Here’s Why Today’s Filibuster Rule Change Is A Big Deal…..Obstruction IS OVAH!!


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) FINALLY Goes Nuclear On Filibuster Parliamentary Procedure

 

Lindsay Holst
Lindsay Holst

November 21, 2013
04:19 PM EST

 

President Barack Obama delivers a statement on Senate filibuster rules, in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Nov. 21, 2013. President Barack Obama delivers a statement on Senate filibuster rules, in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Nov. 21, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

 

President Obama Speaks on Senate Efforts to Confirm Presidential Nominees

November 21, 2013 | 9:17 |Public Domain

 

President Obama says he supports the step a majority of Senators took today to change the ways of Washington by changing the way Congress does business, guaranteeing that all judicial and executive branch nominees, except Supreme Court nominees, can be confirmed with simple up-or-down votes.

 

 

 

Statement by the President On Filibuster Reform

 

Something big happened in the Senate today: A majority of senators voted to change the way the filibuster works. (You can read more about what a filibuster does here.)

 

Under today’s rule change, all executive branch and judicial nominees — except to the Supreme Court — can be confirmed with a simple up-or-down vote rather than the 60-vote supermajority that had been required for more than 200 years.

 

Speaking from the White House Press Briefing Room today, the President supported the change and provided context for why it’s especially pertinent right now:

 

All too often, we’ve seen a single senator or a handful of senators choose to abuse arcane procedural tactics to unilaterally block bipartisan compromises, or to prevent well-qualified, patriotic Americans from filling critical positions of public service in our system of government.

 

Now, at a time when millions of American have desperately searched for work, repeated abuse of these tactics have blocked legislation that might create jobs.  They’ve defeated actions that would help women fighting for equal pay.  They’ve prevented more progress than we would have liked for striving young immigrants trying to earn their citizenship.  Or it’s blocked efforts to end tax breaks for companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  They’ve even been used to block common-sense and widely supported steps to protect more Americans from gun violence, even as families of victims sat in the Senate chamber and watched.  And they’ve prevented far too many talented Americans from serving their country at a time when their country needs their talents the most.

 

As the President went on to note, in the six decades before he took office, only 20 presidential nominees to executive positions had to overcome filibusters. “But in just under five years since I took office, nearly 30 nominees have been treated this way,” the President said.

 

In other words, half of all filibusters waged against nominations in our country’s history have been waged under President Obama. And of the 23 district court nominees that have been filibustered in U.S. History, 20 of them have been Obama nominees.

 

And so, the President said, “Enough is enough.”

The American people’s business is far too important to keep falling prey, day after day, to Washington politics.

 

I’m a former senator.  So is my Vice President.  We both value any Senate’s duty to advise and consent.  It’s important, and we take that very seriously.  But a few now refuse to treat that duty of advise and consent with the respect that it deserves.  It’s no longer used in a responsible way to govern.  It’s rather used as a reckless and relentless tool to grind all business to a halt.  And that’s not what our Founders intended, and it’s certainly not what our country needs right now.

 

And I just want to remind everybody, what’s at stake here is not my ability to fulfill my constitutional duty.  What’s at stake is the ability of any President to fulfill his or her constitutional duty.  Public service is not a game.  It is a privilege.  And the consequences of action or inaction are very real.  The American people deserve better than politicians who run for election telling them how terrible government is, and then devoting their time in elected office to trying to make government not work as often as possible.

 

Earlier this week, Deputy Senior Advisor David Simas sent an email to the White House list about all of the important national measures Congress could be taking action on right now — if only they’d let these measures come to a vote.

 

These are measures that mean  very real things for our economy and millions of Americans: from reforming our immigration system to confirming qualified individuals to lead critical organizations and sit on important courts.

 

Today’s vote should change at least part of that.

 


 

Want to read more?

 

 

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Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) FINALLY Goes Nuclear On Filibuster Parliamentary Procedure


 

By Jueseppi B.

BZm1K05CEAESxSC

Reid is furious that Republicans have thwarted the president's nominations. | Reuters It on;y took 4 plus years to light a fire under Reid.

Reid is furious that Republicans have thwarted the president’s nominations. | Reuters
It on;y took 4 plus years to light a fire under Reid.

 

From POLITICO:

Senate goes for ‘nuclear option’

 

By BURGESS EVERETT and SEUNG MIN KIM

 

The Senate approved a historic rules change on Thursday by eliminating the use of the filibuster on all presidential nominees except those to the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

In doing so, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) invoked the long-threatened “nuclear option,” meaning he called for a vote to change the Senate rules by a simple majority vote. It passed, 52 to 48. Three Democrats voted against changing the rules — Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Mark Pryor of Arkansas.

 

The unprecedented rules change means that most of President Barack Obama’s judicial and executive branch nominees no longer need to clear a 60-vote threshold to reach the Senate floor and get an up-or-down vote.

 

Both parties threatened to change the rules in recent years, but Reid said he felt compelled to finally pull the trigger after what he described as unprecedented use of the filibuster on Obama’s judicial picks — namely three blocked judges to the powerful D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

 

“It’s time to change the Senate before this institution becomes obsolete,” Reid said in a lengthy floor speech on Thursday morning.

 

The changes get rid of filibusters on most presidential nominees, but preserve the filibuster for Supreme Court picks and legislation. The Senate’s vote to push the button on the “nuclear option” is unprecedented and is likely to lead to a further erosion of the filibuster in the future.

Thank you POLITICO.

 

Power Grab – Senate Votes To Change Filibuster Rule Invoking So-Called “Nuclear Option”

 

Published on Nov 21, 2013

Wake The Hell Up America Your Republic & Freedom In Grave Danger!!
Power Grab – Senate Votes To Change Filibuster Rule Invoking So-Called “Nuclear Option”

 

 

Nuclear option

 

The nuclear option, called the constitutional option by some proponents, is a generic term for a set of parliamentary maneuvers that could be used in the United States Senate to achieve approval of certain motions by a majority vote, rather than the “super-majority” required by current Senate rules and precedents. The nuclear option has arisen in reaction to the frequent use of Senate rules by a minority of Senators to block consideration of a nominee for an Executive Branch or judicial position (or less frequently, a bill or resolution). Between the 1970’s and 2013, threats by the majority party to use some version of what is now known as the nuclear option resulted in some changes to Senate rules and practices to limit opportunities for blocking nominations, without actually invoking the nuclear option itself. In November 2013, Senate Democrats used the nuclear option to eliminate filibusters on executive branch nominations other than those to the Supreme Court.

 

Current Senate rules require a three-fifths majority (“duly chosen and sworn” — usually 60 votes) to end debate on a bill, nomination or other proposal (or two-thirds (“present and voting” — 67 or fewer votes) for a change to the Senate rules), effectively allowing a minority of the Senate to block the measure through the technique of the filibuster. This has effectively resulted in a requirement that a nomination have the support of 60 Senators to pass, rather than a majority of 51.

 

In most variations of the nuclear option, the presiding officer of the Senate would rule that a simple majority vote is sufficient to end debate, and if the ruling were challenged, a majority would be required to overturn the ruling. This would mean, for example, that 51 Senators who favor a nomination could use their majority to uphold the presiding officer’s ruling that only 51 votes are needed to end debate and proceed to a final vote, and once the 51 had voted to end debate, they would then have sufficient votes to confirm the nomination. This would end what has effectively become a 60-vote requirement for confirmation of an executive or judicial nominee, or the passage of legislation.

 

Some variations of the nuclear option involve changing the Senate rules themselves, while others would use the maneuver to create a new precedent for particular types of measures, by having a majority of the Senate uphold the ruling of the presiding officer that a previous rule or precedent is no longer valid.

 

The metaphor of a nuclear strike refers to the majority party unilaterally imposing a change to the filibuster rule, which might provoke retaliation by the minority party. The alternative term “constitutional option” is often used with particular regard to confirmation of executive and judicial nominations, on the rationale that the United States Constitution requires these nominations to receive the “advice and consent” of the Senate. Proponents of this term argue that the Constitution implies that the Senate can act by a majority vote unless the Constitution itself requires a supermajority, as it does for certain measures such as the ratification of treaties. By effectively requiring a supermajority of the Senate to fulfill this function, proponents believe that the current Senate practice prevents the body from exercising its constitutional mandate, and that the remedy is therefore the “constitutional option.”

 

The history of the “nuclear” option, though not the name, has been traced to an opinion written by then-Vice President Richard Nixon in 1957, while he held the title President of the Senate. Nixon’s opinion stated that the Constitution grants the presiding officer of the Senate the authority to override Senate rules by making a ruling that is then upheld by a majority vote. Senator Trent Lott (R-Miss.) first used the term “nuclear option” for this maneuver in March 2003.

 

A series of votes in 1975 have been cited as a precedent for the nuclear option, although some of these were reconsidered shortly thereafter.

 

The maneuver was brought to prominence in 2005 when Majority Leader Bill Frist (Republican of Tennessee) threatened its use to end Democratic-led filibusters of judicial nominees submitted by President George W. Bush. In response to this threat, Democrats threatened to shut down the Senate and prevent consideration of all routine and legislative Senate business. The ultimate confrontation was prevented by the Gang of 14, a group of seven Democratic and seven Republican Senators, all of whom agreed to oppose the nuclear option and oppose filibusters of judicial nominees, except in extraordinary circumstances.

 

The nuclear option was raised again following the congressional elections of 2012, this time with Senate Democrats in the majority (but short of a supermajority). The Democrats have been the majority party in the Senate since 2007 but only briefly did they have the 60 votes necessary to halt a filibuster. The Hill reported that Democrats would “likely” use the nuclear option in January 2013 to effect filibuster reform, but the two parties managed to negotiate two packages of amendments to the Rules concerning filibusters that passed on January 24, 2013, by votes of 78 to 16 and 86 to 9, thus avoiding the need for the nuclear option.

 

In July 2013, the Senate Democratic majority came within hours of using the nuclear option to win confirmation of seven of President Obama’s long-delayed executive branch appointments. The ability of the minority party to filibuster appointments was preserved by a last-minute deal in which the White House withdrew two of the nominations in exchange for the other five being brought to the floor for a vote, where they were confirmed.

 

On November 21, 2013, Senate Democrats used the “nuclear option” to require only a majority vote to end a filibuster of certain executive and judicial nominees, not including Supreme Court nominees, rather than the 3/5 of votes previously required. A 3/5 supermajority is still required to end filibusters unrelated to those nominees.

 

Harry Reid

 

From The Hill:

Senate votes to limit filibuster after Reid goes nuclear

 

By Alexander Bolton

 

The Senate voted Thursday to change its rules to prevent the minority party from filibustering any nominations other than nods to the Supreme Court.

 

The change was approved after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) triggered the “nuclear option,” which allows a change to Senate rules by majority vote.

 

The 52-48 vote dramatically changes the rules of the Senate and limits the minority party’s ability to prevent confirmation of presidential nominees. Sens. Carl Levin (Mich.), Mark Pryor (Ark.) and Joe Manchin (W.Va.) were the only Democrats to vote against Reid’s rules change.

 

It will allow all three of President Obama’s nominees to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals to go forward, as well as his nomination of Rep. Mel Watt to lead a housing regulatory agency.

 

Reid said the change was necessary to get the Senate working again.

 

“It’s time to change the Senate before this institution becomes obsolete,” Reid said on the Senate floor.

 

“The American people believe Congress is broken. The American people believe the Senate is broken. And I agree.”

 

The procedural motion is known as the nuclear option because critics warn it would obliterate bipartisan relations in the Senate. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) ripped Reid for triggering it.

 

McConnell accused Democrats of picking a “fake fight over judges” to try and “distract the public” from the problems of ObamaCare.

 

“It only reinforces the narrative of party willing to do or say just about anything to get its way,” said McConnell.

 

“One again, Democrats are threatening to break the rules of the Senate … in order to change the rules of the Senate,” he said.

 

“And over what? Over a court that doesn’t have enough work to do.”

 

The specific procedural vote to change the Senate’s rules was to sustain the ruling of the chair that nominees need 60 votes to advance to final passage.

 

Democrats voted against sustaining the ruling of the chair and in favor of changing the Senate’s rules. The final vote was 48-52.

 

Thank you The Hill.

 

 

Beautiful Image…..

 

President Barack Obama delivers remarks and awards the 2013 Presidential Medal of Freedom to honorees during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2013. Honorees are: Ernie Banks, Ben Bradlee, former President Bill Clinton, Daniel Inouye (posthumous), Daniel Kahneman, Richard Lugar, Loretta Lynn, Mario Molina, Sally Ride (posthumous), Bayard Rustin (posthumous), Arturo Sandoval, Dean Smith, Gloria Steinem, Cordy Tindell "C.T." Vivian, Patricia Wald, and Oprah Winfrey. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama delivers remarks and awards the 2013 Presidential Medal of Freedom to honorees during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 20, 2013. Honorees are: Ernie Banks, Ben Bradlee, former President Bill Clinton, Daniel Inouye (posthumous), Daniel Kahneman, Richard Lugar, Loretta Lynn, Mario Molina, Sally Ride (posthumous), Bayard Rustin (posthumous), Arturo Sandoval, Dean Smith, Gloria Steinem, Cordy Tindell “C.T.” Vivian, Patricia Wald, and Oprah Winfrey. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

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Mitch McConnell Is Scared: Team Mitch Distributed Misogynist Attack Against Alison Lundergan Grimes


 

By Jueseppi B.

20131119_McConnell_0

 

Yesterday, a Mitch McConnell senior staffer promoted an article that features the face of Democratic candidate for Senate in my home state of Kentucky, Alison Lundergan Grimes crudely pasted onto a scantily clad body.

 

Team Mitch is desperate. They’ve seen the latest polls that show him virtually tied with Alison Lundergan Grimes. Now they’re doing everything they can to avoid actually talking about the issues that matter to Kentucky families like my own. But we’re not going to let them get away with it.

 

Join EMILY’s List and Alison Lundergan Grimes and demand that Mitch McConnell apologize to the women of Kentucky.

 

Senator McConnell continues to lead the GOP’s War on Women, and he has demonstrated time and again just how out of touch he is with women.

 
Sign your name to tell Mitch McConnell that he needs to apologize to me, my mom, my grandmother, and all of the women of Kentucky.

 

Demand Mitch McConnell Apologize!

 

Team Mitch is desperate. But that’s no excuse for misogynst attacks. Join EMILY’s List and Alison Lundergan Grimes and tell Mitch McConnell that he needs to apologize to the women of Kentucky.

 

Add your name to demand that Mitch apologize!

 

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WE Work On The Weekends….When There’s Work To Be Done!


 

By Jueseppi B.

President Barack Obama meets with Senate Democratic leadership. Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin, Sen. Charles Schumer, Sen. Patty Murray, and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid to discuss the government shutdown and the nation’s debt ceiling in the Oval Office of the White House

President Barack Obama meets with Senate Democratic leadership. Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin, Sen. Charles Schumer, Sen. Patty Murray, and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid to discuss the government shutdown and the nation’s debt ceiling in the Oval Office of the White House

 

White House Tweets – October 12, 2013

 

 

 
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Lawmakers arrive for budget showdown

 

Members of Congress arrive for a special Saturday session as the government shutdown continues and the debt ceiling deadline looms.

 

Photos courtesy of M.Scott Mahaskey/POLITICOPhotos – Associated Press

.

 

Mitch McConnell The pendulum has swung back to Senate Republicans, who now look more likely to cut a deal with Obama to end the first government shutdown since 1996.

Mitch McConnell
The pendulum has swung back to Senate Republicans, who now look more likely to cut a deal with Obama to end the first government shutdown since 1996.

Eric Cantor Eric Cantor told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Oct. 12 that “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight."

Eric Cantor
Eric Cantor told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Oct. 12 that “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight.”

John Boehner John Boehner says that the House GOP and the White House have not reached a deal

John Boehner
John Boehner says that the House GOP and the White House have not reached a deal

Ted Cruz The fiery Texas senator confronted President Barack Obama over his health care law during a meeting at the White House Friday attended by dozens of GOP senators.

Ted Cruz
The fiery Texas senator confronted President Barack Obama over his health care law during a meeting at the White House Friday attended by dozens of GOP senators.

House Democrats line up to sign a discharge petition.

House Democrats line up to sign a discharge petition.

Sen. Lindsey Graham The  South Carolina Republican is a key Senate player.

Sen. Lindsey Graham
The South Carolina Republican is a key Senate player.

Steny Hoyer The House minority whip speaks to Democrats at the petition signing.

Steny Hoyer
The House minority whip speaks to Democrats at the petition signing.

Susan Collins Democratic leaders in the Senate rejected an offer by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) to end the budget impasse, arguing it asks for too much in return for too little.

Susan Collins
Democratic leaders in the Senate rejected an offer by Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) to end the budget impasse, arguing it asks for too much in return for too little.

Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) walk together after a closed-door Senate GOP meeting. Some polls indicate the fiscal standoff is sending the GOP to a historic nadir, a result that McCain described as “devastating."

Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) walk together after a closed-door Senate GOP meeting. Some polls indicate the fiscal standoff is sending the GOP to a historic nadir, a result that McCain described as “devastating.”

Chuck Grassley Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) arrives for the Senate GOP closed-door meeting.

Chuck Grassley
Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) arrives for the Senate GOP closed-door meeting.

Harry Reid When asked if he is confident he could reach a deal with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told POLITICO: “No."

Harry Reid
When asked if he is confident he could reach a deal with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told POLITICO: “No.”

 

 

From POLITICO

 

President Obama huddles with Senate Dem leaders

 

 

President Barack Obama summoned Senate Democratic leaders to the White House to talk strategy Saturday afternoon after budget and debt ceiling talks between administration officials and House Republicans fell apart overnight.

 

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nevada), along with Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) huddled with Obama in the Oval Office for about an hour and 15 minutes starting around 3:30 p.m. Saturday to discuss the state of the talks just days before the United States is set to exhaust its borrowing power and risk defaulting on the nation’s debt.

 

The White House announced the session — which also included White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, deputy chief of staff Rob Nabors and Office of Management and Budget Director Sylvia Mathews Burwell — just minutes before it began, but was tight-lipped about the agenda. Still photographers were allowed in for a glimpse of the meeting, but reporters and video cameras were kept out.

 

The optics of the day suggested a Washington once again mired in chaos. In a party-line vote, Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic proposal to lift the debt ceiling through 2014 without any spending cuts or changes to Obamacare. And just before that vote, word surfaced that Senate Democratic leaders rejected a compromise proposal from Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) which would have lifted the debt ceiling through January and keep the government open until March.

 

Still, there was a sense that amidst all the fighting, a solution is in the works. That’s because two of the most skilled negotiators on Capitol Hill — Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell — have started talking to each other, something they haven’t done in months.

“As long as people are still negotiating and still talking, that’s positive,” Collins told reporters, though she, like others, was frustrated with Democrats for rejecting her plan.

 

A Senate Democratic leadership aide said the senators had a very productive meeting with the president, “and they remain fully united moving forward.”

 

“The President and the leaders compared notes and reviewed a number of the options raised in meetings over the past few days. Their conclusion was that while Democrats remain united, Republicans have yet to coalesce behind a clear negotiating position,” the aide said in a statement. “The President and the leaders agreed that talks between Senate Democratic and Senate Republican leaders should continue in the coming days, but Democrats’ position remains the same: Democrats are willing to negotiate on anything Republicans want to discuss as soon as we reopen the government and pay our bills.”

 

Meanwhile, Republican senators were eager for a way out of the mess — and have their faith invested in McConnell to figure out a way forward.

 

 

“In the end, Sen. McConnell and Sen. Reid have to come up with a recommendation for us about how to open the government, how to pay our bills by raising the debt limit and how to reduce the debt,” Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) said. “We have to move forward. I think we have to do the best we can, send it to the House, and then they’ll do the best they can.”

 

The talks came after Obama rejected a proposal from House Republicans on Friday that would have lifted the debt ceiling for six weeks, reopened the government and established six weeks of budget negotiations.

 

“We can’t wait for the House to save us, we have to find our own bipartisan path forward,” said Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin.

 

But the Senate leadership discussions are hardly a slam dunk.

 

Each man is unpopular back home — something that McConnell will have to contend with as he tries to cut a deal with Reid and faces a tough reelection next year.

 

Last year, McConnell was the chief architect behind the fiscal cliff deal, after reaching a bitter impasse with Reid and instead reaching an eleventh-hour accord with Vice President Joe Biden.

 

But the Kentucky senator came under fire from the right because the deal raised tax rates on wealthy Americans. And as he faces a primary challenger back home, ahead of a potentially tough Democratic opponent, many in Washington believe McConnell is hamstrung and unable to stick his neck out in the latest fiscal crisis engulfing the Capitol.

 

And in the House, conservative Republicans are urging their Senate counterparts to remain strong.

 

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) told a closed meeting of GOP lawmakers on Saturday morning that, “Senate Republicans need to stand strong and fight,” according to sources in the room.

 

For all sides, the clock is the biggest enemy. It’s unclear if a deal brokered by the Senate could come together before Thursday, when the $16.7 trillion debt limit must be boosted, according to Treasury Secretary Jack Lew. House Republican leadership sources say their offer of a six-week debt limit increase might regain favor if a Senate-brokered deal does not come together before that deadline.

 

— Kevin Cirilli, Manu Raju, Jake Sherman, Burgess Everett and John Bresnahan contributed to this report

 
Thank you POLITICO.

 

Reid to Republicans: It’s Not Too Late To Do The Right Thing

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

Senate floor speech, October 12, 2013

 

 

 

Reid: Open the Government, Let Us Pay Our Bills

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

The focus of efforts to end the government shutdown and prevent a U.S. default shifted to the Senate on Saturday, where leaders were in talks to resolve the twin stalemates. The Senate rejected a Democratic effort to raise the debt ceiling. (Oct. 12)

 

 

 

Day 12 of Government Shutdown

 

Published on Oct 12, 2013

House Democrats call for vote to end the federal shutdown. (October 12)

 

 

 

Reid: Speaker Boehner Couldn’t Deliver

 

Published on Oct 3, 2013

In an interview with CNN, Senator Reid discusses his conversations with Speaker Boehner to prevent a shutdown.

 

 

 

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The Daily 411 From Barack’s House


 

By Jueseppi B.

Get It First. Get it Fast. Get it Right Here...The Daily Word From Barack's House.

Get It First. Get it Fast. Get it Right Here…The Daily Word From Barack’s House.

 

White House Tweets – August 28, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White House Schedule – August 28, 2013

 

 

In the morning, the President and the Vice President will receive the Presidential Daily Briefing in the Oval Office. This meeting is closed press.

 

In the afternoon, the President will deliver remarks at the Let Freedom Ring ceremony on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The First Lady will also attend. The President’s remarks are open to pre-credentialed media.

 

Wednesday, August 28 2013 All Times ET

 

10:00 AM: The President and the Vice President receive the Presidential Daily Briefing in The Oval Office.

 

 

3:05 PM: The President delivers remarks at the Let Freedom Ring ceremony commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom In Front Of The Lincoln Memorial.

 

 

The Week Ahead:

 

Thursday: Attends meetings at the White House.

 

Friday: The President will welcome President Toomas Hendrik Ilves of Estonia, President Dalia Grybauskaite of Lithuania, and President Andris Berzins of Latvia to the White House.

 

 

Multimedia

 

 

This video of The President Speaking To Radio Personalities Tom Joyner & Sybil Wilkes was uploaded by TheObamaDiary.com, who dislikes other bloggers using their content. That said, the video is unviewable here on my blog so just click the “You Tube” icon located in the lower right hand corner of the screen below….that takes you directly to the video on the You Tube site, YouTube.com.

 

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President Obama’s interview with Tom Joyner & Sybil Wilkes

 

 

 

 

 What Day Is It?? It’s HuMp DaY!!

 

 

 

 

First Lady Michelle Obama Speaks at a Screening of “The Powerbroker”

August 27, 2013 | 10:12 |Public Domain

 

“The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights,” a documentary narrated by Alfre Woodard, chronicles Whitney Young’s civil rights fight of the 1960’s that took him from segregated Kentucky to leader of the National Urban League. The First Lady graduated from the Whitney M. Young Magnet High School in Chicago, IL in 1981.

 

 

 

 

Press Briefing

August 27, 2013 | 52:53 |Public Domain

 

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

 

50 Years Forward: Building Ladders of Opportunity

 

Published on Aug 27, 2013

Eric Holder, U.S. Attorney General, and Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama, provide updates on early education, health care, community revitalization, and economic growth programs, among others at an event marking the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. August 27, 2013.

 

 

 

Drag the time counter to the 46 minute mark to see the entire White House event.

 

 

 

 

Speeches and Remarks/Statements and Releases

August 27, 2013

 

 

Readout of the President’s Meeting with Mayors

@petesouza: Pres Obama meets w mayors from across the country to discuss reducing youth violence

@petesouza: Pres Obama meets w mayors from across the country to discuss reducing youth violence

 

Readout of Vice President Biden’s Call with Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Nick Clegg

 

 

Readout of the President’s Call with Prime Minister Harper of Canada

 

 

Readout of the President’s Call with Prime Minister Rudd of Australia

 

 

Statement by the President

Jack Gilligan lived his life in service to his fellow Americans, especially those in his home state of Ohio and across the United States who were left out or left behind. During World War II, he earned a Silver Star for his bravery at Okinawa, and he never stopped serving his country—as a Congressman, where he helped enact historic legislation from the Voting Rights Act to Medicare and Medicaid, and then as governor of Ohio.

 

In addition to his many other accomplishments, Jack was the father of four extraordinary children, including our Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius. Kathleen followed in the high tradition of public service that Jack set, and they became the first father-daughter team of governors in American history. She always made her father proud, and I’m proud to have her on my team each and every day. Michelle and I extend our deepest condolences to Kathleen, the entire Gilligan family, and their many friends.

 

 

Remarks by the First Lady at a screening of “The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights”

 

 

in-case-you-missed-it

 

 

President Obama Awards the Medal of Honor to Ty Carter

 

 

Our ‘Fierce Urgency of Now’

 

 

Becoming a More Perfect Union

 

 

TheObamaCrat™ Wake Up Call…..YES I’m Just Waking Up!!

 

 

The 411 From Barack’s Blog

 

 

Fight Poverty With The PAGE Initiative: Poverty Alleviation through Global Education and Efforts

 

 

Tuesday Evening Potpourri From TheObamaCrat™

 

 

Mark Glaze, Mayors Against Illegal Guns: 7 Backpacks To Congress.

 

 

Celebrating Women’s Equality Day

 

 

August 28th 2013: Photo of the Day

 

President Barack Obama talks on the phone with Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada in the Oval Office, Aug. 27, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama talks on the phone with Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada in the Oval Office, Aug. 27, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

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3:05 EDT President Obama delivers remarks at the ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington

3:05 EDT President Obama delivers remarks at the ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington

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