President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Election Results.


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!000000000000000000000000000AAAMe

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Elections.

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Following Republicans’ big wins in the Senate and House on election night, President Barack Obama and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they would try to avoid the gridlock that has gripped the government lately.

“To everyone that voted — I hear you,” Obama said in news conference Wednesday. “To the two-thirds who didn’t participate, I hear you too.”

 

 

Yesterday, millions of Americans cast their ballots. Republicans had a good night, and I congratulate all the candidates who won.

 

But what stands out to me is that the message Americans sent yesterday is one you’ve sent for several elections in a row now. You expect the people you elect to work as hard as you do. You expect us to focus on your ambitions — not ours — and you want us to get the job done. Period.

 

I plan on spending every moment of the next two years rolling up my sleeves and working as hard as I can for the American people. This country has made real and undeniable progress in the six years since the 2008 economic crisis. But our work will not be done until every single American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most: in your own lives.

 

While I’m sure we’ll continue to disagree on some issues that we’re passionate about, I’m eager to work with Congress over the next two years to get the job done. The challenges that lay ahead of us are far too important to allow partisanship or ideology to prevent our progress as a nation.

 

Screenshot (1830)

 

As we make progress, I’ll need your help, too. Over the weeks and months ahead, I’ll be looking to Americans like you, asking you to stay engaged.

 

I am optimistic about our future. Because for all the maps plastered across our screens today, for all the cynics who say otherwise, we are more than a simple collection of red and blue states. We are the United States.

 

And yesterday, millions of Americans — Democrats and Republicans, women and men, young and old, black and white — took the time out of their day to perform a simple, profound act of citizenship. That’s something we shouldn’t forget amid the din of political commentary. Because making progress starts with showing up.

 

Let’s get to work.

President Barack Obama

 

Screenshot (1822)

 

Remarks by the President in a Press Conference

East Room

2:57 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everybody.  Have a seat.

Today, I had a chance to speak with John Boehner and congratulated Mitch McConnell on becoming the next Senate Majority Leader.  And I told them both that I look forward to finishing up this Congress’ business, and then working together for the next two years to advance America’s business.  And I very much appreciated Leader McConnell’s words last night about the prospect of working together to deliver for the American people. On Friday, I look forward to hosting the entire Republican and Democratic leadership at the White House to chart a new course forward.

Obviously, Republicans had a good night, and they deserve credit for running good campaigns.  Beyond that, I’ll leave it to all of you and the professional pundits to pick through yesterday’s results.  What stands out to me, though, is that the American people sent a message, one that they’ve sent for several elections now.  They expect the people they elect to work as hard as they do.  They expect us to focus on their ambitions and not ours.  They want us to get the job done.

All of us, in both parties, have a responsibility to address that sentiment.  Still, as President, I have a unique responsibility to try and make this town work.  So, to everyone who voted, I want you to know that I hear you.  To the two-thirds of voters who chose not to participate in the process yesterday, I hear you, too.  All of us have to give more Americans a reason to feel like the ground is stable beneath their feet, that the future is secure, that there’s a path for young people to succeed, and that folks here in Washington are concerned about them.  So I plan on spending every moment of the next two-plus years doing my job the best I can to keep this country safe and to make sure that more Americans share in its prosperity.

This country has made real progress since the crisis six years ago.  The fact is more Americans are working; unemployment has come down.  More Americans have health insurance.  Manufacturing has grown.  Our deficits have shrunk.  Our dependence on foreign oil is down, as are gas prices.  Our graduation rates are up.  Our businesses aren’t just creating jobs at the fastest pace since the 1990s, our economy is outpacing most of the world.  But we’ve just got to keep at it until every American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most, and that’s in their own lives.

Screenshot (1821)

Obviously, much of that will take action from Congress.  And I’m eager to work with the new Congress to make the next two years as productive as possible.  I’m committed to making sure that I measure ideas not by whether they are from Democrats or Republicans, but whether they work for the American people.  And that’s not to say that we won’t disagree over some issues that we’re passionate about.  We will.  Congress will pass some bills I cannot sign.  I’m pretty sure I’ll take some actions that some in Congress will not like.  That’s natural.  That’s how our democracy works.  But we can surely find ways to work together on issues where there’s broad agreement among the American people.

So I look forward to Republicans putting forward their governing agenda.  I will offer my ideas on areas where I think we can move together to respond to people’s economic needs.

So, just take one example.  We all agree on the need to create more jobs that pay well.  Traditionally, both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure — our roads, bridges, ports, waterways.  I think we can hone in on a way to pay for it through tax reform that closes loopholes and makes it more attractive for companies to create jobs here in the United States.

We can also work together to grow our exports and open new markets for our manufacturers to sell more American-made goods to the rest of the world.  That’s something I’ll be focused on when I travel to Asia next week.

Screenshot (1818)

We all share the same aspirations for our young people.  And I was encouraged that this year Republicans agreed to investments that expanded early childhood education.  I think we’ve got a chance to do more on that front.  We’ve got some common ideas to help more young people afford college and graduate without crippling debt so that they have the freedom to fill the good jobs of tomorrow and buy their first homes and start a family.

And in the five states where a minimum wage increase was on the ballot last night, voters went five for five to increase it. That will give about 325,000 Americans a raise in states where Republican candidates prevailed.  So that should give us new reason to get it done for everybody, with a national increase in the minimum wage.

So those are some areas where I think we’ve got some real opportunities to cooperate.  And I am very eager to hear Republican ideas for what they think we can do together over the next couple of years.  Of course, there’s still business on the docket that needs attention this year.  And here are three places where I think we can work together over the next several weeks, before this Congress wraps up for the holidays.

First, I’m submitting a request to Congress for funding to ensure that our doctors, scientists, and troops have the resources that they need to combat the spread of Ebola in Africa and to increase our preparedness for any future cases here at home.

Second, I’m going to begin engaging Congress over a new Authorization to Use Military Force against ISIL.  The world needs to know we are united behind this effort, and the men and women of our military deserve our clear and unified support.

Third, back in September, Congress passed short-term legislation to keep the government open and operating into December.  That gives Congress five weeks to pass a budget for the rest of the fiscal year.  And I hope that they’ll do it in the same bipartisan, drama-free way that they did earlier this year.  When our companies are steadily creating jobs — which they are — we don’t want to inject any new uncertainty into the world economy and to the American economy.

The point is it’s time for us to take care of business.  There are things this country has to do that can’t wait another two years or another four years.  There are plans this country has to put in place for our future.

And the truth is I’m optimistic about our future.  I have good reason to be.  I meet Americans all across the country who are determined, and big-hearted, and ask what they can do, and never give up, and overcome obstacles.  And they inspire me every single day.  So the fact is I still believe in what I said when I was first elected six years ago last night.  For all the maps plastered across our TV screens today, and for all the cynics who say otherwise, I continue to believe we are simply more than just a collection of red and blue states.  We are the United States.

And whether it’s immigration or climate change, or making sure our kids are going to the best possible schools, to making sure that our communities are creating jobs; whether it’s stopping the spread of terror and disease, to opening up doors of opportunity to everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility — the United States has big things to do.  We can and we will make progress if we do it together.  And I look forward to the work ahead.

So, with that, let me take some questions.  I think that our team has got my list.  And we’re going to start with Julie Pace at Associated Press.

 

Screenshot (1823)

 

The question & answer session can be found here: Press Conference Q & A

 

Screenshot (1789)

 

The Day After The Last 24™: Complete 2014 Mid Term Election Results

 

genetic-fear-of-a-black-planet1obama-works-at-his-desk

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11bottom !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!deathmikebrown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!fight peace5 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!000000000000000000obama-forward3

The Day After The Last 24™


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!000000000000000000000000000AAAMe

00000000000000000000000000000000024hours

 

Election Results

Last updated Nov 5 at 4:14 AM

 

Screenshot (1792) Screenshot (1793) Screenshot (1794)

 

From Reuters:

 

Tough road ahead for Obama after Republicans seize Senate

 

BY STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES

 

(Reuters) – Republicans rode a wave of voter discontent to seize control of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, dealing a punishing blow to President Barack Obama that will limit his legislative agenda and may force him to make a course correction for his last two years in office.

 

The Republican rout was wide and deep in what was bound to be seen as a sharp rebuke to Obama, who has lurched from crisis to crisis all year and whose unpopularity made him unwelcome to Democratic candidates in many contested states.

 

The Republicans also strengthened their grip on the House of Representatives. When the new Congress takes power in January, they will be in charge of both chambers of Congress for the first time since elections in 2006.

 

The Republican takeover in the Senate will force Obama to scale back his ambitions to either executive actions that do not require legislative approval, or items that might gain bipartisan support, such as trade agreements and tax reform.

 

It will also test his ability to compromise with newly empowered political opponents who have been resisting his legislative agenda since he was first elected. And it could prompt some White House staff turnover as some exhausted members of his team consider departing in favor of fresh legs.

 

Obama, first elected in 2008 and again in 2012, called Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress to the White House on Friday to take stock of the new political landscape.

 

He watched election returns from the White House, and saw little to warm his spirits.

 

Before the election results, the White House had signaled no major changes for Obama. Officials said Obama would seek common ground with Congress on areas like trade and infrastructure.

 

“The president is going to continue to look for partners on Capitol Hill, Democrats or Republicans, who are willing to work with him on policies that benefit middle-class families,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday.

 

Obama, a one-term senator before he became president, has often been faulted for not developing closer relations with lawmakers.

 

He will find one familiar face in a powerful new position.

 

Republican Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who won a tough re-election battle against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, will replace Democrat Harry Reid as Senate majority leader. Reid has been one of Obama’s top political allies and helped him steer the president’s signature healthcare law through the Senate in 2010.

 

“Some things don’t change after tonight. I don’t expect the president to wake up tomorrow and view the world any differently than he did when he woke up this morning. He knows I won’t either. But we do have an obligation to work together on issues where we can agree,” McConnell said in his victory speech in Louisville.

 

TOSS-UPS BECOME REPUBLICAN WINS

In Tuesday’s comprehensive rout, Republicans won in places where Democrats were favored, taking a Senate race in North Carolina, pulled out victories where the going was tough, like a Senate battle in Kansas, and swept a number of governors’ races in states where Democrats were favored, including Obama’s home state of Illinois.

 

Of eight to 10 Senate seats that were considered toss-ups, Republicans won nearly all of them. They needed six seats to win control of the 100-member Senate, and by late evening they had seven.

 

The winning margin came when Iowa Republican Joni Ernst was declared the winner over Democrat Bruce Braley and Republican Thom Tillis defeated incumbent Democratic Senator Kay Hagan in North Carolina.

 

The Iowa race was particularly indicative of Republican fortunes. Ernst came from behind and surged in recent weeks despite herculean efforts by powerful Democratic figures to save Braley, including a campaign visit by Obama’s wife, Michelle.

 

Republican Senate candidates also picked up Democratic seats in Montana, Colorado, West Virginia, South Dakota and Arkansas.

 

‘RESPONSIBILITY … TO LEAD’

Once the euphoria of their victory ebbs, Republicans will be under pressure to show Americans they are capable of governing after drawing scorn a year ago for shutting down the government in a budget fight. That will be a factor in their ambitions to take back the White House in 2016.

 

Republican Senator Ted Cruz, a conservative firebrand who may run in 2016, told CNN: “The American people, they’re frustrated with what’s happening in Washington, but now the responsibility falls on us to lead.”

 

While there was talk of conciliation, no major breakthrough in Washington’s chilly climate is expected soon.

 

Partisan battles could erupt over immigration reform, with Obama poised to issue executive actions by year’s end to defer deportations of some undocumented immigrants, and over energy policy, as Republican press the president to approve the Keystone XL pipeline carrying oil from Canada.

 

Jay Carney, Obama’s former spokesman, said he expects Obama to make an “all-out push” on his priorities regardless of the makeup of Congress.

 

Whatever the case, Obama will face pressure to make changes at the White House. A Reuters/Ipsos poll showed 75 percent of respondents believe the administration needs to “rethink” how it approaches major issues facing the United States (bit.ly/1ph8sLs). Sixty-four percent said Obama should replace some of his senior staff after the election.

 

The Republican victory had been widely predicted ahead of Tuesday’s voting to elect 36 senators, 36 state governors and all 435 members of the House of Representatives.

 

Obama and other White House officials blamed the electoral map – noting that many key Senate races took place in conservative states that Obama lost in 2012.

 

Election Day polling by Reuters/Ipsos found a dour mood among the electorate with less than one-third of voters believing the country is headed in the right direction.

 

Roughly 40 percent of voters said they approved of the job Obama is doing as president, though they were split over whether they expected the economy to improve or worsen in the coming year.

 

In a consolation for Democrats, Jeanne Shaheen won re-election over Republican Scott Brown in New Hampshire in what polls had forecast as a tight race.

 

In Virginia, heavily favored Democratic incumbent Senator Mark Warner found himself in a surprisingly close fight against Republican challenger Ed Gillespie, with much of the vote counted. By late evening, he claimed victory but Gillespie had not yet conceded.

 

In the most closely watched governors’ races, Florida’s Republican Governor Rick Scott edged out Democrat Charlie Crist, and Republican Scott Walker survived a challenge from Democrat Mary Burke in Wisconsin.

 

(Additional reporting by Jeff Mason, Susan Heavey, Tim Ryan and Ian Simpson in Washington; Marti Maguire in Raleigh, North Carolina; David Beasley in Atlanta; Steve Bittenbender in Louisville, Kentucky; Barbara Liston in Orlando, Bill Cotterell in Tallahassee and Zachary Fagenson in Miami Beach; Colleen Jenkins in Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Jonathan Kaminsky in New Orleans; Editing by Frances Kerry)

 

Thank you Reuters & STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES.

 

Joni Ernst makes history in Iowa

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Joni Ernst addresses supporters after becoming the first female senator in Iowa state history.

 

 

 

Why Democrats Lost

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

“Resurgent Republicans captured Democratic seats in Arkansas and West Virginia and bid for control of the U.S. Senate and a tighter grip on the House Tuesday in elections shaped by deep voter discontent with President Barack Obama.

 

 

Screenshot (1795)

 

From POLITICO:

 

4 indicted N.Y. pols win reelection

 

Takeaways from the GOP romp

 

Big win for conservative big money

 

LePage survives Maine 3-way race

 

After drubbing, all eyes on Clinton

 

Minimum wage hikes win

 

Filibuster-proof majority for Keystone

 

Upsets of the night

 

Kansas Gov. Brownback edges Democratic foe

 

No Obama pivot after midterms

 

Walker victory humiliates labor

 

Coakley falls short again in Mass.

 

How Clintons’ candidates did

 

How Mitch did it

 

Cruz won’t commit to McConnell

 

Senate flips, GOP ready to rule

 

Election results: 2014 takeaways

 

D.C. approves pot legalization

 

Personhood movement loses twice

 

Reid to run for minority leader

 

Ernst beats Braley in Iowa

 

Election results 2014: Gubernatorial analysis

 

Tillis clinches GOP Senate majority

 

Rauner ousts Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn

 

 

Thank you POLITICO.

 

Click On Graphics Below To Enlarge

 

Screenshot (1796)

Screenshot (1798) Screenshot (1799) Screenshot (1800) Screenshot (1801) Screenshot (1802) Screenshot (1803)

 

Mediaite FULL LIST: 2014 Midterm Election Senate Results

 

The 2014 midterm elections have finally arrived and voting is underway in all 50 states. There are plenty of major gubernatorial and congressional races — not to mention some crucial ballot referendums — all across the country, but all anyone in the political media really seems to care about is one thing: the Senate.

 

Conventional wisdom seems to be that Republicans will win the six seats needed to take over the Senate from Democrats, giving them control of both house of Congress for PresidentBarack Obama’s final two years in office. But if you ask Vice President Joe Biden, Democrats are going to maintain a two-seat lead in the Senate, so you never know until polls have closed. And even then, potential run-offs in Georgia and Louisiana have some pundits predicting we won’t know which party really controls the Senate until January 2015.

 

Below are the 11 12 most competitive races of the cycle — the ones that will determine which way the Senate falls. We will be updating the winners throughout the evening as they are called so keep checking back here for the most complete picture of where things stand.

 

Alaska

Mark Begich* (Democrat)
Dan Sullivan (Republican)
Mark Fish (Libertarian)
Ted Gianoutsos (No Party Affiliation)

 

Arkansas

Mark Pryor* (Democrat)
Tom Cotton (Republican)
Nathan LaFrance (Libertarian)
Mark Swaney (Green)

 

Colorado

Mark Udall* (Democrat)
Cory Gardner (Republican)
Raul Acosta (Unaffiliated)
Bill Hammons (Unity)

 

Georgia

Michelle Nunn (Democrat)
David A. Perdue (Republican)
Amanda Swafford (Libertarian)

 

Iowa

Bruce Braley (Democrat)
Joni Ernst (Republican)
Douglas Butzier (Libertarian)
Bob Quast (Other)

 

Kansas

Pat Roberts* (Republican)
Greg Orman (Independent)
Randall Batson (Libertarian)

 

Kentucky

Mitch McConnell* (Republican)
Alison Lundergan Grimes (Democrat)
David Patterson (Libertarian)

 

Louisiana

Mary Landrieu* (Democrat)
Bill Cassidy (Republican)
Rob Maness (Republican)

Run-off projected, scheduled for December 6th.

 

New Hampshire

Jeanne Shaheen* (Democrat)
Scott Brown (Republican)

 

North Carolina

Kay Hagan* (Democrat)
Thom Tillis (Republican)
Sean Haugh (Libertarian)

 

South Dakota

Rick Weiland (Democrat)
Mike Rounds (Republican)
Larry Pressler (Independent)
Gordon Howie (Independent)

 

Virginia

Mark Warner* (Democrat)
Ed Gillespie (Republican)

*Incumbent

Bold = Projected winner

Current Senate Breakdown:

Democrats: 45
Republicans: 52

51 seats needed for a majority; Republicans must pick up 6 seats.

 

genetic-fear-of-a-black-planet1

 

From The Grio:

 

What last night’s election results mean for Obama’s final 2 years

 

obama-works-at-his-desk

 

by

 

The 2014 midterm election results are in.  And in keeping with the expectations and conventional wisdom, the Republicans have taken control of the U.S. Senate from Harry Reid and the Democrats.  For the President, the results lay the groundwork for a very interesting final two years in office.  With no possibility of common ground with a GOP-controlled Congress, expect Obama to use his veto pen often, and go it alone through the use of executive orders.

 

With 36 Senate seats in play, mostly in red states, the deck was stacked against the Democrats from the outset.  Sen. Mary Landrieu—who faces a runoff election because no candidate broke through the required 50 percent threshold–created controversy when she suggested the obvious, which is that the South has a problem with Obama because of his race.

 

“I’ll be very, very honest with you. The South has not always been the friendliest place for African-Americans,” Landrieu said. “It’s been a difficult time for the president to present himself in a very positive light as a leader.”

 

Meanwhile, with Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) winning his race against challenger Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, the GOP lawmaker is poised to become majority leader of the upper chamber of Congress.  Grimes—who attempted to distance herself from the president in a state where he is unpopular— was faulted for refusing to say whether she voted for Obama.

 

Compounding the problem for Democrats this election cycle was the issue of lower turnout by the base in midterms, when President Obama was not on the ballot, and the specter of voter suppression efforts such as voter ID, purges and the gutting of the Voting Rights Act making an impact in key races.

 

Among the more high profile races, North Carolina incumbent Senator Kay Hagan (D-North Carolina) lost to Republican Thom Tillis.  In Georgia, Republican David Purdue beat Democrat Michelle Nunn, and Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) held on to his seat, while incumbent Senator Mark Pryor (D-Arkansas) lost his reelection bid to Tom Cotton. In the New Hampshire race, incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire) defeated challenger Scott Brown, while Cory Gardner, a Republican, bested incumbent Mark Udall in Colorado.

 

The two African-American U.S. senators, Tim Scott (R-South Carolina) and Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) will return to the legislative body.  Booker is the first black senator elected in New Jersey.  Scott, who had been appointed by Gov. Nikki Haley in 2012 to finish the term of resigning Senator Jim DeMint, is the first black senator elected to the South since Reconstruction.

 

Republicans also maintained control of the House of Representatives, with its 435 seats at stake.  Looking at races for governors, a number of Republican incumbents, such as Scott Walker (R-Wisconsin), Rick Scott (R-Florida) and Rick Snyder (R-Michigan) won reelection, while the unpopular Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett lost as expected to Tom Wolf.  In Maryland, Anthony Brown, the African-American lieutenant governor, lost in his gubernatorial bid to Republican Larry Hogan.

 

With a Republican controlled Senate and Congress, Americans can expect more gridlock.  It is all but certain that the GOP—emboldened and full of hubris—will interpret their victory as a mandate to jam through all types of Tea Party-anointed pieces of legislation.  In the short term, conservative lawmakers are likely to pursue matters such as corporate tax reform, Keystone XL Pipeline and gutting the Affordable Care Act.

 

President Obama is expected to use his veto pen frequently, with continued, futile attempts by Republicans to repeal Obamacare.  Further, we should expect some intra-party strife within the GOP, as presidential aspirants such as Senators Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul position themselves for the 2016 contest, and Cruz expected to make things difficult for Mitch McConnell with calls to investigate the president.

 

Further, a Republican takeover of the Senate could result in a constitutional crisis over the president’s future appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court.  If there is a vacancy on the high court during Obama’s lame duck presidency, it is conceivable that the Senate simply will not hold hearings on a judicial candidate that fails to meet the GOP ultraconservative litmus test.  In addition, whether the Senate will stall on a replacement for Attorney General Eric Holder remains to be seen.

 

In the midst of partisan gridlock and a perpetually broken Senate that refuses to act on important matters, President Obama has the option to use executive orders on issues such as comprehensive immigration reform and amnesty for undocumented immigrants.  One could argue that the president should have pursued such an effort on immigration before the election—as he had promised—as a means to further energize Latinos and the rest of the Democratic base.  Certainly, such an executive move today would anger Obama’s opponents and may be interpreted as overreach.  But he is still the president, and the legislature does not pass legislation these days, mostly to make a black president look bad.

 

And in light of his GOP detractors who have sabotaged the government for political gain, maintaining a legislative logjam only to blame him for the mess, it would seem Obama has little choice.

 

Thank you The Grio & 

 

Screenshot (1789)

Screenshot (1790)

Screenshot (1791)

 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11bottom !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!deathmikebrown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!fight peace5 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!000000000000000000obama-forward3

Weekly Address: Congress Needs To Act On Minimum Wage


 

By Jueseppi B.

000000000000000000000000001obamacrat

 

 

Weekly Address: Congress Needs to Act on Minimum Wage

 

In this week’s address, the President highlights small business owners across the country acting to raise wages for their workers, and calls on Congress to give America a raise so more hard-working Americans have the opportunity to get ahead.

 

 

 

baracksays

 

 

Mensaje De La Casa Blanca

 

Published on Apr 26, 2014

En el mensaje de esta semana, la Directora de la Oficina de Administración de Personal Katherine Archuleta habló sobre la importancia de aumentar el salario mínimo a fin de que todos los que trabajan duro ganen el salario que se merecen.

 

 

 

baracksays

 

 

What $10.10 Would Mean For Your State. Raise The Wage.

 

In this year’s State of the Union addressPresident Obama called on Congress to raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour.

 

That would benefit more than 28 million workers — helping families across the country make ends meet.

 

But exactly how would it help? We’ll show you.

 

unnamed

 

In his State of the Union address, President Obama called on Congress to raise the national minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour, and soon after signed an Executive Order to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 for the individuals working on new federal service contracts.

 

Raising the minimum wage nationwide will increase earnings for millions of workers, and boost the bottom lines of businesses across the country. Learn more below, and share this page with your friends and family.

 

Raising the federal minimum wage would not only benefit more than 28 million workers across the country, but 19 million workers from all types of households would see a direct increase in their wages

 

minimum_wage_pie_chart_05

 

Today, the real value of the minimum wage has fallen by nearly one-third since its peak in 1968. And right now, a full-time minimum wage worker makes $14,500 a year, which leaves too many families struggling to make ends meet.

 

minimum_wage_poverty_graphic3

 

 

Raising the minimum wage will help millions of Americans

 

Spread the word to friends and family

 

 

 

 

 

 

Untitled.99jpg

 

Raise The Minimum Wage: Barack Speaks At Michigan University, Ann Arbor – Full Speech.

 

 

Obama Speaks At Michigan University, Ann Arbor– Full Speech

 

Published on Apr 2, 2014

President Obama speaks about raising the minimum wage while visiting the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

 

 

 

 

Add Your Name: America Deserves a Raise

 

Last Friday, I spoke at a rally in Cleveland about raising the minimum wage. While I was there, I had the opportunity to talk with 11-year-old Jesseca Hudson, who came out to show her support.

 

Before I’d even boarded my plane back to D.C., she had already emailed me, telling me how she wanted to help in the fight to give millions of workers the wages they deserve.

 

Jesseca doesn’t think that someone working full-time should struggle to make ends meet. But full-time workers earning the current federal minimum wage of $7.25 only earn about $14,500 a year in wages — below the poverty line for a family of two.

 

That’s unacceptable. And it’s why the President has called on Congress and state governments to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour — and on businesses to act on their own to increase the pay of their workers.

 

If you agree, then add your name, and share why you think we need to raise the wage.

 

040214_perez_emailtopper

 

 

Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 will benefit about 28 million workers across the country. And it will help businesses, too — raising the wage will put more money in people’s pockets, which they will pump back into the economy by spending it on goods and services in their communities.

 

The bottom line: America deserves a raise.

 

And it’s not just 11-year-olds that understand why it’s a problem that the minimum wage has lost nearly a third of its value since its peak in 1968. Nearly three out of fourAmericans agree we should raise the wage.

 

If you agree it’s time that we answer the President’s call to increase the minimum wage and reward honest work, add your name and share why.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

baracksays

 

 

 

Three Out Of Four Americans Agree: It’s Time To Raise The Minimum Wage.

 

Raise The Minimum Wage – ’11 Must-Know Facts About The Minimum Wage’

 

 

Raising the minimum wage isn’t just pro-worker; it’s pro-economic growth. Putting money in the pockets of working families, as Henry Ford explained, means they’ll spend it on goods and services, which in turn helps businesses thrive and create more jobs.

 

 

Obama At Costco Promotes Higher Minimum Wage

 

Published on Jan 29, 2014

President Obama notes that Costco pays its workers a higher starting wage and therefor has fewer workers quit, making it a better company. He speaks from a Costco in Lanham, Maryland.

 

 

 

That’s why 75 percent of Americans − including so many business leaders I speak to − support a higher federal minimum wage. That’s why there’s a proud bipartisan history of raising the wage.

 

The typical minimum wage earner is a provider and a breadwinner – most likely a woman – responsible for paying bills, running a household and raising children. How can we expect her to get by on a wage that, in real terms, isn’t worth as much as it was in the 1950s?

 

The value of the minimum wage simply hasn’t kept up with the cost of living, including the essentials a family needs to survive: a gallon of milk, a gallon of gas, monthly rent, a pair of children’s shoes and more.

 

Wages also haven’t kept up with workers’ output. Since 1979, productivity has increased more than 90 percent, but real average hourly earnings have gone up only 3.2 percent.

 

President Obama believes that income inequality is one of the most pressing matters facing the nation. If we are going to be a country that provides ladders of opportunity and believes in a thriving middle class, then we have to raise the minimum wage.

 

But don’t take my word for it. In recent weeks, I’ve had the privilege of meeting with many low-wage workers – proud men and women who want nothing more than a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. I’ve looked into their eyes and seen their struggle and their sacrifice; their dignity and self-respect.

 

They wake up every morning and do their jobs. Now it’s time for Congress to do its job. It’s time to give minimum wage workers the raise they need, the raise they’ve earned, the raise they deserve.

 

baracksays

 

In the year since I asked this Congress to raise the minimum wage, five states have passed laws to raise theirs.  Many businesses have done it on their own.  Nick Chute is here tonight with his boss, John Soranno.  John’s an owner of Punch Pizza in Minneapolis, and Nick helps make the dough.  Only now he makes more of it: John just gave his employees a raise, to ten bucks an hour – a decision that eased their financial stress and boosted their morale.

 

Tonight, I ask more of America’s business leaders to follow John’s lead and do what you can to raise your employees’ wages.  To every mayor, governor, and state legislator in America, I say, you don’t have to wait for Congress to act; Americans will support you if you take this on.  And as a chief executive, I intend to lead by example. Profitable corporations like Costco see higher wages as the smart way to boost productivity and reduce turnover. We should too.  In the coming weeks, I will issue an Executive Order requiring federal contractors to pay their federally-funded employees a fair wage of at least $10.10 an hour – because if you cook our troops’ meals or wash their dishes, you shouldn’t have to live in poverty.

 

Of course, to reach millions more, Congress needs to get on board. Today, the federal minimum wage is worth about twenty percent less than it was when Ronald Reagan first stood here.  Tom Harkin and George Miller have a bill to fix that by lifting the minimum wage to $10.10.  This will help families.  It will give businesses customers with more money to spend.  It doesn’t involve any new bureaucratic program.  So join the rest of the country.  Say yes.  Give America a raise.

 

minimumwage_031814

 

The State of the Union Fact Sheet: Opportunity for All

 

Opportunity for All: Key Executive Actions the President Will Take in 2014

The President’s top priority remains ensuring middle class Americans feel secure in their jobs, homes and budgets.  To build real, lasting economic security the President will work with Congress and act on his own to expand opportunity for all so that every American can get ahead and have a shot at creating a better life for their kids.

 

Raising the Minimum Wage through Executive Order to $10.10 for Federal Contract Workers. The President will also continue to urge Congress to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 across the nation because no one who works full-time should have to raise their family in poverty.

 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEW WHITE HOUSE REPORT: The Impact Of Raising The Minimum Wage On Women


 

By Jueseppi B.

wage

 

 

NEW WHITE HOUSE REPORT: The Impact of Raising the Minimum Wage on Women and the Importance of Ensuring a Robust Tipped Minimum Wage

 

“Most people who would get a raise if we raise the minimum wage are not teenagers on their first job – their average age is 35.  A majority of lower-wage jobs are held by women.  These Americans are working full-time, often supporting families, and if the minimum wage had kept pace with our economy’s productivity, they’d already be earning well over $10 an hour today.  Instead, it’s stuck at $7.25.  Every time Congress refuses to raise it, it loses value because the cost of living goes higher, minimum wage stays the same.”

- President Obama, Remarks at Central Connecticut State University, March 5, 2014

Over the past 30 years, modest minimum wage increases have not kept pace with the rising costs of basic necessities for working families. No one who works full time should have to raise his or her family in poverty. President Obama supports raising the minimum wage to help build real, lasting economic security for the middle class and has made it a key part of his plan to create more opportunities for every hardworking American to get ahead in 2014.

The President knows this is important for workers, and good for the economy. That is why the President has already signed an executive order to raise the minimum wage and tipped minimum wage for federal contract workers and is calling on Congress to raise the national minimum wage  from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour and index it to inflation thereafter, while also raising the tipped minimum wage for the first time in over 20 years. Increasing the minimum wage and the tipped minimum wage is especially important for women, who make up more than half of the workforce in jobs that pay the minimum wage and tipped occupations. Today, the White House is releasing a new report that lays out how women and the workforce would benefit if Congress passed legislation to raise the national minimum wage and tipped minimum wage for all Americans. Key findings from the report include:

Raising the minimum wage is especially important for women because:

  • Women in the workforce are more highly concentrated in low-wage sectors such as personal care and healthcare support occupations.
  • Women account for more than half (55 percent) of all workers who would benefit from increasing the minimum wage to $10.10.

Women also make up the majority of workers in predominantly tipped occupation.  Under Federal law, employers are allowed to pay a “tipped minimum wage” of $2.13 to employees who regularly earn tips as long as their tips plus the tipped minimum wage meet or exceed $7.25 per hour.

  • Women account for 72 percent of all workers in predominantly tipped occupations – such as restaurant servers, bartenders, and hairstylists.
  • Average hourly wages for workers in predominantly tipped occupations are nearly 40 percent lower than overall average hourly wages.
  • Workers in predominantly tipped occupations are twice as likely as other workers to experience poverty, and servers are almost three times as likely to be in poverty.
  • About half of all workers in predominantly tipped occupations would see their earnings increase as a result of the President’s proposal.

The national tipped minimum wage has been stuck at $2.13 for over 20 years.  Partly as a result, tipped workers are at greater risk of not earning the full minimum wage, even though employers are required by law to ensure that employees’ tips plus their employer-paid wage meet or exceed the full minimum wage.

  • Since 1991, the tipped minimum wage has declined by 40 percent in real terms.  Today, the tipped minimum wage equals just 29 percent of the full minimum wage, the lowest share since the tipped minimum wage was established in 1966.
  • When surveyed, more than 1 in 10 workers in predominantly tipped occupations report hourly wages below the full national minimum wage, including tips. This fact highlights the challenges of ensuring compliance with minimum wage laws for tipped workers, as the employer contribution has been eroded by 20 years of inflation.
  • Many states have recognized the need for a greater employer contribution to the wages of tipped workers. Currently 32 states (including the District of Columbia) require employers to pay tipped workers an hourly wage that exceeds the national tipped minimum of $2.13 – and seven of these states require employers to pay both tipped and non-tipped workers the same state minimum wage before tips.

Raising the full minimum wage and the tipped minimum wage will help reduce poverty among women and their families, as well as make progress toward closing the gender pay gap.

  • About one-quarter (26 percent) of all workers who would benefit from increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 have dependent children, and 31 percent of female workers who would benefit have children.
  • 2.8 million working single parents would benefit from the President’s proposed increase in the full minimum wage, more than 80 percent of whom are women.
  • Research shows that raising the minimum wage reduces child poverty among female-headed households.
  • Increasing the minimum wage can also help women work their way out of poverty and into the middle class.
  • For every dollar that men earn, women earn just 77 cents. Estimates from the President’s Council of Economic Advisers suggest that increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour and indexing it to inflation could close about 5 percent of the gender wage gap.

 

Read the entire report in PDF form…..

THE IMPACT OF RAISING THE MINIMUM WAGE ON WOMEN – March 2014

 

This report was prepared by the National Economic
Council, the Council of Economic Advisers, the
Domestic Policy Council, and the Department of
Labor

 

 

chicago-raise-the-min-wage-rally-thumb-580x365-5724

raise-illinois

cropped-b4peace-header

obamabottomheader

 

A Brand New Day™: Weekly Address. White House Blog Updates.


 

By Jueseppi B.

artworks-000036749300-9mb2cv-crop

 

 

Peter Welsch
Peter Welsch

February 01, 2014
06:00 AM EST

 

In his weekly address, President Obama discussed the goals he laid out in the State of the Union address to expand opportunity for all so that every American can get ahead and have a shot at creating a better life for their kids.

 

 

 

VIDEO MENSAJE DE LA CASA BLANCA: Temas del Estado de la Unión de 2014

February 01, 2014 | 2:43 |Public Domain

 

En el mensaje de esta semana, la Directora de los Medios Hispanos Katherine Vargas habló sobre los temas del Estado de la Unión del martes. El Presidente presentó un conjunto de propuestas prácticas y concretas para hacer crecer la economía, fortalecer la clase media, y para empoderar a todas las personas que desean ser parte de la clase media.

 

 

 

Weekly Address: Restoring Opportunity for All

WASHINGTON, DC— In this week’s address, the President discussed the goals he laid out in the State of the Union address to expand opportunity for all so that every American can get ahead and have a shot at creating a better life for their kids.

 

The audio of the address and video of the address will be available online atwww.whitehouse.gov at 6:00 a.m. ET, Saturday, February 1, 2014.

 

Remarks of President Barack Obama
Weekly Address
The White House
February 1, 2014

 

Hi, everybody.

 

This week, I delivered my State of the Union Address. Today, here’s the three-minute version.

 

After four years of economic growth with eight million new private sector jobs, our unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in more than five years.  And with the economy speeding up, companies say they intend to hire more people this year.

 

But while those at the top are doing better than ever, average wages have barely budged.  Inequality has deepened.  Too many Americans are working harder and harder just to get by.  And too many still aren’t working at all.

 

Our job is to reverse those trends.  It’s time to restore opportunity for all people – the idea that no matter who you are, if you work hard and live up to your responsibilities, you can make it if you try.

 

The opportunity agenda I laid out on Tuesday has four parts. This week, I took them on the road.

 

Job one is more new jobs: jobs in construction and manufacturing, jobs in innovation and energy.

 

In Wisconsin, I talked with plant workers at GE about part two: training more Americans with the skills to fill those new jobs.

 

In Tennessee, I talked with students about part three: guaranteeing every child access to a world-class education, from early childhood, through college, and right into a career.

 

And with steelworkers in Pittsburgh, and retail workers in Maryland, I laid out part four: making sure hard work pays off for men and women, with wages you can live on, savings you can retire on, and health insurance that’s there for you when you need it.

 

These ideas will strengthen the middle class and help more people work their way into the middle class.  Some of them will require Congress.  But wherever I can take steps to expand opportunity for more families on my own, I will.  I’m going to ask business leaders, education leaders, and philanthropic leaders to partner with us to advance these goals.

 

And every single day, I’m going to fight for these priorities – to shift the odds back in favor of more working and middle-class Americans, and to keep America a place where you can always make it if you try.

 

Thanks.  Have a great weekend.  And enjoy the Super Bowl.

 

BfWULazCQAAqbEd

 

 

January 31st 2014: Photo of the Day

 

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden provide encouragement to Erick Varela, who was about to introduce the President, prior to an event to outline new efforts to help the long-term unemployed, in the Green Room of the White House, Jan. 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden provide encouragement to Erick Varela, who was about to introduce the President, prior to an event to outline new efforts to help the long-term unemployed, in the Green Room of the White House, Jan. 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

 

White House Schedule – Week Of February 3rd to 6th 2014

 

37a82236e3ea71e060ab77c60dbc28281

 

On Monday, the President will attend meetings at the White House.

 

On Tuesday, the President will deliver remarks on education. In the evening, the President will host the House Democratic Caucus for a roundtable and reception at the White House. The Vice President will also attend.

 

On Wednesday, the President will deliver remarks at the Senate Democratic Issues Conference.

 

On Thursday, the President will deliver remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast. The Vice President and the First Lady will also attend. Later, the President will meet with President Martelly of Haiti at the White House.

 

Details about Friday’s schedule will be released as they become available.

 

p122013lj-01663

 

Proud To Be

 

Published on Jan 27, 2014

Watch the #BigGame commercial the NFL would never air. Get involved by contacting the Washington Professional Football Team, the NFL and the Washington Post.

 

 

 

President Obama Gets Asked “How Are You?” in a Google+ Hangout

January 31, 2014 | 4:23 |Public Domain

 

During a virtual road trip on Google+, President Obama answered questions from people joining around the country. Including Rob in Portland who asked, “How are you?” Watch what President Obama had to say.

 

 

 

Press Briefing

January 31, 2014 | 47:43 |Public Domain

 

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

Remarks by the President on Giving the Long-Term Unemployed a Fair Shot

January 31, 2014 | 20:58 |Public Domain

East Room.

 

 

 

West Wing Week 01/31/14 or “West Wing Week Turns 200!”

January 30, 2014 | 6:57 |Public Domain

 

This anniversary episode, hosted by the President, coincides with this year’s State of the Union Address. We’ll take you behind the scenes and on the road to speak directly with Americans like you about your lives and your families, and how together we can make sure that every American who works and studies hard has a real chance to get ahead.

 

 

Friday, January 24th

  • The President participated in pre-State of the Union preparations.

 

Tuesday, January 28th

 

Wednesday, January 29th

  • The President toured the Costco in Lanham, Marylandand spoke on the company’s leadership on employee pay.
  • Later that day, the President toured the US Steel Irvin Plant in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania to speak on making hard work pay off for every single American.

 

Thursday, January 30th

  • The President toured the General Electric gas engines factory and discussed the rebounding of the U.S. manufacturing sector in Waukesha, Wisconsin
  • Then, the President delivered a speech on educational opportunity at McGavock High School

 

 

The White House Blog

 

bloggersimage

 

Kori Schulman
Kori Schulman

January 31, 2014
07:51 PM EST

 

President Barack Obama participates in a virtual road trip across the country via Google+ President Barack Obama participates in a virtual road trip across the country via Google+ Hangouts to discuss the issues and policies that he laid out in the State of the Union address, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. January 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

This afternoon, President Obama traveled (virtually) around the country via Google+ Hangout to answer questions about his State of the Union Address from everyday Americans. Starting on the West Coast and heading East, the President spoke to Sheila in San Francisco about immigration reform; Darnell, a fry cook at a fast-food company in Milwaukee, about raising the minimum wage; and Rob in Portland who simply asked, “how are you?

 

Watch the full video of the Hangout below, or over on YouTube. And be sure to follow the White House on Google+ for more opportunities to engage with the President and his administration.

 

 

 

New Transit Projects Connect Communities to Opportunities

 

Road Trip with President Obama

 

President Obama Extends Best Wishes for the Lunar New Year

 

President Obama Travels the Country to Promote Opportunity for All

 

Mad Men, Working Women, and Fair Pay

 

0000ttheobamacratblogimages

AxXLohKCAAEanTT

BfWKBsNIYAA762W

BfWjhV8CQAAmq2l

BfVCHnjCMAAAR35

bfvbpzociaauhh3-large

bexgnp6ceaa2dfr

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden provide encouragement to Erick Varela, who was about to introduce the President, prior to an event to outline new efforts to help the long-term unemployed, in the Green Room of the White House, Jan. 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden provide encouragement to Erick Varela, who was about to introduce the President, prior to an event to outline new efforts to help the long-term unemployed, in the Green Room of the White House, Jan. 31, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Harriet Tubman born Araminta Harriet Ross; 1820 – March 10, 1913

Harriet Tubman born Araminta Harriet Ross; 1820 – March 10, 1913

1559712_363622480444458_383074617_n

buh2mdaceaavkle

 

President Barack Obama signs a memorandum directing the federal government not to discriminate against those long-term unemployed workers in its own hiring practices

President Barack Obama signs a memorandum directing the federal government not to discriminate against those long-term unemployed workers in its own hiring practices

blackheroesbanner2

BeDP5OJCQAADtdA

Bd-HDz_CYAAsdpG

140128-gop-freaks-out-over-obama-executive-orders-for-no-reason-whatsoever

cropped-b4peace-header obamabottomheader

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 276,270 other followers

%d bloggers like this: