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Geraldo Attacks O’Reilly Over Contentious Obama Interview: You ‘Minimized’ The President!


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Geraldo Attacks O’Reilly over Contentious Obama Interview: You ‘Minimized’ the President!

 

Published on Feb 8, 2014

Geraldo Rivera took on Bill O’Reilly Friday night over whether O’Reilly was disrespectful to President Obama in their big Super Bowl interview. Rivera gave O’Reilly some benefit of the doubt, but other than that thought O’Reilly was a bit too confrontational and didn’t give Obama the kind of respect a president normally deserves.

 

 

 

Rivera argued it was less like an interview and more like a meeting of the minds with the “President of Most of the White Guys of America” (O’Reilly) against the president of the rest of the country, and told O’Reilly that it was out of line for him to refer to Obama as a “community organizer.”

 

He said it was “unsettling to watch,” and the president deserves “all the respect and dignity” of the office. O’Reilly fired back that his job is not to please, it’s to “get information” and ask “the tough questions,” and believed that he gave enough deference and respect to the office of the presidency.

 

Bill O’Reilly interviews President Obama before the Super Bowl

 

Published on Feb 2, 2014

Bill O’Reilly sits down with President Obama at the White House to discuss the IRS scandal, Benghazi, the Affordable Care Act and the Super Bowl.

 

 

 

Rivera concluded that the larger point O’Reilly made about inner-city families was “obscured” by how he “minimized” the president.

 

 

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Super Bowl XLVIII Is Why The Game Is Played And “The Expert Pundits” Should Be Ignored.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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The Denver Broncos Must Have Been Tied Up In Gov. Chris Christie’s Bridge Gate, You Know, Stuck In That Traffic Study On The George Washington Bridge. They Never Showed Up To Play In Super Bowl XLVIII.

 

This is why we play the actual sports games and don’t pay a lick of attention to ALL the sports “experts” who are highly paid idiots, according to their Super Bowl picks for XLVIII.

 

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Super Bowl XLVIII By The Numbers: Historic ineptitude on display.

 

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The game wasn’t all that interesting, not with the Seahawks jumping out to a big lead and with the Broncos unable to do anything about it, but Super Bowl XLVIII certainly produced some interesting statistics.

 

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Like, how Peyton Manning set a Super Bowl record for the most completions and Broncos receiver Demaryius Thomas set a Super Bowl record for the most catches. So, it wasn’t all bad for Denver, am I right?

 

Anyway, here were the most fascinating numbers for the final game of the 2013 season.

 

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0: The number of times in NFL history before Sunday that an NFL game ended with a 43-8 score.

 

0: The number of interceptions thrown by Russell Wilson this postseason.

 

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0.125: The percentage of successful replay challenges by Broncos coach John Fox this season. Fox challenged the call of a forward pass by Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson in the first half, but referee Terry McAuley confirmed the original ruling on the field. On the season, Fox was 1 for 8.

 

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2:02: The length of time of Renee Fleming’s beautiful national anthem if you hit the stopwatch when she opened her mouth to sing.

 

2:12: The length of time of Renee Fleming’s gorgeous national anthem if you hit the stopwatch when her accompanying band began to play.

 

3: The number of consecutive seasons that a safety has been scored in a Super Bowl, via Michael David Smith.

 

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3: The number of times since the 1975 season, including Sunday, that a Super Bowl team has not scored at least 10 points in the game.

 

5: The number of points the Seahawks had accumulated early in the first quarter. No other Super Bowl team in history has ever had five points on the scoreboard.

 

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5: The number of losses for the Broncos in Super Bowl games. That’s the most of any team in the league.

 

11:41: The amount of time in the first quarter that the Seahawks held the ball. Overall, Seattle ran 22 plays in the first 15 minutes. Denver ran six.

 

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12: The number of seconds it took for the Seahawks to score, the fastest score in Super Bowl history. The previous fastest was 14 seconds when Devin Hester scored on the opening kickoff return in Super XLI.

 

13: The number of receptions for Broncos receiver Demaryius Thomas, the most of anybody in Super Bowl history.

 

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13: The number of years it’s been since a Super Bowl participant was shut out in the first half. That would be the Giants falling behind 10-0 to the Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV.

 

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19: The number of minutes into the game that it took for the Broncos to get their first first down.

 

24: The number of times a coin flip in the Super Bowl has landed on heads, and the number of times it’s landed on tails, via RJ Bell.

 

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29: The number of points scored by the Seahawks to start the game, the most consecutive points ever scored by one team to open a game since the Redskins scored 24 in Super Bowl XXVI, via ESPN Stats Info.

 

33: The number of completions Sunday by Peyton Manning, the most-ever by a Super Bowl quarterback.

 

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69: The length of Malcolm Smith‘s pick-6 of Peyton Manning in the first half. It’s the longest interception return for a touchdown since Tracy Porter returned one 74 yards in Super Bowl XLIV against a guy named Peyton Manning.

 

82,529: The number of fans who jammed themselves into MetLife Stadium to watch the game.

 

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526,217: The base salary made by Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson for the entire 2013 season.

 

882,352:The salary made by Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning eachweek of the NFL season, via Bryan A. Graham.

 

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$10.2 Million: The amount the legendary boxer, Floyd Mayweather bet on a Denver Broncos victory. I won’t mention the starving children, poor families, charities that could have used that $10.2 million. Now his bookie can retire. Oh well, he’ll just jave to fight Manny Pacquiáo.

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Best, worst of Super Bowl XLVIII

 

Evaluating the memorable moments of Seattle’s Super blowout of Denver

 

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Malcolm Smith Named Super Bowl MVP

 

Seahawks LB and Super Bowl MVP Malcolm Smith gives credit to the entire Seattle defense.
The Seattle Seahawks, underdogs in the eyes of the folks in Las Vegas, smoked the Denver Broncos 43-8.
This was an unlikely game in which Peyton Manning did a passable imitation of his beleaguered younger brother, Eli. Or was it barely passable? This season alone, Eli (15) and Peyton (two) combined to throw 17 interceptions at MetLife Stadium, the home of the Giants and Jets. In a quirky turn of events, the brothers combined to throw seven interceptions (and one lonely touchdown) here against the Seahawks this season.
The best play of the game, if you are a Seahawks fan, was linebacker Malcolm Smith‘s 69-yard interception return for a touchdown late in the second quarter. Defensive end Cliff Avril hit Manning’s arm as he released the ball, and Smith gathered in the disabled duck — and ran a wondrous, meandering route to the end zone. That gave Seattle a stunning 22-0 lead.
It was the longest interception return for a touchdown since the Saints’ Tracy Porter took one back 74 yards — against Manning in Super Bowl XLIV.
Going in, if you had known that Seattle’s two starting cornerbacks – Richard Sherman and Byron Maxwell – would be out of the game midway through the fourth quarter, you might have thought Manning would have a field day. Instead, he merely finished the game with a Super Bowl record for completions (34), an exceedingly hollow victory.
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Best effort by a part-time player: It’s not how you start; it’s how you finish. Seattle wide receiver Percy Harvin got a six-year, $67 million contract but made exactly one catch during the 2013 regular season. Hip surgery on Aug. 1 to repair a torn labrum took Harvin out of play for much of the season, but he returned for the divisional playoff game against the Saints (three catches), then suffered a concussion. After sitting out the NFC Championship Game against the 49ers, he was a big part of the Seahawks’ offensive game plan. He had two sweet runs in the first half, a 30-yard rush around left end and a 15-yard sweep. Then he ran back the kickoff to open the second half 87 yards for a touchdown — and a 29-0 lead.
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Best quarterback: Russell Wilson is the most successful quarterback in NFL history over his first two seasons. This Super Bowl victory gives Wilson a total of 28 wins — one more than the Steelers’ Ben Roethlisberger in 2004 and ’05. This is a guy who was drafted in the third round, 53 spots behind Cleveland’s Brandon Weeden.
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Worst quarterback: He had the best offensive season in NFL history, but he was also the second-oldest quarterback to start this ultimate game. Peyton Manning was the only player on either team to win a Super Bowl, but he certainly didn’t win this one. No, the two interceptions weren’t completely his fault, but his big-game nerves will be questioned after this loss. Again. Manning is now 11-12 in playoff games.
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Worst effort in the big game: The Broncos franchise is now 2-5 in Super Bowls — and the only team to lose five. The worst Super Bowl blowout ever? The Broncos lost to the 49ers 55-10 in Super Bowl XXIV.
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Best career opportunist: In addition to his memorable interception, Smith had a backbreaking fumble recovery in the third quarter. Cornerback Byron Maxwell punched the ball from the hands of Demaryius Thomas. Smith scooped it up, and it wasn’t long before Seattle had a 36-0 lead.
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Best non-omen: The Seahawks had zero players who had previously appeared in a Super Bowl, the first team with that number since the 1990 Buffalo Bills. Those Bills, by the way, lost a tough one to the Giants (Scott Norwood, wide right) and went on to lose four consecutive Super Bowls. The Seahawks, obviously, are not students of history.
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Worst start (ever):We’ve seen Peyton Manning check out of so many plays this season that we almost expect it. So when the Broncos’ quarterback stepped out of the shotgun formation and moved toward center Manny Ramirez on the first offensive play of the game, it seemed like business as usual. But then Ramirez inexplicably snapped the ball over Manning’s head. It sailed into the end zone, and Seattle had a stunning safety — 12 seconds into the game. It was the fastest score in Super Bowl history and only the ninth safety. The second-fastest? Chicago’s Devin Hester took the opening kickoff all the way back in Super Bowl XLI — against Manning’s Indianapolis Colts. Indianapolis, for the record, came back to win that game.
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Best dressed: Manning, declining to follow the fashion trend of Michael Jackson, actually wore two gloves, one on each hand. An hour before the game, when he first started throwing, the temperature was 52 degrees. But with a forecast calling for the low 40s (not to mention a modest wind chill), Manning probably didn’t want to make a “Bad” decision and change midstream.
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Worst dressed: “Broadway” Joe Namath made a pregame sideline appearance wearing an enormous retro 1960s fur coat, which sent Twitter into a tizzy. It was tawny, with white, snowy piping, and it had a hood. See temperature in above item.
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Best breakup: If not for Denver linebacker Nate Irving, the Seahawks almost certainly would have had a 12-0 lead in the first quarter. But after Russell Wilson feathered a lovely pass up and over into the end zone to Jermaine Kearse, Irving stuck his right hand in Kearse’s face. As they fell to earth, he wrenched the ball loose, and Seattle had to settle for a field goal.
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Worst route-running decision: On paper, it was an ugly interception by Manning. But judging by the exercised discussion his coaches had with him afterward, tight end Julius Thomas might have broken off the route prematurely. In any event, Seattle safety Kam Chancellor collected the late-first-quarter gift ball, and the Seahawks had another offensive possession. They ran 22 plays in the first quarter versus only seven for Denver.
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Best dodged bullet: The Broncos’ Trindon Holliday appeared to fumble after returning a kickoff past his 30-yard-line. Chris Maragos knocked it loose, and kicker Steven Hauschka recovered. It was ruled a fumble on the field and would have given Seattle the ball in Denver territory with more than three minutes left in the first half. But, upon further review, Holliday was ruled down by contact. So take heart, Broncos fans. It could’ve been worse.
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President Barack Hussein Obama Hands Bill O’Reilly His Ass On Fox Super Bowl Interview – 2-2-2014


 

By Jueseppi B.

POTUS Super Bowl interview w Bill O’Reilly of Fox (Pete Souza)

POTUS Super Bowl interview w Bill O’Reilly of Fox (Pete Souza)

 

The most intriguing element of Fox’s four-hour pregame show? It might be Bill O’Reilly’s interview with President Barack Obama because we’re eager to see if O’Reilly treats Obama more respectfully than the last time they sat together for a pre-Super Bowl chat, in 2010.

 

That day, O’Reilly interrupted Obama 48 times in 15 minutes, or 3.2 per minute. It’s one thing to challenge the President; it’s another to not let him finish a thought. Sunday’s session, scheduled for 4:30 p.m., could be compelling television.

 

 

Obama Vs O’Reilly Interview On Fox – 2-2-2014 – Obamacare, Benghazi Attack, IRS Targeting

 
The clown O’reillyis getting old and ugly and no one is scared anymore when he interrupts. The Prince Obama is cool and coherent and won handily.

Understand something,  by definition Billm when some one is attacking our compound it’s an act of terror!.” Once again President Obama tells what happened  and explains the situation as it went down  .And calls O Reilly out on his lying about it and other subjects.

 

 

 

From Deadline Hollywood:

 

Super Bowl: Obama Blasts Fox News In Testy O’Reilly Interview

 

Things turned tense quickly today between President Obama and Bill O’Reilly in their Super Bowl pregame interview. “OK, Bill, you’ve got a long list of my mistakes,” Obama said to The O’Reilly Factor host near the start of their 10-minute live interview on Fox. That remark — in response to a question from O’Reilly whether it was the biggest mistake of Obama’s presidency when he told Americans no one would lose their healthcare under Obamacare — was one of a number of points on which the two butted heads.

 

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The duo sparred almost from the beginning in the interview live from the White House this afternoon. Obama also took on Fox News Channel when O’Reilly asked him about reports the IRS was investigating Tea Party-related groups for political reasons. “These kind of things keep resurfacing in part because you and your TV station will promote them,” Obama said. “When you look there have been multiple hearings.”

 

Obama denied any corruption, just some “boneheaded decisions.” Earlier, the Fox News host interrupted Obama with a “you’re not going to answer that?” as the President replied to a question about why he didn’t fire Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius after the botched online launch of Obamacare.

 

The face-to-face marked the first time O’Reilly has interviewed Obama since Fox last broadcast the Super Bowl in 2011. The two covered several topics today including the Obamacare rollout, the attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, and the IRS scandal. Obama wouldn’t offer a prediction for the game between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks.

 

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I can’t make a prediction, I don’t know, these guys are too evenly matched,” he said. “I think it is going to be 24-21 but I don’t know who is going to be 24 and I don’t know who is going to be 21.”  Just before the interview ended, O’Reilly told the President he thought his heart was in the right place. O’Reilly and Obama are set to chat more today for an additional taped portion that will be shown Monday on O’Reilly Factor.

 

The last time the FNC host and the President sat down together three years ago, O’Reilly grilled Obama about the Affordable Care Act, then before the courts, and how Obama felt knowing people “hate” him. The first time the two spoke on-camera was in 2008, when then-Sen. Obama was running for president.

 

It’s a now six-year Super Bowl tradition that the lead newsman for the host network sits down with Obama. Last year, with CBS broadcasting, anchor Scott Pelley did the honors, and in 2012 Today’s Matt Lauer landed the interview when NBC had the game. A well-known big sports fan and also well aware of the giant TV audience the big NFL game grants him, Obama noted the Broncos-Seahawks matchup in his weekly online address yesterday.  “Have a great weekend,” he said concluding his speech, “and enjoy the Super Bowl.”

 

Thank you Deadline Hollywood.

 

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On This Super Bowl Eve, Remember Those Who Committed Suicide From NFL Head Injuries. (CTE)


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Players of American football who committed suicide

 

A

 

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Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

 

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of encephalopathy that is a progressive degenerative disease, which can only be definitively diagnosed postmortem, in individuals with a history of multiple concussions and other forms of head injury. The disease was previously called dementia pugilistica (DP), as it was initially found in those with a history of boxing. CTE has been most commonly found in professional athletes participating in American footballice hockeyprofessional wrestling and other contact sports who have experienced repetitive brain trauma. It has also been found in soldiers exposed to a blast or a concussive injury, in both cases resulting in characteristic degeneration of brain tissue and the accumulation of tau protein. Individuals with CTE may show symptoms of dementia, such as memory lossaggression, confusion and depression, which generally appear years or many decades after the trauma.

 

Repeated concussions and injuries less serious than concussions (“sub-concussions”) incurred during the play of contact sports over a long period can result in CTE. In the case of blast injury, a single exposure to a blast and the subsequent violent movement of the head in the blast wind can cause the condition

 

Signs and symptoms

Other than repeated brain trauma, the risk factors for CTE remain unknown. So far, CTE can only be diagnosed posthumously. Research studies are looking into possible genetic, exposure level, and other risk factors.

 

Researchers who conducted a CTE pilot study at UCLA described the findings as a significant step toward being able to diagnose CTE, in living patients.

 

Research performed at the Cleveland Clinic and at the University of Rochester  has shown that in addition to concussions, sub-concussive head hits also produce measurable changes in athletes’ MRI. Dr. Bazarian (University of Rochester) demonstrated persistent changes in white matter properties in athletes who did not experience a concussion during a season but had several blows to the head. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that a number of sub-concussive events may be as damaging as a frank concussion. The MRI changes reported in this study were causally related to the presence in serum of players of auto-antibodies against the brain protein S100B. The sequence of events proposed by Dr. Janigro at the Cleveland Clinic links sub-concussion to leakage of the blood-brain barrierextravasation of brain S100B in blood, activation of an immune response due to antigen unmasking and production of auto-antiboides. These auto-antibodies maybe pathogenic as shown for example in epileptic human brain. The link between S100B auto-antibodies and CTE needs experimental confirmation; however, antibodies against S100B or other brain protein have been found in patients affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Clinical symptoms of CTE are only beginning to be understood. They are thought to include changes in mood (i.e. depression, suicidality, apathy, anxiety), cognition (i.e. memory loss, executive dysfunction), behavior (short fuse, aggression), and in some cases motor disturbance (i.e. difficulty with balance and gait). While the pathology of CTE has been broken up into stages, the clinical symptoms and clinical progression of CTE are not yet fully understood.

 

 

American football

Between 2008 and 2010, the bodies of twelve former professional American football players underwent postmortem evaluations for CTE, and all of them showed evidence of the disease, indicating a conservatively estimated prevalence rate of 3.7% among professional football players if no other players who died during this period had CTE.

 

In 2002, Dr. Bennet Omalu, a forensic pathologist and neuropathologist in PittsburghPennsylvania found CTE in the brains of Mike WebsterTerry LongAndre WatersJustin Strzelczyk and Tom McHale. Omalu, in 2012 a medical examiner and associate adjunct professor in California, was a co-founder of BIRI and reportedly in 2012 participated in the autopsy of Junior Seau. Dr. Omalu’s participation was halted during the autopsy after Junior Seau’s son revoked previously provided oral permission after he received telephone calls from NFL management denouncing Dr. Omalu’s professional ethics, qualifications, and motivation.

 

As of December 2012, thirty-three former National Football League (NFL) players have been diagnosed post-mortem with CTE. Former Detroit Lions lineman and eight-time Pro Bowler Lou Creekmur, former Houston Oilers and Miami Dolphins linebacker John Grimsley, formerTampa Bay Buccaneers guard Tom McHale, former Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Chris Henry, and former Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson, have all been diagnosed post-mortem with CTE. Other football players diagnosed with CTE include former Buffalo Bills star running back Cookie Gilchrist and Wally Hilgenberg., among others.

 

An autopsy conducted in 2010 on the brain of Owen Thomas, a 21-year-old junior lineman at the University of Pennsylvania who committed suicide, showed early stages of CTE, making him the second youngest person to be diagnosed with the condition. Thomas was the second amateur football player diagnosed with CTE, after Mike Borich, who died at 42. The doctors who performed the autopsy indicated that they found no causal connection between the nascent CTE and Thomas’s suicide. There were no records of Thomas missing any playing time due to concussion, but as a player who played hard and “loved to hit people,” Thomas may have played through concussions and received thousands of subconcussive impacts on the brain.

 

In October 2010, 17-year-old Nathan Stiles died hours after his high school homecoming football game, where he took a hit that would be the final straw in a series of subconcussive and concussive blows to the head for the highschooler. The CSTE diagnosed him with CTE, making him the youngest reported CTE case to date.

 

In July, 2011, Colt tight end John Mackey died after several years of deepening symptoms of frontotemporal dementia. BUSM was reported to be planning to examine his brain for signs of CTE. The CSTE found CTE in his brain post-mortem.

 

In 2012, retired NFL player Junior Seau committed suicide with a gunshot wound to the chest. There was speculation that he suffered brain damage due to CTE.  Seau’s family donated his brain tissue to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. On January 10, 2013, the brain pathology report was revealed and Seau did have evidence of CTE.

 

On July 27, 2012, an autopsy report concluded that the former Atlanta Falcons safety Ray Easterling, who committed suicide in April 2012, had CTE.

 

The NFL has taken measures to help prevent CTE. As of July 2011, the NFL has changed its return-to-play rules. The number of contact practices has been reduced, based on the recent collective bargaining agreement.

 

In 2012, some four thousand former NFL players “joined civil lawsuits against the League, seeking damages over the League’s failure to protect players from concussions, according to Judy Battista of the [New York] Times“.

 

On August 30, 2013, the NFL reached a $765 million settlement with the former NFL players over the head injuries. The settlement created a $675 million compensation fund from which former NFL players can collect from depending on the extent of their conditions. Severe conditions such as Lou Gehrig’s disease and postmortem diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy would be entitled to payouts as high as $5 million. From the remainder of the settlement, $75 million will be used for medical exams, and $10 million will be used for research and education. However, in January, 2014, U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody refused to accept the agreed settlement because “the money wouldn’t adequately compensate the nearly 20,000 men not named in the suit”.

 

Bernie Kosar, who sustained several concussions during his twelve-year NFL career and has shown symptoms of CTE, has submitted himself to an experimental treatment program led by Dr. Rick Sponaugle of Florida that has alleviated many of his symptoms. The program, the details of which are proprietary, involves increasing blood flow to damaged portions of the brain. He has spoken out in public about his successes with the treatment in the hopes that others who suffer from the disease can find relief and avoid the fates of Duerson and Seau, both of whom were personal friends of Kosar’s. The efficacy of Dr. Sponaugle’s treatment has not been validated through any published clinical trials or other validated scientific process, nor has this treatment been supported by any reputable medical group conducting research into CTE.

 

League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis | PBS America

 

Published on Oct 22, 2013

League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis – premieres in the UK at 9pm, Thursday 28 November on PBS America (Virgin Media 243 | Sky 534 | pbsamerica.co.uk)

 

Gridiron football is America’s great national sport, offering a gladiatorial spectacle for millions of fans. But what long-term health risks do the players face?

 

At the top level, American Football is a huge commercial operation, with the National Football League presiding over a competition whose leading players command eight-figure salaries. But the NFL is currently under assault as thousands of former players are claiming that the league has covered up football’s connection to long-term brain injuries.

 

Award-winning journalists Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada investigate allegations that the league worked to refute scientific evidence that the violent collisions at the heart of the game are linked to early onset dementia and potentially catastrophic brain damage.

 

Featured cases include former Pittsburgh Steelers star Mike Webster, who died in 2002 at the age of 50. Webster had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a devastating neurological disorder that was almost certainly contracted during the Hall of Famer’s 17-year career. But Webster’s case may prove to be merely the tip of the iceberg. With thousands of lawsuits having been filed by former players, the very future of the game may be at risk.

 

 

 

LEAGUE OF DENIAL: NFL’s Concussion Crisis (ESPN Outside The Lines) (Full Episode HD)

 

Published on Oct 2, 2013

Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru discuss their new book with Bob Ley on OTL, in which they say the NFL used its power to deny a link between playing football and brain damage.

 

The National Football League conducted a two-decade campaign to deny a growing body of scientific research that showed a link between playing football and brain damage, according to a new book co-authored by a pair of ESPN investigative reporters.

 

The book, “League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth,” reports that the NFL used its power and resources to discredit independent scientists and their work; that the league cited research data that minimized the dangers of concussions while emphasizing the league’s own flawed research; and that league executives employed an aggressive public relations strategy designed to keep the public unaware of what league executives really knew about the effects of playing the game.

 

 

From CBS News:

With chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and concussions a hot topic in the NFL, a new study is adding evidence to the claims that repeated blows to the head may leave lasting effects in athletes.

 

Brain imaging scans of retired football players have showed unusual activity linked to how many times they had a head injury during their careers. The new study, published in Scientific Reports on Oct. 17, reports that these players may develop small neurological defects that doctors might not see with regular tests.

 

“The critical fact is that the level of brain abnormality correlates strongly with the measure of head impacts of great enough severity to warrant being taken out of play,” lead study author Dr. Adam Hampshire, from the department of medicine at Imperial College London, said in a press release. “This means that it is highly likely that damage caused by blows to the head accumulate towards an executive impairment in later life.”

 

The study looked at 13 former NFL players who said they were suffering from neurological problems likely due to their time on the field. They were compared to 60 healthy volunteers.

 

Participants were told to rearrange colored balls in a series of tubes in as few moves as possible. During the task, their brains were monitored through a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan.

 

The NFL group performed slightly worse on the test than the control group. More troubling, the NFL group’s brain scans shown unusual patterns of brain activity in their frontal lobe. The frontal lobe controls higher-order brain activity that regulates for cognitive or thought processes. The researchers believe that the changes observed may have an effect on the NFL players’ abilities to plan and organize.

 

The differences were so stark that a computer program was able to determine with 90 percent accuracy which brain belonged to a former NFL player based on the frontal lobe activation patterns.

 

“The NFL alumni showed some of the most pronounced abnormalities in brain activity that I have ever seen, and I have processed a lot of patient data sets in the past,” Hampshire said.

 

The researchers suggests the data shows that the brain may compensate for damage by having other areas work harder to make up for all the deficits. They called for more research on players, especially over the course of different seasons.

 

They add their work may be relevant to others outside of athletics who have suffered repeated head injuries.

 

An increasing amount of research has looked into how head blows sustained during football may affect the brain long-term.

 

Ex-NFL players were shown in a 2012 study to be especially vulnerable to deaths from degenerative brain diseases. The death rate from Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease combined was three times higher for the former players than the general population. Former players are also more likely to have higher rates of depression and cognitive problems.

 

Then there’s CTE, a progressive degenerative brain disease that often occurs in people who have had multiple concussions or other brain trauma. Symptoms can include changes in mood including depression, problems with cognition or behavior like dementia and difficulties with motor abilities. It can only be diagnosed after death.

 

Brain autopsies on former football players, wrestlers, hockey players, boxers, and military combat veterans revealed that the majority of them that who had repeated head trauma during their careers had evidence of CTE. Junior Seau, the former NFL linebacker who committed suicide in April 2012, was diagnosed with CTE postmortem. Interviews with family members of patients confirmed to have CTE after death revealed that their loved ones experienced symptoms that could be linked to CTE – including “explosive” and out of control behavior, depression and memory problems — before they passed away.

 

The NFL agreed to a $765 million settlement for the concussion lawsuits that more than 4,000 former players had brought forth.

 

A promising study in January on the brains of five retired NFL players may have found a way to diagnose CTE before the death of the person. The researchers used a PET scan and a chemical marker to look for abnormal tau proteins in their brain that normally signify Alzheimer’s. But, the research is still preliminary.

 

Physiologist Damir Janigro of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio pointed out that the new study had limitations, including the researchers did not compare the brains of injured NFL players to those of healthy players. It also did not look at brain function of players before their injuries. Janigro said the findings may suggest that these NFL players always had more brain function in their frontal lobe to begin with, regardless if they were hit or not.

 

“It could be why they are good football players,” he said to LiveScience.

 

Despite greater awareness around head injuries and stricter guidelines before players can return to the field, many NFL players state that they would try to hide concussion symptoms even if they know it may mean bad news for their brains in the long run. The Associated Press revealed that 23 out of 44 NFL players would try to conceal a possible concussion rather than leave the game.

 

“The bottom line is: You have to be able to put food on the table. No one’s going to sign or want a guy who can’t stay healthy,” Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew said.” I know there will be a day when I’m going to have trouble walking. I realize that,” Jones-Drew said. “But this is what I signed up for. Injuries are part of the game. If you don’t want to get hit, then you shouldn’t be playing.”

 

Thank you  CBS News.

 

Other Professional Athletes Diagnosed With CTE

 

Canadian football

 

Professional wrestling

Baseball

Hockey

 

 

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SuperBowl Time….In Two Weeks That Is. You’ll Hear About It EVERYday From Now Till February 2nd, 2014.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Seattle vs. Denver in Super Bowl XLVIII

 

The Seattle Seahawks (15-3) will meet the Denver Broncos (15-3) for the NFL title in two weeks in the New Jersey Meadowlands. It’s the first trip to the big game for the Seahawks since they lost to Pittsburgh after the 2005 season.

 

From Chicago Tribune:

 

Broncos beat Patriots for AFC title

 

By Rich Campbell, Tribune reporter

 

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DENVER — Peyton Manning didn’t have to outduel Tom Brady in the AFC championship game Sunday. The Broncos’ defense made sure of that.

 

Another Manning vs. Brady postseason classic never materialized because the Broncos’ defense stuffed the run, pressured Brady at critical moments and took advantage of his ill-timed inaccuracy.

 

It amounted to an orange tidal wave that the Broncos rode to a 26-16 victory over the Patriots and a berth in Super Bowl XLVIII against the Seattle Seahawks.

 

“Coming in with the two quarterbacks you have in Peyton and Tom Brady, there was all this talk about a shootout and who’s going to play the better game,” Broncos cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie said. “So our main thing was just trying to get the ball back to our offense.”

 

They consistently did, and Manning took advantage. He completed 32 of 43 passes for 400 yards and two touchdowns. His 118.4 passer rating was his fifth-best in 22 career postseason games.

 

The conference title was especially gratifying for Manning, who sat out the 2011 season following multiple neck surgeries, including a cervical fusion procedure. He celebrated his third career Super Bowl berth by posing for pictures with brothers Eli and Cooper inside a home locker room littered with orange, blue and white confetti.

 

“I put a lot of hard work in,” Manning said. “I had a lot of people — teammates, coaches, trainers — help me along the way. We’ve definitely come a long way in two years. It’s an exciting feeling.”

 

The Broncos claimed their first AFC title since they won back-to-back Super Bowls in the 1997 and 1998 seasons. It seemed particularly sweet to players and coaches because of the adversity they have endured.

 

Coach John Fox missed almost one month after undergoing aortic heart valve replacement surgery on Nov. 4. The Broncos also played Sunday without 10 players who are on the reserve/injured list, including All-Pro left tackle Ryan Clady and All-Pro linebacker Von Miller.

 

“Just standing here feels pretty good because I almost wasn’t,” said Fox, 58, who was the Panthers’ head coach in 2003 when they lost the Super Bowl to the Patriots. “To be able to come back, be on the sideline, be in those meeting rooms, those late-night meetings with the coaches, players, and all the sacrifices that go into these things, it feels outstanding.”

 

The Patriots lost for the third time in eight AFC championship games under coach Bill Belichick. He and Brady, who have been together since 2000, have not won a Super Bowl since the 2004 season.

 

“Losing is not easy,” Brady said. “I give them a lot of credit. They are going to be tough to beat in a couple weeks.”

 

On an unseasonably warm day in the 60s, the Broncos played with the offensive and defensive balance they have discovered this postseason.

 

Their receiving corps consistently won at the line of scrimmage and separated on the perimeter and down the field. The size, speed, physicality and agility of Demaryius Thomas, Eric Decker, Wes Welker and tight end Julius Thomas were too much for the Patriots’ defenders, especially after top cornerback Aqib Talib left the game in the first half with knee and rib injuries.

 

Manning threw a 1-yard touchdown to Jacob Tamme in the second quarter and a 3-yarder to Demaryius Thomas in the third.

 

“They did a good job mixing up plays, and, as always, he did an excellent job of reading the defenses,” Belichick said. “And he got us in some situations that were less than ideal with his astute play-calling and recognition.”

 

The Broncos are accustomed to such offensive domination under Manning. But on Sunday, their defense matched that output.

 

In building a 23-3 lead early in the fourth quarter, the Broncos limited the Patriots to 160 total yards. Brady finished 24 of 38 for 277 yards, one touchdown pass and a touchdown run, but he also had some critical misfires.

 

Late in the first quarter, receiver Julian Edelman got behind the defense on a play-action stretch play to the right, but Brady overthrew him. Then Brady overthrew an open Austin Collie deep down the right sideline in the final 30 seconds of the first half.

 

Neither team turned the ball over, but the Broncos made enough plays at decisive moments.

 

Defensive tackle Terrance Knighton sacked Brady on fourth-and-3 from the Broncos’ 29-yard line late in the third with the Broncos up 20-3. His two-handed swim move beat Pro Bowl left guard Logan Mankins.

 

And when the Patriots scored their final touchdown and threatened to make it a one-possession game with 3 minutes, 7 seconds remaining, defensive end Shaun Phillips came around the edge unblocked and tackled running back Shane Vareen on the two-point conversion attempt.

 

“As a defense, we wanted to rise to the occasion,” Terrance Knighton said. “We knew our offense was going to come out and get a rhythm, and we just wanted to do our part.”

 

rcampbell@tribune.com

Twitter @Rich_Campbell

 

Thank you Chicago Tribune.

 

 

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From NFL.com:

 

Seahawks squeak by 49ers to reach Super Bowl

 

SEATTLE – Russell Wilson threw a 35-yard touchdown pass on fourth down and Seattle’s top-ranked defense forced two late turnovers, lifting the Seahawks to their second Super Bowl with a 23-17 victory over the San Francisco 49ers for the NFC championship Sunday.

 

Seattle will meet Denver for the NFL title in two weeks in the New Jersey Meadowlands. It’s the first trip to the big game for the Seahawks (15-3) since they lost to Pittsburgh after the 2005 season.

 

The conference champs had the best records in the league, the first time the top seeds have gotten to the Super Bowl since 2009.

 

San Francisco (14-5) led 17-13 when Wilson, given a free play as Aldon Smith jumped offside, hurled the ball to Jermaine Kearse, who made a leaping catch in the end zone.

 

Steven Hauschka then kicked his third field goal, and Seattle intercepted in the end zone on the 49ers‘ final possession.

 

Demaryius Thomas #88 celebrates his third quarter touchdown with Denver Broncos teammate Eric Decker. Source: AFP

Demaryius Thomas #88 celebrates his third quarter touchdown with Denver Broncos teammate Eric Decker. Source: AFP

 

PEYTON Manning and the Denver Broncos will meet the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII after overcoming the New England Patriots with a 26-16 victory.

 

The Seahawks earned their place in NFL’s showpiece event with a 23-17 win against the 49ers.

 

Seattle’s Malcolm Smith intercepted a Colin Kaepernick pass in the end zone with 22 seconds remaining to halt a potential game-winning drive for the 49ers and send the Seahawks to the February 3 (AEDT) championship game in New Jersey.

 

Less than three years after being unable to throw a football because of his surgically ravaged neck and nerve endings, Manning will get a chance for his second title and will try to become the first quarterback to win one with two different teams.

 

After taking the final knee, Manning stuffed the football in his helmet and ran to the 30-yard line to shake hands with Brady.

 

The Indy-turned-Denver quarterback improved to 5-10 lifetime against New England’s QB but 2-1 in AFC title games.

 

It was far from a fireworks show in this, the 15th installment of the NFL’s two best quarterbacks of their generation.

 

But Manning, who finished 32 for 43 for 400 yards and two short touchdown passes, set up four field goals by Matt Prater and put his stamp on this one with a pair of long, meticulous and mistake-free touchdown drives in which nothing came cheap.

 

Manning geared down the no-huddle, hurry-up offense that helped him set records for touchdown passes and yardage this season and made the Broncos the highest-scoring team in history.

 

The result: A pair of scoring drives that lasted a few seconds over seven minutes; they were the two longest, time-wise, of the season for the Broncos (15-3).

 

Manning capped the second with a 3-yard pass to Demaryius Thomas – who got inside the overmatched Alfonzo Dennard and left his feet to make the catch – for a 20-3 lead midway through the third quarter.

 

From there, it was catch-up time for Brady and the Pats, and they are not built for that.

 

A team that averaged more than 200 yards on the ground the past three weeks didn’t have much quick-strike capability.

 

Brady, who threw for most of his 277 yards in comeback mode, actually led the Patriots to a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns. But they were a pair of time-consuming, 80-yard drives.

 

The second cut the deficit to 26-16 with 3:07 left, but the Broncos stopped Shane Vereen on the 2-point conversion and the celebration was on in Denver.

 

Manning insisted the showdown against Brady was more Broncos vs. Patriots than Manning vs. Brady. He lets others decide who’s the greatest at this or that.

 

But he earned a chance to improve on his already-sterling legacy, one that figures to include a fifth MVP award come Super Bowl week.

 

A win at MetLife Stadium would put him in the same company as his brother, Eli, along with John Elway, Roger Staubach and others as a two-time Super Bowl winner.

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Richard Sherman called Michael Crabtree a “sorry receiver” during a crazy postgame interview of the Seahawks’ 23-17 win over the 49ers for the NFC title.
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The city of Omaha gave Peyton Manning’s charitable foundation $24,800 for all of his ‘OMAHA’ calls from Sunday.
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The early 2014 Super Bowl line and odds were released Sunday night and the Broncos are -3 against the NFC champion Seahawks.
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