Man Who Shot NYPD Choke-Hold Video, 22-year-old Ramsey Orta, Arrested On Gun Charge.


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Man Who Shot NYPD Choke-Hold Video, 22-year-old Ramsey Orta, Arrested On Gun Charge.

 

Ramsey Orta appears with the Rev. Al Sharpton at Eric Garner’s funeral on July 23, 2014. (credit: Getty Images)

Ramsey Orta appears with the Rev. Al Sharpton at Eric Garner’s funeral on July 23, 2014. (credit: Getty Images)

 

[NEW UNSEEN VIDEO] NYPD Chokehold Death : Eric Garner Chokehold Death

 

Published on Jul 20, 2014

Another video has surfaced online of Eric Garner, a New York man who died after an NYPD officer put him in a chokehold in broad daylight on Thursday.

 

In the new video, Staten Island resident, 43-year-old Garner, appears unconscious or dead as officers stand around him, keeping him rolled onto his side.

 

Witnesses at the scene remark that police aren’t doing enough to save Garner’s life in the video.

 

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“Now they’re trying to get him an ambulance, after they harassed and slammed him down,” a woman taking the video says. “[The] NYPD harassing people for no reason, he didn’t do anything at all.”

 

Police said Garner “took a fighting stance” and was resisting an arrest for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes when he suffered a heart attack and died.

 

 
Medical examiners have not yet released an official cause of death.

 

In video obtained exclusively by The New York Daily News, an officer can be seen wrapping his arm around Garner’s neck in a chokehold position and throwing him to the ground.

 

Garner desperately shouts “I can’t breathe!” multiple times before going silent.

 

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In the new video, an emergency medical service worker can be seen taking Garner’s pulse and attempting to talk to him.

 

“Why is no one doing CPR?” a witness at the scene asks.

 

“He’s breathing,” an officer responds back.

 

Mayor Bill de Blasio expressed his condolences, and promised a thorough investigation into the incident. In the wake of Garner’s death, de Blasio has delayed his ten-day Italian vacation.

 

 

 

Man Who Shot Chokehold Video Held on Gun Charge

 

Ramsey Orta appears with the Rev. Al Sharpton at Eric Garner’s funeral on July 23, 2014. (credit: Getty Images)

Ramsey Orta appears with the Rev. Al Sharpton at Eric Garner’s funeral on July 23, 2014. (credit: Getty Images)

 

Published on Aug 3, 2014

The NYPD said Sunday that the man who shot a video of a fatal police chokehold had been arrested on a gun charge.

 

 

 

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — The man who shot a video of a fatal police chokehold has been arrested on a gun charge, police said.

 

Ramsey Orta, 22, was arrested Saturday night on Staten Island on a charge of criminal possession of a firearm, an NYPD spokesman said.

 

Orta shot the video of an officer using a choke hold to restrain Eric Garner on July 17. Garner died shortly after.

 

Police say an unloaded semi-automatic weapon was recovered from Orta. It was reported stolen in Michigan in 2007.

 

They say Orta is in a hospital being treated for a medical condition.

 

It wasn’t clear if Orta had a lawyer.

 

Rev. Al Sharpton said Orta’s arrest supports his call for the federal government to take over the case. Rev. Sharpton also said this is because the Staten Island district attorney shouldn’t be in the position of prosecuting someone who may be a witness in the Garner case, WCBS 880’s Jim Smith reported

 

Reacting to the arrest, Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association President Patrick Lynch said in a statement, “The arrest of Ramsey Orta for criminal possession of a firearm only underscores the dangers that brought police officers to respond to a chronic crime condition in that community. It is criminals like  Mr. Orta who carry illegal firearms who stand to benefit the most by demonizing the good work of police officers.”

 

Rev. Sharpton went after Lynch’s statement, 1010 WINS’ Roger Stern reported.

 

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“I don’t know anything Orta said to demonize anyone.  He put out a tape.  The tape speaks for itself and then the medical examiner comes in and corroborates what happened,” Sharpton said. “This has no bearing at all on the case or the movement for justice in the regard to Eric Garner.”

 

Sharpton also pointed out that nowhere in the PBA statement did they deny that officers used a chokehold.

 

“The chokehold is illegal and they’re confessing that they break the law because they can’t handle crime– is that what it sounds like? A confession by the PBA?” Sharpton said.

 

The New York City medical examiner ruled Garner’s death a homicide. The man’s widow and the Rev. Sharpton have called for an arrest in his death.

 

“I knew that was the cause because I saw it,” Orta said after the medical examiner’s ruling. “Now somebody should get charged.”

 

Police said Garner was being arrested for selling illegal untaxed cigarettes, but Orta said Garner had just broken up a fight before officers arrived.

 

“They were just going after him because of his past,” Orta said. “They didn’t witness him sell no cigarettes.”

 

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Eric Garner’s death in NYPD chokehold case ruled a homicide.

 

The casket of Eric Garner is carried from his funeral in late July. The death of the 43-year-old man, who was placed in a chokehold by a New York police officer, has been ruled a homicide. (Getty Images)

The casket of Eric Garner is carried from his funeral in late July. The death of the 43-year-old man, who was placed in a chokehold by a New York police officer, has been ruled a homicide. (Getty Images)

 

JAMES QUEALLY, ALANA SEMUELS

 

The controversial death of a New York City man who was placed in a chokehold by police was formally ruled a homicide Friday, a move that will almost certainly place the officers in front of a grand jury and heighten tensions between residents and the police department, city officials and policing experts said.

 

Eric Garner, 43, died after being placed in a chokehold that caused him to suffer neck and chest compressions during his arrest two weeks ago in the Tompkinsville section of Staten Island, according to findings released by the New York City medical examiner’s office. Garner’s weight, chronic asthma and cardiovascular disease were listed as contributing factors.

 

On July 17, officers approached Garner and questioned him. He was believed to be selling untaxed cigarettes, a charge on which he had been arrested several times previously. Videos of the incident show that Garner repeatedly said he had done  nothing wrong and asked the officers to leave him alone. As police tried to make an arrest, one of the officers placed his arm across Garner’s throat and wrestled him to the ground. Garner can be heard repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe,” while another officer presses his head against the sidewalk.

 

Two officers, Daniel Pantaleo and Justin D’Amico, face an internal investigation in connection with Garner’s death. Pantaleo was placed on modified duty, meaning he was stripped of his gun and badge, while D’Amico was placed on desk duty.

 

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“My administration will continue to work with all involved authorities, including the Richmond County district attorney, to ensure a fair and justified outcome,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement.

 

Patrick Lynch, the president of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Assn., issued a statement in support of Pantaleo and D’Amico, noting again that Garner’s poor health and his refusal to submit to arrest may have played a role in his death.

 

“We believe, however, that if he had not resisted the lawful order of the police officers placing him under arrest, this tragedy would not have occurred,” Lynch said.

 

“When the medical examiner rules a case a homicide by chokehold, and the entire world has seen a video of … the chokehold, the case is going before the grand jury.” - Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York City chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union

 

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York City chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the medical examiner’s findings would almost certainly result in Pantaleo facing a grand jury. A spokesman for the NYPD declined to comment.

 

“This case has to go before the grand jury,” she said. “When the medical examiner rules a case a homicide by chokehold, and the entire world has seen a video of the people responsible for the chokehold, the case is going before the grand jury.”

 

Garner’s family was expected to speak out Saturday during a rally in Harlem alongside the Rev. Al Sharpton and National Action Network members.

 

From 2009 to 2013, the police department received 1,022 complaints of officers using chokeholds, according to data tracked by the city’s Civilian Complaint Review Board. But very few, just 1 out of 50 in the first six months of this year, have been substantiated, records show. Chokeholds are a violation of department policy, Police Comissioner William J. Bratton has said.

 

Garner’s death is the latest wedge driven between New York City’s police and its residents. In recent years, for example, the department has been accused of unfairly targeting minorities through its stop-and-frisk program.

 

For New York’s freshman mayor, who loudly decried such tactics and promised police reform, the incident leaves him in a bind.

 

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“‘Broken windows’ is diametrically opposed to the overall political project that De Blasio says he’s engaged in,” said Alex S. Vitale, a professor of sociology at Brooklyn College and the author of a book on New York City policing. “But Bratton is still committed to this ‘broken windows’ approach.”

 

The actions of the Richmond County Dist. Atty. Daniel Donovan will also play a major role in determining the long-term effect of Garner’s death.

 
The NYPD has been implicated in a number of high-profile deaths and beatings, including those of Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell and Anthony Baez. Officers were acquitted of state criminal charges in each case, although Officer Francis Livoti was later convicted of violating Baez’s civil rights after placing him in a chokehold in 1994.

 

Vitale said if Donovan brings minimal charges against the officers involved, it could ignite a firestorm similar the ones that followed the Diallo and Bell verdicts.

 

Lieberman and other experts said that Garner’s death and Friday’s ruling will place increased scrutiny on recent promises made by De Blasio and Bratton to reform the department and retrain officers.

 

“It should be chastening to the police department that what the world saw on video was deemed homicide by the medical examiner,” Lieberman said. “The need for thorough and effective retraining of police officers in New York City is essential.”

 

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National Geographic Magazine: The New Face of Hunger.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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Millions of working Americans don’t know where their next meal is coming from. We sent three photographers to explore hunger in three very different parts of the United States, each giving different faces to the same statistic: One-sixth of Americans don’t have enough food to eat.

 

The New Face of Hunger

 

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Osage, Iowa PHOTOGRAPHS BY AMY TOENSING On our nation’s richest lands, farmers grow corn and soybeans used to feed livestock, make cooking oil, and produce sweeteners. Yet one in eight Iowans often goes hungry, with children the most vulnerable to food insecurity.

Bronx, New York PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEPHANIE SINCLAIR Urban neighborhoods with pervasive unemployment and poverty are home to the hungriest. The South Bronx has the highest rate of food insecurity in the country, 37 percent, compared with 16.6 for New York City as a whole.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEPHANIE SINCLAIR
Urban neighborhoods with pervasive unemployment and poverty are home to the hungriest. The South Bronx has the highest rate of food insecurity in the country, 37 percent, compared with 16.6 for New York City as a whole.

Houston, Texas PHOTOGRAPHS BY KITRA CAHANA Despite a strong economy, Houston is ringed by neighborhoods where many working families can’t afford groceries. Hunger has grown faster in America’s suburbs than in its cities over the past decade, creating a class of “SUV poor.”

Houston, Texas
PHOTOGRAPHS BY KITRA CAHANA
Despite a strong economy, Houston is ringed by neighborhoods where many working families can’t afford groceries. Hunger has grown faster in America’s suburbs than in its cities over the past decade, creating a class of “SUV poor.”

 

On a gold-gray morning in Mitchell County, Iowa, Christina Dreier sends her son, Keagan, to school without breakfast. He is three years old, barrel-chested, and stubborn, and usually refuses to eat the free meal he qualifies for at preschool. Faced with a dwindling pantry, Dreier has decided to try some tough love: If she sends Keagan to school hungry, maybe he’ll eat the free breakfast, which will leave more food at home for lunch.

 

Dreier knows her gambit might backfire, and it does. Keagan ignores the school breakfast on offer and is so hungry by lunchtime that Dreier picks through the dregs of her freezer in hopes of filling him and his little sister up. She shakes the last seven chicken nuggets onto a battered baking sheet, adds the remnants of a bag of Tater Tots and a couple of hot dogs from the fridge, and slides it all into the oven. She’s gone through most of the food she got last week from a local food pantry; her own lunch will be the bits of potato left on the kids’ plates. “I eat lunch if there’s enough,” she says. “But the kids are the most important. They have to eat first.”

 

The fear of being unable to feed her children hangs over Dreier’s days. She and her husband, Jim, pit one bill against the next—the phone against the rent against the heat against the gas—trying always to set aside money to make up for what they can’t get from the food pantry or with their food stamps, issued by the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Congressional cuts to SNAP last fall of five billion dollars pared her benefits from $205 to $172 a month.

On this particular afternoon Dreier is worried about the family van, which is on the brink of repossession. She and Jim need to open a new bank account so they can make automatic payments instead of scrambling to pay in cash. But that will happen only if Jim finishes work early. It’s peak harvest time, and he often works until eight at night, applying pesticides on commercial farms for $14 an hour. Running the errand would mean forgoing overtime pay that could go for groceries.

It’s the same every month, Dreier says. Bills go unpaid because, when push comes to shove, food wins out. “We have to eat, you know,” she says, only the slightest hint of resignation in her voice. “We can’t starve.”

 

Chances are good that if you picture what hunger looks like, you don’t summon an image of someone like Christina Dreier: white, married, clothed, and housed, even a bit overweight. The image of hunger in America today differs markedly from Depression-era images of the gaunt-faced unemployed scavenging for food on urban streets. “This is not your grandmother’s hunger,” says Janet Poppendieck, a sociologist at the City University of New York. “Today more working people and their families are hungry because wages have declined.”

In the United States more than half of hungry households are white, and two-thirds of those with children have at least one working adult—typically in a full-time job. With this new image comes a new lexicon: In 2006 the U.S. government replaced “hunger” with the term “food insecure” to describe any household where, sometime during the previous year, people didn’t have enough food to eat. By whatever name, the number of people going hungry has grown dramatically in the U.S., increasing to 48 million by 2012—a fivefold jump since the late 1960s, including an increase of 57 percent since the late 1990s. Privately run programs like food pantries and soup kitchens have mushroomed too. In 1980 there were a few hundred emergency food programs across the country; today there are 50,000. Finding food has become a central worry for millions of Americans. One in six reports running out of food at least once a year. In many European countries, by contrast, the number is closer to one in 20.

 

To witness hunger in America today is to enter a twilight zone where refrigerators are so frequently bare of all but mustard and ketchup that it provokes no remark, inspires no embarrassment. Here dinners are cooked using macaroni-and-cheese mixes and other processed ingredients from food pantries, and fresh fruits and vegetables are eaten only in the first days after the SNAP payment arrives. Here you’ll meet hungry farmhands and retired schoolteachers, hungry families who are in the U.S. without papers and hungry families whose histories stretch back to theMayflower. Here pocketing food from work and skipping meals to make food stretch are so common that such practices barely register as a way of coping with hunger and are simply a way of life.

It can be tempting to ask families receiving food assistance, If you’re really hungry, then how can you be—as many of them are—overweight? The answer is “this paradox that hunger and obesity are two sides of the same coin,” says Melissa Boteach, vice president of the Poverty and Prosperity Program of the Center for American Progress, “people making trade-offs between food that’s filling but not nutritious and may actually contribute to obesity.” For many of the hungry in America, the extra pounds that result from a poor diet are collateral damage—an unintended side effect of hunger itself.

 

 

Help for the Hungry

More than 48 million Americans rely on what used to be called food stamps, now SNAP: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

 

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In 2013 benefits totaled $75 billion, but payments to most households dropped; the average monthly benefit was $133.07 a person, less than $1.50 a meal. SNAP recipients typically run through their monthly allotment in three weeks, then turn to food pantries. Who qualifies for SNAP? Households with gross incomes no more than 130 percent of the poverty rate. For a family of four that qualifying point is $31,005 a year.*

 

As the face of hunger has changed, so has its address. The town of Spring, Texas, is where ranchland meets Houston’s sprawl, a suburb of curving streets and shade trees and privacy fences. The suburbs are the home of the American dream, but they are also a place where poverty is on the rise. As urban housing has gotten more expensive, the working poor have been pushed out. Today hunger in the suburbs is growing faster than in cities, having more than doubled since 2007.

Yet in the suburbs America’s hungry don’t look the part either. They drive cars, which are a necessity, not a luxury, here. Cheap clothes and toys can be found at yard sales and thrift shops, making a middle-class appearance affordable. Consumer electronics can be bought on installment plans, so the hungry rarely lack phones or televisions. Of all the suburbs in the country, northwest Houston is one of the best places to see how people live on what might be called a minimum-wage diet: It has one of the highest percentages of households receiving SNAP assistance where at least one family member holds down a job. The Jefferson sisters, Meme and Kai, live here in a four-bedroom, two-car-garage, two-bath home with Kai’s boyfriend, Frank, and an extended family that includes their invalid mother, their five sons, a daughter-in-law, and five grandchildren. The house has a rickety desktop computer in the living room and a television in most rooms, but only two actual beds; nearly everyone sleeps on mattresses or piles of blankets spread out on the floor.

Though all three adults work full-time, their income is not enough to keep the family consistently fed without assistance. The root problem is the lack of jobs that pay wages a family can live on, so food assistance has become the government’s—and society’s—way to supplement low wages. The Jeffersons receive $125 in food stamps each month, and a charity brings in meals for their bedridden matriarch.

Like most of the new American hungry, the Jeffersons face not a total absence of food but the gnawing fear that the next meal can’t be counted on. When Meme shows me the family’s food supply, the refrigerator holds takeout boxes and beverages but little fresh food. Two cupboards are stocked with a smattering of canned beans and sauces. A pair of freezers in the garage each contain a single layer of food, enough to fill bellies for just a few days. Meme says she took the children aside a few months earlier to tell them they were eating too much and wasting food besides. “I told them if they keep wasting, we have to go live on the corner, beg for money, or something.”

 

Stranded in a Food Desert

Tens of thousands of people in Houston and in other parts of the U.S. live in a food desert: They’re more than half a mile from a supermarket and don’t own a car, because of poverty, illness, or age. Public transportation may not fill the gap. Small markets or fast-food restaurants may be within walking distance, but not all accept vouchers. If they do, costs may be higher and nutritious options fewer.

 

 

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Jacqueline Christian is another Houston mother who has a full-time job, drives a comfortable sedan, and wears flattering clothes. Her older son, 15-year-old Ja’Zarrian, sports bright orange Air Jordans. There’s little clue to the family’s hardship until you learn that their clothes come mostly from discount stores, that Ja’Zarrian mowed lawns for a summer to get the sneakers, that they’re living in a homeless shelter, and that despite receiving $325 in monthly food stamps, Christian worries about not having enough food “about half of the year.”

Christian works as a home health aide, earning $7.75 an hour at a job that requires her to crisscross Houston’s sprawl to see her clients. Her schedule, as much as her wages, influences what she eats. To save time she often relies on premade food from grocery stores. “You can’t go all the way home and cook,” she says.

 

On a day that includes running a dozen errands and charming her payday loan officer into giving her an extra day, Christian picks up Ja’Zarrian and her seven-year-old, Jerimiah, after school. As the sun drops in the sky, Jerimiah begins complaining that he’s hungry. The neon glow of a Hartz Chicken Buffet appears up the road, and he starts in: Can’t we just get some gizzards, please?

Christian pulls into the drive-through and orders a combo of fried gizzards and okra for $8.11. It takes three declined credit cards and an emergency loan from her mother, who lives nearby, before she can pay for it. When the food finally arrives, filling the car with the smell of hot grease, there’s a collective sense of relief. On the drive back to the shelter the boys eat until the gizzards are gone, and then drift off to sleep.

Christian says she knows she can’t afford to eat out and that fast food isn’t a healthy meal. But she’d felt too stressed—by time, by Jerimiah’s insistence, by how little money she has—not to give in. “Maybe I can’t justify that to someone who wasn’t here to see, you know?” she says. “But I couldn’t let them down and not get the food.”

To supplement what they get from the food pantry, the cash-strapped Reams family forages in the woods near their Osage home for puffball mushrooms and grapes. Kyera Reams cans homegrown vegetables when they are in season and plentiful, so that her family can eat healthfully all year. “I’m resourceful with my food,” she says. “I think about what people did in the Great Depression.”

To supplement what they get from the food pantry, the cash-strapped Reams family forages in the woods near their Osage home for puffball mushrooms and grapes. Kyera Reams cans homegrown vegetables when they are in season and plentiful, so that her family can eat healthfully all year. “I’m resourceful with my food,” she says. “I think about what people did in the Great Depression.”

Of course it is possible to eat well cheaply in America, but it takes resources and know-how that many low-income Americans don’t have. Kyera Reams of Osage, Iowa, puts an incredible amount of energy into feeding her family of six a healthy diet, with the help of staples from food banks and $650 in monthly SNAP benefits. A stay-at-home mom with a high school education, Reams has taught herself how to can fresh produce and forage for wild ginger and cranberries. When she learned that SNAP benefits could be used to buy vegetable plants, she dug two gardens in her yard. She has learned about wild mushrooms so she can safely pick ones that aren’t poisonous and has lobbied the local library to stock field guides to edible wild plants.

“We wouldn’t eat healthy at all if we lived off the food-bank food,” Reams says. Many foods commonly donated to—or bought by—food pantries are high in salt, sugar, and fat. She estimates her family could live for three months on the nutritious foods she’s saved up. The Reamses have food security, in other words, because Kyera makes procuring food her full-time job, along with caring for her husband, whose disability payments provide their only income.

But most of the working poor don’t have the time or know-how required to eat well on little. Often working multiple jobs and night shifts, they tend to eat on the run. Healthful food can be hard to find in so-called food deserts—communities with few or no full-service groceries. Jackie Christian didn’t resort to feeding her sons fried gizzards because it was affordable but because it was easy. Given the dramatic increase in cheap fast foods and processed foods, when the hungry have money to eat, they often go for what’s convenient, just as better-off families do.

 

It’s a cruel irony that people in rural Iowa can be malnourished amid forests of cornstalks running to the horizon. Iowa dirt is some of the richest in the nation, even bringing out the poet in agronomists, who describe it as “black gold.” In 2007 Iowa’s fields produced roughly one-sixth of all corn and soybeans grown in the U.S., churning out billions of bushels.

These are the very crops that end up on Christina Dreier’s kitchen table in the form of hot dogs made of corn-raised beef, Mountain Dew sweetened with corn syrup, and chicken nuggets fried in soybean oil. They’re also the foods that the U.S. government supports the most. In 2012 it spent roughly $11 billion to subsidize and insure commodity crops like corn and soy, with Iowa among the states receiving the highest subsidies. The government spends much less to bolster the production of the fruits and vegetables its own nutrition guidelines say should make up half the food on our plates. In 2011 it spent only $1.6 billion to subsidize and insure “specialty crops”—the bureaucratic term for fruits and vegetables.

Those priorities are reflected at the grocery store, where the price of fresh food has risen steadily while the cost of sugary treats like soda has dropped. Since the early 1980s the real cost of fruits and vegetables has increased by 24 percent. Meanwhile the cost of nonalcoholic beverages—primarily sodas, most sweetened with corn syrup—has dropped by 27 percent.

“We’ve created a system that’s geared toward keeping overall food prices low but does little to support healthy, high-quality food,” says global food expert Raj Patel. “The problem can’t be fixed by merely telling people to eat their fruits and vegetables, because at heart this is a problem about wages, about poverty.”

When Christina Dreier’s cupboards start to get bare, she tries to persuade her kids to skip snack time. “But sometimes they eat saltine crackers, because we get that from the food bank,” she said, sighing. “It ain’t healthy for them, but I’m not going to tell them they can’t eat if they’re hungry.”

The Dreiers have not given up on trying to eat well. Like the Reamses, they’ve sown patches of vegetables and a stretch of sweet corn in the large green yard carved out of the cornfields behind their house. But when the garden is done for the year, Christina fights a battle every time she goes to the supermarket or the food bank. In both places healthy foods are nearly out of reach. When the food stamps come in, she splurges on her monthly supply of produce, including a bag of organic grapes and a bag of apples. “They love fruit,” she says with obvious pride. But most of her food dollars go to the meat, eggs, and milk that the food bank doesn’t provide; with noodles and sauce from the food pantry, a spaghetti dinner costs her only the $3.88 required to buy hamburger for the sauce.

What she has, Christina says, is a kitchen with nearly enough food most of the time. It’s just those dicey moments, after a new bill arrives or she needs gas to drive the kids to town, that make it hard. “We’re not starved around here,” she says one morning as she mixes up powdered milk for her daughter. “But some days, we do go a little hungry.”

 

Crops Taxpayers Support With Subsidies

Federal crop subsidies began in the 1920s, when a quarter of the U.S. population worked on farms. The funds were meant to buffer losses from fluctuating harvests and natural disasters. Today most subsidies go to a few staple crops, produced mainly by large agricultural companies and cooperatives.

 

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How Subsidized Crops Affect Diet

Subsidized corn is used for biofuel, corn syrup, and, mixed with soybeans, chicken feed. Subsidies reduce crop prices but also support the abundance of processed foods, which are more affordable but less nutritious. Across income brackets, processed foods make up a large part of the American diet.

 

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Thanks to the National Geographic….

 

Tracie McMillan is the author of The American Way of Eating and a Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University. Photographers Kitra Cahana, Stephanie Sinclair, and Amy Toensing are known for their intimate, sensitive portraits of people.

The magazine thanks The Rockefeller Foundation and members of the National Geographic Society for their generous support of this series of articles.

Maps and graphics by Virginia W. Mason and Jason Treat, NGM Staff. Help for the Hungry, sources: USDA; Food Research and Action Center; Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Stranded in a Food Desert, sources: USDA; City of Houston; U.S. Census Bureau. Crop Subsidies, research: Amanda Hobbs. Sources: Mississippi Department of Human Services; Environmental Working Group; National Cancer Institute.

Related Links:

http://food.nationalgeographic.com/

 

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/hunger/

 

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/140722-hacking-future-food-vin

 

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/land-grab/

 

http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/23/amy-toensing-on-hunger-in-america-iowas-breadbasket/

 

http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/24/kitra-cahana-on-hunger-in-america-the-suburbs/

 

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/24/jose-andres-what-it-means-to-cook-american-food/

 

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/25/small-changes-for-big-results-how-to-feed-3-billion-more-people/

 

 

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What Did Barack Do Today™


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White House Schedule – July 17, 2014

 

In the morning, the President will travel to Delaware. The departure from the South Lawn is open press and the arrival at the New Castle Air National Guard Base is open to pre-credentialed media.

 

The President will then travel to the Port of Wilmington, where he will announce a new initiative, using his pen and his phone, to increase private sector investment in our nation’s infrastructure.  The President’s remarks in front of the Interstate 495 Bridge are open to pre-credentialed media and streamed live on http://www.whitehouse.gov/live.

 

Afterward, the President will depart Delaware en route New York.  The President’s departure from New Castle Air National Guard Base and arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport are open to pre-credentialed media.

 

While in New York, the President will attend two events, one for the DNC followed by a House Majority PAC roundtable event. Both events are closed press.

 

Following the roundtable, the President will depart New York City en route Washington, DC. The departure from John F. Kennedy International Airport is open to pre-credentialed media and the arrival on the South Lawn is open press.

 

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THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 17th, 2014

 

DAILY GUIDANCE AND SCHEDULE FOR
THURSDAY, JULY 17th, 2014

 

Thursday, July 17 2014 All Times ET

 

11:20 AM: The President departs the White House en route Joint Base Andrews, South Lawn.

 

11:35 AM: The President departs Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

12:15 PM: The President arrives Delaware, New Castle Air National Guard Base.

 

12:30 PM: The Vice President attends an event for the Michigan Democratic Coordinated Campaign Committee, Westin Book Cadillac -Detroit.

 

2:10 PM: The President delivers remarks on Infrastructure, Port of Wilmington.

 

2:15 PM: The Vice President visits the Step IT Up America program at Wayne County Community College with Mayor Michael Duggan, Wayne County Community College.

 

3:15 PM: The Vice President delivers remarks to the Netroots Nation Conference, Cobo Center.

 

4:00 PM: The President arrives New York, John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

5:45 PM: The President attends a DNC event, Private Residence – New York.

 

7:30 PM: The President attends a House Majority PAC roundtable event, Private Residence – New York.

 

9:15 PM: The President departs New York, John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

10:15 PM: The President arrives Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

10:30 PM: The President arrives at the White House, South Lawn.

 

 

"President Barack Obama in Denver, CO"

 

President Obama Responds to Malaysia Airlines Flight 17

 

 

President Obama calls to President Poroshenko of Ukraine aboard Air Force OnePresident Obama calls to President Poroshenko of Ukraine aboard Air Force One to discuss the tragic crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. July 17, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

This afternoon, aboard Air Force One, President Obama placed separate telephone calls to President Poroshenko of Ukraine and Prime Minister Najib of Malaysia to discuss the tragic crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.

 

Here’s a readout of the President’s call with President Poroshenko of Ukraine:

 

President Obama spoke with Ukrainian President Poroshenko this afternoon to discuss the tragic crash of flight Malaysian Airlines 17. President Poroshenko welcomed the assistance of international investigators to ensure a thorough and transparent investigation of the crash site. President Obama assured him that U.S. experts will offer all possible assistance immediately. The Presidents emphasized that all evidence from the crash site must remain in place on the territory of Ukraine until international investigators are able to examine all aspects of the tragedy.

 

And a readout of President Obama’s call with Prime Minister Najib of Malaysia:

 

President Obama called Malaysian Prime Minister Najib today to express condolences to the people of Malaysia for the terrible loss of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in Ukraine, as well as all the families who lost loved ones in this tragic event. The President told the Prime Minister that United States has offered immediate assistance to support a prompt international investigation. President Obama reaffirmed the strength of the friendship between the United States and Malaysia and underscored that the United States stands ready to provide any assistance or support necessary.

 

Bernadette Meehan is Deputy Spokesperson of the National Security Council

 

 

Readout of the President’s Call with Prime Minister Najib of Malaysia

 

Readout of the President’s Call with President Putin of Russia

 

Readout of the President’s Call with President Poroshenko of Ukraine

 

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President Obama: “Let’s Build Some Bridges. Let’s Build Some Roads.”

 

 

President Barack Obama delivers remarks near the Interstate 495 Bridge at the Port of Wilmington in Wilmington, DelawarePresident Barack Obama delivers remarks before he signs an executive action creating the Build America Investment Initiative during an event near the Interstate 495 Bridge at the Port of Wilmington in Wilmington, Del., July 17, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

 

This afternoon, President Obama traveled to the Port of Wilmington in Delaware to talk about creating jobs, rebuilding America, and making our middle class stronger.

 

Before delivering his remarks, however, the President took a moment to discuss the tragic crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17:

 

Right now, we’re working to determine whether there were American citizens onboard. That is our first priority.  And I’ve directed my national security team to stay in close contact with the Ukrainian government.  The United States will offer any assistance we can to help determine what happened and why.  And as a country, our thoughts and prayers are with all the families of the passengers, wherever they call home.

 

The President Talks About the Economy in Delaware

 

Published on Jul 17, 2014

At the Port of Wilmington in Delaware, President Obama delivers remarks on the economy, July 17, 2014.

 

 

After acknowledging some of the officials in attendance — including Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, Sen. Chris Coons, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew — President Obama talked a bit about the nearby Interstate 495 Bridge.

 

Noting that the bridge used to carry 90,000 cars a day, the President explained that it’s been closed for repairs since last month — repairs that will make it safer, and more reliable for commuters and commerce. And TIGER Grants are enabling the Port of Wilmington to rebuild a wharf, which will allow it to compete with other ports for the largest cargo ships.

 

Today, the President delivered remarks at the Port of Wilmington in front of the I-495 Bridge in Delaware.

Today, the President delivered remarks at the Port of Wilmington in front of the I-495 Bridge in Delaware.

 

Discussing how much the economy has rebounded over the past few years, the President explained that we’ve got a “huge opportunity to keep this momentum going…but also to make sure that growth is broadly shared.” And one example is by creating those good jobs rebuilding America.

 

We know that in the 21st century economy, businesses are going to set up shop wherever they find the best roads, the best bridges, the fastest Internet connection, the fastest rail lines, the smartest airports, the best power grid. First-class infrastructure attracts investment and it creates first-class jobs. Unfortunately, right now, our investment in transportation lags behind a lot of other countries. China is doing more. Germany is doing more. They’re putting money back into building the infrastructure we need to grow over the long term.

 

And if Washington were working the way it was supposed to, Congress would be creating jobs right now … jobs like these guys in the hard hats are doing right now rebuilding bridges and roads and airports and ports all across the country. It helps us now and it helps us create jobs tomorrow. That’s what we should be doing.

 

Earlier this year, President Obama put together a plan to rebuild America’s transportation infrastructure over the long term. As he noted today, the plan would “support millions of jobs, [and] would give cities and states and private investors the certainty they need to hire more workers faster.” And it wouldn’t add to the deficit, as it would be paid for in part by closing tax loopholes for companies that are shipping their profits overseas.

 

President Barack Obama speaks about transportation and an initiative to increase private sector investment in national infrastructure, at the Port of Wilmington in Wilmington, Delaware, near the Interstate 495 Bridge. The federal government is helping pay for repairs to the bridge, which state officials ordered closed on an emergency basis last month because several supporting columns were tilting.

President Barack Obama speaks about transportation and an initiative to increase private sector investment in national infrastructure, at the Port of Wilmington in Wilmington, Delaware, near the Interstate 495 Bridge. The federal government is helping pay for repairs to the bridge, which state officials ordered closed on an emergency basis last month because several supporting columns were tilting.

 

We got $2 trillion worth of deferred maintenance in this country in roads and bridges and sewer systems and water mains. And we could put a lot of people back to work right now getting that done. And we’re going to have to do it eventually anyway.

 

But so far, Congress has refused to act on the idea — which is strange because infrastructure should not be a partisan issue. If you think about it, it was a Republican, Dwight Eisenhower, who built the Interstate Highway System. Lincoln built the Transcontinental Railroad. Both parties historically have understood that investing in this country for the long run pays off. When we invest in infrastructure we’re making sure that the economy is growing not just for the next five years, but for another century. That’s what right now Republicans in Congress don’t seem to be focused on. But until they do get focused on it, I’m going to do whatever I can to create jobs rebuilding America on my own.

 

The President also announced the launch of the Build America Investment Initiative, a government-wide initiative to increase infrastructure investment and economic growth:

 

As part of [the initiative], we’re creating a one-stop shop for cities and states looking to partner with the private sector to fund infrastructure projects.  There are lots of investors who want to back infrastructure projects because, when it’s done right, they then get a steady, long-term investment.  They get a steady return.

 

And lots of states and local governments would welcome more private investment, but they need a partner in the federal government to help do some matchmaking and work through some of the complexities of private financing of infrastructure.  So my administration is going to help states and cities apply for federal loans, get more public-private partnerships up and running, get more investment flowing into communities like Wilmington.

 

The President will sign a Presidential Memorandum to launch the Build America Investment Initiative, a government-wide initiative to increase infrastructure investment and economic growth by engaging with state and local governments and private sector investors.

The President will sign a Presidential Memorandum to launch the Build America Investment Initiative, a government-wide initiative to increase infrastructure investment and economic growth by engaging with state and local governments and private sector investors.

 

And this builds on other actions we’ve taken to speed up the permitting process for big projects, and attract new manufacturing jobs to America, and raise more workers’ wages, help women fight for fair pay, ease loan burdens for millions of students.  We’re taking steps on our own, still hoping that Congress at some point actually does something.

 

 

Remarks by the President on the Economy — Wilmington, DE ( Transcript)

 

A young girl greets President Obama as he arrives at the New Castle Air National Guard Base, in New Castle, Delaware.

A young girl greets President Obama as he arrives at the New Castle Air National Guard Base, in New Castle, Delaware.

As part of the Initiative, the Administration is launching the Build America Transportation Investment Center: Housed at the Department of Transportation, this center will serve as a one-stop shop for state and local governments, public and private developers and investors seeking to utilize innovative financing strategies for transportation infrastructure projects.

As part of the Initiative, the Administration is launching the Build America Transportation Investment Center: Housed at the Department of Transportation, this center will serve as a one-stop shop for state and local governments, public and private developers and investors seeking to utilize innovative financing strategies for transportation infrastructure projects.

President Obama is reflected through the window as he greets customers at the Charcoal Pit to in Wilmington, Del.

President Obama is reflected through the window as he greets customers at the Charcoal Pit to in Wilmington, Del.

President Barack Obama hugs Tanei Benjamin at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington, Del., before speaking about transportation and infrastructure.

President Barack Obama hugs Tanei Benjamin at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington, Del., before speaking about transportation and infrastructure.

President Barack Obama meets with Tanei Benjamin at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington, Del., before speaking about transportation and infrastructure. Benjamin wrote the president a letter about her struggles as a working single mother.

President Barack Obama meets with Tanei Benjamin at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington, Del., before speaking about transportation and infrastructure. Benjamin wrote the president a letter about her struggles as a working single mother.

Tanei Benjamin wipes tears from her eyes after receiving a hug from President Barack Obama

Tanei Benjamin wipes tears from her eyes after receiving a hug from President Barack Obama

President Obama holds Jaidyn Oates, 7 months, at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington

President Obama holds Jaidyn Oates, 7 months, at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington

President Barack Obama holds seven-month-old Jaidyn Oates, during a stop at the Charcoal Pit

President Barack Obama holds seven-month-old Jaidyn Oates, during a stop at the Charcoal Pit

Barack chatting with surprised patrons at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington

Barack chatting with surprised patrons at the Charcoal Pit in Wilmington

 

And finally….the reason for the trip…..

 

President Barack Obama signs a initiative to increase private sector investment in the nation’s infrastructure after speaking in front of the Interstate 495 bridge over the Christina River near Wilmington, Delaware

President Barack Obama signs a initiative to increase private sector investment in the nation’s infrastructure after speaking in front of the Interstate 495 bridge over the Christina River near Wilmington, Delaware

 

Statements and Releases – July 17th, 2014.

 

President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts

 

FACT SHEET: Building a 21st Century Infrastructure: Increasing Public and Private Collaboration with the Build America Investment Initiative

 

Conference Call by Senior Administration Officials on Ukraine

 

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Elizabeth Warren

Warren for President

President Obama is reflected through the window as he greets customers at the Charcoal Pit to in Wilmington, Del.

President Obama is reflected through the window as he greets customers at the Charcoal Pit to in Wilmington, Del.

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TheObamaCrat Wake-Up Call™ For Thursday The 17th Of July…..It’s A Travel Day. Delaware, Port Of Wilmington, New York City.


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White House Schedule – July 17, 2014

 

In the morning, the President will travel to Delaware. The departure from the South Lawn is open press and the arrival at the New Castle Air National Guard Base is open to pre-credentialed media.

 

The President will then travel to the Port of Wilmington, where he will announce a new initiative, using his pen and his phone, to increase private sector investment in our nation’s infrastructure.  The President’s remarks in front of the Interstate 495 Bridge are open to pre-credentialed media and streamed live on http://www.whitehouse.gov/live.

 

Afterward, the President will depart Delaware en route New York.  The President’s departure from New Castle Air National Guard Base and arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport are open to pre-credentialed media.

 

While in New York, the President will attend two events, one for the DNC followed by a House Majority PAC roundtable event. Both events are closed press.

 

Following the roundtable, the President will depart New York City en route Washington, DC. The departure from John F. Kennedy International Airport is open to pre-credentialed media and the arrival on the South Lawn is open press.

 

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THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 17th, 2014

 

DAILY GUIDANCE AND SCHEDULE FOR
THURSDAY, JULY 17th, 2014

 

Thursday, July 17 2014 All Times ET

 

11:20 AM: The President departs the White House en route Joint Base Andrews, South Lawn.

 

11:35 AM: The President departs Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

12:15 PM: The President arrives Delaware, New Castle Air National Guard Base.

 

12:30 PM: The Vice President attends an event for the Michigan Democratic Coordinated Campaign Committee, Westin Book Cadillac -Detroit.

 

2:10 PM: The President delivers remarks on Infrastructure, Port of Wilmington.

 

2:15 PM: The Vice President visits the Step IT Up America program at Wayne County Community College with Mayor Michael Duggan, Wayne County Community College.

 

3:15 PM: The Vice President delivers remarks to the Netroots Nation Conference, Cobo Center.

 

4:00 PM: The President arrives New York, John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

5:45 PM: The President attends a DNC event, Private Residence – New York.

 

7:30 PM: The President attends a House Majority PAC roundtable event, Private Residence – New York.

 

9:15 PM: The President departs New York, John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

10:15 PM: The President arrives Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

10:30 PM: The President arrives at the White House, South Lawn.

 

 

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White House Live

 

Next Up…

 

July 17, 2014 2:10 PM EDT

President Obama Speaks on Infrastructure

Wilmington, Delaware,  White House LIVE Streaming

 

 

 

July 17, 2014 3:30 PM EDT

Vice President Biden Speaks to the Netroots Nation Conference

Audio Only

Detroit, Michigan,  White House LIVE Streaming

 

 

Speeches and Remarks/Statements and Releases

 

Remarks by the First Lady at Grammy Museum’s Jane Ortner Education Award Luncheon

 

Remarks by the President on Foreign Policy

 

Remarks by the First Lady at the Unite for Veterans Summit

 

Remarks by the President at Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience Meeting

 

FACT SHEET: Building a 21st Century Infrastructure: Increasing Public and Private Collaboration with the Build America Investment Initiative

 

Readout of the President’s Meeting with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus

 

FACT SHEET: Taking Action to Support State, Local, and Tribal Leaders as They Prepare Communities for the Impacts of Climate Change

 

 

Preparing Communities for the Impacts of Climate Change

 

 

President Barack Obama drops by a meeting of the Task Force on Climate Preparedness and ResiliencePresident Barack Obama drops by a meeting of the Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, in the State Dining Room of the White House, July 16, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

 

We’ve been talking a lot recently about the need to rebuild and strengthen our nation’s infrastructure. As the President has made clear, a world-class infrastructure system is a vital part of a top-performing economy.

 

But there’s another important reason why we need to rebuild our infrastructure: climate change.

 

Communities across America need more resilient infrastructure that can withstand the impacts of climate change — like more extreme weather and increased flooding. That’s part of the reason why the President established the State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience last November.

 

The Task Force, made up of 26 governors, mayors, and county and tribal officials from across the country, advises the President on how the federal government can best help American communities dealing with the effects of climate change. Today, the Task Force came to the White House for their fourth and final meeting, and will give the President final recommendations this fall.

 

Read More.

 

 

The President Meets with His Climate Task Force

July 16, 2014 | 4:11 | Public Domain

 

President Obama meets with his State, Local, and Tribal Leaders Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience.

 

 

 

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Coast guard rescues casino boat stranded for 16 hours

 

Published on Jul 17, 2014

More than 120 passengers on board a stranded Casino boat off the coast of Georgia were rescued by Coast Guard officials. Mark Strassmann reports.

 

 

 

Three dead after violent bank robbery pursuit

 

Published on Jul 17, 2014

Two bank robbery suspects and one hostage were killed when the suspects led police on an hour-long chase in California.

 

 

 

Armed Bank Robbery, High-Speed Chase Leave 3 Dead in California

 

Published on Jul 16, 2014

Stockton police late Wednesday said a second suspect has died after a bank robbery and gunbattle that led to the death of a hostage.

 

Police said that in all, three people are dead from the violence, which included a high-speed chase that left cars and houses riddled with bullets.

 

One of the people killed was a hostage, and the other two were suspects in the robbery, according to police.The violence began at 2 p.m. when officers responded to a call of a robbery at a Bank of the West branch in north Stockton. Arriving officers spotted three men walking three female hostages from the bank. The robbers stole a bank employee’s SUV and a pursuit started, Stockton police Officer Joe Silva said.

 

Cellphone footage taken by a driver captured the moments when more than a dozen police cars were in pursuit of the bank robbers.

 

During the chase that lasted 45 minutes and spanned several miles, one of the hostages was thrown from the SUV and was taken to a hospital with a gunshot wound, Silva said. The pursuit continued as gunfire continued to erupt from the SUV, he said. Police cars and homes along the robbers’ path were peppered with gunshots.”In my 18 years of law enforcement, I’ve never seen anything like this in the city of Stockton,” Silva said, adding that no officers were injured.

 

A second hostage was later thrown from the vehicle, and officers tending to her found she had suffered a grazing bullet wound, Silva said.

 

As the SUV came to a stop, officers exchanged gunfire with someone inside the vehicle. When it was all over, a hostage and one of the robbers was dead, Silva said. Besides the first hostage thrown from the vehicle, at least two other people were hospitalized.Witnesses said the shootout that brought the episode to a close looked like a war.

 

“I could see the car getting blasted,” witness Manuel Gallegos said. “I can see all the little sparks and everything off the car, and actually there was a police car right in front of our house shooting in that direction.”

 

Jose Maldonado, who said he saw the robbers taking the women out of the bank, said the men had rifles that looked like AK-47s slung over their shoulders and they didn’t seem to care that there were police all around.

 

“They were not afraid. They weren’t going to take no for an answer. These poor women, they were screaming, they were so distraught, so scared,” Maldonado said.

 

 

Where the hell were all the “good guys with guns” the NRAssholes speak of? No “good guys with guns” were present….musta been off at the local Home Depot…armed, patrolling the lumber section.

 

 

 

Bowe Bergdahl’s Lawyer Says Fmr Taliban Captive “Deeply Grateful” to Obama

 

Published on Jul 16, 2014

Eugene Fidell tells ABC News Bergdahl believes the President “saved his life.”

 

 

 

HORROR: 295 Dead as Missile at Russia border Shoots down Malaysia Boeing MH17

 

Published on Jul 17, 2014

WATCH: Malaysia Airlines plane shot down in Ukraine near Russian border
(NYDaily News) BREAKING: The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 reportedly had 280 passengers and 15 crew members when it went down in a war-torn region of Ukraine.

 

A Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was reportedly shot down in Ukraine near the Russian border Thursday.
The Boeing 777 had 280 passengers and 15 crew members, Interfax reported citing an an aviation industry source.

 

Anton Gerashenko, an adviser to Ukraine’s Interior Minister, said on Facebook that the plane was flying at an altituse of 33,000 feet when it was hit by a missile fired from a Buk launcher.
It came down just 20 miles short of entering Russian airspace near the town of Shakhtyorsk, in an area where the Ukrainian government has been fighting pro-Russian rebels.

 

It “began to drop, afterwards it was found burning on the ground on Ukrainian territory,” a unidentified source told Reuters.
Flight Aware shows the flight was heading from Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, the main international airport in the Netherlands, to Kuala Lumpur International Airport outside Kuala Lumpur, the most populous city of Malaysia.

 

The flight reportedly departed at 12:14 a.m. local time.

 

The crash comes a little more than four months after Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 lost contact with air traffic control less than an hour after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur International Airport.

 

The aircraft, also a Boeing 777, was carrying 227 passengers and 12 Malaysian crew members.
The airline issued a public statement an hour after the flight was expected to arrive in China.

 

The subsequent search efforts, which involved multiple governments, expanded to more than 60,000 square miles and soared to become the most expensive in history.

Malaysia Airlines confirmed it lost contact with the flight.

 

 

 

Republicans Equal ‘Gross Incompetence’ Says Congressman

 

 

 

 

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Where In The World Is Barack Today™: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. New York City, N.Y.


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Where In The World Is Barack Today™: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. New York City, N.Y. 

 

US President Barack Obama holds his first Twitter Town Hall

 

On Tuesday, President Obama will travel to TechShop Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to deliver remarks on the economy.  Following this, he will travel to New York City to attend the DNC LGBT Gala and take part in another DNC Event.

 

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In the morning, the President will receive the Presidential Daily Briefing in the Oval Office. This meeting is closed press.

Later in the morning, the President will travel to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The President’s departure from White House and the arrival at Pittsburgh International Airport are open press.

While in Pittsburgh, the President will tour the TechShop Pittsburgh, deliver remarks and answer questions on the additional ways we can continue to create good jobs and expand opportunity for Americans by spurring American manufacturing and innovation. There will be out-of-town travel pool coverage of the tour, and the remarks are open to pre-credentialed media.

In the afternoon, the President will depart Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania en route New York, NY. The departure from Pittsburgh International Airport and arrival at the John F. Kennedy International Airport are open press.

While in New York, the President will attend a Senate Majority PAC roundtable event at the Intercontinental Hotel. This roundtable is closed press. Following this event the President will attend and deliver remarks at the DNC LGBT Gala. There will be expanded pool coverage of this event.

In the evening the President will attend a DNC roundtable at a private residence. The roundtable is closed press. Following the roundtable, the President will depart New York City en route Washington, DC. The departure from John F. Kennedy International Airport and the arrival on the South Lawn are open press.

 

White House Schedule – June 17th, 2014

 

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THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 17th, 2014

 

THE WHITE HOUSE GUIDANCE & SCHEDULE
TUESDAY June 17th, 2014

 

Tuesday June 17th 2014  All Times ET

 

8:00 AM: The Vice President holds a bilateral meeting with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. Local Event Time: 9:00 AM, Palácio do Planalto – Brazil.

 

9:30 AM: The Vice President holds a bilateral meeting with Brazilian Vice President Michel Temer. Local Event Time: 10:30 AM, Vice President Michel Temer’s residence – Brazil

 

10:00 AM: The President receives the Presidential Daily Briefing, Oval Office.

 

10:50 AM: The President departs the White House en route Joint Base Andrews, South Lawn.

 

11:05 AM: The President departs Joint Base Andrews en route Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Joint Base Andrews.

 

11:15 AM: The Vice President and Vice President Temer deliver statements to the press. Local Event Time: 12:15 AM, U.S. Embassy – Brasilia.

 

12:00 PM: The President arrives Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh International Airport.

 

1:25 PM: The President tours TechShop Pittsburgh, Techshop Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh.

 

1:45 PM: The President delivers remarks and answers questions, Techshop Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh.

 

3:25 PM: The President departs Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania en route New York, NY, Pittsburgh International Airport.

 

4:35 PM: The President arrives New York, NY. John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

5:25 PM: The President attends a Senate Majority PAC roundtable event, Intercontinental Hotel – New York.

 

8:00 PM: The Vice President arrives at El Dorado International Airport. Local Event Time: 7:00 PM, El Dorado International Airport – Bogota.

 

8:05 PM: The President delivers remarks at the DNC LGBT Gala, Gotham Hall – New York.

 

9:00 PM: The President attends a DNC roundtable, Private Residence – New York.

 

10:40 PM: The President departs New York, John F. Kennedy International Airport.

 

11:35 PM: The President arrives Joint Base Andrews, Joint Base Andrews.

 

11:50 PM: The President arrives at the White House, South Lawn.

 

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 White House LIVE!! 

 

Now Streaming…
June 17, 2014 11:35 AM EDT
White House Honors Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) Champions of Change
The White House,  White House LIVE!! 

 

 
Next Up…
June 17, 2014 1:45 PM EDT
President Obama Delivers Remarks and Answers Questions at TechShop Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  White House LIVE!! 

 

 

President Obama Delivers Remarks and Answers Questions at TechShop Pittsburgh

 

 

 

 

 

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Whats The Tweets In The Twitterverse…….

 

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U.S. embassy on alert in Iraq

 

 

 

ISIS moves closer to Baghdad

 

 

 

Kurdish fighters trying to keep ISIS at bay

 

 

 

Insurgent advance spreads in Iraq’s northwest

 

 

 

Behind the Scenes: Inside the U.S. National Team Locker Room

 

 

 

theweekahead

 

On Wednesday, the President will host the first ever White House Maker Faire and meet with students, entrepreneurs and everyday citizens who are using new tools and techniques to launch new businesses, learn vital skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), and fuel the renaissance in American manufacturing.

 

On Thursday, the President will award Corporal William “Kyle” Carpenter, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.), the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry.

 

On Friday, the President will meet with Prime Minister John Key of New Zealand to highlight our increasingly close relationship with New Zealand and our collaboration on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, climate change, and military-to-military cooperation.  The President looks forward to consulting with Prime Minister Key on these and other issues, including the U.S. rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region, regional maritime security issues, and global security issues.

 

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