies who are benefiting. Jason Noble, 44, who has his own property management firm in Southern California, found a gold plan that will cover his wife and their three children–a daughter, 9, and 5-year-old twins–for a little less than $1,300 a month. That’s slightly more than they’d be paying next year for their existing Blue Shield plan, but the benefits are much greater, including pediatric dental coverage. Their family deductible will fall from $3,400 to zero. Last year, the family had a health scare that ran them $1,800 in out-of-pocket expenses; a similar event next year would cost them nothing. “It’s definitely a good deal,” Noble says.

 

It’s fair to observe that not all these people are enamored with their enrollment experience. Ellen Holzman found Covered California’s website “definitely clunky,” and she and Vezina are still awaiting enrollment documents from Sharp that they say are well overdue.

 

Brian Sheppard, 58, a self-employed Southern California attorney, says he spent five to seven hours on the website before determining that he could upgrade from the existing Kaiser plan covering him and his wife for an additional $100 a month, but with lower deductibles and prescription costs. He’s still waiting to hear whether he’ll be eligible for a subsidy that would slash his expenses significantly.

 

“I’m persistent, I’m a lawyer, and I found it very difficult to work through that system,” he says. But for him it was worth the effort. “In 2010, when people were being canceled because they got sick, there was all this outrage,” he observes. “People have forgotten that.”

The difficulties of the federal government’s healthcare.gov and some state enrollment websites are real, and have kept hundreds of thousands of Americans, even millions, from enrolling. But many of those who understand the benefits of the Affordable Care Act know that obsessing about the technical glitches is like mistaking the scoreboard for the game.

Political opportunists (like House Speaker John Boehner), exploit near-term difficulties to obscure the tangible benefits the Affordable Care Act will bring to tens of millions of their constituents. When they say “this law has to go,” as Boehner’s spokesman did this weekend, they’re talking about returning people to the era of exclusions for pre-existing conditions. To people learning they’re uninsurable because of injuries from accidents, or chronic diseases, or the sheer bloody-mindedness of insurance company bureaucrats.

Let’s hear Boehner and his people explain to Holzman and Vezina, the Shevlinos, the Nobles, the Sheppards, and Silverstein–and to 20-30 million other Americans like them who might be locked out of the individual insurance market without the law they ridicule as “Obamacare”–how they’d be better off that way.

 

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Read The Full Rand Corporation Report

 

 

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The Latest Hitler Inspired Anti-ObamaCARES Ad By Foster Friess: Hitler finds out he can’t keep his doctor under Obamacare

This is what America has become, The United States Of AmeriKKKa. This idiot posted this “preamble” to his racist anti-Semitic video…

 

Since people were subscribing to my YouTube channel, I felt the pressure to produce, produce, produce! So, here’s another take on “Hitler finds out..” 

 
This time, Hitler learns that he is losing his doctor because Dr Steiner is not in the network for his new health insurance.

 
Also, I would like to apologize to anyone who is, is related to, or knows any proctologists named Feingold. The use of the name Dr. Feingold is not meant to make fun of any individual, except for President Obama.
Make your own Hitler video at http://downfall.jfedor.org/

 

This Crapplefratz is truly a dumbass full of dumbfuckery.

 

 

 

Amazing that something that helps 9.3 million Americans can be hated by AmeriKKKans.

 

 

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How Many Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES) Enrollees Were Uninsured? 5.4 Million.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From The L.A. Times:

 

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A look at how many Obamacare enrollees were uninsured: 5.4 million

 

By Michael Hiltzik

 

Reason to smile again? HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius at the White House ceremony this week announcing the Obamacare enrollment numbers. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

Reason to smile again? HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius at the White House ceremony this week announcing the Obamacare enrollment numbers. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

 

 

As we observed earlier this week, one of the obsessions of opponents of the Affordable Care Act is the question of how many enrollees in Obamacare health plans already had insurance. The goal is to knock down the latest enrollment numbers by suggesting that most of the 7.1 million people enrolled through the individual insurance exchanges just moved from one insurance plan to another in a waste of time and effort.

 

The real figure probably won’t be known for weeks, even months. But researchers at the Urban Institute‘s Health Policy Center have weighed in with their own estimate. They’re figuring that the ACA has reduced the number of uninsured Americans by 5.4 million from the first quarter of 2013 through early March this year.

 

Their estimate is based on data from their March 2014 Health Reform Marketing Survey, which consists of public polling. Their finding is that the uninsurance rate for adults ages 18–64 was 15.2% for the nation in early March, a decline of 2.7 percentage points since September 2013, just before open enrollment on the exchanges began Oct. 1.

 

“This represents a gain in coverage for about 5.4 million adults,” they write.

 

Although the Urban Institute figures aren’t keyed to the enrollment figures, it’s worth observing that if all those newly insureds were among those who signed up on the individual exchanges, that would mean that of the 7.1 million enrollees, 77% were previously uninsured.

 

The researchers say, however, that their figures include people who will receive their insurance from Medicaid, which was expanded in about half the states. (The others refused to take up the federal government’s offer to pick up 90% to 100% of the tab.)

 

In Medicaid-expanding states, the uninsured rate fell by an average of 4% and is now an average 12.4%, according to the survey; in the others, it fell by an average of only 1.5% and is stuck at an average 18%. Thus does ideological opposition to the ACA by Republican office-holders in non-expanding states make suckers of their citizens.

 

The Urban Institute says its figures probably understate the decline in the uninsured ratio for two reasons. First, it doesn’t count the late-March surge of enrollments that brought the exchange total to 7.1 million; second, it doesn’t measure the effect of other ACA provisions, including one allowing adults up to the age of 26 to stay on their parent’s health plans.

 

That said, it’s proper to observe that the debate over how many people were previously insured is something of a red herring. The ACA had several goals — to impose national consumer protection standards on the health insurance industry by eliminating exclusions for preexisting conditions, among other things; slow the growth of healthcare costs; reduce the number of underinsureds (those who were forced because of costs to buy plans with limited coverage); and finally to reduce the number of uninsured people.

 

All those goals, not just the last, have been advanced by the ACA. In addition, it has always been clear that the act is a multi-year project. Judging its success or failure by this one metric of how many uninsured people were signed up in year one doesn’t tell us anything about how it will change healthcare coverage in the U.S. over time.

 

Thank you MICHAEL HILTZIK & The L.A. Times.

 

 

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President Obama: “7.1 Million Americans”

 

 

President Barack Obama, joined by Vice President Joe Biden, delivers a statement on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the Rose Garden of the White House, April 1, 2014.President Barack Obama, joined by Vice President Joe Biden, delivers a statement on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the Rose Garden of the White House, April 1, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

 

The President sent the message below to the White House email list this afternoon following his remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

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President Obama Delivers a Statement on the Affordable Care Act

April 01, 2014 | 18:13 |Public Domain

 

Following the closing of the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, the President delivers remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private health coverage.

 

 

 

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Hello everybody,

 

Last night, the first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act came to an end.

 

And this afternoon, we announced that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance plans through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

7.1 million.

 

That doesn’t count the more than 3 million young adults who have gained insurance under this law by staying on their families’ plans. It doesn’t count the millions more who have gotten covered through the expansion of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It doesn’t include the more than 100 million folks who now have better care — who are receiving additional benefits, like mammograms and contraceptive care, at no extra cost.

 

Now, millions of our fellow Americans have the comfort and peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re no longer leaving their health and well-being to chance. For many of them, quality health insurance wasn’t an option until this year — maybe because they couldn’t afford it, or because a pre-existing condition kept them locked out of a discriminatory system.

 

Today, that’s changed. And while our long-broken health care system may not be completely fixed, it’s without question a lot better. That’s something to be proud of — and there’s no good reason to go back.

 

Regardless of your politics, or your feelings about the Affordable Care Act, millions more Americans with health coverage is something that’s good for our economy and our country.

 

At the end of the day, that is what this law — and the other reforms we’re fighting for, from a 21st-century immigration system to a fairer wage for every American who’s willing to work for it — are all about:

 

Making sure our country lives up to our highest ideals.

 

I am thankful to be your President today, and every day. And I am proud that this law will continue to make life better for millions of Americans in the years to come.

 

Thank you.

President Barack Obama

 

 

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President Obama Speaks About The Success Of The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES).


 

By Jueseppi B.

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More Than 7 Million Americans Have Enrolled in Private Health Coverage Under the Affordable Care Act

 

 

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Today, the White House announced that more than 7 million Americans signed up for affordable care through the Health Insurance Marketplace during the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment, which ended on March 31.

The number, announced during Press Secretary Jay Carney‘s briefing, means that millions of Americans across the country now have access to quality, affordable care. And as numbers continue to come in from states that run their own Marketplaces, that number will continue to rise.

Later today, President Obama will deliver a statement on the Affordable Care Act in the Rose Garden — you can watch on WhiteHouse.gov/Live at 4:15 p.m. ET.

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President Obama Delivers a Statement on the Affordable Care Act

 

Published on Apr 1, 2014

Following the closing of the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act, the President delivers remarks in the Rose Garden, announcing that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private health coverage. April 1, 2014.

 

 

 

President Barack Obama: 7.1 million Americans.

 

Last night, the first open enrollment period under theAffordable Care Act came to an end.

 

And this afternoon, we announced that 7.1 million Americans have now signed up for private insurance plans through the new Health Insurance Marketplaces.

 

7.1 million.

 

That doesn’t count the more than 3 million young adults who have gained insurance under this law by staying on their families’ plans. It doesn’t count the millions more who have gotten covered through the expansion of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It doesn’t include the more than 100 million folks who now have better care — who are receiving additional benefits, like mammograms and contraceptive care, at no extra cost.

 

Now, millions of our fellow Americans have the comfort and peace of mind that comes with knowing they’re no longer leaving their health and well-being to chance. For many of them, quality health insurance wasn’t an option until this year — maybe because they couldn’t afford it, or because a pre-existing condition kept them locked out of a discriminatory system.

 

Today, that’s changed. And while our long-broken health care system may not be completely fixed, it’s without question a lot better. That’s something to be proud of — and there’s no good reason to go back.

 

Regardless of your politics, or your feelings about the Affordable Care Act, millions more Americans with health coverage is something that’s good for our economy and our country.

 

At the end of the day, that is what this law — and the other reforms we’re fighting for, from a 21st-century immigration system to a fairer wage for every American who’s willing to work for it — are all about:

 

Making sure our country lives up to our highest ideals.

 

I am thankful to be your President today, and every day. And I am proud that this law will continue to make life better for millions of Americans in the years to come.

 

Thank you.

President Barack Obama

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Though HealthCare.gov got off to a rocky start in October, the open enrollment period ended with soaring interest — including a record-breaking 4.8 million visits to HealthCare.gov, and around 2 million calls to CMS call centers. Throughout this weekend, Americans across the country were literally lined up around the block at local enrollment centers.

It’s important to remember that 7 million represents only part of the total number of people who have received coverage under the Affordable Care Act: millions more have been covered by state Medicaid expansions, and around 3 million Americans under 26 are now covered under their parents’ plans.

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