Racism AmeriKKKan Style: South Bend Uniform Co. Sells “Breath Easy” Shirts Supporting Choke-hold Murderers.


Jueseppi B. AKA...  Mr MilitantNegro™

Jueseppi B. AKA…
Mr MilitantNegro™

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From The Grio:

Indiana company selling ‘Breathe Easy’ t-shirts

by | December 16, 2014

 

An Indiana uniform company is responding to the “I Can’t Breathe” shirts that star athletes and protesters have been wearing following the death of Eric Garner by an NYPD officer with a t-shirt of their own.

 

South Bend Uniform Company is currently selling “Breathe Easy” shirts, reports RTV6. The black t-shirts with white text feature “Breathe Easy” written at the top, followed by an illustration of a police badge and then the words “Don’t Break The Law.”

 

According to the company’s website, it is owned and operated by Corporal Jason Barthel of the Mishawaka Police Department.

 

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The new t-shirt came shortly after the Notre Dame women’s basketball team donned “I Can’t Breathe” shirts while warming up for their game Saturday.

 

After receiving negative feedback via social media, the uniform company posted an explanation for the t-shirts on their Facebook page.

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Thank you The Grio & .

 

Company Selling ‘Breathe Easy: Don’t Break the Law’ Shirts to Rebut ‘I Can’t Breathe’

Breathe-easy-shirt

 

Breathe Easy, Don’t Break the Law

 

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Maybe the good old AmeriKKKan boys over at South Bend Uniform, should hear from us on how much we appreciate them supporting murderers who used an illegal choke-hold to kill Eric Garner.

 

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I simply don’t have the words to express how racist, cruel and insensitive this garbage is to humanity.  THIS is what the asshole owner says about his business venture: “For those upset, please understand when we use the slogan “Breathe Easy” we are referring to knowing the police are there for you! We are one people, one nation regardless of race, religion, creed or gender. We are all in this together. 

 

As I have repeatedly said to racist asshole on social media, “when caucasians start to die at the hands of law enforcement for being caucasian, then and ONLY then will we all be in this together”. Then and ONLY then will you caucasian skinned Americans understand what it’s like to be hunted by police. Fuck The Police…they are dumbfucks and this tee shirt, it’s creator and his business proves my point.

 

Shoot First, Question Later: Interrogation Of John Crawford’s Girlfriend Released

Published on Dec 16, 2014

“A newly released video shows Ohio police aggressively interrogating the girlfriend of a young black man officers had shot and killed earlier in the day. A detective threatened Tasha Thomas, John Crawford’s girlfriend, with jail time and suggested she was high during an interrogation that lasted more than 90 minutes.Throughout the questioning, Thomas can be heard pleading with the detective and swearing on the lives of her relatives that she didn’t know Crawford had a gun.”

 

 

 

Boston students walk out of class to protest Grand Jury non indictments in police shootings

 

 

Ferguson Grand Jury: Was ‘Witness 40’ even there

 

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It’s Raining Videos During A Twitter Storm™


Mr MilitantNegro™         Jueseppi B.

Mr MilitantNegro™     Jueseppi B.

It's Raining Videos™

It’s Raining Videos™

Samuel L Jackson Just Challenged Celebrities to Call Out the “Violence of the Racist Police”

Samuel L. Jackson Just Challenged Celebrities to Call Out the “Violence of the Racist Police

In a bold move, heavyweight actor Samuel L. Jackson has issued a call to action, similar to that of the ice bucket challenge, but for police.

 

Saturday, on his facebook page, Jackson offers to “all the celebrities that poured ice water on their head, a chance to do something else.”

 

Jackson challenges celebrities to sing the “We ain’t gonna stop, till people are free” song.

 

The song starts off with a reference to Eric Garner’s last words.

 

“I can hear my neighbor cryin’ ‘I can’t breathe’

Now I’m in the struggle and I can’t leave.

Callin’ out the violence of the racist police.

We ain’t gonna stop, till people are free.

We ain’t gonna stop, till people are free.”

 

 

Jackson then ends the 47 second challenge asking celebrities to “come on, sing it out.”

 

This is a bold move by Jackson, as sometimes those who call out the establishment using their celebrity statuses are quickly blacklisted or ridiculed.

 

Hopefully this call to action by Jackson can help to garner support for police accountability in the US.

 

This is not the first time in recent months that a celebrity has called out the problem of police brutality either. Immediately following the killing of Michael Brown in August, actor Orlando Jones issued a similar call to action.

 

Jones’ call to action also included a reference to the ice bucket challenge, only Jones used a bucket of bullets.

 

“It’s not about black or white,” said Jones, in his video. “It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious.”

 

Orlando Jones Modifies the Bucket Challenge to Raise Awareness for Another ‘Very Serious Disease’

Orlando Jones – Bucket Challenge

“It all seems to stem from a militarized police force threatening the rights of people to assemble.”

 

Actor, NRA member, and special member of the Louisiana sheriff’s reserve force, Orlando Jones, has put a new spin on the Ice Bucket Challenge. Instead of donning a bucket of ice and water, he grabs a bucket of bullets to raise awareness to the rising militarized police state and the lack of concern by citizens in the US.

 

Jones does not make light of ALS and in fact says he will donate to the cause. However, in this video he speaks of another serious disease, apathy.

 

 

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Samuel Jackson is not race baiting here, he’s simply calling out the “racist” police. To deny that the system is racist is to deny that police brutality exists.

 

However, racism is only part of the problem. The other part of this problem is the color blue, and the violent unaccountable leviathan that it represents in police state America.

 

A racist idiot without a badge and uniform is simply a racist idiot, add the power of the state and that racist idiot lays waste to civil rights, initiates violence, and extorts the populace; all of this, with impunity.

 

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The MilitantNegro SoapBox™: Mr. Bill Cosby

Published on Dec 15, 2014

We as Americans tend to make idols & heroes out of celebrities or athletes or people who get TV shows or become wealthy. Instead of these people we should idolize teachers, firemen, volunteers & case workers. Bill Cosby was an icon because he was an actor and a voice of commercials. He created a Saturday morning cartoon of Black kids for Black kids. He became America’s surrogate father.

 

Little did we know that during all that hero worship and idolization of Bill Cosby the icon, Bill Cosby the man could have been raping women. Could have been sexually assaulting young teen girls. May have been drugging women who came to him for guidance and assistance to break into “the business” of entertainment.

 

Bill has been accused by women who number in double digits. Bill has also been as silent on these numerous accusations as a church mouse. Not a word to defend himself.

 

 

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BREAKING!! UPDATE MIKE BROWN CASE AND ERIC GARNER

 

 

Ferguson shooting: What do mothers tell their children?

 

 

Nazi Stormtrooper Police Brutality Tasers 76-Year-Old Man Dash Cam

 

 

Cop Pulls Over People Then Gives Them Gifts

 

 

Friends Say They Pushed UVA Student to Call Cops

 

 

CNN hosts display own conhtroversial ‘hands up’

 

 

N.C. family says son was lynched

 

 

Lennon Lacy was lynched in “Crackertown” (Bladenboro, NC) in 2014

 

 

QUANT e-Sportlimousine with nanoFLOWCELL® drive

 

 

World Premiere of the new QUANT e-Sportlimousine

 

 

Garner, Brown, Martin,-What ya Gon’do? Omega B ft. Takeema D

 

 

Shades of Brown

 

The Twitter Storm™

The Twitter Storm™

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Congress Raids Ancestral Native American Lands With Defense Spending Bill. Whose Next…Orphans?


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apacheleap

Apache Leap an area that would be included in the Copper mining land grab that Sen McCain snuck into the recent defense bill.

 

From The Daily Kos & One Pissed Off Liberal

Our heroes in Congress are stealing Indian land (again)

And it’s not even the 1800s. All I have to say about this story is…

Holy FUCK! Look what these assholes are doing now!

 

When Terry Rambler, the chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, woke up Wednesday in Washington, D.C., it was to learn that Congress was deciding to give away a large part of his ancestral homeland to a foreign mining company.

 

Rambler came to the nation’s capital for the White House Tribal Nations Conference, an event described in a press announcement as an opportunity to engage the president, cabinet officials and the White House Council on Native American Affairs “on key issues facing tribes including respecting tribal sovereignty and upholding treaty and trust responsibilities,” among other things.

 

Rambler felt things got off to an unfortunate, if familiar, start when he learned that the House and Senate Armed Services Committee had decided to use the lame-duck session of Congress and the National Defense Authorization Act to give 2,400 acres of the Tonto National Forest in Arizona to a subsidiary of the Australian-English mining giant Rio Tinto.

 

“Of all people, Apaches and Indians should understand, because we’ve gone though this so many times in our history,” Rambler said.

 

Congress Raids Ancestral Native American Lands With Defense Bill

 

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Kill black people, steal Indian land. Kill black people, steal Indian land. Could somebody please put on a different record? This one is getting old.

 

On Thursday, the Justice Department released the results of a 20-month investigationinto the use of force by Cleveland police. The review was unequivocally damning, finding the department responsible for an alarming pattern of excessive and sometimes deadly force, as well as other forms of misconduct and a general failure among supervisors to respond to this behavior.

 

Cleveland — where a police officer recently shot and killed Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black child who was holding a toy gun — is only the latest city to have its police force subject to DOJ scrutiny following allegations of chronic misconduct. In the months and years leading up to the Cleveland investigation, the city’s police were responsible for a number of highly publicized incidents involving alleged brutality. In particular, the DOJ report notes a 2012 incident in which a prolonged police chase involving 62 cars ended with Cleveland officers firing 132 rounds into a car containing two unarmed suspects. The suspects, both black, died after each suffering more than 20 gunshot wounds.

 

What The Justice Department Finds When It Investigates City Police Is Truly Disturbing

 

And people wonder why I’m pissed off.

 

UPDATE: From Azazello in the comments:

The long-stalled land-swap bill was added to the must-pass National Defense Authorization Act this week at the urging of supporters in the House and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., a supporter of the bill. McCain’s office did not respond to requests for comment on Thursday.

 

How surprising that there are republicans involved.

 

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John McCain and Congress helping mining company steal ancestral, ceremonial Apache land

By Carissa Lovelace Daily Kos Staff

 

On December 4, the House passed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

 

Hidden in the defense bill was a package granting an illegal land swap near Superior, AZ, for the benefit of a foreign company Rio Tinto PLC who seek to mine copper. Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) as part of the Senate Armed Services Committee was instrumental in pushing to get the provision language included.

 

All 2,400 acres are part of Apache ancestral and ceremonial lands. So although Republican lawmakers have tried for years to secure the transfer of these lands, they have always run into strong opposition from the San Carlos Apache Tribe and Democratic lawmakers and conservation advocates.

 

Apache leaders learned of the inclusion of the provision to the NDAA while attending—ironically—the White House Tribal Nations conference.

 

Conservation advocates and American Indian groups, particularly the San Carlos Apache Tribe, say the mine would damage natural resources and culturally sensitive areas. A site called Apache Leap in the Tonto National Forest has been of particular concern.

 

Resolution Copper—a Rio Tinto venture with BHP Billiton Ltd.—would be given more than 2,000 acres of federal land in return for more than 5,000 acres of company land.

 

The NDAA now goes to the Senate for vote.

 

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Urgent action needed: Don’t give ancestral Apache land to foreign mining companies

 

Petitioning
Senator John McCain, Senate Armed Service Committee and Congress
Created By
Daily Kos

On December 4th, the House of Representatives passed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Hidden inside the defense bill was a strange provision–2,400 acres of Apache ancestral and ceremonial lands are to be handed over to Rio Tinto, PLC–a foreign mining company seeking to mine copper in the area.

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) was instrumental in getting the provision inserted into the entirely unrelated defense bill. He took this action after years of opposition from the San Carlos Apache Tribe, conservation activists and Democratic lawmakers.

The Senate is set to vote on the NDAA bill very soon and we have to stop this outrageous land grab.

Sign the petition to Senator John McCain, Senate Armed Service Committee and Congress:

 

Petition Text

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Our Message to Senator John McCain, Senate Armed Service Committee and Congress

Swapping ancestral Apache lands in order to line the pockets of a foreign mining company is not acceptable. Remove this provision from the NDAA before the final vote.

 

Congress Raids Ancestral Native American Lands With Defense Bill

By Huffington Post

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WASHINGTON — When Terry Rambler, the chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, woke up Wednesday in Washington, D.C., it was to learn that Congress was deciding to give away a large part of his ancestral homeland to a foreign mining company.

 

Rambler came to the nation’s capital for the White House Tribal Nations Conference, an event described in a press announcement as an opportunity to engage the president, cabinet officials and the White House Council on Native American Affairs “on key issues facing tribes including respecting tribal sovereignty and upholding treaty and trust responsibilities,” among other things.

 

Rambler felt things got off to an unfortunate, if familiar, start when he learned that the House and Senate Armed Services Committee had decided to use the lame-duck session of Congress and the National Defense Authorization Act to give 2,400 acres of the Tonto National Forest in Arizona to a subsidiary of the Australian-English mining giant Rio Tinto.

The Liar in Chief, Barack Hussein Obama

The Liar in Chief, Barack Hussein Obama

“Of all people, Apaches and Indians should understand, because we’ve gone though this so many times in our history,” Rambler said.

 

Rambler knew there was a possibility that supporters of the move — which failed twice on the House floor last year — would slip the deal into themust-pass legislation, but aides and officials involved had declined to reveal it. Even Tuesday evening, when Republicans and Democrats on the House Armed Services Committee released summaries of the bill, the land deal was left out.

 

Rambler and other opponents couldn’t find out until late Tuesday night when the bill, named the “Carl Levin and Howard P. ‘Buck’ McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015” (after the retiring Senate and House committee chairmen), was finally posted online. The news that Apache burial, medicinal and ceremonial grounds would be given to Resolution Copper, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton, was on page 1,105.

 

“The first thing I thought about was not really today, but 50 years from now, probably after my time, if this land exchange bill goes through, the effects that my children and children’s children will be dealing with,” Rambler said in an interview.

 

The land includes territory where Apaches gather medicinal plants and acorns — a food source that Rambler said has sustained his people for as long as they know. It also surrounds the Apache Leap, a summit from which trapped Apaches once jumped to their deaths rather than be killed by settlers in the late 1800s.

 

“Since time immemorial people have gone there. That’s part of our ancestral homeland,” Rambler said, referring to the overall area in question. “We’ve had dancers in that area forever — sunrise dancers — and coming-of-age ceremonies for our young girls that become women. They’ll seal that off. They’ll seal us off from the acorn grounds, and the medicinal plants in the area, and our prayer areas.”

 

There are supposed to be two areas excluded from mining, including Apache Leap, but the bill specifies Resolution Copper can get permission in just 30 or 90 days to drill among the oaks.

 

Rio Tinto has pursued the deal for a decade, and it was apparently pushed into the NDAA largely thanks to Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). It passed the House once in 2011, but when leaders brought it to the floor twice last year, they couldn’t find enough votes, and pulled it. Most Democrats opposed it and growing numbers of Republicans were concerned about how it was being conducted. To many, it looked like a sweetheart deal being made outside of the regular process of dealing with federal land. And some were unhappy that the prime beneficiary, Rio Tinto, also owns a uranium mine in Africa with Iran. Others worried that most of the copper will go to China, which owns 10 percent of Rio Tinto.

 

The argument for the land swap — the government will acquire other lands in exchange — is economic development and jobs. The company claims it will generate $61 billion in economic activity and 3,700 direct and indirect jobs over 40 years. Opponents dispute those numbers, but Rambler is not sure they matter, even if they are accurate.

 

“It seems like us Apaches and other Indians care more about what this type of action does to the environment and the effects it leaves behind for us, while others tend to think more about today and the promise of jobs, but not necessarily what our creator God gave to us,” he said.

 

He is particularly worried about the longterm impact. The company intends to use a variety of “block cave” mining that digs underneath the ore and causes it to collapse from its own weight. Resolution Copper describes the process in a video:

 

Resolution Copper Mining Method

Published on Nov 8, 2012

Resolution Copper will use the panel caving mining method, a variation of block caving to break up the underground ore. This technique uses gravity primarily to break the rock. Panel caving is more efficient than other underground mining methods for this type of deposit. It will result in lower operating costs and will allow us to mine the most ore while creating the least amount of waste. The technique is also favorable because it is safe, allows a high degree of mechanization, and results in both high production rates and favorable economies of scale

 

 

The land above such mines eventually cracks and subsides.

 

“What those mountains mean to us is that when the rain and the snow comes, it distributes it to us,” Rambler said. “It replenishes our aquifers to give us life.” He’s not sure how that will happen once the land starts subsiding. Resolution Copper promises to monitor it.

 

In comments to The Huffington Post on Tuesday, spokespeople for the mine said that it had filed an operating plan with the federal Forest Service and was starting a review under the National Environmental Policy Act, which is supposed to ensure that federal lands are protected.

 

But Rambler found little assurance in that, since NEPA only applies while the land belongs to the federal government.

 

“This is what will happen — the law in one area says there will be consultation, but the law in another area of the bill says the land exchange will happen within one year of enactment of this bill,” Rambler noted, correctly. “So no matter what we’re doing within that one year, the consultation part won’t mean anything after one year. Because then it’s really theirs after that.”

 

Two properties within the land would remain in the hands of the federal government, one around the Apache Leap and one an area called Oak Flats. Outside of those places, the federal government would have no say under NEPA, an official with the Bureau of Land Management said.

 

“We would only have to do NEPA on any activity that would take place on remaining federal land,” said Arizona BLM official Carrie Templin. The company promises to stop 1,500 feet short of Apache Leap, but reserves the right to drill in Oak Flats.

 

The Arizona exchange is not the only land measure in the defense bill.

 

In fact, there are dozens of other land-related items, including at least one more that is angering Native Americans. A transfer of 1,600 acres from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State for industrial development has also sparked protest by tribes, who note that the area also contains lands important to them, and which are already undergoing various federal evaluations that would be short-circuited by the legislation.

 

Still another deal would benefit a Native American corporation in Alaska called Sealaska. It is opposed by environmental groups, though, because it would open some 70,000 acres of the Tongass National Forest to logging.

 

Environmental groups approve of some of the deals in the bill, but those have been attracting anger on the right. Two leaders of the Heritage Foundation campaign arm described them in an op-ed as a “land grab” that had no place in a defense bill. Another, Myron Ebell, director of the Center for Energy and Environment, also slammed it in a statement.

 

“The federal lands package added to the National Defense Authorization Act is a backroom deal that would lock up use of hundreds of thousands of acres of land,” said Ebell, although it is likely he would favor the part of the Rio Tinto deal that allows mining since he favors using federal land for resources. “Many of these federal land lockups could never be enacted on their own if debated and voted in the light of day.”

 

Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) also doesn’t think the land bills belong in the defense measure, and has vowed to stall the bill as long as possible until they are removed.

 

The bill is expected to be voted on in the House as soon as this week, and sent to the Senate in a manner that does not allow it to be amended. If anything is to change in the bill, it would have to happen before then, and House leaders would have to agree to allow amendment votes.

 

UPDATE: 11:15 p.m. — Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) tried Wednesday night to offer an amendment to remove the Resolution Copper deal from the defense bill, but lost in the House Rules Committee on a 6-4 vote, with three Democrats supporting him, and his GOP colleagues voting against him. The Rules Committee determines how measures will be considered on the floor. It decided to give the NDAA one hour of debate, with no vote on Cole’s amendment.

 

Michael McAuliff covers Congress and politics for The Huffington Post. Talk to himon Facebook.

 

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The MilitantNegro SoapBox™: #BlackLivesMatter


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Do Black Lives Matter?

 

 

Black Lives Matter: Ferguson Erupts After Grand Jury Clears Officer in Michael Brown Killing

 

 

Black Lives Matter

 

 

Black Lives Matter: Oakland Speaks On Ferguson

 

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The hashtag #BlackLivesMatter has gone viral and is trending worldwide thanks to Twitter. As expected, jealous ass caucasians joined by caucasians who just don’t “get it” as usual want to hijack the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag with #AllLivesMatter. Bull shit. The moment caucasians start to get murdered for selling loose cigarettes, or shot 6 times for walking down the middle of a deserted street, or assaulted for not showing a cop ID, or shot dead for holding toy guns….when you caucasian folks get centuries of abuse, oppression and mistreatment…..THEN AND ONLY THEN CAN YOU CLAIM THAT YOUR LIFE MATTERS.

 

 

Until then, sit the fuck down and shut the fuck up. #BlackLivesMatter ain’t about YOU. It’s a rallying cry for injustice against Black Americans who are disgusted with Black Genocide from law enforcement.

 

For those uneducated caucasians who say I am racist….No person of color can ever be racist. Why? Racism is about Power, Control, Oppression & Wealth. What Black person do you know who has Power, Control,  has enough Wealth to Oppress anyone? Black people are the oppressed, and have been for centuries, so we can not be racist. What we can do is fight racism as best we can. And you are witnessing that fight right now.

 

 

Enough with all this garbage ass talk of #AllLivesMatter. When caucasians, who do the oppressing both mentally and physically, are the oppressed, then and only then will #AllLivesMatter. Until then, “Miss Me With That Bull Shit.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meet The Man Showing America The Real Ferguson Story: DeRay Mckesson.


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“I didn’t want that to be the story about Mike Brown”: Meet the man showing America the real Ferguson story

DeRay Mckesson didn’t know of Mike Brown or Ferguson four months ago. Here’s how all that changed

By SARAH JAFFE

 

DeRay Mckesson had never met Michael Brown. He’d never even been to the St. Louis area before Aug. 16, but after watching the protests break across his social media feeds, he got in his car and headed out, leaving a note on his Facebook page asking if anyone could help him find a place to stay.

“I didn’t know what was real or not,” he tells Salon. He had to see for himself, to be part of it. When he was tear-gassed for the first time, it only made him more committed to building a lasting movement.

 

That was almost four months ago. Since then, he’s become one of the most recognizable social media presences keeping the public updated on the protests in Ferguson and elsewhere, as they’ve spread across the country. He started an email newsletter that he co-curates with Johnetta Elzie, another young activist based in St. Louis, sending out articles, action alerts, photos and tweets about the growing movement. The newsletter serves to connect people with actions and with each other, to filter an overwhelming volume of news reports, and to maintain a narrative of the movement going forward.

 

To Mckesson, the newsletter is about “fighting this fight in a different way.” He remembers the night the verdict came down that George Zimmerman, the Florida man who shot Trayvon Martin, would get off. “I remember it was like at night when the verdict came out and you were alone, you didn’t know who to talk to, you couldn’t find any information then, you didn’t know what was real and what wasn’t,” he says. “I didn’t want that to be the story about Mike Brown.”

 

In the weeks following Brown’s death, national media flocked to Ferguson, broadcasting from its streets and often unintentionally making itself the story, or focusing on conflict between protesters and police rather than on what was being built between the protesters on the ground and the people around the world who were following them on social media. Mckesson and Elzie’s newsletter created a supplement to often-rushed social media accounts, and applied an activist’s view to the news coming out of Ferguson. The stories they choose come with their commentary, notes like “Though we find this to be subtle victim-blaming, we encourage you to read it,” from Nov. 20 on a local media story on Vonderrit Myers, another young black man shot by police in the days following Brown’s death. Or “As you read, tune into the slant that subtly blames the protests for a spike in crime in STL, from Dec. 4.

 

“We try to make sure that there’s a broad cross-section,” Mckesson says. “There are a lot of articles that get a lot of play that actually don’t say a whole lot, whereas there are some articles that don’t get any play but they’re really powerful, and we want to make sure that they get visibility. We also want there to be a record of the movement, so when people look back they can track the movement through the news and the commentary.”

 

At the beginning, he notes, people told him there would never be enough news for the newsletter to continue, and yet 64 issues later, he says, “We’re making really tough decisions every day.” For example, the morning after the news broke that a grand jury would not indict the officer who killed Eric Garner in Staten Island, they had to spend a lot of time winnowing down the many stories to those that included something different, something important, other than the news that presumably, most readers had heard.

 

The Ferguson protests broke on social media, and like the other social movements of the post-financial crisis era, social media has allowed people like Mckesson to reach an audience without relying on traditional news outlets. It has, the newsletter shows, also allowed them to become very astute critics of their own press coverage.

 

But the goal of the newsletter is not just to manage a public image; it is to motivate, as its title says, “Words to Action.” It opens with a countdown: number of days Darren Wilson has remained free. Number of days Kajieme Powell has been dead. Number of days Vonderrit Myers has been dead. It includes bolded calls to action, links to where readers can donate, tweet, submit and even buy T-shirts that support movement organizations. Notably, those organizations are local, small and mostly led by young people, part of this new generation of activists that, as Mychal Denzel Smith wrote, have shaken off nostalgia and have clear eyes set on making big changes, now.

 

“I think that what’s really powerful about Ferguson is that it started because regular people without an organization came together because they knew something was wrong,” Mckesson says. “What is different about social media and I think what is true about this movement is that it allows many voices to be heard at the same time and it’s not necessarily a competition for air, which is really powerful.”

 

Social media has, as well, Mckesson says, served to legitimize certain voices as authoritative — not by virtue of their position in a national organization, but because we can see through their eyes, night after night of violent police crackdowns, day after day of building. Social media can capture a moment — a die-in at a convenience store, a blocked highway — and give it life beyond its brief duration. It also adds pressure for the activists who have a large following to be there at every action. They wind up functioning, themselves, as journalists, albeit ones who are not being paid and supported by a major publication — and, Mckesson notes, ones who can say what they feel without having to adhere to some ideal of objectivity, without having to ask for the cops’ side of the story.

 

That allows them to challenge the narratives that pop up again and again in the media. “People always ask about the anger and rage and, yes, we are angry, we are enraged, but that doesn’t sustain a movement for 118 days. Love does,” Mckesson says. “There is this incredible sense of love in protest that is real that wasn’t getting visibility. So I was tweeting, there’s a cleanup crew, their job is to clean up after the protest. There is a woman who gets on the corner every day with her grill and feeds protesters as they walk to protests. There is somebody who passes out water every day, there is somebody who buys 50 pizzas, there are people who hold hands as they protest.”

 

The media’s focus on rage, he points out, paints black people as monolithic, as only capable of one emotion, one type of expression. “One of the narratives of blackness in protest is ‘the angry people outside,’ as opposed to ‘disenfranchised people who’ve been oppressed and victimized as they tried to grieve,’” he says. “We’ve been tear-gassed and shot at and LRAD’d and smoke-bombed and all these things and we still protest every day because we know that not only will our silence not save us, our surrender won’t save us, a video camera won’t save us. It is not that we are willing to die, it’s that we are unwilling to live in an America where blackness equals death.”

 

As the protests have spread and continued around the country, blocking highways and streets, shuttering stores, dying-in in public spaces, Mckesson notes, “Ferguson manifests differently in many different places.” It is important, he says, to remember that when you are facing down violent police, it is hard to move beyond basic survival as a goal. People understandably have a hard time talking about systemic reform with a gun in their face or when they can’t pay the bills. That’s why, as an educator and activist, he feels compelled to stay in this movement. “You have to be alive to learn,” he says. All of the improvement in schools in the world will mean nothing if kids are being killed by the people who are supposed to protect them.

 

And so the struggle goes on. Mckesson spent the weekend in New York joining protests for Eric Garner, and he and Elzie plan to continue the newsletter — and their activism — as long as is necessary.

 

“Ferguson didn’t show us that there’s racial injustice in America. We knew that,” he says. “What Ferguson showed us was the power of people coming together to demand change. Ferguson made protests comfortable, gave people permission to protest. It allowed people to access their voice in a different way.”

 

Thank you SARAH JAFFE.

 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!soapbox

 

In the face of NO Black leaders taking THE LEAD on Black Genocide, Mr. DeRay Mckesson IS the Black Leader for this struggle. His voice on #Ferguson and all things related to the killing of unarmed Black Americans has been exemplary as well as informative. He consistently focuses on the issues and does not allow himself or others to lose sight of whats at stake: #BlackLivesMatter. Yes I said #BlackLivesMatter. All lives won’t matter until caucasians start to die at the hands of law enforcement for being caucasian.

 

Thank you Mr. DeRay Mckesson. Follow him at https://twitter.com/deray”>deray mckesson @deray on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

kQ5CPShh

 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!banner

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