Michael Dunn’s Sentencing Hearing May Be Delayed.


 

By Jueseppi B.

jordan-davis

 

 

From Associated Press:

 

Michael Dunn‘s sentencing hearing in loud music killing delayed

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida man convicted of attempted murder in a confrontation over loud music will have to wait until at least Friday to see if a judge sentences him or waits until after the 47-year-old software developer’s retrial on first-degree murder.

 

Jurors deadlocked last month on the murder charge against Michael Dunn in the shooting of 17-year-old Jordan Davis outside a Jacksonville convenience store. Prosecutors have vowed to retry him on the count.

 

Dunn could face a maximum of 60 years in prison for the charges on which he already has been convicted.

 

The South Patrick Shores resident worked in Vero Beach as vice president at Dunn & Dunn Data Systems.

 

Dunn’s attorney on Monday asked that sentencing be postponed until after the second trial. Defense attorney Cory Strolla says he is concerned that statements Dunn makes at a sentencing hearing could be used against him in his second trial.

 

Strolla also said he is stepping down as Dunn’s attorney and asked Judge Russell Healey to appoint public defenders.

 

Healey, an interim circuit judge, said he has never come across a case with similar circumstances in 150 trials.

 

“I’ve never had a hung jury,” Healey said at Monday’s hearing.

 

A mistrial was declared on the murder charge after jurors deliberated for four days. The 12 jurors found him guilty of three counts of attempted second-degree murder and a count of firing into an occupied car.

 

Dunn was charged with fatally shooting Davis, of Marietta, Ga., in 2012 after the argument over loud music coming from the SUV occupied by Davis and three friends. The teens were black. Dunn, who is white, had described the music to his fiancee as “thug music.”

 

Thank you Associated Press.

 

seek-justice-slide 0000millionhoodies cropped-b4peace-header dreamstime_xs_27320355 obamabottomheader

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Michael Dunn Trial Day 4: State Rests Case In Michael Dunn Trial.


 

By Jueseppi B.

remember

 

 

Michael Dunn Trial Day 4: State Rests Case In Michael Dunn Trial.

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Jurors saw dramatic photos of the body of slain Florida teenager Jordan Davis Monday during the trial of the man accused in his killing, Michael Dunn, and viewed clothing Davis was wearing the evening he was shot to death.

 

The prosecution rested its case against Dunn early Monday afternoon after associate medical examiner Stacey Simons took the stand.

 

Dunn is accused of opening fire into a Dodge Durango in which the 17-year-old Davis was riding with three friends the night of Nov. 23, 2012. Dunn allegedly shot the teen at the Jacksonville, Fla. gas station after an argument over loud music.

 

Davis’ friend testified last week that Dunn said “Are you talking to me?” before opening fire. Dunn claims he shot in self-defense.

 

Michael Dunn Trial Day 4. Part 1

 

 

 

Michael Dunn Trial – Day 4 – Part 2 (State Rests)

 

 

 

Michael Dunn Trial – Day 4 – Part 3

 

 

 

Michael Dunn Trial – Day 4 – Part 4 (Jordan’s Father)

 

 

 

Michael Dunn Trial – Day 4 – Part 5

 

 

 

From Blackbutterfly7:

 

Michael Dunn Trial – Day 5, Tuesday Feb. 11, 2014

 

Here’s a link to a live stream.

Court starts at 8 a.m. EST to hear pending matters, including whether Strolla’s expert witness will be allowed to testify.  The prosecution and defense have to complete and submit jury instructions to the judge.  Actual trial begins at 9 a.m. EST.

Based on yesterday’s hearing, the judge anticipates closing arguments today and has said that he will hold court as late as 7 p.m.

Thank you Blackbutterfly7.

Bfe1QYWCUAAVBbT

From First Coast News:

State rests case in Michael Dunn trial

 

Anne Schindler, First Coast News

 

The State of Florida rested in the first degree murder trial of Michael Dunn

 

State Attorney Angela Corey holds the 9mm handgun recovered from Dunn's vehicle, during the testimony of FDLE firearms analyst Marie Pagan. (Photo: Bob.Mack@jacksonville.com/Pool)

State Attorney Angela Corey holds the 9mm handgun recovered from Dunn’s vehicle, during the testimony of FDLE firearms analyst Marie Pagan.
(Photo: Bob.Mack@jacksonville.com/Pool)

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The State of Florida rested in the first degree murder trial of Michael Dunn, having presented 24 witnesses over four days.

 

The state’s final witness was also one of the most exhaustively questioned, former Medical Examiner Dr. Stacy Simmons, who was on the stand from about 10:30 a.m. until noon Monday.

 

Simmons’ testimony was accompanied by graphic evidence, including autopsy photos of 17-year-old Jordan Davis and clothing penetrated by bullet holes.

 

Davis’ parents were not in the courtroom for the testimony.

 

At least one juror appeared to react to the graphic images, repeatedly putting his hand over his mouth.

 

Defense Attorney Cory Strolla questioned Dr. Simmons aggressively, as he has most previous witnesses. Their exchanges were sometimes tense, as he challenged Simmons’ training, and suggested she may have been given bad information by police.

 

Strolla asked her more than once if she was familiar with the phrase, “garbage in, garbage out.”

 

The court took a longer than usual recess at noon, with Judge Russell Healey saying he needed to discuss matters with both lawyers. Court resumed at 1:30 p.m., at which point Strolla began presenting defense witnesses.

 

It is not yet clear if he intends to put Michael Dunn on the stand, though several experts, including First Coast News legal analyst Mark O’Mara, have said they think he may have to in order to establish a claim of self-defense.

 

Continue to watch complete trial coverage on First Coast News, as well as gavel to gavel coverage of the trial at firstcoastnews.com.

 

WATCH LIVE COVERAGE

 

Thank you First Coast News.

 

 

BS2FiYBCAAAAOEJ

Defendant Michael Dunn looks back at his family seated in the gallery as a morning recess is called. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Defendant Michael Dunn looks back at his family seated in the gallery as a morning recess is called. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn's girlfriend testifies on the stand during the 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn’s girlfriend testifies on the stand during the 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn's girlfriend testifies on the stand. She appears to make eye contact with Michael Dunn as her testimony ends and is helped out of the courtroom.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mac

Witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn’s girlfriend testifies on the stand. She appears to make eye contact with Michael Dunn as her testimony ends and is helped out of the courtroom. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Eyewitness Shawn Atkins, currently in prison on theft charges, shows the jury how the shooter at the Gate station fired at the red SUV that was backing out of the parking lot.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Eyewitness Shawn Atkins, currently in prison on theft charges, shows the jury how the shooter at the Gate station fired at the red SUV that was backing out of the parking lot. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Associate Medical Examiner Stacey Simons shows the jury the blood and bullet hole in a t-shirt worn by Jordan Davis.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Associate Medical Examiner Stacey Simons shows the jury the blood and bullet hole in a t-shirt worn by Jordan Davis. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Christopher Dunn, son of the defendant, was called to the stand by defense attorney Cory Strolla. It was his wedding that brought the defendant to Jacksonville.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Christopher Dunn, son of the defendant, was called to the stand by defense attorney Cory Strolla. It was his wedding that brought the defendant to Jacksonville. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn puts a tissue to his eye while witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn's girlfriend testifies on the stand.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn puts a tissue to his eye while witness Rhonda Rouer, Michael Dunn’s girlfriend testifies on the stand. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State Attorney Angela Corey shows the jury five shell casings recovered from the scene by JSO Det. Andrew Kipple, a major crimes evidence technician who was on the stand at the time. The 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Saturday Feb. 8, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State Attorney Angela Corey shows the jury five shell casings recovered from the scene by JSO Det. Andrew Kipple, a major crimes evidence technician who was on the stand at the time. The 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Saturday Feb. 8, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

The first witness of the day was FDLE firearms analyst Marie Pagan pulls back the slide on the 9mm pistol recovered in the case to show the jury. The trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis in November 2012 entered the 4th day of testimony on Monday Feb. 10, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

The first witness of the day was FDLE firearms analyst Marie Pagan pulls back the slide on the 9mm pistol recovered in the case to show the jury. The trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis in November 2012 entered the 4th day of testimony on Monday Feb. 10, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn watches as his mother Sandra Dunn leave the courtroom during a morning break during the 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn watches as his mother Sandra Dunn leave the courtroom during a morning break during the 3rd day of the murder trial of Michael Dunn The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn watches as his mother Family leave the courtroom during a morning break on the third day of the trial.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn watches as his mother Family leave the courtroom during a morning break on the third day of the trial. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn's mother, Sandra Dunn, walks out of the courtroom as the day ends.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Michael Dunn’s mother, Sandra Dunn, walks out of the courtroom as the day ends. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State's evidence photo of Michael Dunn's weapon used in the shooting. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State’s evidence photo of Michael Dunn’s weapon used in the shooting. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State's evidence photo of the vehicle where Jordan Davis was seated at the time of the shooting and removed to the ground for CPR to be applied. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State’s evidence photo of the vehicle where Jordan Davis was seated at the time of the shooting and removed to the ground for CPR to be applied. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

At the request of defense attorney Cory Strolla, State Attorney Angela Corey showed the jury the pocket knife that Jordan Davis had in his pocket the night he was shot. The knife had been opened after removal from a display of other items found in Davis' pockets, again at the request of Strolla.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

At the request of defense attorney Cory Strolla, State Attorney Angela Corey showed the jury the pocket knife that Jordan Davis had in his pocket the night he was shot. The knife had been opened after removal from a display of other items found in Davis’ pockets, again at the request of Strolla. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Leland Brunson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session. He wiped his eyes after questioning by the Asst. State Attorney, John Guy.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Leland Brunson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session. He wiped his eyes after questioning by the Asst. State Attorney, John Guy. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Leland Brunson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session. He demonstrated how the shooter pulled back the slide on the weapon before shooting at the SUV.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Leland Brunson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session. He demonstrated how the shooter pulled back the slide on the weapon before shooting at the SUV. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Jordan Davis' parents Lucia McBath (L) and Ronald Davis talk during a sidebar moment.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Jordan Davis’ parents Lucia McBath (L) and Ronald Davis talk during a sidebar moment. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Dowels show the trajectory of bullets that were fired during the shooting incident involving Michael Dunn and Jordan Davis  JSO

Dowels show the trajectory of bullets that were fired during the shooting incident involving Michael Dunn and Jordan Davis JSO

1392056904004-met-05DunnTrial020714

1391784488000-session-24

Dr. Stacey Simons, a former Duval County medical examiner, on the stand to testify for state.  First Coast News

Dr. Stacey Simons, a former Duval County medical examiner, on the stand to testify for state. First Coast News

Ronald Davis, father of the victim, Jordan Davis, was called to the stand by defense attorney Cory Strolla.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Ronald Davis, father of the victim, Jordan Davis, was called to the stand by defense attorney Cory Strolla. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Ofc. Robert Holmes is the first State's witness of the day. He was one of the first officers to respond to the shooting scene. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Ofc. Robert Holmes is the first State’s witness of the day. He was one of the first officers to respond to the shooting scene. The 2nd day on of the murder trial of Michael Dunn for the shooting death of Jordan Davis opened early Friday Feb. 7, 2014. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

FDLE biologist and DNA specialist Sukhan Wharf. Wharf holds a swab taken from a shell casing recovered from the scene that contained a touch sample.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

FDLE biologist and DNA specialist Sukhan Wharf. Wharf holds a swab taken from a shell casing recovered from the scene that contained a touch sample. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

The second witness Friday was William Spicer, an engineer/paramedic with Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Dept. Spicer indicates where one gunshot wound was on Jordan Davis' body when he responded to give aid.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

 William Spicer, an engineer/paramedic with Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Dept. Spicer indicates where one gunshot wound was on Jordan Davis’ body when he responded to give aid. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Associate Medical Examiner Stacey Simons shows the jury the pants and belt worn by Jordan Davis.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Associate Medical Examiner Stacey Simons shows the jury the pants and belt worn by Jordan Davis. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tevin Thompson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand during the second day.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tevin Thompson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand during the second day. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tevin Thompson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand and under questioning by defense attorney Cory Strolla, shows how Michael Dunn pointed his weapon when he shot at the car he and Jordan Davis were riding in.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tevin Thompson, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand and under questioning by defense attorney Cory Strolla, shows how Michael Dunn pointed his weapon when he shot at the car he and Jordan Davis were riding in. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Aliyah Harris, Jordan Davis' girlfriend who was working at the mall when Davis and his friends came to see her on the day he was killed.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Aliyah Harris, Jordan Davis’ girlfriend who was working at the mall when Davis and his friends came to see her on the day he was killed. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Defense attorney Cory Strolla (L) and Michael Dunn watch a surveillance video from the Gate Station on the night of the shooting, as a purchase is made by a woman later identified as Michael Dunn's girlfriend Rhonda Rouer.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Defense attorney Cory Strolla (L) and Michael Dunn watch a surveillance video from the Gate Station on the night of the shooting, as a purchase is made by a woman later identified as Michael Dunn’s girlfriend Rhonda Rouer. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State Attorney Angela Corey (R) asks witness Phillip Miranda, a crime scene investigator with the Brevard County Sheriff's Office who recovered the 9mm pistol recovered from Michael Dunn's vehicle in the garage of his Satellite Beach, Fl home, to confirm that it was the weapon that he recovered.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

State Attorney Angela Corey (R) asks witness Phillip Miranda, a crime scene investigator with the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office who recovered the 9mm pistol recovered from Michael Dunn’s vehicle in the garage of his Satellite Beach, Fl home, to confirm that it was the weapon that he recovered. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tommie Stornes, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session.  The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

Tommie Stornes, one of the four young men in the red Durango SUV when the shooting took place, takes the stand in the afternoon session. The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack

 

1391439410000-dunn-4

hoodies_logo_front

1391439410003-dunn-7

1391439410002-dunn-6

1391437075006-dunn-1

jordandavis-michaeldunn-jpg

0000millionhoodies

cropped-b4peace-header

obamabottomheader

Enhanced by Zemanta

Shannon Watts, Founder Of Moms Demand Action, Comments On Trial Against the Killer Of Jordan Davis.


 

By Jueseppi B.

MomsDemandAction

 

 

The trial of Michael Dunn, who shot and killed Jordan Davis in November 2012 in a dispute over loud music at a Jacksonville, Fla., gas station, began today. Dunn is expected to invoke Florida’s Stand Your Ground law in his defense – the same law used to exonerate George Zimmerman for killing Trayvon Martin last year. Jordan’s mother, Lucia McBath, is a national spokesperson for Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

 

jordan-davis-flag-320x487

 

As the trial begins, Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action, released the following statement:

 

“Moms want justice for Jordan, and for the nearly 10,000 children who are killed by guns every year. Jordan’s mother, Lucia McBath, has turned her grief into activism and we’re proud to stand with her. Together, we will stop Stand Your Ground laws and the “shoot first” mentality these laws promote. Jordan died after a dispute over loud music because Michael Dunn had easy access to a gun and felt within his rights to fire nine shots into a car full of unarmed teenagers. The impact of Stand Your Ground is real and devastating. I hope that justice is served in this trial and that lawmakers act quickly to rescind these dangerous laws.”

 

jordan-davis-2

seek-justice-slide

Jordan_Davis_and_Dad

941126_375162935934966_315036989_n

488143_339040889547171_1391156327_n

MayorsAgainstIllegalGuns

momsdemandaction (1)

BJwZCgQCEAEixg_

TALK-AJ-2-BILLBOARD-0202

unnamed

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

BREAKING NEWS: Marissa Alexander Bonds Out Of Jail. THATS A Great Thanksgiving Moment.


 

By Jueseppi B.

download (2)

 

 

Marissa Alexander bonds out of jail

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla — The Jacksonville mother convicted of shooting at her estranged husband has bonded out of jail.

 

Marissa Alexander was released just before midnight Wednesday. She is now under house arrest.

 

Alexander is awaiting a new trial for firing two shots near her estranged husband.

 

A judge ruled in September that Alexander would receive a new trial due to bad jury instructions given in her first trial.

 

Alexander and her attorneys say she fired the gun as a “warning shot.”

 

 

Statement from State Attorney‘s Office

 

“The State Attorney’s Office made all statements regarding its position on bond in its written response dated November 13, 2013. The SAO will continue to seek justice for our two child victims and their father who were endangered by the shot the defendant fired at them. Any further comments regarding the prosecution of this defendant will be made in the proper venue – the courtroom.”
402528_176619879142958_864642698_n

Jackelyn Barnard
State Attorney’s Office

402528_176619879142958_864642698_n

Marissa Alexander Released On Bail

 

 

 

Florida Woman Marissa Alexander Sentenced To 20 Years For Firing Warning Shot Seeks Bail

 

 

Marissa Alexander of Jacksonville, Florida was convicted of aggravated assault in March 2012. She has now been granted a new trial in September after her conviction was thrown out by an appeals court judge who said the trial jury was given incorrect instructions on self-defense.

 

A new trial for the 31-year-old mother of three will begin next April.

 

Alexander’s conviction sparked criticism of racial double standards in Florida’s justice system as it was compared to George Zimmerman‘s exoneration.

 

The Jacksonville woman, who is black, argued self-defense under the “Stand Your Ground” law, which gives the benefit of the doubt to a shooter who feels threatened. In her case no one was injured and she was still convicted.

 

More than a year later George Zimmerman, who is half Latino and half white, used the same defense. In his case a black teenager was killed and he was not convicted.

 

Alexander hopes she will be released from jail after her bond hearing on Wednesday. As she awaits the new trial, her team of prosecutors say they will be prepared.

 

“The facts are facts,” Assistant State Attorney David Thompson said. “Facts don’t change. So we’re going to put the same facts to the law and give the proper jury instruction this time.”

 

Related Links

 

Marissa Alexander Bond Order 

 

This is the best Thanksgiving that I have ever experienced. Enjoy your family Ms. Alexander. Well deserved. No Justice No Peace.

 

obamabottomheader

blogger4peacelogo

enoughisenough2 (1)

Whats In A Name? Racism. Disrespect. Evil. Hatred.


 

By Jueseppi B.

BXFlyJrCAAEtVsh

 

 

Nathan Bedford Forrest High School is a public high school in the Duval County School District located on the Westside of JacksonvilleFlorida. Forrest opened in 1959 in Jacksonville’s Wesconnett neighborhood, at the site of present-day J. E. B. Stuart Middle School. Forrest moved to its current location on Firestone Road in 1966. The facility on Firestone Road was a duplicate of the design used for Samuel W. Wolfson High School, the work of Jacksonville architect Taylor Hardwick. The school is named for Confederate General and first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan Nathan Bedford Forrest.

 

Namesake

Nathan Bedford Forrest was a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and later became the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. As of 2011, it is one of only two high schools named after Forrest; the other is located in his hometown of Chapel Hill, Tennessee. Prior to the school’s opening in 1959, many Jacksonville organizations suggested names for the new school, to be voted on at a school board meeting. After many ballots, “Nathan Bedford Forrest High School,” suggested by the Daughters of the Confederacy, won.

 

From The Florida Times Union, jacksonville.com:

 

First vote on controversial name change for Nathan B. Forrest High due Nov. 4

 

Online petition against name of ex-KKK leader reach 158,000 signatures

Change the name of Nathan Bedford Forrest High School

 

By Khristopher J. Brooks

 

Nathan B. Forrest High School’s Advisory Council plans to vote Nov. 4 on whether to start the lengthy process of re-naming the Westside school. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti says it’s hard to tell at this point how soon the issue could come before the Duval County School Board, but an online petition certainly has given the issue more national attention.

 

The school is named after Forrest, a Confederate Army Lt. General who was the first Grand Wizard of the Klu Klux Klan. On one side, proponents of the name change say a school should not be named after someone who was associated with a white-supremacy group. Opponents of the name change answer that Forrest later ordered that the Klan be disbanded and spoke against its racial hatred. They suggest that funds needed to change the school name should be spent on academic achievement.

 

10-22-2013 12-26-36 PM

 

Nathan B. Forrest High School’s Advisory Council plans to vote Nov. 4 on whether to start the lengthy process of re-naming the Westside school. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti says it’s hard to tell at this point how soon the issue could come before the Duval County School Board, but an online petition certainly has given the issue more national attention.

 

If Forrest High’s SAC approves starting the process for a name change, the School Board then decides whether to move forward. If so, the school district then must gather public opinion and consider new names.

 

At that point, Vitti must then decide whether he will recommend changing the name. If he does, the final vote comes down to the School Board.

 

Vitti said he and the School Board are awaiting a report from board member Connie Hall, who was assigned to determine where people in the Forrest community stand on changing the name. The report is due in coming weeks, the superintendent said.

 

Vitti already has said he would support a Forrest High name change if the push came naturally from the public.

 

Several attempts to reach Forrest High Principal Greg Bostic Friday were unsuccessful.

 

A decision on whether to change the school’s name has long been a divisive issue in Jacksonville.

 

A similar effort to change the school’s name died in 2007.

 

One proponent of the name change, Florida State College at Jacksonville professor Steven Stoll, said he’s delighted about the SAC’s upcoming vote.

 

“It’s wonderful,” he said. “It’s obvious people in the community have realized that this is the right thing to do.”

 

In recent weeks, Stoll has been leading an effort to send surveys across the city about re-naming Forrest. His goal is to gather 10,000 surveys before the School Board’s November meeting. On Friday, Stoll was sitting at home, staring at a stack of 1,500 completed surveys.

 

“I see a five-inch stack that says yes and an one-inch stack for no,” he said.

 

Stoll said there’s nothing scientific about his findings right now, but through conversations he has seen that young people, African Americans and people not from Duval County are more interested in changing the name, while older people who are white and are natives tend to want to keep the name.

 

“So, to me, it’s very much falling along racial lines,” the professor said.

 

The online petition, on Change.org, has helped Forrest High’s name change catapult into national headlines. It has gathered signatures from all over the country.

 

As of Friday, the petition had more than 158,000 signatures.

Change the name of Nathan Bedford Forrest High School

 

 

nathan-203x300

4f46672b52da4

549127_t607

Nathan-B-Forrest-High-School-jpg

Confederate Parks

 

 

Florida High School Keeps KKK Founder’s Name

 

School named after KKK leader asked to change its name

 

KKK asks panel to keep school named after ‘grand wizard’

 

Florida school named after KKK leader won’t change name

 

 

redskins-logo

 

 

Change.org Petition: Washington Redskins: Ask Daniel Snyder To Change The Name

 

From The DailyKOS:

On ‘Redskins,’ President Obama gets it right and Fox News Dem Lanny Davis gets it completely wrong

 

By Meteor Blades

sports-stereotypes-banner

 

 

Lanny Davis, once a Bill Clinton strategist, a pal of Joe Lieberman and now attorney for the Washington, D.C., NFL football franchise, chastised President Obama Monday for commenting unfavorably on the name of that team. In a Saturday interview, the president said:

“If I were the owner of the team and I knew that there was a name of my team — even if it had a storied history — that was offending a sizeable group of people, I’d think about changing it[.]“

. . .
“I don’t want to detract from the wonderful Redskins fans that are here,” the president said. “They love their team, and rightly so—even though they’ve been having a pretty tough time this year. But I think—all these mascots and team names related to Native Americans, Native Americans feel pretty strongly about it. And I don’t know whether our attachment to a particular name should override the real, legitimate concerns that people have about these things.”

 

Mr. Davis said the president ought to be focused on other things, challenged him because he hasn’t complained about the name of the Chicago Blackhawks hockey team and pointed out that an Associated Press poll last April found four out of five Americans don’t see the name of the Washington Redskins as offensive.

 

Sigh. In America today, anyone who defends the use of “nigger” or “chink” or “spic” or “Raghead” outside a Klan meeting or some other pocket of ignorance and hatred, gets treated like the racist s/he is. Anyone who showed up at a party in blackface and began tap-dancing would be ejected, and not too gently.

 

If somebody decided to buy the Tennessee Titans and rename them the Nashville N—-s, can it be doubted that the outcry would be heard nationwide?

 

Imagine what would happen if every time Robert Griffin weaved himself 30 yards downfield, the crowd leaped up to shout “Go Kikes!” The outcry would long ago have forced a change. But “Redskins”? That still gets a pass.

 

“Redskins” is treated differently than all these others. As is redface—adult non-Indians dressing up and delivering tomahawk chops and “Ugh, me big chief” talk. Plenty of places you can still get away with that without raising an eyebrow. Thus, we still have people defending the name of the Washington Redskins and the despicable Chief Wahoo of the Cleveland Indians baseball team and resistant to changing either.

 

Most people, we Indians are told, don’t find these matters offensive. In fact, we’re told—with a straight face—that these names and this mascot (and other caricatured team mascots) actually honor indigenous people. So, we’re told, not really asked, what’s the problem?

 

This, in fact, happens to us Indians all the time because so few non-Indian Americans are aware of the impact many common expressions have. We Indians often hear non-Indians describing one of these racist put-downs with a comment such as oh-that’s-not-racist. Or I-don’t-mean-it-offensively. Thus does “squaw” and “chief” and “off the reservation” or “casino Indian” get used frequently. We try, most of us, patiently to explain what’s wrong with these usages, just as we patiently explain why having a football team in the nation’s capital still named the “Redskins” in the 21st century is, frankly, grotesque. People’s defense of keeping the name makes the offense worse.

 

Some of those defenders will go to just about any lengths to make their case, including putting a fake chief up like some cigar store Indian to say he has no problem with the name. So it must be okay.

 

No it isn’t. It’s racist.

 

Thankfully, over the past few years, more and more non-Indians have gotten the message in the Washington team’s hometown, including writers such as Robert McCartney at the Washington Post earlier this year. There was even a symposium on the issue in D.C. in February. The pressure is on and the president has added some helpful support.

 

As Ray Halbritter, the leader of the Oneida tribe, told the Associated Press: “When one of the most valuable franchises in the NFL is using a racial epithet, how do you explain that to the children? How do you explain how it makes you feel as a human being?”

 

That the president has weighed in doesn’t mean the change will happen immediately. The National Congress of American Indians has,for decades, sought to get teams to drop the “Redskins” name. It has had considerable success at the college and high school levels. But the resistance, as Davis and the Washington team’s owner Dan Snyder have made clear, will continue.

 

And we should expect the team to trot out a couple more bona fide Indians to say they don’t think the name is offensive. That’s a trick we’ve seen used against us quite a few times in the past 400 years.

 

Thank you The DailyKOS.

 

Change.org Petition: Washington Redskins: Ask Daniel Snyder To Change The Name

 

washington-redskins9

 

The Washington Redskins organization is currently in shambles. The team is off to a mediocre start with a 1-4 record. More importantly the team has come under fire for reasons other than their poor play.

 

A segment of the Native American population is applying public pressure on Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder to change the name of the team. Native Americans feel the name is racist and the time has come to do what they consider is the right thing and change it.

 

As a Black American I understand why Native Americans feel as they do. As a human being and a male I’ve been subjected to racism in its purest form. I’ve been called the N-Word and many of its derivatives. If one understands the historical development of this country “Redskin” isn’t a very endearing term.

 

In May Snyder issued the following to the USA Today when asked if he would change the name. Snyder said, “We’ll never change the name. It’s that simple. NEVER-you can use caps.”

 

I smell a boycott against a racist insensitive greedy millionaire NFL team owner.

 

 

racism-in-america

BUh2mdaCEAAvkle

nc3

blogger4peacelogo obamacratbanner (2)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 233,798 other followers

%d bloggers like this: