The MilitantNegro SoapBox™: #BlackLivesMatter


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Do Black Lives Matter?

 

 

Black Lives Matter: Ferguson Erupts After Grand Jury Clears Officer in Michael Brown Killing

 

 

Black Lives Matter

 

 

Black Lives Matter: Oakland Speaks On Ferguson

 

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The hashtag #BlackLivesMatter has gone viral and is trending worldwide thanks to Twitter. As expected, jealous ass caucasians joined by caucasians who just don’t “get it” as usual want to hijack the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag with #AllLivesMatter. Bull shit. The moment caucasians start to get murdered for selling loose cigarettes, or shot 6 times for walking down the middle of a deserted street, or assaulted for not showing a cop ID, or shot dead for holding toy guns….when you caucasian folks get centuries of abuse, oppression and mistreatment…..THEN AND ONLY THEN CAN YOU CLAIM THAT YOUR LIFE MATTERS.

 

 

Until then, sit the fuck down and shut the fuck up. #BlackLivesMatter ain’t about YOU. It’s a rallying cry for injustice against Black Americans who are disgusted with Black Genocide from law enforcement.

 

For those uneducated caucasians who say I am racist….No person of color can ever be racist. Why? Racism is about Power, Control, Oppression & Wealth. What Black person do you know who has Power, Control,  has enough Wealth to Oppress anyone? Black people are the oppressed, and have been for centuries, so we can not be racist. What we can do is fight racism as best we can. And you are witnessing that fight right now.

 

 

Enough with all this garbage ass talk of #AllLivesMatter. When caucasians, who do the oppressing both mentally and physically, are the oppressed, then and only then will #AllLivesMatter. Until then, “Miss Me With That Bull Shit.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meet The Man Showing America The Real Ferguson Story: DeRay Mckesson.


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“I didn’t want that to be the story about Mike Brown”: Meet the man showing America the real Ferguson story

DeRay Mckesson didn’t know of Mike Brown or Ferguson four months ago. Here’s how all that changed

By SARAH JAFFE

 

DeRay Mckesson had never met Michael Brown. He’d never even been to the St. Louis area before Aug. 16, but after watching the protests break across his social media feeds, he got in his car and headed out, leaving a note on his Facebook page asking if anyone could help him find a place to stay.

“I didn’t know what was real or not,” he tells Salon. He had to see for himself, to be part of it. When he was tear-gassed for the first time, it only made him more committed to building a lasting movement.

 

That was almost four months ago. Since then, he’s become one of the most recognizable social media presences keeping the public updated on the protests in Ferguson and elsewhere, as they’ve spread across the country. He started an email newsletter that he co-curates with Johnetta Elzie, another young activist based in St. Louis, sending out articles, action alerts, photos and tweets about the growing movement. The newsletter serves to connect people with actions and with each other, to filter an overwhelming volume of news reports, and to maintain a narrative of the movement going forward.

 

To Mckesson, the newsletter is about “fighting this fight in a different way.” He remembers the night the verdict came down that George Zimmerman, the Florida man who shot Trayvon Martin, would get off. “I remember it was like at night when the verdict came out and you were alone, you didn’t know who to talk to, you couldn’t find any information then, you didn’t know what was real and what wasn’t,” he says. “I didn’t want that to be the story about Mike Brown.”

 

In the weeks following Brown’s death, national media flocked to Ferguson, broadcasting from its streets and often unintentionally making itself the story, or focusing on conflict between protesters and police rather than on what was being built between the protesters on the ground and the people around the world who were following them on social media. Mckesson and Elzie’s newsletter created a supplement to often-rushed social media accounts, and applied an activist’s view to the news coming out of Ferguson. The stories they choose come with their commentary, notes like “Though we find this to be subtle victim-blaming, we encourage you to read it,” from Nov. 20 on a local media story on Vonderrit Myers, another young black man shot by police in the days following Brown’s death. Or “As you read, tune into the slant that subtly blames the protests for a spike in crime in STL, from Dec. 4.

 

“We try to make sure that there’s a broad cross-section,” Mckesson says. “There are a lot of articles that get a lot of play that actually don’t say a whole lot, whereas there are some articles that don’t get any play but they’re really powerful, and we want to make sure that they get visibility. We also want there to be a record of the movement, so when people look back they can track the movement through the news and the commentary.”

 

At the beginning, he notes, people told him there would never be enough news for the newsletter to continue, and yet 64 issues later, he says, “We’re making really tough decisions every day.” For example, the morning after the news broke that a grand jury would not indict the officer who killed Eric Garner in Staten Island, they had to spend a lot of time winnowing down the many stories to those that included something different, something important, other than the news that presumably, most readers had heard.

 

The Ferguson protests broke on social media, and like the other social movements of the post-financial crisis era, social media has allowed people like Mckesson to reach an audience without relying on traditional news outlets. It has, the newsletter shows, also allowed them to become very astute critics of their own press coverage.

 

But the goal of the newsletter is not just to manage a public image; it is to motivate, as its title says, “Words to Action.” It opens with a countdown: number of days Darren Wilson has remained free. Number of days Kajieme Powell has been dead. Number of days Vonderrit Myers has been dead. It includes bolded calls to action, links to where readers can donate, tweet, submit and even buy T-shirts that support movement organizations. Notably, those organizations are local, small and mostly led by young people, part of this new generation of activists that, as Mychal Denzel Smith wrote, have shaken off nostalgia and have clear eyes set on making big changes, now.

 

“I think that what’s really powerful about Ferguson is that it started because regular people without an organization came together because they knew something was wrong,” Mckesson says. “What is different about social media and I think what is true about this movement is that it allows many voices to be heard at the same time and it’s not necessarily a competition for air, which is really powerful.”

 

Social media has, as well, Mckesson says, served to legitimize certain voices as authoritative — not by virtue of their position in a national organization, but because we can see through their eyes, night after night of violent police crackdowns, day after day of building. Social media can capture a moment — a die-in at a convenience store, a blocked highway — and give it life beyond its brief duration. It also adds pressure for the activists who have a large following to be there at every action. They wind up functioning, themselves, as journalists, albeit ones who are not being paid and supported by a major publication — and, Mckesson notes, ones who can say what they feel without having to adhere to some ideal of objectivity, without having to ask for the cops’ side of the story.

 

That allows them to challenge the narratives that pop up again and again in the media. “People always ask about the anger and rage and, yes, we are angry, we are enraged, but that doesn’t sustain a movement for 118 days. Love does,” Mckesson says. “There is this incredible sense of love in protest that is real that wasn’t getting visibility. So I was tweeting, there’s a cleanup crew, their job is to clean up after the protest. There is a woman who gets on the corner every day with her grill and feeds protesters as they walk to protests. There is somebody who passes out water every day, there is somebody who buys 50 pizzas, there are people who hold hands as they protest.”

 

The media’s focus on rage, he points out, paints black people as monolithic, as only capable of one emotion, one type of expression. “One of the narratives of blackness in protest is ‘the angry people outside,’ as opposed to ‘disenfranchised people who’ve been oppressed and victimized as they tried to grieve,’” he says. “We’ve been tear-gassed and shot at and LRAD’d and smoke-bombed and all these things and we still protest every day because we know that not only will our silence not save us, our surrender won’t save us, a video camera won’t save us. It is not that we are willing to die, it’s that we are unwilling to live in an America where blackness equals death.”

 

As the protests have spread and continued around the country, blocking highways and streets, shuttering stores, dying-in in public spaces, Mckesson notes, “Ferguson manifests differently in many different places.” It is important, he says, to remember that when you are facing down violent police, it is hard to move beyond basic survival as a goal. People understandably have a hard time talking about systemic reform with a gun in their face or when they can’t pay the bills. That’s why, as an educator and activist, he feels compelled to stay in this movement. “You have to be alive to learn,” he says. All of the improvement in schools in the world will mean nothing if kids are being killed by the people who are supposed to protect them.

 

And so the struggle goes on. Mckesson spent the weekend in New York joining protests for Eric Garner, and he and Elzie plan to continue the newsletter — and their activism — as long as is necessary.

 

“Ferguson didn’t show us that there’s racial injustice in America. We knew that,” he says. “What Ferguson showed us was the power of people coming together to demand change. Ferguson made protests comfortable, gave people permission to protest. It allowed people to access their voice in a different way.”

 

Thank you SARAH JAFFE.

 

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In the face of NO Black leaders taking THE LEAD on Black Genocide, Mr. DeRay Mckesson IS the Black Leader for this struggle. His voice on #Ferguson and all things related to the killing of unarmed Black Americans has been exemplary as well as informative. He consistently focuses on the issues and does not allow himself or others to lose sight of whats at stake: #BlackLivesMatter. Yes I said #BlackLivesMatter. All lives won’t matter until caucasians start to die at the hands of law enforcement for being caucasian.

 

Thank you Mr. DeRay Mckesson. Follow him at https://twitter.com/deray”>deray mckesson @deray on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Thanksgiving? HELL No.


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Happy Thanksgiving? If you’re caucasian. And accepted for who you are. If you’re wealthy and have food to eat. If you’re a racist and express hatred toward those unlike you. Yes, I guess today would be a Happy Thanksgiving.

 

Not a Happy Thanksgiving for me. Or The Michael Brown Family. The Trayvon Martin Family. The Sean Bell Family. The Oscar Grant Family. The Michelle Cusseaux Family. The Miriam Carey Family. The Renisha McBride Family. The John Crawford Family. The Kajieme Powell Family. The Clinton Allen Family. The Ezell Ford Family. The Eric Garner Family. The Roshad McIntosh Family. The Vonderrit Myers Family. The Kendrick Johnson Family. The Jordan Davis Family.

 

There are literally thousands I am not listing here this morning, mostly because I can’t recall them all, and that shames me but also makes me violently angry that a list of Black Americans, Black human beings, have been executed by AmeriKKKan Law Enforcement. The largest gang of true thugs on the planet. So well organized a gang are they, that they all have unions to protect their legalized murder of Black  Life.

The REAL Thugs In AmeriKKKa...The Police.

The REAL Thugs In AmeriKKKa…The Police.

I offer my sincere apologies to all the families of victims of The Black Genocide. I am sorry I can’t remember each and every dead Black man & woman, each slaughtered Black child, at the hands of those we pay to “Serve & Protect” us. I am saddened the total number of those murdered by police is not tracked or documented by anyone in AmeriKKKa. I am pissed that there is no agency policing the police.

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I am also very angry with the multitude of caucasians who criticize the reactions in Ferguson, Missouri, to Darren Wilson being exonerated for murdering UNARMED Michael Brown. 

 

 

The issue isn’t the reaction to the . The issue IS the .

 

Lets get to the rioting in Ferguson. This image says it all: From Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King…..I took the liberty of writing this quote from MLK so those who condemn the reaction in Ferguson by asking the dumbass question “what would Dr. King do”, can read his words.

 

 

Just in case you can’t see the words………

 

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contigent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. Ans I must say tonight that a riot  is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promise of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King.

 

I have come across many many many dumbass caucasians, some racist and some not racist, with all types of opinions on what is happening not only in Ferguson, Missouri, but nationwide in cities and towns….protest against the no indict decision by the Ferguson Grand Jury. Racist or not, many caucasians just don’t get it, simply don’t understand. 

 

Until you experience racism, until your caucasian race starts to die for being caucasian, until a caucasian POTUSA gets the racial hatred Barack Hussein Obama has received just for having skin like mine, until you get racially profiled in a store when inside your pocket is 7 times the cash of anyone else in that store, your judgement of the violence in Ferguson means jack shit. I love how people sitting comfortably in their homes pass judgement on people reacting to Black Genocide in Ferguson, Missouri. Racism is the problem, racism is the cause and racism requires a response. The response in Ferguson is appropriate.

 

Black Americans are tired. Fed up. Angry. Hurt. Insulted. Disrespected. All because of a beautiful skin tone given them by DNA missing in caucasians. YOU mad cause you lack Melanin in your skin. Then you turn around and attempt to judge a people who bear the brunt of racial discrimination, racial profiling, racial hatred and being singled out as a thug every time a Black man stands up and reacts to violence with violence.

 

Then there’s this bull shit miscarriage of justice: From Lawrence O’Donnell’s Rewrite…..

 

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MSNBC  host Lawrence O’Donnell blasted St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh on Wednesday for taking weeks to tell the grand jury in the Darren Wilson case she made a major mistake regarding police officers’ right to use legal force.

 

“With prosecutors like this, Darren Wilson never really needed a defense lawyer,” he said.

 

O’Donnell said that early on in the jurors’ deliberations, Alizadeh handed them a copy of a 1979 Missouri statute saying police were “justified in the use of such physical force as he or she reasonably believes is immediately necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape from custody.” However, he explained, the Supreme Court found those kinds of statutes to be unconstitutional six years later.

 

NBC host Lawrence O’Donnell blasted St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh on Wednesday for taking weeks to tell the grand jury in the Darren Wilson case she made a major mistake regarding police officers’ right to use legal force.

 

“With prosecutors like this, Darren Wilson never really needed a defense lawyer,” he said.

 

O’Donnell said that early on in the jurors’ deliberations, Alizadeh handed them a copy of a 1979 Missouri statute saying police were “justified in the use of such physical force as he or she reasonably believes is immediately necessary to effect the arrest or prevent the escape from custody.” However, he explained, the Supreme Court found those kinds of statutes to be unconstitutional six years later.

 

Thank you NBC host Lawrence O’Donnell.

 

In 1985 the Supreme court found the statute that had allowed police to shoot a suspect for running away, unconstitutional. This old outdated law, struck down as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court was handed out to the Ferguson, Missouri Grand Jury by St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh…..as fact and jury instruction.

 

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As of 1985, American law enforcement is no longer allowed by law to just shoot a suspect, or any American citizen, for running away. That police action was deemed Unconstitutional by The U.S. Supreme Court. Yet St. Louis County assistant district attorney Kathy Alizadeh, handed out that outdated law, that unconstitutional law, as a guideline in considering Darren Wilson actions in murdering Michael Brown.

 

Darren Wilson testifies before the Grand Jury

 

A Closer Look at Darren Wilson, Cop who Murdered Michael Brown – Lawrence O’Donnell

 

You can see from the contents of this post, how this Thanksgiving is not Happy for me. Or for any Black family missing their loved ones due to Black Genocide.

 

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Help Right Now In Ferguson. Michael Brown’s Parents React To Darren Wilson’s First TV Interview “How Can Your Conscience Be Clear After Killing Someone?”


 

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Here’s a way to do something for Ferguson right now: Join me in donating to one of the Ferguson-area classroom projects below.

-Rachel Sklar

 

 

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i is for iPad Mini

Hearing a book read aloud helps my students see how the words on the page can come alive in a fluid, expressive way. It provides a model of fluent reading! My students are in need of more… more

My students need 2 mini iPads and cases to have access to technology. This will allow them to listen to reading in order to implement the Common Core Standards.

 

 

#FergusonStrong with iPads for Autism

A normal day in my classroom begins when my five students with autism walk in and give me a bright “good morning!” We work hard to practice social skills, math, reading, and communication in small… more

My students need two iPads to increase engagement and communication throughout the school day.

 

 

Building A Technology Classroom in Ferguson

My classroom is a place were students can experience things that they never knew they would enjoy. They can work cooperatively to build free-standing structures out of unusual materials, design… more

My students need 6 Chrome books to complete a classroom set.

 

 

Hear All Our Voices in Ferguson

By the time they finish 3rd grade, I want my students to have a strong, unwavering writing voice. Children need to know that their stories matter. They need to know that everyone has a story, and… more

My students need 10 laptops for a classroom writing program that includes an after-school community collaborative writing group.

 

 

All About That Bass – Round Three!

My students walk into my classroom excited about learning how to play a string instrument. Some students are trying out the instruments for the very first time; others have been playing for up to… more

My students need a 1/4 sized upright string bass, a bass stand, humidifier to help eliminate potential repairs due to weather and back up strings should any break.

 

 

Promoting Success for All Students in Ferguson

From childhood the belief that ‘education is the one thing that can’t be taken from you’ has been instilled in me. People can take your fortune, home, freedom, but they cannot take your education… more

My students need stability balls to replace their classroom chairs. Studies show that when both sides of the brain are simultaneously stimulated students greatly benefit.

 

 

Tablet For Flipping The Classroom

I recently started to use the flipped classroom strategy for my science classes. The students are able to watch the lectures at their own pace and as many times as needed prior to the actual class… more

My students need a tablet that has stylus technology.

 

 

All About That Bass – Round Four!

My students walk into my classroom excited about learning how to play a string instrument. Some students are trying out the instruments for the very first time; others have been playing for up to… more

My students need a 1/4 sized upright string bass, a bass stand, humidifier to help eliminate potential repairs due to weather and back up strings should any break.

 

 

Tablets For Tots

Every morning we start the day by singing along to Will.i.am’s Sesame Streets song “What I Am”. We call this our “pump it up jam.” Much like athletes have a song to get them ready to give their… more

My students need 5 IPad mini’s, protective covers and cases

 

 

Kindergarten Confidence Through Technology!

Our classroom is a place of safety, honesty, laughter, stability and most of all equality for all my kids. Equality is not only race or gender but giving each child the opportunity to learn using…more

My students need two iPad minis with Wi-Fi.

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Michael Brown’s Parents React To Darren Wilson’s First TV Interview “How Can Your Conscience Be Clear After Killing Someone?”

 

 

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An Open Letter to White America

By 

I am sending out a call for compassion. I am sending out a call for reason. I am sending out a call for an expansion of our presence with one another. This morning, a Black woman tweeted that she thought she was okay, until she saw a group of children walking to school and burst into tears. I don’t know what it is like to live inside that sort of fear, anguish, grief, and pain.

 

I am not a parent, frightened that a child might not make it home from the store. I am not a man who knows that just walking out the door might get me shot. I am not a woman – cis or trans – who knows that asking for help from police might just get me raped or killed.

 

The rallying cry of “Black Lives Matter” is important because, within these systems, they clearly don’t. Black lives, in the United States, only matter to the systems of capitalism and imperialism as resources to be exploited and cast off. 

We have got to turn this around. Black. Lives. Matter.

Someone on my Facebook feed commented this week that all life is sacred, and we shouldn’t preference Black people as being special. I replied that all life is indeed sacred, but some life is more endangered. Black lives are more endangered. This is simple reality. In this, I’m not appealing to empathy or emotion, I’m drawing upon facts.

This is not something over which we can “agree to disagree.” This is a truth.

Taken from:

An Open Letter to White America

 

By 

Check put the entire article…..

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Powerful Open Letter Ferguson Protesters Just Released to the World …..


Originally posted on It Is What It Is:

~~November 26, 2014~~

Ferguson protesters released an open letter Monday night after a St. Louis grand jury handed down its decision not to indict Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown.

~THE RESULTS ARE IN~

FergDec

An Open Letter from Protestors On The Grand Jury Decision

November 24, 2014

In Ferguson, a wound bleeds. For 108 days, we have been in a state of prolonged and protracted grief. In that time, we have found community with one another, bonding together as family around the simple notion that our love for our community compels us to fight for our community. We have had no choice but to cling together in hope, faith, love, and indomitable determination to capture that ever-escaping reality of justice. After 108 days, that bleeding wound has been reopened, salt poured in, insult added to the deepest of injury.

On August 9th, we found ourselves pushed into…

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