• ✿ Welcome ✿

    Hello Graphic #37

  • VoteRiders.com

    Votes Count. Be Counted.

  • Registration INFO

    Barack The Vote

  • The 2014 Mid Term’s Are Almost Here.

    GET OUT AND VOTE!! Mid Term Election Day Happens OnNovember 4th, 2014
    6 months to go.
  • The 2016 Iowa Caucus

    The The 2016 Iowa Caucus Happens OnJanuary 18th, 2016
    21 months to go.
  • 2016 Presidential Election

    We Elect The 45th President In The 58th Quadrennial U.S. Presidential Election OnNovember 8th, 2016
    2.6 years to go.
  • Pete Souza

  • Barack Obama

  • Michelle Obama

  • VP Joey B.

  • Dr. Jill Biden

  • The White House

    Official Blog

  • White House Blog

  • The White House

  • OFA

  • Michelle Obama Fan Club

  • Barack Obama

  • TheObamaCrat™

  • Erase Racism NOW™

  • Loudly & Proudly™

  • TheObamaCrat™ Archives

Lilly Ledbetter, Tell Congress: Pass Paycheck Fairness.


 

By Jueseppi B.

Screen-shot-2014-04-08-at-7.50.18-AM

 

Tell Congress: Pass Paycheck Fairness

 

Equal pay for equal work is critical for our economy, our families and our children.

 

It is outrageous that in 2014 – 2014 – a woman can still be paid less than one of her male counterparts for the exact same work.

 

This is about fairness and economic opportunity for all. Pay discrimination is holding families back. Equal pay is not only an ideal, it should be a guarantee. That’s the message we have to send to Republicans in Congress now.

 

We have to fight for this.

 

Add your name today and join the call for basic paycheck fairness immediately.

 

 

Sen. Tammy Baldwin
Sen. Chris Coons
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
Sen. Kay Hagan
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
Sen. Amy Klobuchar
Sen. Joe Manchin
Sen. Bob Menendez
Sen. Mark Pryor
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen
Sen. Mark Udall
Sen. John Walsh
Sen. Mark Warner
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
Rep. Nita Lowey
Rep. Carolyn Maloney
Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney
Rep. Raul Ruiz
Rep. Kyrsten Sinema
Alison Lundergan Grimes, Candidate for Senate
Natalie Tennant, Candidate for Senate
Sean Eldridge, Candidate for Congress

 

20140407-FairPay-2

 

 

On Tuesday, Alison joined thousands of others in calling on Congress to act and pass the Paycheck Fairness Act.



Rather than listen to these voices, Mitch McConnell led the charge to block the legislation that would help close the pay gap between men and women. McConnell even went so far as to say equal pay for equal work “threatens to hurt” women even though, in Kentucky, women make just 76 cents for every dollar earned by a man. 



Someone needs to tell Mitch McConnell it’s 2014 – not 1963. 



Last week’s gridlock from McConnell makes the call for equal pay for equal work more important than ever.



Add your name now and tell Mitch McConnell to end the obstruction and pass paycheck fairness immediately.

 

Bk_WhGXCcAAaDTt

 

 

As Alison often says, “Equal pay for equal work isn’t just a women’s issue – it’s a family issue.” For countless working families living paycheck-to-paycheck, pay equity isn’t a “threat” or a “special interest vote” – it’s a principle of basic fairness that helps pay the bills and put food on the table. 

McConnell’s opposition to paycheck fairness is yet another example of how out of touch he has become with Kentucky’s working families.

Join us and sign the petition demanding Congressional action on paycheck fairness.

Thanks for standing with Alison and women across the country,

Lilly Ledbetter
Fair pay advocate

 

 

President Obama Speaks on Equal Pay for Equal Work

 

President Obama signs Executive Order for Paycheck Fairness.

President Obama signs Executive Order for Paycheck Fairness.

 

Published on Apr 8, 2014

Following an introduction by Lilly Ledbetter, President Obama announces two new executive actions to strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws for women.

 

 

 

lilly1

lilly

dc62dff0d07fc90d500f6a706700c8a0

2014-04-08t172139z_1895307678_gm1ea4903m101_rtrmadp_3_obama-women

2014-04-08t171831z_1018655448_gm1ea4903jo01_rtrmadp_3_obama-women

2014-04-08t172251z_1406107555_gm1ea4903rc02_rtrmadp_3_obama-women

a4a94c26d08ec90d500f6a7067002058

d0ca13b9dbb4a2ff92a53207cd48e7c2

lily9

lily8

2d12692dd07fc90d500f6a706700207e

BkKs05aCQAAS5aK

cropped-b4peace-header

obamacratbanner

obamabottomheader

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Alison Lundergan Grimes, Candidate For U.S. Senate: Tell Congress Raise The Minimum Wage


 

By Jueseppi B.

Graphic_Min-Wage

 

 

Tell Congress: Raise the Minimum Wage

 

For more than four years, the federal minimum wage has been frozen at $7.25 an hour. A family with two children that earns minimum wage lives below the poverty line. This is unacceptable.

 

Raising the minimum wage would lift millions of hardworking Americans out of poverty. Despite the indisputable benefits – and despite support for raising the minimum wage from 80% of Americans – congressional Republicans are blocking legislation on this common sense measure. We can’t let them get away with hurting working America‘s working families.

 

Add your voice and demand Congress raise the minimum wage and lift Americans out of poverty.

 

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand
U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp
U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen
U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard
U.S. Representative Sean Patrick Maloney
U.S. Representative Kyrsten Sinema

 

Sean Eldridge, Candidate for Congress LPAC
Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, Candidate for U.S. Senate

 

Add your name

 

Americans deserve wages that are consistent with our values.

I’m beyond disappointed to see legislation to raise the minimum wage continue to stall out in Congress.

 

Nobody who works a full-time job should be faced with choices like whether to take their children to the doctor or put a warm dinner on the table at the end of the day.

 

Especially on an issue like this, real leaders don’t fear compromise and finding common ground with folks outside their party.

 

It doesn’t matter which side of the aisle someone sits on — what matters is that raising the minimum wage would help Kentucky families.

 

Join me: Tell Congress to raise the minimum wage and give all working Americans a fair shot at the American Dream. 

 

Nobody wins when people aren’t paid a decent wage for their work, especially when we’re talking about huge corporations raking in record profits.

 

Why Mitch McConnell wouldn’t stand with America’s working families and support raising the minimum wage doesn’t make any sense to me. Even worse than that, he’s up to his usual gridlock ways and trying to quietly do away with this legislation altogether.

 

Now, I’ve heard from people around the Nation and I can tell you that’s not what they want to see happen. People tell me to keep putting the pressure on because there is wide support for raising the minimum wage, so that’s what I’m going to do.

 

Show your support: Add your name in favor of raising the minimum wage for hardworking Kentuckians and millions of Americans.

 

Let’s tell Congress to get this done.

 

KentuckSecretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, Candidate for U.S. Senate

 

 

The Campaign Begins

 

 

 

MEET ALISON

Kentucky born and raised

 

AG0204-kentuckyButton_274x274

 

Alison Lundergan Grimes has been working to improve the lives of fellow Kentuckians all her life.

 

Growing up in Central Kentucky, she learned the value of public service at an early age by volunteering with her family every year to distribute Thanksgiving dinners to the homeless. As a young adult, she continued to believe in the power to make a difference in the lives of others, working with the National Kidney Foundation. While working in the private sector, she provided free legal help to victims of domestic violence. Alison’s passion has always been increasing opportunity for every citizen of the Commonwealth.

 

As a successful business attorney in Lexington, Alison helped businesses open, expand and thrive in Kentucky, allowing them to create jobs and foster economic growth. She also worked with Kentucky institutions such as the Salvation Army, Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital and God’s Pantry Food Bank, where she serves on the Board of Directors.

 

As Kentucky’s Secretary of State, Alison has helped modernize and streamline government services to make sure Kentucky’s doors truly are open for small businesses. She works with industry leaders to promote Kentucky and embraces bipartisan cooperation to help expand our economy and create jobs. Her efforts, including establishing a one-stop business portal and a uniform business identification number, are helping businesses spend less time interacting with government and more time creating jobs and giving back to their communities.

 

Alison has also ushered in new laws that protect the voting rights of victims of domestic violence and absentee voters, maintain the integrity of the democratic process and save counties money in administering elections.

 

In September 2012, Alison traveled to the Middle East to meet with deployed soldiers to learn how to improve military voting procedures. Her recommendations received overwhelming bipartisan support and were signed into law in April 2013. The new law, Kentucky Heroes Voting Initiative, the first of its kind in the state, will allow military members and their families to register to vote and update their registration online, ensure that military voters have sufficient time to vote in special elections and extend existing protections to state and local elections and National Guard members.

 

Alison is a native of Maysville, Kentucky. She received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, where she served as a trustee to the Board of Directors. Alison obtained her law degree, graduating with honors, from American University, Washington College of Law, in Washington, DC.

 

Alison lives with her husband, Andrew, in Lexington.

 

AG0502-carMagnet_274x274

blogger4peacelogo

bvsdukuccaa7hnq

ALG_Facebook-Graphic.2jpg - Copy

Alison-for-Kentucky3 (1)

obamabottomheader

 

Mitch McConnell Is Scared: Team Mitch Distributed Misogynist Attack Against Alison Lundergan Grimes


 

By Jueseppi B.

20131119_McConnell_0

 

Yesterday, a Mitch McConnell senior staffer promoted an article that features the face of Democratic candidate for Senate in my home state of Kentucky, Alison Lundergan Grimes crudely pasted onto a scantily clad body.

 

Team Mitch is desperate. They’ve seen the latest polls that show him virtually tied with Alison Lundergan Grimes. Now they’re doing everything they can to avoid actually talking about the issues that matter to Kentucky families like my own. But we’re not going to let them get away with it.

 

Join EMILY’s List and Alison Lundergan Grimes and demand that Mitch McConnell apologize to the women of Kentucky.

 

Senator McConnell continues to lead the GOP’s War on Women, and he has demonstrated time and again just how out of touch he is with women.

 
Sign your name to tell Mitch McConnell that he needs to apologize to me, my mom, my grandmother, and all of the women of Kentucky.

 

Demand Mitch McConnell Apologize!

 

Team Mitch is desperate. But that’s no excuse for misogynst attacks. Join EMILY’s List and Alison Lundergan Grimes and tell Mitch McConnell that he needs to apologize to the women of Kentucky.

 

Add your name to demand that Mitch apologize!

 

ALG_Facebook-Graphic

alison-for-kentucky

blogger4peacelogo obamabottomheader

 

GOP Sends Clear Message To POTUS Obama: NO More Negros Or Females In YOUR Administration!


 

By Jueseppi B.

obstruction2

 

 

From The New York Times:

Senate Republicans Block 2 Obama Nominees

 

By 

 

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans on Thursday blocked the confirmation of two of President Obama’s nominees, one to a powerful appeals court and another to a housing lending oversight post, setting up a confrontation with Democrats that could escalate into a larger fight over limiting the filibuster and restricting how far the minority party can go to thwart a president’s agenda.

 

The Senate voted 55 to 38 to move forward with the nomination of Patricia Ann Millett to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, five votes short of the 60 required to break the Republican filibuster. Forty Republicans opposed the nomination, three voted “present” and two joined Democrats in supporting her. The vote to advance the nomination of Representative Melvin Watt, Democrat of North Carolina, to become the head of the Federal Housing Finance Agency was 56 to 42, four votes short. Forty-one Republicans opposed Mr. Watt, and two supported him.

Republican objections to Ms. Millet, however, had nothing to do with her judicial temperament or political leanings. Instead, Republicans say they want to refuse Mr. Obama any more appointments to the appeals court, which is widely recognized as second only to the Supreme Court in importance and often rules on the legality of executive branch actions.

Millett_0503_1-1

Patricia+Ann+Millett+Barack+Obama+Nominates+uNdAt_Pk9WRl

“Our Democratic colleagues and the administration’s supporters have been actually pretty candid,” said Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader. “They’ve admitted they want to control the court so it will advance the president’s agenda.”

The court is currently split evenly with four Republican appointees and four Democratic appointees among the judges who regularly hear cases. But it still has three vacancies. And Senate Democrats have accused Republicans, who are pushing a bill that would eliminate those three seats permanently because they argue the court has a light caseload, of trying to change the rules simply because they do not like the president who is picking judges.

“The judiciary is too important to play partisan games with,” said Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California. “And that’s exactly what’s going on here.”

Senator Patrick J. Leahy, Democrat of Vermont and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said Ms. Millett’s defeat would force Democrats to reconsider changing the Senate rules so Republicans would not be able use the filibuster so freely.

“It’s not fair, it’s not an extraordinary circumstance,” Mr. Leahy said of the Republicans’ reasons for opposing her. “There’s no justification for it.”

Whether Democrats have the stomach for another tense and consuming fight over the filibuster is an open question. Supporters of overhauling the rules note that with judges, the political calculation is far more complicated than changing the rules on filibusters against executive branch nominees.

Among senators of both parties, there is agreement that a president should be granted deference in picking members of his cabinet and top executive branch positions. But with judges, who are given lifetime terms that extend far beyond a president’s four or eight years in office, sentiments can be different.

Senator Jeff Merkley, Democrat of Oregon, said that he senses a reluctance among his colleagues to eliminate filibusters against judicial nominees in the event Democrats found themselves in the minority in the future.

“They’ll say, those folks are two or four years, they’re not lifetime appointments like judges. And so with judges we want to protect and sustain the ability to block bad judges,” he said, adding that he did not share that view because any majority can change the rules at any point and render the judicial filibuster obsolete.

“Preserving a filibuster on judicial nominees is not going to protect against judges you disagree with down the line if you’re in the minority,” Mr. Merkley said.

Thank you The New York Times.

 

 

57f461fa4e82adf795_3m6bxe2s

 

Senate GOP blocks Obama’s housing nominee

 

By Susan Davis, USA TODAY

 

WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans on Thursday blocked the nomination of Rep. Mel Watt, D-N.C., to head the agency that oversees mortgage lenders Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac at a critical time for the industry.

 

Democrats fell three votes shy of the 60 required to advance his nomination to lead the Federal Housing Finance Agency. White House spokesman Jay Carney called the vote “enormously disappointing” and said the president is hopeful Watt can be confirmed in the future.

 

FE_DA130501watt620x413

mel-watt-16x9

 

 

President Obama nominated the North Carolina Democrat in May to replace acting FHFA director Edward DeMarco. Thursday’s filibuster marked the first time since the Civil War that a sitting member of Congress was denied a presidential nomination by the Senate.

 

Senate Republicans opposed Watt’s nomination because they prefer the policies advanced by DeMarco, who has been targeted by liberal Democrats and activists for not doing more to aid homeowners facing foreclosure. Only two Republican senators broke with their party to support Watt: Rob Portman of Ohio and Richard Burr of North Carolina.

 

Republicans argue that DeMarco saved taxpayers money. Watt opponents said they feared the 11-term congressman would advance more costly policies. “I think this is the wrong job for this good man,” said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., who supported the GOP filibuster, citing the far-reaching authority granted the FHFA director. “There is no parallel in our country for an institution where so much power is concentrated in one person.”

 

Toomey also questioned Watt’s credentials, citing a previous comment made by Watt in which he said he didn’t understand derivatives, a controversial financial instrument. Toomey also said Watt supported the policies that “helped drive Fannie and Freddie into the conservatorship that cost taxpayers so much money.”

 

Watt is a veteran member of the House Financial Services Committee and Democrats hailed his credentials. “Mel Watt is the right man for the job,” said Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.”When it comes to housing, Congressman Watt has seen it all, and Congressman Watt has shown good judgment throughout it all.”

 

Watt was also strongly supported by civil rights groups and the Congressional Black Caucus, of which he is a member. Those groups decried the filibuster. “Mel Watt is a sitting member of Congress with the support of the realtors, the Mortgage Bankers Association, the homebuilders, consumer groups and civil rights advocates; today’s filibuster came from the most broken Senate in modern history,” said Nancy Zirkin, executive vice president of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.

 

The nomination was also dragged down by a brewing internal political fight over all presidential nominees.

 

Just after the Watt vote, Senate Republicans also filibustered Obama’s nomination for Patricia Millett to serve on the D.C. circuit court.

 

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has warned Republicans that he might again try to advance a controversial procedural rules change to confirm presidential appointees with 51 votes instead of 60 votes. It is a particularly divisive proposal for judicial nominations.

 

Republicans say that doing so would tear the institution apart, which is why is it informally called the “nuclear option.”

 

“We will destroy the very fabric of the United States Senate and that is that it requires a larger than numerical majority in order to govern,” said Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., in protest of Reid’s threat to change the rules.

 

Thank you USA TODAY.

 

obstruction5

 

 

I am a bit confused by the direction The TeaTardedRepubliCANT Tea Party Led GOP is headed. How does a political party plan to win an election by disenfranchising Black Voters, Female Voters, Latino Voters and any voter with a brain, which includes the poor, the elderly, the students and out military veterans?

 

Read this one more timeOn Ms. Millett’s defeat:  Republican objections to Ms. Millet, however, had nothing to do with her judicial temperament or political leanings. Instead, Republicans say they want to refuse Mr. Obama any more appointments to the appeals court, which is widely recognized as second only to the Supreme Court in importance and often rules on the legality of executive branch actions. “Our Democratic colleagues and the administration’s supporters have been actually pretty candid,” said Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader. “They’ve admitted they want to control the court so it will advance the president’s agenda.”

 

On Rep Watt’s defeatSenate Republicans on Thursday blocked the nomination of Rep. Mel Watt, D-N.C., to head the agency that oversees mortgage lenders Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac at a critical time for the industry. President Obama nominated the North Carolina Democrat in May to replace acting FHFA director Edward DeMarco. Thursday’s filibuster marked the first time since the Civil War that a sitting member of Congress was denied a presidential nomination by the Senate.

Senate Republicans opposed Watt’s nomination because they prefer the policies advanced by DeMarco, who has been targeted by liberal Democrats and activists for not doing more to aid homeowners facing foreclosure. Only two Republican senators broke with their party to support Watt: Rob Portman of Ohio and Richard Burr of North Carolina.

Republicans argue that DeMarco saved taxpayers money. Watt opponents said they feared the 11-term congressman would advance more costly policies. “I think this is the wrong job for this good man,” said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., who supported the GOP filibuster, citing the far-reaching authority granted the FHFA director. “There is no parallel in our country for an institution where so much power is concentrated in one person.”

 

All the pretty words above simply mean the GOPretenders will not approve any further Presidential nominees because they don’t like the President skin color.

 

No More nominees for the Negro President.

 

BX1wTTZCUAETsHv

BX3a8OeCMAIQIGt

 

fatherhealthcare

bx3vc6scaaaqkql

BXwDErbCMAAWVZs

seek-justice-slide

stop-the-madness

blogger4peacelogo obamacratbanner

WE Work On The Weekends….When There’s Work To Be Done!


 

By Jueseppi B.

President Barack Obama meets with Senate Democratic leadership. Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin, Sen. Charles Schumer, Sen. Patty Murray, and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid to discuss the government shutdown and the nation’s debt ceiling in the Oval Office of the White House

President Barack Obama meets with Senate Democratic leadership. Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin, Sen. Charles Schumer, Sen. Patty Murray, and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid to discuss the government shutdown and the nation’s debt ceiling in the Oval Office of the White House

 

White House Tweets – October 12, 2013

 

 

 
BS2FiYBCAAAAOEJ

Lawmakers arrive for budget showdown

 

Members of Congress arrive for a special Saturday session as the government shutdown continues and the debt ceiling deadline looms.

 

Photos courtesy of M.Scott Mahaskey/POLITICOPhotos - Associated Press

.

 

Mitch McConnell The pendulum has swung back to Senate Republicans, who now look more likely to cut a deal with Obama to end the first government shutdown since 1996.

Mitch McConnell
The pendulum has swung back to Senate Republicans, who now look more likely to cut a deal with Obama to end the first government shutdown since 1996.

Eric Cantor Eric Cantor told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Oct. 12 that “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight."

Eric Cantor
Eric Cantor told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Oct. 12 that “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight.”

John Boehner John Boehner says that the House GOP and the White House have not reached a deal

John Boehner
John Boehner says that the House GOP and the White House have not reached a deal

Ted Cruz The fiery Texas senator confronted President Barack Obama over his health care law during a meeting at the White House Friday attended by dozens of GOP senators.

Ted Cruz
The fiery Texas senator confronted President Barack Obama over his health care law during a meeting at the White House Friday attended by dozens of GOP senators.

House Democrats line up to sign a discharge petition.

House Democrats line up to sign a discharge petition.

Sen. Lindsey Graham The  South Carolina Republican is a key Senate player.

Sen. Lindsey Graham
The South Carolina Republican is a key Senate player.

Steny Hoyer The House minority whip speaks to Democrats at the petition signing.

Steny Hoyer
The House minority whip speaks to Democrats at the petition signing.

Susan Collins Democratic leaders in the Senate rejected an offer by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) to end the budget impasse, arguing it asks for too much in return for too little.

Susan Collins
Democratic leaders in the Senate rejected an offer by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) to end the budget impasse, arguing it asks for too much in return for too little.

Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) walk together after a closed-door Senate GOP meeting. Some polls indicate the fiscal standoff is sending the GOP to a historic nadir, a result that McCain described as “devastating."

Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) walk together after a closed-door Senate GOP meeting. Some polls indicate the fiscal standoff is sending the GOP to a historic nadir, a result that McCain described as “devastating.”

Chuck Grassley Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) arrives for the Senate GOP closed-door meeting.

Chuck Grassley
Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) arrives for the Senate GOP closed-door meeting.

Harry Reid When asked if he is confident he could reach a deal with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told POLITICO: “No."

Harry Reid
When asked if he is confident he could reach a deal with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told POLITICO: “No.”

 

 

From POLITICO

 

President Obama huddles with Senate Dem leaders

 

 

President Barack Obama summoned Senate Democratic leaders to the White House to talk strategy Saturday afternoon after budget and debt ceiling talks between administration officials and House Republicans fell apart overnight.

 

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nevada), along with Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) huddled with Obama in the Oval Office for about an hour and 15 minutes starting around 3:30 p.m. Saturday to discuss the state of the talks just days before the United States is set to exhaust its borrowing power and risk defaulting on the nation’s debt.

 

The White House announced the session — which also included White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, deputy chief of staff Rob Nabors and Office of Management and Budget Director Sylvia Mathews Burwell — just minutes before it began, but was tight-lipped about the agenda. Still photographers were allowed in for a glimpse of the meeting, but reporters and video cameras were kept out.

 

The optics of the day suggested a Washington once again mired in chaos. In a party-line vote, Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic proposal to lift the debt ceiling through 2014 without any spending cuts or changes to Obamacare. And just before that vote, word surfaced that Senate Democratic leaders rejected a compromise proposal from Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) which would have lifted the debt ceiling through January and keep the government open until March.

 

Still, there was a sense that amidst all the fighting, a solution is in the works. That’s because two of the most skilled negotiators on Capitol Hill — Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell — have started talking to each other, something they haven’t done in months.

“As long as people are still negotiating and still talking, that’s positive,” Collins told reporters, though she, like others, was frustrated with Democrats for rejecting her plan.

 

A Senate Democratic leadership aide said the senators had a very productive meeting with the president, “and they remain fully united moving forward.”

 

“The President and the leaders compared notes and reviewed a number of the options raised in meetings over the past few days. Their conclusion was that while Democrats remain united, Republicans have yet to coalesce behind a clear negotiating position,” the aide said in a statement. “The President and the leaders agreed that talks between Senate Democratic and Senate Republican leaders should continue in the coming days, but Democrats’ position remains the same: Democrats are willing to negotiate on anything Republicans want to discuss as soon as we reopen the government and pay our bills.”

 

Meanwhile, Republican senators were eager for a way out of the mess — and have their faith invested in McConnell to figure out a way forward.

 

 

“In the end, Sen. McConnell and Sen. Reid have to come up with a recommendation for us about how to open the government, how to pay our bills by raising the debt limit and how to reduce the debt,” Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) said. “We have to move forward. I think we have to do the best we can, send it to the House, and then they’ll do the best they can.”

 

The talks came after Obama rejected a proposal from House Republicans on Friday that would have lifted the debt ceiling for six weeks, reopened the government and established six weeks of budget negotiations.

 

“We can’t wait for the House to save us, we have to find our own bipartisan path forward,” said Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin.

 

But the Senate leadership discussions are hardly a slam dunk.

 

Each man is unpopular back home — something that McConnell will have to contend with as he tries to cut a deal with Reid and faces a tough reelection next year.

 

Last year, McConnell was the chief architect behind the fiscal cliff deal, after reaching a bitter impasse with Reid and instead reaching an eleventh-hour accord with Vice President Joe Biden.

 

But the Kentucky senator came under fire from the right because the deal raised tax rates on wealthy Americans. And as he faces a primary challenger back home, ahead of a potentially tough Democratic opponent, many in Washington believe McConnell is hamstrung and unable to stick his neck out in the latest fiscal crisis engulfing the Capitol.

 

And in the House, conservative Republicans are urging their Senate counterparts to remain strong.

 

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Saturday morning that, “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight,” according to sources in the room.

 

For all sides, the clock is the biggest enemy. It’s unclear if a deal brokered by the Senate could come together before Thursday, when the $16.7 trillion debt limit must be boosted, according to Treasury Secretary Jack Lew. House Republican leadership sources say their offer of a six-week debt limit increase might regain favor if a Senate-brokered deal does not come together before that deadline.

 

— Kevin Cirilli, Manu Raju, Jake Sherman, Burgess Everett and John Bresnahan contributed to this report

 
Thank you POLITICO.

 

Reid to Republicans: It’s Not Too Late To Do The Right Thing

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

Senate floor speech, October 12, 2013

 

 

 

Reid: Open the Government, Let Us Pay Our Bills

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

The focus of efforts to end the government shutdown and prevent a U.S. default shifted to the Senate on Saturday, where leaders were in talks to resolve the twin stalemates. The Senate rejected a Democratic effort to raise the debt ceiling. (Oct. 12)

 

 

 

Day 12 of Government Shutdown

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

House Democrats call for vote to end the federal shutdown. (October 12)

 

 

 

Reid: Speaker Boehner Couldn’t Deliver

 

Published on Oct 3, 2013

In an interview with CNN, Senator Reid discusses his conversations with Speaker Boehner to prevent a shutdown.

 

 

 

obama-budget

2013-10-12t201429z_1944490787_gm1e9ad0bpv01_rtrmadp_3_usa-fiscal

2013-10-12t201639z_538567316_gm1e9ad0brd02_rtrmadp_3_usa-fiscal

barackobamagovernmentshutdowncontinueseikkiclgnqel

barackobamagovernmentshutdowncontinuesicr62zfhuhtl

barackobamagovernmentshutdowncontinuessrc7dni_abll

ben-carson

BWZp6rWCcAE-gjM

BWZXrDOCIAACIKY

 

 

 

blogger4peacelogo obamabottomheader

 

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 110,342 other followers

%d bloggers like this: