President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Election Results.


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President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Elections.

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Following Republicans’ big wins in the Senate and House on election night, President Barack Obama and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they would try to avoid the gridlock that has gripped the government lately.

“To everyone that voted — I hear you,” Obama said in news conference Wednesday. “To the two-thirds who didn’t participate, I hear you too.”

 

 

Yesterday, millions of Americans cast their ballots. Republicans had a good night, and I congratulate all the candidates who won.

 

But what stands out to me is that the message Americans sent yesterday is one you’ve sent for several elections in a row now. You expect the people you elect to work as hard as you do. You expect us to focus on your ambitions — not ours — and you want us to get the job done. Period.

 

I plan on spending every moment of the next two years rolling up my sleeves and working as hard as I can for the American people. This country has made real and undeniable progress in the six years since the 2008 economic crisis. But our work will not be done until every single American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most: in your own lives.

 

While I’m sure we’ll continue to disagree on some issues that we’re passionate about, I’m eager to work with Congress over the next two years to get the job done. The challenges that lay ahead of us are far too important to allow partisanship or ideology to prevent our progress as a nation.

 

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As we make progress, I’ll need your help, too. Over the weeks and months ahead, I’ll be looking to Americans like you, asking you to stay engaged.

 

I am optimistic about our future. Because for all the maps plastered across our screens today, for all the cynics who say otherwise, we are more than a simple collection of red and blue states. We are the United States.

 

And yesterday, millions of Americans — Democrats and Republicans, women and men, young and old, black and white — took the time out of their day to perform a simple, profound act of citizenship. That’s something we shouldn’t forget amid the din of political commentary. Because making progress starts with showing up.

 

Let’s get to work.

President Barack Obama

 

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Remarks by the President in a Press Conference

East Room

2:57 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everybody.  Have a seat.

Today, I had a chance to speak with John Boehner and congratulated Mitch McConnell on becoming the next Senate Majority Leader.  And I told them both that I look forward to finishing up this Congress’ business, and then working together for the next two years to advance America’s business.  And I very much appreciated Leader McConnell’s words last night about the prospect of working together to deliver for the American people. On Friday, I look forward to hosting the entire Republican and Democratic leadership at the White House to chart a new course forward.

Obviously, Republicans had a good night, and they deserve credit for running good campaigns.  Beyond that, I’ll leave it to all of you and the professional pundits to pick through yesterday’s results.  What stands out to me, though, is that the American people sent a message, one that they’ve sent for several elections now.  They expect the people they elect to work as hard as they do.  They expect us to focus on their ambitions and not ours.  They want us to get the job done.

All of us, in both parties, have a responsibility to address that sentiment.  Still, as President, I have a unique responsibility to try and make this town work.  So, to everyone who voted, I want you to know that I hear you.  To the two-thirds of voters who chose not to participate in the process yesterday, I hear you, too.  All of us have to give more Americans a reason to feel like the ground is stable beneath their feet, that the future is secure, that there’s a path for young people to succeed, and that folks here in Washington are concerned about them.  So I plan on spending every moment of the next two-plus years doing my job the best I can to keep this country safe and to make sure that more Americans share in its prosperity.

This country has made real progress since the crisis six years ago.  The fact is more Americans are working; unemployment has come down.  More Americans have health insurance.  Manufacturing has grown.  Our deficits have shrunk.  Our dependence on foreign oil is down, as are gas prices.  Our graduation rates are up.  Our businesses aren’t just creating jobs at the fastest pace since the 1990s, our economy is outpacing most of the world.  But we’ve just got to keep at it until every American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most, and that’s in their own lives.

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Obviously, much of that will take action from Congress.  And I’m eager to work with the new Congress to make the next two years as productive as possible.  I’m committed to making sure that I measure ideas not by whether they are from Democrats or Republicans, but whether they work for the American people.  And that’s not to say that we won’t disagree over some issues that we’re passionate about.  We will.  Congress will pass some bills I cannot sign.  I’m pretty sure I’ll take some actions that some in Congress will not like.  That’s natural.  That’s how our democracy works.  But we can surely find ways to work together on issues where there’s broad agreement among the American people.

So I look forward to Republicans putting forward their governing agenda.  I will offer my ideas on areas where I think we can move together to respond to people’s economic needs.

So, just take one example.  We all agree on the need to create more jobs that pay well.  Traditionally, both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure — our roads, bridges, ports, waterways.  I think we can hone in on a way to pay for it through tax reform that closes loopholes and makes it more attractive for companies to create jobs here in the United States.

We can also work together to grow our exports and open new markets for our manufacturers to sell more American-made goods to the rest of the world.  That’s something I’ll be focused on when I travel to Asia next week.

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We all share the same aspirations for our young people.  And I was encouraged that this year Republicans agreed to investments that expanded early childhood education.  I think we’ve got a chance to do more on that front.  We’ve got some common ideas to help more young people afford college and graduate without crippling debt so that they have the freedom to fill the good jobs of tomorrow and buy their first homes and start a family.

And in the five states where a minimum wage increase was on the ballot last night, voters went five for five to increase it. That will give about 325,000 Americans a raise in states where Republican candidates prevailed.  So that should give us new reason to get it done for everybody, with a national increase in the minimum wage.

So those are some areas where I think we’ve got some real opportunities to cooperate.  And I am very eager to hear Republican ideas for what they think we can do together over the next couple of years.  Of course, there’s still business on the docket that needs attention this year.  And here are three places where I think we can work together over the next several weeks, before this Congress wraps up for the holidays.

First, I’m submitting a request to Congress for funding to ensure that our doctors, scientists, and troops have the resources that they need to combat the spread of Ebola in Africa and to increase our preparedness for any future cases here at home.

Second, I’m going to begin engaging Congress over a new Authorization to Use Military Force against ISIL.  The world needs to know we are united behind this effort, and the men and women of our military deserve our clear and unified support.

Third, back in September, Congress passed short-term legislation to keep the government open and operating into December.  That gives Congress five weeks to pass a budget for the rest of the fiscal year.  And I hope that they’ll do it in the same bipartisan, drama-free way that they did earlier this year.  When our companies are steadily creating jobs — which they are — we don’t want to inject any new uncertainty into the world economy and to the American economy.

The point is it’s time for us to take care of business.  There are things this country has to do that can’t wait another two years or another four years.  There are plans this country has to put in place for our future.

And the truth is I’m optimistic about our future.  I have good reason to be.  I meet Americans all across the country who are determined, and big-hearted, and ask what they can do, and never give up, and overcome obstacles.  And they inspire me every single day.  So the fact is I still believe in what I said when I was first elected six years ago last night.  For all the maps plastered across our TV screens today, and for all the cynics who say otherwise, I continue to believe we are simply more than just a collection of red and blue states.  We are the United States.

And whether it’s immigration or climate change, or making sure our kids are going to the best possible schools, to making sure that our communities are creating jobs; whether it’s stopping the spread of terror and disease, to opening up doors of opportunity to everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility — the United States has big things to do.  We can and we will make progress if we do it together.  And I look forward to the work ahead.

So, with that, let me take some questions.  I think that our team has got my list.  And we’re going to start with Julie Pace at Associated Press.

 

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The question & answer session can be found here: Press Conference Q & A

 

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The Day After The Last 24™: Complete 2014 Mid Term Election Results

 

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The Last 24™


 

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Mr. MilitantNegro™

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First Lady Michelle Obama Host A Fashion Education Workshop at the White House.

 

 

The workshop was to connect students with leading fashion professionals to show what to take to succeed in the fashion industry.

 

Remarks by the First Lady at Fashion Education Workshop

 

 

Fashion Education Workshop Slideshow

 

Among those attending were young fashion design students and such fashion design/stylist icons as Naeem KhanEdward Wilkerson, Thom BrownePhillip LimJason Wu, Mary Alice Stephenson and Editor-in-Chief of Vogue magazineAnna Wintour.

 

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First Lady Michelle Obama also spent time visiting the “Wearable Technology” workshop. Wearable technology is the integration of technology with fashion, like boots that charges cellphone, bras that detect cancer, compression shirts that monitor and record your heart rate, breathing rate and body temperature.

 

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The first lady also found time to support Wendy Davis Of Texas.

 

 

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President Obama Meets with the Pentagon About ISIL

 

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, President Obama and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey,  met with Military Senior Leadership at the Pentagon on October 8, 2014 in Arlington, Virginia. The President met with the military leaders for an update on the battle against ISIS.

 

 

The President met with and shook hands with military service members prior to a meeting with military senior leadership at the Pentagon. The President also participated in a conference call with state and local officials to discuss the Administration’s domestic preparedness response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, at the White House on October 8.

 

 

President Obama at the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia.

 

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President Obama Provides an Update on the Ebola Outbreak

 

October 06, 2014 | 9:33 | Public Domain

On October 6, 2014, President Obama was briefed on the Ebola outbreak in the U.S. and abroad, and provided an update on the U.S. preparedness and response to the epidemic.

 

 

Remarks by the President in Conference Call with State and Local Officials on Ebola

 

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Statements and Releases/Speeches and Remarks

 

Readout of the President’s Phone Call with President Santos of Colombia

 

Statement by the Press Secretary on the Canadian Decision to Authorize Military Force Against ISIL

 

FACT SHEET: The U.S. Response to the Ebola Epidemic in West Africa

 

 

White House Press Briefing

 

October 08, 2014 | 01:08:20 | Public Domain

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

The White House Blog Updates:

 

Empowering Our Young People, and Stemming the Collateral Damage of Incarceration

 

Five U.S. Airports Are Enacting New Screening Measures to Protect Against Ebola

 

Preparing America’s Hospitals, Health Care Facilities, and Health Care Providers for Ebola

 

In Case You Missed It: Why We Can — and Will — Stop Ebola in the U.S.

 

U.S. Fuel Economy Reaches All-Time High

 

Vice President Biden: No One Who Works 40 Hours a Week Should Live in Poverty

 

The American Dream Needs a Fair Minimum Wage

 

Vice President Biden at the Reopening of Joplin High School: “We Never Stop. And We Always Rebuild.”

 

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It's Raining Videos™

It’s Raining Videos™

Secretary Kerry Delivers Remarks With Vice President Biden and Indian Prime Minister Modi

 

Published on Oct 8, 2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers remarks with Vice President Biden and Indian Prime Minister Modi at a Luncheon at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. on September 30, 2014. A text transcript can be found at: http://www.state.gov/secretary/remark

 

 

 

Pastor: Family devastated by Ebola death

 

Published on Oct 8, 2014

Pastor George Mason of Wilshire Baptist Church in Dallas talks to Anderson Cooper about the death of Thomas Eric Duncan.

 

 

Even with combating The Ebola Virus, skin color plays a part in who survives and who dies. Remember the two caucasian Ebola medical personal who returned to America and were given the experimental drug….and lived/recovered? Why was Mr. Thomas Eric Duncan NOT given the same treatment? Skin color is why.

 

 

Chinese company snathces up NYC’s iconic Waldorf-Astoria hotel

 

Published on Oct 8, 2014

In a record-breaking sale, a Chinese insurance giant is buying New York City’s iconic Waldorf-Astoria hotel for nearly $2 billion. The purchase comes as China remains the leading foreign buyer of US properties, and what some experts call the largest transfer of wealth in history, with centuries of accumulated American capital being scooped up by Chinese investors. RT’s Marina Portnaya takes a closer look.

 

 

Notice that China owns a lot of property and “things” in America, but America owns jack shit in China?

 

 

Immigrant military veterans fight deportation after discharge

 

 

 

Supreme Court reignites same-sex marriage as campaign issue

 

 

 

Liberals Too Tolerant of Islam? Ben Affleck, Bill Maher, Sam Harris, Nicholas Kristoff Debate

 

 

 

Ebola battle through nurse’s eyes

 

 

 

Demanding Justice for John Crawford (w/ Malaya Davis)

 

 

 

NOW for the days “feel good” video: Open Carry Enthusiast Has Gun Stolen in Robbery at Gunpoint

 

Published on Oct 8, 2014

An Open Carry gun enthusiast has his gun stolen by gunpoint by a man who saw and “liked” his pistol…

 

 

Every now and again…..Karma just shows up and makes you bust the fuck out laughing.

 

The Twitter Storm™

The Twitter Storm™

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Twitter Storm™


 

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The White House Observes A Moment Of Silence Marking The 9/11 13th Anniversary. President Obama Speaks At The September 11th Observance Ceremony.


9-11 Tribute In Light Memorial

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Remarks by the President at 9/11 Memorial

The Pentagon

9:45 A.M. EDT

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The White House Observes a Moment of Silence to Mark the 13th Anniversary of the 9/11 Attacks

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President Obama Speaks at the September 11th Observance Ceremony

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Remarks by the President at 9/11 Memorial

The Pentagon

9:45 A.M. EDT

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Good morning. Scripture tells us, “We count as blessed those who have persevered.”

Secretary Hagel, General Dempsey, members of our Armed Forces, and, most of all, the survivors of that September day and the families of those we lost –- Michelle and I are humbled to be with you once again.

It has now been 13 years. Thirteen years since the peace of an American morning was broken. Thirteen years since nearly 3,000 beautiful lives were taken from us, including 125 men and women serving here at the Pentagon. Thirteen years of moments they would have shared with us. Thirteen years of memories they would have made.

Here, once more, we pray for the souls of those we remember, for you, their families, who love them forever, and for a nation that has been inspired by your example — your determination to carry on, your resolve to live lives worthy of their memories.

As Americans, we draw strength from you. For your love is the ultimate rebuke to the hatred of those who attacked us that bright, blue morning. They sought to do more than bring down buildings or murder our people. They sought to break our spirit and to prove to the world that their power to destroy was greater than our power to persevere and to build. But you, and America, proved them wrong.

America endures in the strength of your families who, through your anguish, kept living. You have kept alive a love that no act of terror can ever extinguish. You, their sons and daughters, are growing into extraordinary young men and women they knew you could be. By your shining example, your families have turned this day into something that those who attacked us could never abide, and that is a tribute of hope over fear, and love over hate.

America endures in the tenacity of our survivors. After grievous wounds, you learned to walk again and stand again. After terrible burns, you smiled once more. For you, for our nation, these have been difficult years. But by your presence here today, in the lives of service that you have led, you embody the truth that no matter what comes our way, America will always come out stronger.

America endures in the dedication of those who keep us safe. The firefighter, the officer, the EMT who carries the memory of a fallen partner as they report to work each and every day, prepared to make the same sacrifice for us all. Because of these men and women, Americans now work in a gleaming Freedom Tower. We visit our great cities, we fill our stadiums and cheer for our teams. We carry on, because, as Americans, we do not give in to fear — ever.

America endures in the courage of the men and women who serve under our flag. Over more than a decade of war, this 9/11 Generation has answered our country’s call, and three months from now, our combat mission in Afghanistan will come to an end. Today, we honor all who have made the ultimate sacrifice these 13 years, more than 6,800 American patriots. And we give thanks to those who serve in harm’s way to keep our country safe and meet the threats of our time.

America endures in that perennial optimism that defines us as a people. Beginning tomorrow, there will be teenagers –- young adults –- who were born after 9/11. It’s remarkable. And while these young Americans did not know the horrors of that day, their lives have been shaped by all the days since — a time that has brought us pain, but also taught us endurance and strength; a time of rebuilding, of resilience, and of renewal. What gives us hope –- what gives me hope -– is that it is these young Americans who will shape all the days to come.

Thirteen years after small and hateful minds conspired to break us, America stands tall and America stands proud. And guided by the values that sustain us, we will only grow stronger. Generations from now, Americans will still fill our parks, our stadiums, our cities. Generations from now, Americans will still build towers that reach toward the heavens; still serve in embassies that stand for freedom around the world; still wear the uniform and give meaning to those words written two centuries ago: Land of the free. Home of the Brave. Generations from now, no matter the trial, no matter the challenge, America will always be America.

“We count as blessed those who have persevered.”

May God bless your families, who continue to inspire us all. May God bless our Armed Forces and all who serve to keep us safe. And may God continue to bless the United States of America.
END
9:52 A.M. EDT

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Memorial Museum Dedication Ceremony 9/11. We Remember

Published on May 15, 2014

The brand new Sept. 11 museum opened Thursday, May 15th, 2014 and was praised as “a sacred place of healing and of hope” that captures both the story and the spirit of heroism and helpfulness that followed the attacks. This is a video slide show of the dedication ceremony.

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September 9/11: 13 Years Later. Memorial Museum Dedication Ceremony.


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President Obama, Others Dedicate 9/11 Museum In Solemn Ceremony

President Barack Obama praised the new Sept. 11 museum on Thursday as “a sacred place of healing and of hope” that captures both the story and the spirit of heroism and helpfulness that followed the attacks. (May 15)

Obama at 9/11 Museum: Terrorism Can’t Break Us

President Barack Obama, dignitaries, Sept. 11 survivors, rescuers and victims’ relatives marked the opening of the 9/11 museum in a solemn dedication ceremony on Thursday.

Obama called the National September 11 Memorial Museum as “a sacred place of healing and of hope” that captures both the story and the spirit of heroism and helping others that followed the attacks.

“It’s an honor to join in your memories, to recall and to reflect, but above all to reaffirm the true spirit of 9/11 — love, compassion, sacrifice — and to enshrine it forever in the heart of our nation,” he told an audience of victims’ relatives, survivors, and rescuers at the ground zero museum’s dedication ceremony.

“Like the great wall and bedrock that embrace us today, nothing can ever break us. Nothing can change who we are as Americans.”

The president praised the men and women who helped save lives in the attack, including those who gave their lives in the effort.

“Those we lost live on in us,” Obama said. “In the families who love them still, the friends who remember them always and in a nation that will honor them now and forever.”

Former mayor Michael Bloomberg called the museum “a place we come to remember those who died and to honor acts of courage and compassion.”

“We are here today to help dedicate a great museum, one that rises out of the bedrock of our city, our history and our hearts,” Bloomberg said before introducing Obama at the dedication ceremony. “In the years to come, the 9/11 memorial museum will take its place alongside the fields of Gettysburg, the waters of Pearl Harbor and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial as a sacred marker of our past and as a solemn gathering place.”

The museum, which commemorates the 2001 terrorist attack as well as the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, opens to the public on May 21.

Before the ceremony, Obama walked quietly through an expansive hall with Bloomberg.First lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton following behind them.

Reflections from dignitaries, including New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Mayor Bill de Blasio and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, were interspersed with the voices of everyday people caught up in Sept. 11.

Retired Fire Department Lt. Mickey Cross described being trapped for hours in the wreckage of the north tower and then joining the recovery effort after being rescued.

“There was a real sense of caring for each other,” he said.

Kayla Bergeron remembered walking down 68 flights of stairs in the north tower, amid confusion and fear that there was no way out. Her final steps to safety were on an outdoor stairway, now in the museum as the “survivors’ stairs.”

“Today, when I think about those stairs, what they represent to me is resiliency,” she said.

Thirteen years after the Twin Towers fell, the raw emotion is still palpable among those who lived through it.

“It was like this dream you thought you were going to wake up from,” Midtown resident Peter Bricken said.

“It’s like being in a sacred place, like a tomb,” Washington Heights resident Roman Kopinads said. “So many people lost their lives.”

Inside The 9/11 Museum

9/11 Memorial Museum Dedication Ceremony

Published on May 15, 2014

The brand new Sept. 11 museum opened Thursday, May 15th, 2014 and was praised as “a sacred place of healing and of hope” that captures both the story and the spirit of heroism and helpfulness that followed the attacks. This is a video slide show of the dedication ceremony.

The museum and memorial plaza above, which opened in 2011, were built for $700 million in donations and tax dollars.

By turns chilling and heartbreaking, the ground zero museum leads people on an unsettling journey through the terrorist attacks, with forays into their lead up and legacy.

The sights and sounds are all-encompassing and at times, overwhelming.

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“Walking through this museum can be difficult at times, but it is impossible to leave without feeling inspired,” Bloomberg said Thursday.

There are scenes of horror, including videos of the skyscrapers collapsing and people falling from them. But there also are symbols of heroism, ranging from damaged fire trucks to the wristwatch of one of the airline passengers who confronted the hijackers.

Visitors start in an airy pavilion where the rusted tops of two of the World Trade Center’s trident-shaped columns shoot upward. From there, museumgoers descend stairs and ramps, passing through a dark corridor filled with the voices of people remembering the day and past the battered “survivors’ staircase” that hundreds used to escape the burning towers.

At the base level, 70 feet below ground, amid remnants of the skyscrapers’ foundations, there are such artifacts as a mangled piece of the antenna from atop the trade center and a fire truck with its cab shorn off.

Then, galleries plunge visitors into the chaos of Sept. 11: fragments of planes, a set of keys to the trade center, a teddy bear left at the impromptu memorials that arose after the attacks, the dust-covered shoes of those who fled the skyscrapers’ collapse, emergency radio transmissions and office workers calling loved ones, even a recording of an astronaut solemnly describing the smoke plume from the International Space Station.

President Obama Speaks at 9/11 Museum Dedication

Published on May 15, 2014

President Obama delivers remarks at the dedication of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at Ground Zero, May 15, 2014.

Sprinkled in are snippets about the 19 hijackers, including photos of them on an inconspicuous panel.

The unidentified human remains of more than 1,000 people will also be housed in an underground repository within the museum.

But several families gathered outside the memorial gates Wednesday night to say their relatives should not be buried inside a museum that costs $24 to enter.

“We want those remains up on the plaza, a nice memorial where they can continue DNA testing. They don’t belong in an admission charging museum,” said Jim Riches, whose firefighter son was killed in the attack.

Other victims’ families see it as a fitting resting place.

After Thursday’s dedication, the museum will be open for six days around-the-clock to Sept. 11 survivors, victims’ relatives, first responders and lower Manhattan residents.

When the museum opens to the public May 21, the $24 admission will be waived for all visitors, but advance reservations are required.

There will be no admission charge for relatives of Sept. 11 victims or for rescue and recovery workers. Children age 6 and younger will get in free. Admission will be free for everyone on Tuesdays from 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.

The museum’s regular hours will be 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.

Officials say advanced reservations for tickets can be booked at 911memorial.org.

Thank you CBS & The Associated Press

September 11 2001 As It Happened – CNN Live 8.40am – 10.11am

Published on Aug 10, 2012

CNN Live of September 11 2001 from 8:40am – 10:11am.

September 11 2001 As It Happened – CNN live 10:11am – 9:00pm

Published on Aug 12, 2012

CNN Live of September 11 2001 from 10:11am – 9:00pm

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