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Weekly Address: Time To Pass Bipartisan Legislation To Extend Emergency Unemployment Insurance


 

By Jueseppi B.

weeklyadress

 

 

Weekly Address: Time to Pass Bipartisan Legislation to Extend Emergency Unemployment Insurance

January 04, 2014 | 3:18 |Public Domain

 

In this week’s address, President Obama says Congress should act to extend emergency unemployment insurance for more than one million Americans who have lost this vital economic lifeline while looking for a job.

 

 

 

VIDEO MENSAJE DE LA CASA BLANCA: El Congreso debe extender el seguro de desempleo

January 04, 2014 | 3:04 |Public Domain

 

En el mensaje de esta semana, la Directora del Consejo de Política Doméstico Cecilia Muñoz habla sobre la importancia de que el Congreso extienda el seguro de desempleo cuando regrese de nuevo a Washington la próxima semana. El seguro de desempleo proporciona una fuente vital para millones de estadounidenses, incluyendo a muchos Latinos, que siguen buscando trabajo.

 

 

 

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Statement by Gene B. Sperling, Director of the National Economic Council

 

This New Year’s Day, there is likely less joy and more fear and distress in the homes of 1.3 million Americans who this week have seen their unemployment insurance suddenly cut off – a vital lifeline that these Americans depend on as they fight to find a job. There would be no better New Year’s resolution for Congress to make today than to commit to making the first new legislation for the new year the restoration of emergency unemployment insurance for those who have this week just been cut off.

 

Failing to extend emergency unemployment insurance through 2014 will negatively impact 14 million Americans – the 4.9 million workers who will see unemployment insurance cut off and the approximately 9 million additional family members they are supporting. But if Congress does the right thing and acts to extend emergency unemployment benefits through 2014, it is estimated to lead to 200,000 jobs and a fifth of a point of additional economic growth. This emergency unemployment insurance is temporary and by design will taper off as the unemployment falls around the nation.

 

The claims by some that those experiencing long-term unemployment are solely at fault are belied by the countless accounts of the names, faces and stories of responsible Americans among those 1.3 million who have worked hard their whole lives and are fighting to find a new job to support their families. Because these workers are only eligible for this emergency assistance if they are actively looking for work, extension will help encourage many of the long-term unemployed to keep at it even if they are getting discouraged.

 

We as Americans can choose to have each other’s backs when we face serious spells of long-term unemployment. In more than 50 years, we have never cut off emergency unemployment insurance when the rate of long-term unemployment was even above 50% of its current level, even though none of those recessions were nearly as deep as the one we are now recovering from. Serious studies make clear that those who are long-term unemployed face serious barriers to getting new jobs than can lead to lasting damage to their economic future. At a time when we as a nation should be moving forward in our efforts to help those who are long-term unemployed find new jobs, we should not take a harsh step backwards by abruptly cutting off their unemployment insurance.

 

The President strongly supports Majority Leader Harry Reid’s commitment to bring the bipartisan Reed-Heller bill for a vote the very first day the Senate returns on January 6th. By temporarily extending emergency unemployment insurance for three months, this bipartisan bill will provide benefits for over 2 million Americans when they need it most, and we urge every member of Congress to support this vitally important bill.

 

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West Wing Week 01/03/14: Best Of The West (Wing Week) 2013


 

By Jueseppi B.

westwingweek

 

 

Adam Garber
Adam Garber

January 03, 2014
02:30 PM EST

 

As we move into 2014 we’d like to take a quick look back with you at some of our favorite moments, large and small from the 2013 White House video library. There was quite a bit to choose from, but we were able to narrow it down to 10. Take a look in this years edition of “Best of the West (Wing Week).”

 

 

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in-case-you-missed-it

 

Obama Family’s Gift To Girls Godmother Delivered By Mistake To A Suburban Chicago Woman.

 

“I don’t want him to ever be forgotten.” A Grieving Cousin Speaks To Moms Demand Action

 

President Barack Hussein Obama Meets With Prime Minister Key Of New Zealand…On Hawaiian Golf Course.

 

Real Success Stories From Real People: The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act (ObamaCARES).

 

New Health Insurance Options, New Consumer Protections: New Year. A New Day in Health Care Coverage. New Year, New Coverage: Trinace’s Story.

 

Statement By Gene B. Sperling, Director Of The National Economic Council

 

Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America Applauds Upholding Of NY SAFE Act By Federal Court

 

James La Rue Avery, Sr, Star Of ‘The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air,’ Dies At Age 68

 

Barack’s World™: Happy New 2014…Now Lets Get To Work. Presidential Actions On New Years Eve.

 

Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America: The New Leaders On Gun Safety In 2013? Moms

 

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James La Rue Avery, Sr, Star Of ‘The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air,’ Dies At Age 68


 

By Jueseppi B.

140101143325-nr-james-avery-fresh-prince-death-00001213-story-top

 

 

James La Rue Avery, Sr. (November 27, 1948 – December 31, 2013) was an American actor, best known for his portrayal of the patriarch and attorney (later judge) Philip BanksWill Smith‘s character’s uncle, in the TV show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. This character was ranked #34 in TV Guide‘s “50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time.” He also provided the voice of Shredder in the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles television series, as well as War Machine in the animated series Iron Man and Junkyard Dog in Hulk Hogan’s Rock ‘n’ Wrestling. He also played Michael Kelso‘s commanding officer at the police academy late in the series run of the popular sitcom That ’70s Show.

 

Life and career

Avery was born in Virginia and raised in Atlantic CityNew Jersey. He served in the Vietnam War as a member of the U.S. Navy from 1968–1969, after graduating high school. Later on, he moved to San DiegoCalifornia where he began to write poetry and TV scripts. In addition to his fame insitcoms, he did voice acting for many animated series, most notably the 1987 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series (as the voice of The Shredder) and James Rhodes in the 1990s Iron Man series. He also performed in the single season production of Captain Simian and the Space Monkeys as “Gor-illa” a loveable, simple, and bi-polar gorilla.

 

He has been the primary host of Going Places, a popular travel and adventure series on PBS. He also guest starred in That ’70s Show as Officer Kennedy. In 2000, he guest starred in the “Unfriendly Skies” episode of CSI as Preston Cash, a legally-blind witness to a murder who assists the CSI team with a near-flawless verbal account of what he heard on board the flight. Avery played a Los Angeles County Medical Examiner, Dr. Crippen (who has recently appeared in a wheelchair), on the TNT series The Closer. In 2004, he guest starred on the television series That’s So Raven where he played an entrepreneur.

 

He also appeared in a 2005 episode of My Wife and Kids as Jay’s reluctant professor. He was cast in the new sitcom Sherri, starring Sherri Shepherd, playing her father.

 

Most recently, Avery wrapped production on Valediction, which could begin its film festival circuit as early as October 2011. He played the role of Edward, the husband of co-star Bonnie Bartlett. In addition, he starred in a 2012 role on the TV series Grey’s Anatomy, playing a distraught spouse to his brain-dead partner who was a patient.

 

Death

On December 31, 2013, Avery died from complications following open heart surgery in a Los Angeles hospital.

 

(CNN) – Actor James Avery, who played the beloved Uncle Phil on the hit 1990s sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” died Tuesday, his publicist confirmed. He was 68.

 

The cause of death was complications from open-heart surgery, said his manager, Toni Benson.

 

His “Fresh Prince” co-star Alfonso Ribeiro tweeted news of Avery’s passing.

 

“I’m deeply saddened to say that James Avery has passed away,” Riberio tweeted. “He was a second father to me. I will miss him greatly.

 

A classically trained actor and poet, Avery grew up in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where he was raised by a single mother. He served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and first appeared onscreen as a dancer in an uncredited role in the 1980 film “The Blues Brothers.”

 

According to IMDb, after he served in the military, Avery moved to San Diego, California, where he began writing TV scripts and poetry for PBS. Before joining the military, he once said, he had dreams of being like Richard Wright and living in Paris. But life took a different turn.

 

“I knew I loved the arts,” Avery said in an interview for the show “Unscripted.” “I knew I wanted to be a writer, but the theater was something I had been involved in before.”

 

Avery appeared in multiple TV shows and movies, including “CSI,” “That ’70s Show,” “The Closer” and several appearances as a judge on “L.A. Law.”

 

Indeed, with his deep, mellifluous voice, he frequently played judges, professors and doctors — Uncle Phil began as a lawyer and eventually became a judge — and was much in demand as a voice actor. His voice roles included Shredder in the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” series and James “Rhodey” Rhodes in the 1990s animated series version of “Iron Man.”

 

He most recently appeared in Zach Braff’s new film, “Wish I Was Here,” which will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival later this month.

 

But his most famous role was as Phillip Banks, the stern but loving uncle to Will Smith’s character on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.” The show, co-executive produced by Quincy Jones and created by Andy Borowitz and Susan Borowitz, cast Smith — then best known as a rapper — as a Philadelphia teenager who is sent to live with his wealthy Los Angeles relatives. As Banks, a former civil-rights activist and Harvard Law-trained attorney, Avery provided a role model for Smith’s sometimes wild character.

 

Avery, too, leveled with youthful audiences, noting in “Unscripted” that he left home at 18 because “I had too good a time.”

 

In a 2007 interview with the New York Film Academy, he was forthright about his abilities.

 

“You can either be a movie star or an actor. I’m an actor,” he said. “(But) I’ve done pretty good.”

 

He is survived by his wife of 26 years, Barbara Avery, his mother, Florence Avery of Atlantic City, and a stepson, Kevin Waters.

 

People we lost in 2013

 

CNN’s Todd Leopold contributed to this story.

 

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Uncle Phil loses it

 

Uploaded on Sep 26, 2007

Uncle Phil goes psycho on Geoffrey after another sly insult from the butler.

 

 

 

Unscripted: James Avery

 

Uploaded on Jan 14, 2010

Best known as Will Smith’s “Uncle Phil” on the hit series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, the imposing James Avery is a classically trained actor who has written TV scripts and poetry, and earned an Emmy Award for production while working for PBS. Born and raised in Atlantic City, New Jersey, he served in Vietnam with the U.S. Navy. Avery made his first screen appearance in 1980 with an uncredited part in The Blues Brothers, and in the three decades since then has amassed a long list of film and TV credits that includes Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, C.S.I. and The Closer.

 

 

 

James Avery, who played the character of Phil Banks on the hit sitcom ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air,’ died at the age of 68 on Dec. 31.

James Avery, who played the character of Phil Banks on the hit sitcom ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air,’ died at the age of 68 on Dec. 31.

Former Heavyweight Champion Ken Norton Has Died At 70.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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LAS VEGAS – Former heavyweight champion Ken Norton, who beat Muhammad Ali and then lost a controversial decision to him in Yankee Stadium, died Wednesday at a local care facility, his son said. He was 70.

 

Norton had been in poor health for the last several years after suffering a series of strokes, a friend of the fighter said.

 

“He’s been fighting the battle for two years,” said Gene Kilroy, Ali’s former business manager. “I’m sure he’s in heaven now with all the great fighters. I’d like to hear that conversation.”

 

Norton broke Ali’s jaw in their first bout, beating him by split decision in 1973 in a non-title fight in San Diego. They fought six months later, and Ali narrowly won a split decision.

 

They met for a third time on Sept. 28, 1976, at Yankee Stadium and Ali narrowly won to keep his heavyweight title.

 

Norton would come back the next year to win a heavyweight title eliminator and was declared champion by the World Boxing Council. But on June 9, 1978, he lost a bruising 15-round fight to Larry Holmes in what many regard as one of boxing’s epic heavyweight bouts and would never be champion again.

 

Norton finished with a record of 42-7-1 and 33 knockouts. He would later embark on an acting career, appearing in several movies, and was a commentator at fights.

 

Norton started boxing when he was in the Marines, and began his pro career after his release from duty in 1967. He lost only once in his early fights but had fought few fighters of any note when he was selected to meet Ali. At the time, Ali was campaigning to try to win back the heavyweight crown he lost to Joe Frazier in 1973.

 

Few gave Norton, who possessed a muscular, sculpted body, much of a chance against Ali in the fight, held at the Sports Arena in San Diego, where Norton lived. But his awkward style and close-in pressing tactics confused his opponent and Norton broke Ali’s jaw on the way to the decision that put him in the top echelon of heavyweight fighters.

 

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Muhammad Ali vs Ken Norton III

 

 

Muhammad Ali vs Ken Norton I – March 31, 1973 – Entire fight – Rounds 1 – 12 & Interviews

 

Uploaded on Feb 20, 2011

Muhammad Ali vs Ken Norton I
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No. 1 ranked Muhammad Ali takes on No. 8 ranked Ken Norton. What was said to be the greatest mismatch of all time turned out to be a great upset, the turningpoint in Ken Nortons career and the start of a great trilogy.
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Their records at the time
Muhammad Ali: 41-1
Ken Norton: 29-1

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Howard Norton Sr. (August 9, 1943 – September 18, 2013) was an American former heavyweight boxer and former WBC world Heavyweight Champion. He was best known for his 12-round victory over Muhammad Ali, when he famously broke Ali’s jaw, on March 31, 1973, becoming only the second man to defeat a peak Ali as a professional (after Joe Frazier, who won a 15-round unanimous decision against Ali on March 8, 1971).

 

He and Ali would fight twice more in their trilogy, with Ali officially winning narrowly both return bouts, although many felt Norton truly deserved their third fight. Norton was awarded the WBC title (by virtue of his win over Jimmy Young in a 1977 title elimination bout) when Leon Spinks declined a mandated title defense against Norton, the number one contender. However, Norton lost it in his first defense on a split decision by 1 point to Larry Holmes in a great contest (Holmes-Norton is ranked as the 10th-greatest heavyweight fight of all time by Monte D. Cox, a member of the International Boxing Research Organization).

 

Ken Norton
Kenny Norton.jpg
Statistics
Real name Kenneth Howard Norton
Nickname(s) “The Black Hercules”
“The Jaw Breaker” or

The Fighting Marine

Rated at Heavyweight
Height 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)[2]
Reach 80 in (203 cm)
Nationality American
Born August 9, 1943
Jacksonville, Illinois, USA
Died September 18, 2013

(aged 70)
Arizona, USA

Stance Unorthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 50
Wins 42
Wins by KO 33
Losses 7
Draws 1
No contests 0

 

man who came back 090208

 

Early years

Norton was an outstanding athlete at Jacksonville High School. He was a member of the state championship football team and was selected to the all-state team on defense as a senior in 1960. His track coach entered him in eight events, and Norton placed first in all of them. As a result, the “Ken Norton Rule”, which limits participation of an athlete to a maximum of three track and field events, was instituted in Illinois high school sports. After graduating from high school, Norton went to Northeast Missouri State University (now Truman State University) on a football scholarship and studied elementary education.

 

Boxing career

Norton started boxing when he was in the United States Marine Corps from 1963 to 1967, compiling a 24-2 record en route to three All-Marine Heavyweight titles. Following the National AAU finals in 1967, he turned professional.

 

Norton built up a steady string of wins, some against journeyman fighters and others overs fringe contenders like the giant Jack O’Halloran. He was learning and improving. But he suffered a surprise defeat, ironically just after Ring magazine had profiled him as a prospect, at the hands of Jose Luis Garcia in 1970. It was Garcia’s career peak.

 

Norton was given the motivational book Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill, which, as he states in his autobiography, Going the Distance, changed his life (Norton, et al., 2000, p. 46). Upon reading it, he went on a 14-fight winning streak, including a shocking victory over Muhammad Aliin 1973 to win the North American Boxing Federation heavyweight champion title. To quote Norton from his autobiography noted above “These words (from Napoleon Hill’s Think and Grow Rich) were the final inspiration in my victory over Ali: Life’s battles dont always go to the stronger or faster man, but sooner or later the man who wins is the man who thinks he can.”

 

An article which appeared in The Southeast Missourian discussed that Norton credited Napoleon Hill’s philosophy for his success. To quote from the article “Norton says he’s a believer in Napoleon Hill’s philosophy, that a person can do anything he puts his mind to. ‘So I train for my fights,’ he says, ‘mentally as well as physically. One thing I do is only watch films of the fights in which I’ve done well or in which my opponent has done poorly.’”

Ken Norton once said, “In boxing, and in all of life, nobody should ever stop learning!”

 

Versus Ali, first & second fight

‘Name’ opponents were elusive in Norton’s early career. His first big break came with a clear win over respected contender Henry Clark. This helped get him his world recognition break when Ali agreed to a match. Joe Frazier, who’d sparred with Norton, presciently said of Ali, “He’ll have plenty of trouble!” Though both were top boxers in the mid 1970s, Norton and Frazier never fought each other. In part because they shared the same trainer Eddie Futch.

On March 31, 1973, Muhammad Ali entered the ring at the San Diego Sports Arena wearing a robe given to him by Elvis Presley as a 5-1 favorite versus Ken Norton in a bout televised by ABC’s Wide World of Sports. Norton won a 12-round split decision over Ali in his adopted hometown of San Diego to win the NABF heavyweight title. In this bout, Norton broke Ali’s jaw (he maintains in round eleven, though Angelo Dundee said it was earlier), leading to only the second defeat for “The Greatest” in his career. (Ali’s only previous loss was to Joe Frazier, and Ali would later go on to defeat George Foreman to regain the heavyweight title in 1974.)

 

Almost six months later, at The Forum in Inglewood, California, on September 10, 1973, Ali avenged the Norton loss, but only just, when he got the return by another split decision. Norton weighed in at 205 lbs (5 pounds lighter than his first match with Ali) and boxing scribes discussed that his preparation was too intense and that perhaps he had overtrained. There were some furious exchanges in this hard-fought battle. From Ali’s point of view, a loss here would have seriously dented his claim of ever being “The Greatest”.

 

Championship challenge against Foreman

In 1974, Norton fought George Foreman for the World Heavyweight Championship but was stopped in two rounds.

 

In 1975, Norton regained the NABF heavyweight title when he impressively defeated Jerry Quarry by TKO in the fifth round. Norton then avenged his above-mentioned 1970 loss to Jose Luis Garcia by decisively knocking out Garcia in round five.

 

Third Ali match

On September 28, 1976, at Yankee Stadium in New York City, Norton would again fight Ali, who was now the world heavyweight champion since regaining the title with an eighth-round knockout of George Foreman in 1974. Many observers have felt this was the beginning of Ali’s decline as a boxer. It was a tough bruising battle for Ali. In one of the most disputed fights in history, the fight was even on the judges’ scorecards going into the final round, which Ali won on both the referee’s and judges’ scorecards to retain the world heavyweight championship. The judges scored the bout 8-7 for Ali, and the referee scored it 8-6 for Ali. At the end of the last round, the commentator announced he would be “very surprised” if Norton has not won the fight.

 

At the time of the third Ali-Norton bout, the last time a heavyweight champion had lost the title by decision was Max Baer to Jim Braddock41 years earlier, and Ali-Norton III did not set a new marker. The January 1998 issue of Boxing Monthly listed Ali-Norton as the fifth most disputed title fight decision in boxing history. The unofficial UPI scorecard was 8-7 for Norton, and the unofficial AP scorecard was 9-6 for Ali.

 

But Ali had received a pounding. His tactics were to try to push Norton back, but they had failed. He’d refused to ‘dance’ until the 11th when in sheer desperation, although the crowd massively roared it’s appreciation. Norton has said the third fight with Ali was the last boxing match for which he was fully motivated, owing to his disappointment at having lost a fight he believed he had clearly won.

 

Aftermath: Norton becomes champion

1977 was a top year for Norton. He knocked out previously unbeaten top prospect Duane Bobick in one round, and after despatching European title holder Lorenzo Zannon easily, he beat number two contender Jimmy Young (who himself had beaten George Foreman and Ron Lyle) in a 15-round split decision in a WBC big mandatory title-elimination fight, with the winner to face reigning WBC champion Ali, but Ali’s camp told Ring Magazine they did not want to fight Norton for a fourth time. Both boxers fought a smart fight; however, observers thought the decision controversial.

 

Plans, however, changed on February 15, 1978. On that night, in front of a nationwide television audience, Ali lost his title to Leon Spinks. The WBC then ordered a match between the new champion and its number one contender, but Spinks chose instead to give the fallen champion the first shot at taking his title  rather than face the still dangerous Norton. The WBC responded on March 18, 1978, by retroactively giving title fight status to Norton’s victory over Young the year before and awarded Norton their championship, which split the heavyweight championship for the first time since Jimmy Ellis and Joe Frazier were both recognized as champions in the early 1970s.

 

Larry Holmes title fight

In his first defense of the WBC title on June 9, 1978, Norton and new #1 contender Larry Holmes met in a classic fight. After 15 brutal rounds, Holmes was awarded the title via an extremely close split decision. The three judges’ cards were as follows: 143-142 for Holmes, 143-142 for Holmes, and 143-142 for Norton. The Associated Press scored it 143-142 for Norton. The March 2001 edition of The Ring magazine listed the final round of the Holmes-Norton bout as the 7th most exciting round in boxing history. As noted above, Holmes-Norton is ranked as the 10th greatest heavyweight fight of all time by Monte D. Cox, a member of the International Boxing Research Organization (IBRO). Holmes went on to become the second-longest reigning world heavyweight champion in the history of boxing, behind Joe Louis. Holmes years later wrote of his experience that this was his toughest match in over 70 contests.

 

Retirement looms

After losing to Holmes, Norton won his next fight by knockout over sixth-ranked Randy Stephens in 1978 before taking on Earnie Shavers in another compulsory. WBC title eliminator fight in Las Vegas on March 23, 1979. It appeared for the first time that Norton’s career had perhaps hit a decline, as Shavers took the former champion out in the first round (Norton’s peak was 1973-1978.) Then, in his next fight, he fought to a draw with future contender Scott LeDoux at the Met Center in Minneapolis. Norton carried the day until sustaining an injury when he took a thumb in the eye in the eighth round, which immediately changed the bout. LeDoux rallied from that point and Norton became decidedly fatigued. Norton was down two times in the final round, resulting in the draw; Norton fell behind on one scorecard, kept his lead on the second, and dropped to even on the third (the unofficial AP scorecard was 5-3-2 Norton).

 

After the fight, Norton decided that at 37 it was time to retire from boxing. However, not satisfied with the way he had gone out, Norton returned to the ring to face the undefeated Randall “Tex” Cobb in Cobb’s home state of Texas on November 7, 1980. In a back-and-forth fight, Norton escaped with a split decision, with referee Tony Perez and judge Chuck Hassett voting in his favor and judge Arlen Bynum giving the fight to Cobb.

 

The win over the title contending Cobb gave Norton another shot at a potential title fight, and on May 11, 1981. at Madison Square Garden he stepped into the ring with top contender Gerry Cooney, who like Cobb was undefeated entering the fight. Very early in the fight it became clear that Norton was no longer the caliber of fighter he once was, as Cooney’s first punch caused Norton’s legs to buckle. Norton continued to take shots from Cooney in his corner for nearly a full minute before Perez, who refereed his last fight, stepped in to stop the bout 54 seconds in, as Norton was slumped in his corner. Norton decided to retire following the match and turned his attention to charitable pursuits.

 

Norton’s enduring legacy as a fighter is that he is considered second to Joe Frazier as Ali’s main nemesis and toughest opponent. Norton fought Ali to three decisions and was never hurt or knocked down. All three bouts were close and subject to controversy. Unfortunately, Norton was less successful against three of the greatest punchers of all time, losing by KO to Foreman and Shavers and by TKO to Cooney. Norton was considered past his prime in boxing from 1979 to 1981.

 

Awards and recognition

Ken Norton is a 1989 inductee of the World Boxing Hall of Fame, a 1992 inductee of the International Boxing Hall Of Fame, a 2004 inductee into the United States Marine Corps Sports Hall of Fame, and a 2008 inductee into the WBC Hall of Fame.

 

The 1998 holiday issue of The Ring ranked Norton #22 among “The 50 Greatest Heavyweights of All Time.” Norton received the Boxing Writers Association of America J. Niel trophy for “Fighter of the Year” in 1977.

 

Norton, a proponent of motivational author Napoleon Hill’s writings  (e.g. Think and Grow Rich as noted above and Success Through A Positive Mental Attitude  by Hill and W. Clement Stone) also received the “Napoleon Hill Award” for positive thinking in 1973 (Norton, et al., 2000, p. 46).

 

In 2001, Norton was inducted by the San Diego Hall of Champions into the Breitbard Hall of Fame honoring San Diego’s finest athletes both on and off the playing surface. Norton was also inducted into the California Sports Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

Unconventional style

Norton was a forward, pressing fighter/boxer who was notably for his unusual guard/stance characterised by arms held crosswise. The left arm low across the torso and right hand up by the right or left ear. But when under heavy pressure both arms are bought up high across at face level whilst one leans forward. This leaves the opponent little target in theory. The guard was also used by the legendary Archie MooreGeorge Foreman later used it very effectively during his famous comeback years. Tim Witherspoon was another practitioner. Joe Frazier even borrowed it for occasions in his third Ali match. The style is named the “cross-armed defense”. It tends to look crablike. Norton would bob and weave from a crouch firing well placed heavy punches. Norton was best when advancing. He’d drag or slide the right foot along from behind. By comparison, most conventional boxers have elbows in at the torso with forearms vertically parallel to each another. The gloves then being both near sides of the face. Most trainers believe the conventional style is a better defense and that the cross-arm style leaves the user open far too often.

 

But Norton’s style was in itself fascinating. He gave Ali more trouble than anyone else in history over three contests – no small feat by any standard. He could, as they say in the trade, ‘box’ or ‘fight’. Norton was never fazed by Ali’s various famous tactics like clinching or rope-a-dope. In fact, Ali usually found rope-a-dope a particularly unpleasant experience with Norton, as Ken would get many punches through. He seemed to have a unique ability here. Then Ali’s famous clinching and holding or launching sharp shots from a distance were all for various reasons not as effective as when Ali fought Frazier, the only other man he fought three times.

 

Angelo Dundee wrote that Ken’s best punch was the left hook. Many others lauded his infamous overhand right. In a Ring Magazine article, Norton himself said that a right uppercut to Jerry Quarry was the hardest blow he recalled landing.

 

Unlike many boxers, Norton would often not attempt to stare down an opponent while announcements were made before the match started. Instead, he’d often look down at the floor and gather his thoughts. He was also widely noted for his fine athletic build.

 

TV and film career

Norton has appeared in approximately twenty motion pictures. Norton additionally worked as a television and radio sports commentator and appeared in popular TV series, such as jailbird “Jackhammer” Jackson in “Pros and Cons”, an early first-season episode of The A-Team (filmed 1982, broadcast 1983), and as boxer Bo Keeler in the fourth season Knight Rider episode “Redemption of a Champion” (1986). Norton also appeared on the Superstars sports competition on ABC TV (1976) and was a member of the Sports Illustrated Speakers Bureau. The character of “Apollo Creed” in Rocky was initially going to be played by Norton. However, when he pulled out, Carl Weathers was selected.

 

Car crash

Norton continued making TV, radio and public speaking appearances until suffering injuries in a near-fatal car accident in 1986. It left him with slow and slurred speech.

 

Video and autobiography

He appeared along with Ali, Foreman, Frazier and Holmes in a video titled Champions forever discussing their best times and in 2000 he published his autobiography titled Going the DistanceISBN 1-58261-225-0

 

Family

Ken Norton was twice voted “Father of the Year” by the Los Angeles Sentinel and the Los Angeles Times in 1977. To quote Norton from his biography, Believe: Journey From Jacksonville: “Of all the titles that I’ve been privileged to have, the title of ‘dad’ has always been the best.”

 

His son, Ken Norton Jr, played football at UCLA and had a long successful career in the NFL. In tribute to his father’s boxing career, Ken Jr. would strike a boxing stance in the end zone each time he scored a defensive touchdown and throw a punching combination at the goalpost pad. He is now the linebackers’ coach for the Seattle Seahawks.

 

Ken Norton’s other son, Keith Norton, was once the weekend sports anchor for KPRC in Houston, Texas.

 

Professional boxing record

42 Wins (33 knockouts), 7 Losses1 Draw

Professional boxing record

 

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IKF 1976-07 Cov

 

KenNorton

 

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AMBER ALERT OVER!! Suspect James Lee DiMaggio “shot & killed.” Victim: Hannah Anderson Safe


 

By Jueseppi B.

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From The LA Times:

 

Kidnapping suspect killed by FBI; Hannah Anderson in ‘good shape’

 

By Kate Mather, Andrew Blankstein and Kurt Streeter

 

August 10, 2013, 5:51 p.m.

 

CASCADE, Idaho — The man accused of kidnapping 16-year-old Hannah Anderson was killed in the Idaho wilderness Saturday, but the teen was found safe and “appears to be in pretty good shape,” San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said.

 

Gore said the suspect, James Lee DiMaggio, was shot by the FBI.

 

“Obviously we would have liked Mr. DiMaggio to surrender and face justice in a court of law, but that was not the case,” Gore said. Hannah will be “thoroughly evaluated” at a hospital before detectives talk to her, he said.

Hannah’s father, Brett Anderson, was notified this afternoon and was “very relieved,” Gore said at a press conference in San Diego. Plans are in progress to reunite him with his daughter Sunday. She was taken to a hospital for observation.

 

DiMaggio, 40, was killed not far from the remote Idaho location where a group of horseback riders had seen him and Hannah earlier in the week, law enforcement sources told The Times.

 

DiMaggio was the subject of an intensive manhunt in the wilderness above Cascade, where he had taken Hannah, who had been missing from her San Diego County community since Sunday

DiMaggio had been considered armed and dangerous. Earlier in the day, FBI Special Agent Jason Pack said that danger required officials to send in “highly trained, enhanced SWAT teams and law enforcement” as part of the search.

 

DiMaggio’s blue Nissan Versa — the subject of a five-state Amber Alert — was found Friday roughly 60 miles northeast of Cascade, at a trail head leading into the wilderness.

 

Ada County sheriff’s spokeswoman Andrea Dearden said it was “the last place you can go before you hit the wilderness and stop driving.”

 

Much of the terrain is so rugged and remote that some ground search crews had to be flown in Saturday morning. Others took to horseback, while helicopters buzzed overhead.

 

By Saturday afternoon, roughly 150 FBI officials had combined with local and state officials to amass a force of more than 200 personnel, according to Dearden.

 

kate.mather@latimes.com

 

andrew.blankstein@latimes.com

 

jason.wells@latimes.com

 

Thank you Los Angeles Times

 

Amber Alert: Body of Child Found in Amber Alert Suspect’s Home IDed as Missing Boy – ABC News

The body of a child found in the Boulevard, Calif. home of murder and kidnapping suspect James DiMaggio was positively identified as 8-year-old Ethan Anderson, who was previously thought to have been abducted, the San Diego County Sheriff’s department said. …

abcnews.go.com

 

Body found in home identified as brother of kidnapped San Diego teen – CNN.com

Lab tests confirm the child’s body found in a California house fire was that of 8-year-old Ethan Anderson. …

www.cnn.com

 

 

LIVE BROADCAST: WATCH NOW: KTLA 5 News at 6 live streaming video.

 

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