Black Genocide In 21st Century America


Mr. Militant Negro, Jueseppi B.

Mr. Militant Negro, Jueseppi B.

maafa_poster_JUNE4TH

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 1of13)

 

Published on Mar 25, 2012

“They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and taken across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help to build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known.

 

But when slavery ended, their welcome was over. America’s wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not particular about how it might be done.

 

What you are about to see is that the plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today. So don’t think that this is history. It is not. It is happening right here, and it’s happening right now.”

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 2of13)

 

 

 

Abortion: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 3/13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 4of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 5of13)

 

 

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MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 6of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 7of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 8of13)

 

 

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MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 9of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 10of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 11of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 12of13)

 

 

 

MAAFA 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Part 13of13)

 

 

Maafa21

 

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Michael Brown’s Mother Lesley McSpadden And Father Michael Brown Sr., Lead Ferguson Rally For Justice.


Mr. Militant Negro, Jueseppi B.

Mr. Militant Negro, Jueseppi B.


Ferguson March: Call For Labor Day Highway Protest

 

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USA: Mike Brown’s family leads Ferguson rally for justice

 

 

 

FERGUSON, Mo. — Activists on Saturday called for mass civil disobedience on the highways in and around this St. Louis suburb to protest the killing of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer, with the leaders of one coalition encouraging supporters to stop their cars to tie up traffic on Labor Day.

 

The announcement came at a peaceful if at times tense march and rally on Saturday that drew more than 1,000 demonstrators to some of the same Ferguson streets where the police clashed with protesters in the days after the killing of Michael Brown. Mr. Brown, 18, was shot Aug. 9 by Officer Darren Wilson of the Ferguson Police Department, and his bloody body lay on Canfield Drive for about four and a half hours before it was removed.

 

Organizers at the rally on Saturday called on demonstrators to drive on Interstate 70 and other area highways at 4:30 p.m. Monday, turn their hazard lights on and stop their vehicles for four and a half minutes to symbolize those four and a half hours that Mr. Brown’s body lay in the middle of the street.

 

“We’re going to tie it down, going to lock it down,” Anthony Shahid, one of the lead organizers of the rally, told supporters from the stage at a Ferguson park. “I want the highways shut down. I know it’s a holiday, but it won’t be no good holiday.”

 

Mr. Shahid’s announcement was met with applause by many of the marchers, but it was unclear how many people would take part. Only a few hundred demonstrators were in the park when Mr. Shahid made the announcement. It was also unclear what the authorities planned to do in response to the civil disobedience plan.

 

The march and rally were organized by a coalition of black activists and leaders largely from the St. Louis region, including state legislators, lawyers, and representatives of theNation of Islam, the N.A.A.C.P., the New Black Panther Party and the Green Party. Organizers with the group, called the Justice for Michael Brown Leadership Coalition, said they wanted Saturday’s event to be a peaceful gathering and had coordinated some of the logistics with city, county and police officials. For much of the march and rally, the police had a very light presence compared with the show of force they had made at other protests.

 

“They’ve already seen the whole world look at the missteps that they made, how they handled the black community like an army going to war in Iraq,” said Akbar Muhammad, an organizer of the demonstration and a top aide to Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. “If they had any sense, they will handle it in a tactful manner.”

 

The march convened at the site where Mr. Brown was shot dead, in the Canfield Green apartment complex, then wound up at a public park, at one point enduring a heavy rainfall.

 

“We know about this from the ’60s,” said Jonell Calloway, 64, a retiree from the Army Reserve who said she had been among the first black students at her high school in Alabama and felt some of that same energy now.

 

“This is an awakening for them,” she said of the young people in St Louis. “We’ve been awake.”

 

As the march turned into the park, a few dozen protesters began chanting, “Ain’t no justice in the park!” out of frustration that the march was not moving on to the city police station. “If they stop here, a lot of people will feel misled,” said Trinette Buck, 40.

 

Organizers urged order, intimating that splitting up would not help the protest. But eventually a few did break off, then a few more, then many more walking the two miles along the road, drawing supportive honks along the way. Withing an hour, hundreds had convened outside the police station, chanting, holding signs and even directing traffic on the nearby streets while a line of police officers stood behind police tape.

 

“There is no fear anymore,” said Ms. Buck. “It’s either stand up or die.”

 

Thank you The New York Times.

 

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It’s Raining Videos™


Jueseppi B. Mr. Militant Negro

Jueseppi B. Mr. Militant Negro

It's Raining Videos™

It’s Raining Videos™


Herbie Hancock – Wayne Shorter Quartet (Munchner Klaviersommer 1991)

 

 

 

Ukrainians brace for rebel attack

 

 

 

Raw: Protesters Clash With Pakistan Police

 

 

 

Taking From the Many to Give to the Few – David Cay Johnston on Reality Asserts Itself (1/4)

 

 

 

Kansas Cops Shoot 18-year-old Suicidal WHITE Teen 16 Times to Death

 

 

 

Michael Sam cut by St. Louis Rams

 

 

 

Fox Guest EXPLODES: Will You SHUP UP? You’re a MORON

 

 

 

Ferguson Missouri sets it off over the killing of Michael Brown

 

 

 

Phoenix police say veteran officer shot, killed mentally ill

 

 

 

WATCH: Melissa Harris-Perry Delivers Powerful Tribute to Unarmed Black Men Killed By Police

 

 

 

Michael Brown’s dad: Justice only when officer is in jail.

 

 

 

Kirk Franklin Down by the Riverside

 

 

 

Something About the Name Jesus – The Rance Allen Group feat. Kirk Franklin

 

 

 

Your Weekly Address
 

This Labor Day, Let’s Talk About the Minimum Wage

 

 

US President Barack Obama holds his first Twitter Town Hall

 

White House Schedule for the Week of September 1, 2014

 

On Monday, the President will travel to Milwaukee, Wisconsin to deliver remarks at Laborfest 2014 at Henry Maier Festival Park. Further details on the President’s travel to Milwaukee will be made available in the coming days.

 

On Tuesday, the President will travel to the Republic of Estonia to further enhance the strong relations between the two countries and to affirm America’s commitment to our Baltic allies. Following the President’s arrival, the President will remain overnight in Tallinn, Estonia.

 

On Wednesday, the President will meet with employees and family members of the United States Embassy to Estonia. Following the meet and greet, he will visit the Kadriorg Palace to participate in the official arrival ceremony, where he will be greeted by President Ilves of Estonia. Later in the morning, the President will also participate in the guest book signing and official photo and hold a bilateral meeting while at the Palace. In the afternoon, the President will visit the Bank of Estonia to participate in a joint press conference with President Ilves. Following the press conference, the President will visit the Stenbok House to meet with Prime Minister Roivas to discuss bilateral ties, strategic and regional cooperation, and our shared commitment to the trans-Atlantic partnership. Later in the afternoon, the President will visit the Kadriorg Art Museum to meet with the three Baltic presidents — President Ilves, President Berzins of Latvia, and President Grybauskaite of Lithuania — to discuss ongoing cooperation on regional security and policies that support economic growth and to discuss collective defense. In the evening, the President will deliver remarks at the Nordea Concert Hall to students, young professionals, and civil society and political leaders. Following his speech, the President will deliver remarks to U.S. and Estonian troops at the Tallinn Airport Hangar. Later in the evening, the President will travel to Newport, Wales, where he will remain overnight.  

 

On Thursday, the President will take an official family photo with leaders attending the NATO Summit at Celtic Manor Resort in Newport. The President will then join NATO leaders for the first session on Afghanistan and then proceed a meeting of the NATO-Ukraine Commission. The President will attend a working dinner on security challenges at historic Cardiff castle and will remain overnight in Wales.

 

On Friday, the President will view a fly-over ceremony and then attend two more working sessions on the Future NATO and the Transatlantic Bond. In the afternoon, the President will hold a press conference and then depart Wales en route Washington, DC.

 

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Ferguson March: Call For Labor Day Highway Protest


Jueseppi B.

Jueseppi B.

5

 

From The New York Times:

At Ferguson March, Call for Labor Day Highway Protest

 

By MANNY FERNANDEZ and CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

 

FERGUSON, Mo. — Activists on Saturday called for mass civil disobedience on the highways in and around this St. Louis suburb to protest the killing of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer, with the leaders of one coalition encouraging supporters to stop their cars to tie up traffic on Labor Day.

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The announcement came at a peaceful if at times tense march and rally on Saturday that drew more than 1,000 demonstrators to some of the same Ferguson streets where the police clashed with protesters in the days after the killing of Michael Brown. Mr. Brown, 18, was shot Aug. 9 by Officer Darren Wilson of the Ferguson Police Department, and his bloody body lay on Canfield Drive for about four and a half hours before it was removed.

 

Organizers at the rally on Saturday called on demonstrators to drive on Interstate 70 and other area highways at 4:30 p.m. Monday, turn their hazard lights on and stop their vehicles for four and a half minutes to symbolize those four and a half hours that Mr. Brown’s body lay in the middle of the street.

 

“We’re going to tie it down, going to lock it down,” Anthony Shahid, one of the lead organizers of the rally, told supporters from the stage at a Ferguson park. “I want the highways shut down. I know it’s a holiday, but it won’t be no good holiday.”

 

Mr. Shahid’s announcement was met with applause by many of the marchers, but it was unclear how many people would take part. Only a few hundred demonstrators were in the park when Mr. Shahid made the announcement. It was also unclear what the authorities planned to do in response to the civil disobedience plan.

 

The march and rally were organized by a coalition of black activists and leaders largely from the St. Louis region, including state legislators, lawyers, and representatives of the Nation of Islam, the N.A.A.C.P., the New Black Panther Party and the Green Party. Organizers with the group, called the Justice for Michael Brown Leadership Coalition, said they wanted Saturday’s event to be a peaceful gathering and had coordinated some of the logistics with city, county and police officials. For much of the march and rally, the police had a very light presence compared with the show of force they had made at other protests.

 

“They’ve already seen the whole world look at the missteps that they made, how they handled the black community like an army going to war in Iraq,” said Akbar Muhammad, an organizer of the demonstration and a top aide to Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. “If they had any sense, they will handle it in a tactful manner.”

 

The march convened at the site where Mr. Brown was shot dead, in the Canfield Green apartment complex, then wound up at a public park, at one point enduring a heavy rainfall.

 

“We know about this from the ’60s,” said Jonell Calloway, 64, a retiree from the Army Reserve who said she had been among the first black students at her high school in Alabama and felt some of that same energy now.

 

“This is an awakening for them,” she said of the young people in St Louis. “We’ve been awake.”

 

As the march turned into the park, a few dozen protesters began chanting, “Ain’t no justice in the park!” out of frustration that the march was not moving on to the city police station. “If they stop here, a lot of people will feel misled,” said Trinette Buck, 40.

 

Organizers urged order, intimating that splitting up would not help the protest. But eventually a few did break off, then a few more, then many more walking the two miles along the road, drawing supportive honks along the way. Withing an hour, hundreds had convened outside the police station, chanting, holding signs and even directing traffic on the nearby streets while a line of police officers stood behind police tape.

 

“There is no fear anymore,” said Ms. Buck. “It’s either stand up or die.”

 

Thank you The New York Times.

 

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Labor Day


Jueseppi B. Mr. Militant Negro

Jueseppi B. Mr. Militant Negro

labor-day

 

LABOR DAY: WHAT IT MEANS

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

 

 

LABOR DAY LEGISLATION

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

 

 

THE FIRST LABOR DAY

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

 

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

 

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A NATIONWIDE HOLIDAY

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

 

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

 

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

 

JOB CORPS CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF OPPORTUNITY

 

jobcorps50logo1

 

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson launched a series of programs aimed at restoring our nation’s fundamental promise of equality and opportunity. The Economic Opportunity Act, signed on Aug. 20 of 1964 as part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty,” established the Job Corps, a residential education and training program for disadvantaged young people ages 16-24. Today, nearly 2.7 million students have benefited from the Job Corps. At 125 centers in 48 states, students today learn the skills necessary to succeed in good jobs with high-growth potential in a dynamic economy. Graduates learn career skills in more than 100 areas – from automotive maintenance to information technology, from health care to hospitality, from construction to IT. Some have become doctors, judges and entertainment executives. All across the country, Job Corps centers are celebrating this historic milestone with demonstrations, open houses, local proclamations, and other events. We’re also sharing stories from some of the people whose lives have been most deeply transformed by the program on our blog. You can contribute by submitting your story through our Web form here − or share on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram using the hashtag #JobCorps50.

 

 

“The basic bargain of America is that no matter who you are, where you come from or what you look like, if you work hard & play by the rules, you can make it.”

— Labor Secretary Tom Perez

 

happy-Labor-Day-images

 

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

 

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.

 

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

 

Labor Day
Labor Day New York 1882.jpg
Labor Day Parade, Union Square, New York, 1882
Observed by United States
Type

Federal Holiday (federal government, DC and U.S. Territories);

and State Holiday (in all 50 U.S. States)

Celebrations Parades, barbecues
Date First Monday in September
2013 date September 2
2014 date September 1
2015 date September 7
2016 date September 5
Frequency annual
Related to Labour Day

 

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York. Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882, after witnessing the annual labor festival held in Toronto,CanadaOregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.

 

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike. The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day. All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

 

Retail Sale Day

To take advantage of large numbers of potential customers free to shop, Labor Day has become an important sale weekend for many retailers in the United States. Some retailers claim it is one of the largest sale dates of the year, second only to the Christmas season’s Black Friday.

 

Ironically, because of the importance of the sale weekend, some of those who are employed in the retail sector not only work on Labor Day, but work longer hours. More Americans work in the retail industry than any other, with retail employment making up 24% of all jobs in the United States. As of 2012, only 3% of those employed in the retail sector were members of a labor union.

 

In high society, Labor Day is (or was) considered the last day of the year when it is fashionable to wear white or seersucker.

 

In U.S. sports, Labor Day marks the beginning of the NFL and college football seasons. NCAA teams usually play their first games the weekend of Labor Day, with the NFL traditionally playing their first game the Thursday following Labor Day. The Southern 500 NASCAR auto race was held that day from 1950 to 1983 in Darlington, South Carolina. At Indianapolis Raceway Park, the National Hot Rod Association hold their finals to the U.S. Nationals drag race. Labor Day is the middle point between weeks 1 and 2 of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships held in Flushing Meadows, New York.

 

In the United States, many school districts resume classes around the Labor Day holiday weekend (see First Day of School). Most begin the week before, making Labor Day weekend the first three-day weekend of the school calendar, while others return the Tuesday following Labor Day, allowing families one final get away before the school year begins. Many districts across the Midwest are opting to begin school after Labor Day.

 

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