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President Barack Obama’s Keynote Speech: Civil Rights Summit, The LBJ Presidential Library.


 

By Jueseppi B.

U.S. President Barack Obama gives the keynote speech on the third day of the Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library

U.S. President Barack Obama gives the keynote speech on the third day of the Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library

 

 

The Day At The Civil Rights Summit at the LBJ Presidential Library

 

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The President and First Lady attended The Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. The President will delivered remarks at this event hosted by the LBJ Presidential Library.

 

 

Mavis Staples sings acoustic rendition of ‘We Shall Overcome

 

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Published on Apr 10, 2014

Mavis Staples appeared on stage Thursday to sing “We Shall Overcome.” Her performance was part of a Civil Rights Summit on Thursday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

 

 

 

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The Arrival In Texas…..

 

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Marking the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act at the LBJ Presidential Library

 

 

Ed. note: Tune in to whitehouse.gov/live at 11:50 am ET to watch President Obama’s remarks at the LBJ Presidential Library to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

 

In early December 1972, heroes of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, braved a rare Austin ice storm to convene at the LBJ Presidential Library for a Civil Rights Symposium. Towering figures like Hubert Humphrey, Barbara Jordan, Clarence Mitchell and Earl Warren rose to the stage in the course of the two-day conference to reflect on the movement they had helped to foster while examining the issues where progress was still needed.

 

Among them was the host of the gathering, Lyndon Baines Johnson, the thirty-sixth President. It was he who, during the course of his five-year presidency, had sounded a death knell to racial inequality through a triumvirate of laws: The Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968.

 

Lyndon B. Johnson speaks to the nation before signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964. East Room, White House, Washington, DC. 7/2/64.

Lyndon B. Johnson speaks to the nation before signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964. East Room, White House, Washington, DC. 7/2/64.

 

He considered the second—the Voting Rights Act—his greatest legislative achievement. As with all of them, it had come hard. In March 1965, after a protest march in Selma, Alabama, was brutally thwarted by state troopers, he stood before a joint session of Congress knowing that his plea for the law would fall on the deaf ears of segregationists in his own party. His voice strong, his will determined, he said:

 

It was more than a hundred years ago that Abraham Lincoln, a great president from another party, signed the Emancipation Proclamation, but emancipation is a proclamation and not a fact. A century has passed since the day of promise. And the promise is unkept.

What happened in Selma is part of a larger movement, which reached into every section and state of America. It is the effort of American Negroes to secure for themselves the full blessings of American life. Their cause must be our cause, too. Because it is not just Negroes, but really, it’s all of us who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice.

And we shall overcome.

 

Through what became known legendarily as “the Johnson Treatment”—wielding political capital, horse-trading, flattering, threatening, cajoling, whatever it took—Johnson overcame resistance to the bill. He signed it under the dome of the U.S. Capitol, on August 10, 1965. As he scrawled his name, a marble statue of Abraham Lincoln, head bowed slightly, the troubles of his administration weighing heavily on his countenance, stood over his right shoulder.

 

It was apt; Lyndon Johnson aimed to finish what Abraham Lincoln had started.

 

Yet when Johnson gave the keynote address at his Library’s Civil Rights Symposium on December 9, 1972, nearly four years after leaving the White House, he believed work still needed to be done. Nursing an ailing heart and looking far beyond his 64 years, he spoke to the assembled body, his voice weaker than it had been when he pressed for Voting Rights, but his will just as determined.

 

Our objective must be to assure that all Americans play by the same rules, and all Americans play against the same odds. Who among us would claim that that is true today?

We have proved that great progress is possible. We know how much still remains to be done. And if our efforts continue, and if our will is strong, and if our hearts are right, and if courage remains our constant companion, then my fellow Americans, I am confident, we shall overcome.

Below, watch an excerpt of President Johnson’s address at the 1972 Civil Rights Symposium

 

 

 

 

It would be the last address Johnson would make publically. The following month, on January 22, 1973, he died of heart attack at his beloved LBJ Ranch. But we hear his voice still.

 

This week, the LBJ Presidential Library Civil Rights Summit marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the first of Johnson’s civil rights landmarks, an act of bi-partisanship Johnson called “an American bill.” Our goal is not only to celebrate America’s progress in a half a century, but, just as LBJ would have wanted, to address the civil rights issues of our times.

 

Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr., others look on. 7/2/64.

Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr., others look on. 7/2/64.

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We are honored that we will have on hand a number of eminent guests who will shed light on those issues, including heroes of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and those who, along with them, are making a difference today.

 

We are further honored to welcome the thirty-ninth, forty-second and forty-third Presidents—Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush respectively—whose administrations furthered the cause of civil rights domestically while championing human rights and freedom abroad.

 

Finally, we are honored to welcome the President and First Lady of the United States, as the Honorable Barack Obama delivers the Summit’s keynote address. Five years ago last January, history shined on President Obama as he became the forty-forth President and the first African-American to achieve the nation’s highest office, the fulfillment, to be sure, of the distant dreams of Abraham Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson.

 

President Obama’s keynote and all programs at the Civil Rights Summit will be live streamed at http://www.civilrightssummit.org/

 

Mark K. Updegrove is the Director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library and Museum, one of thirteen Presidential Libraries of the National Archives.

 

 

Civil rights marches, the White House, Congress & the U.N.: This group's been all over

Civil rights marches, the White House, Congress & the U.N.: This group’s been all over

Yesterday @billclinton stepped back in history as he explored the @LBJLibrary #CivilRightsSummit

Yesterday @billclinton stepped back in history as he explored the @LBJLibrary #CivilRightsSummit

@repjohnlewis with Lyndon Johnson the day LBJ signed the Voting Rights Ac

@repjohnlewis with Lyndon Johnson the day LBJ signed the Voting Rights Ac

Here's Dorothy Height in a meeting with LBJ & civil rights leaders at the White House on 3/18/1966

Here’s Dorothy Height in a meeting with LBJ & civil rights leaders at the White House on 3/18/1966

3/21/1965: Civil rights marchers leave from Selma on the 54-mile trek to Montgomery, for the third time.

3/21/1965: Civil rights marchers leave from Selma on the 54-mile trek to Montgomery, for the third time.

 

President Barack Obama is greeted by Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., as he arrives to speak at the LBJ Presidential Library, Thursday, April 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas, during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. Lewis withstood violence and arrest during the civil rights marches through Alabama in the mid-1960s.

President Barack Obama is greeted by Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., as he arrives to speak at the LBJ Presidential Library, Thursday, April 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas, during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. Lewis withstood violence and arrest during the civil rights marches through Alabama in the mid-1960s.

From left, LBJ Presidential Library Director Mark Updegrove, President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., arrive in the Great Hall at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas, Thursday, April 10, 2014, to attend a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

From left, LBJ Presidential Library Director Mark Updegrove, President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., arrive in the Great Hall at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas, Thursday, April 10, 2014, to attend a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk to greet supporters on the tarmac after landing aboard Air Force One at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Austin, Texas, Thursday, April 10,,2014.

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk to greet supporters on the tarmac after landing aboard Air Force One at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in Austin, Texas, Thursday, April 10,,2014.

President Barack Obama speaks at the LBJ Presidential Library, Thursday, April 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas, during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

President Barack Obama speaks at the LBJ Presidential Library, Thursday, April 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas, during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

 

President Barack Obama and former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush will all speak at a three-day summit to honor the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

President Barack Obama and former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush will all speak at a three-day summit to honor the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act.

 

Remarks by the President at LBJ Presidential Library Civil Rights Summit

 

 

 

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Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library, Austin, Texas

12:16 P.M. CDT

President Obama Delivers Keynote Address at Civil Rights Summit 2014 (Full Speech)

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THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)  Thank you so much.  Please, please, have a seat.  Thank you.

What a singular honor it is for me to be here today.  I want to thank, first and foremost, the Johnson family for giving us this opportunity and the graciousness with which Michelle and I have been received.

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We came down a little bit late because we were upstairs looking at some of the exhibits and some of the private offices that were used by President Johnson and Mrs. Johnson.  And Michelle was in particular interested to — of a recording in which Lady Bird is critiquing President Johnson’s performance.  (Laughter.)  And she said, come, come, you need to listen to this.  (Laughter.)  And she pressed the button and nodded her head.  Some things do not change — (laughter) — even 50 years later.

To all the members of Congress, the warriors for justice, the elected officials and community leaders who are here today  — I want to thank you.

Four days into his sudden presidency — and the night before he would address a joint session of the Congress in which he once served — Lyndon Johnson sat around a table with his closest advisors, preparing his remarks to a shattered and grieving nation.

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He wanted to call on senators and representatives to pass a civil rights bill — the most sweeping since Reconstruction.  And most of his staff counseled him against it.  They said it was hopeless; that it would anger powerful Southern Democrats and committee chairmen; that it risked derailing the rest of his domestic agenda.  And one particularly bold aide said he did not believe a President should spend his time and power on lost causes, however worthy they might be.  To which, it is said, President Johnson replied, “Well, what the hell’s the presidency for?”  (Laughter and applause.)  What the hell’s the presidency for if not to fight for causes you believe in?

Today, as we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, we honor the men and women who made it possible.  Some of them are here today.  We celebrate giants like John Lewis and Andrew Young and Julian Bond.  We recall the countless unheralded Americans, black and white, students and scholars, preachers and housekeepers — whose names are etched not on monuments, but in the hearts of their loved ones, and in the fabric of the country they helped to change.

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But we also gather here, deep in the heart of the state that shaped him, to recall one giant man’s remarkable efforts to make real the promise of our founding:  “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

Those of us who have had the singular privilege to hold the office of the Presidency know well that progress in this country can be hard and it can be slow, frustrating and sometimes you’re stymied.  The office humbles you.  You’re reminded daily that in this great democracy, you are but a relay swimmer in the currents of history, bound by decisions made by those who came before, reliant on the efforts of those who will follow to fully vindicate your vision.

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But the presidency also affords a unique opportunity to bend those currents — by shaping our laws and by shaping our debates; by working within the confines of the world as it is, but also by reimagining the world as it should be.

This was President Johnson’s genius.  As a master of politics and the legislative process, he grasped like few others the power of government to bring about change.

LBJ was nothing if not a realist.  He was well aware that the law alone isn’t enough to change hearts and minds.  A full century after Lincoln’s time, he said, “Until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of men’s skins, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact.”

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He understood laws couldn’t accomplish everything.  But he also knew that only the law could anchor change, and set hearts and minds on a different course.  And a lot of Americans needed the law’s most basic protections at that time.  As Dr. King said at the time, “It may be true that the law can’t make a man love me but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that’s pretty important.”  (Applause.)

And passing laws was what LBJ knew how to do.  No one knew politics and no one loved legislating more than President Johnson.  He was charming when he needed to be, ruthless when required.  (Laughter.)  He could wear you down with logic and argument.  He could horse trade, and he could flatter.  “You come with me on this bill,” he would reportedly tell a key Republican leader from my home state during the fight for the Civil Rights Bill, “and 200 years from now, schoolchildren will know only two names:  Abraham Lincoln and Everett Dirksen!”  (Laughter.)  And he knew that senators would believe things like that.  (Laughter and applause.)

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President Johnson liked power.  He liked the feel of it, the wielding of it.  But that hunger was harnessed and redeemed by a deeper understanding of the human condition; by a sympathy for the underdog, for the downtrodden, for the outcast.  And it was a sympathy rooted in his own experience.

As a young boy growing up in the Texas Hill Country, Johnson knew what being poor felt like.  “Poverty was so common,” he would later say, “we didn’t even know it had a name.”  (Laughter.)  The family home didn’t have electricity or indoor plumbing.  Everybody worked hard, including the children.  President Johnson had known the metallic taste of hunger; the feel of a mother’s calloused hands, rubbed raw from washing and cleaning and holding a household together.  His cousin Ava remembered sweltering days spent on her hands and knees in the cotton fields, with Lyndon whispering beside her, “Boy, there’s got to be a better way to make a living than this.  There’s got to be a better way.”

It wasn’t until years later when he was teaching at a so-called Mexican school in a tiny town in Texas that he came to understand how much worse the persistent pain of poverty could be for other races in a Jim Crow South.  Oftentimes his students would show up to class hungry.  And when he’d visit their homes, he’d meet fathers who were paid slave wages by the farmers they worked for.  Those children were taught, he would later say, “that the end of life is in a beet row, a spinach field, or a cotton patch.”

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Deprivation and discrimination — these were not abstractions to Lyndon Baines Johnson.  He knew that poverty and injustice are as inseparable as opportunity and justice are joined.  So that was in him from an early age.

Now, like any of us, he was not a perfect man.  His experiences in rural Texas may have stretched his moral imagination, but he was ambitious, very ambitious, a young man in a hurry to plot his own escape from poverty and to chart his own political career.  And in the Jim Crow South, that meant not challenging convention.  During his first 20 years in Congress, he opposed every civil rights bill that came up for a vote, once calling the push for federal legislation “a farce and a sham.”  He was chosen as a vice presidential nominee in part because of his affinity with, and ability to deliver, that Southern white vote.  And at the beginning of the Kennedy administration, he shared with President Kennedy a caution towards racial controversy.

But marchers kept marching.  Four little girls were killed in a church.  Bloody Sunday happened.  The winds of change blew.  And when the time came, when LBJ stood in the Oval Office — I picture him standing there, taking up the entire doorframe, looking out over the South Lawn in a quiet moment — and asked himself what the true purpose of his office was for, what was the endpoint of his ambitions, he would reach back in his own memory and he’d remember his own experience with want.

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And he knew that he had a unique capacity, as the most powerful white politician from the South, to not merely challenge the convention that had crushed the dreams of so many, but to ultimately dismantle for good the structures of legal segregation.  He’s the only guy who could do it — and he knew there would be a cost, famously saying the Democratic Party may “have lost the South for a generation.”

That’s what his presidency was for.  That’s where he meets his moment.  And possessed with an iron will, possessed with those skills that he had honed so many years in Congress, pushed and supported by a movement of those willing to sacrifice everything for their own liberation, President Johnson fought for and argued and horse traded and bullied and persuaded until ultimately he signed the Civil Rights Act into law.

And he didn’t stop there — even though his advisors again told him to wait, again told him let the dust settle, let the country absorb this momentous decision.  He shook them off.  “The meat in the coconut,” as President Johnson would put it, was the Voting Rights Act, so he fought for and passed that as well.  Immigration reform came shortly after.  And then, a Fair Housing Act.  And then, a health care law that opponents described as “socialized medicine” that would curtail America’s freedom, but ultimately freed millions of seniors from the fear that illness could rob them of dignity and security in their golden years, which we now know today as Medicare.  (Applause.)

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What President Johnson understood was that equality required more than the absence of oppression.  It required the presence of economic opportunity.  He wouldn’t be as eloquent as Dr. King would be in describing that linkage, as Dr. King moved into mobilizing sanitation workers and a poor people’s movement, but he understood that connection because he had lived it.  A decent job, decent wages, health care — those, too, were civil rights worth fighting for.

An economy where hard work is rewarded and success is shared, that was his goal.  And he knew, as someone who had seen the New Deal transform the landscape of his Texas childhood, who had seen the difference electricity had made because of the Tennessee Valley Authority, the transformation concretely day in and day out in the life of his own family, he understood that government had a role to play in broadening prosperity to all those who would strive for it.

“We want to open the gates to opportunity,” President Johnson said, “But we are also going to give all our people, black and white, the help they need to walk through those gates.”

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Now, if some of this sounds familiar, it’s because today we remain locked in this same great debate about equality and opportunity, and the role of government in ensuring each.  As was true 50 years ago, there are those who dismiss the Great Society as a failed experiment and an encroachment on liberty; who argue that government has become the true source of all that ails us, and that poverty is due to the moral failings of those who suffer from it.  There are also those who argue, John, that nothing has changed; that racism is so embedded in our DNA that there is no use trying politics — the game is rigged.

But such theories ignore history.  Yes, it’s true that, despite laws like the Civil Rights Act, and the Voting Rights Act and Medicare, our society is still racked with division and poverty.  Yes, race still colors our political debates, and there have been government programs that have fallen short.  In a time when cynicism is too often passed off as wisdom, it’s perhaps easy to conclude that there are limits to change; that we are trapped by our own history; and politics is a fool’s errand, and we’d be better off if we roll back big chunks of LBJ’s legacy, or at least if we don’t put too much of our hope, invest too much of our hope in our government.

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I reject such thinking.  (Applause.)  Not just because Medicare and Medicaid have lifted millions from suffering; not just because the poverty rate in this nation would be far worse without food stamps and Head Start and all the Great Society programs that survive to this day.  I reject such cynicism because I have lived out the promise of LBJ’s efforts.  Because Michelle has lived out the legacy of those efforts.  Because my daughters have lived out the legacy of those efforts.  Because I and millions of my generation were in a position to take the baton that he handed to us.  (Applause.)

Because of the Civil Rights movement, because of the laws President Johnson signed, new doors of opportunity and education swung open for everybody — not all at once, but they swung open.  Not just blacks and whites, but also women and Latinos; and Asians and Native Americans; and gay Americans and Americans with a disability.  They swung open for you, and they swung open for me.  And that’s why I’m standing here today — because of those efforts, because of that legacy.  (Applause.)

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And that means we’ve got a debt to pay.  That means we can’t afford to be cynical.  Half a century later, the laws LBJ passed are now as fundamental to our conception of ourselves and our democracy as the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  They are foundational; an essential piece of the American character.

But we are here today because we know we cannot be complacent.  For history travels not only forwards; history can travel backwards, history can travel sideways.  And securing the gains this country has made requires the vigilance of its citizens.  Our rights, our freedoms — they are not given.  They must be won.  They must be nurtured through struggle and discipline, and persistence and faith.

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And one concern I have sometimes during these moments, the celebration of the signing of the Civil Rights Act, the March on Washington — from a distance, sometimes these commemorations seem inevitable, they seem easy.  All the pain and difficulty and struggle and doubt — all that is rubbed away.  And we look at ourselves and we say, oh, things are just too different now;  we couldn’t possibly do what was done then — these giants, what they accomplished.  And yet, they were men and women, too.  It wasn’t easy then.  It wasn’t certain then.

Still, the story of America is a story of progress.  However slow, however incomplete, however harshly challenged at each point on our journey, however flawed our leaders, however many times we have to take a quarter of a loaf or half a loaf — the story of America is a story of progress.  And that’s true because of men like President Lyndon Baines Johnson.  (Applause.)

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In so many ways, he embodied America, with all our gifts and all our flaws, in all our restlessness and all our big dreams.  This man — born into poverty, weaned in a world full of racial hatred — somehow found within himself the ability to connect his experience with the brown child in a small Texas town; the white child in Appalachia; the black child in Watts.  As powerful as he became in that Oval Office, he understood them.  He understood what it meant to be on the outside.  And he believed that their plight was his plight too; that his freedom ultimately was wrapped up in theirs; and that making their lives better was what the hell the presidency was for.  (Applause.)

And those children were on his mind when he strode to the podium that night in the House Chamber, when he called for the vote on the Civil Rights law.  “It never occurred to me,” he said, “in my fondest dreams that I might have the chance to help the sons and daughters of those students” that he had taught so many years ago, “and to help people like them all over this country.  But now I do have that chance.  And I’ll let you in on a secret — I mean to use it.  And I hope that you will use it with me.”  (Applause.)

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That was LBJ’s greatness.  That’s why we remember him.  And if there is one thing that he and this year’s anniversary should teach us, if there’s one lesson I hope that Malia and Sasha and young people everywhere learn from this day, it’s that with enough effort, and enough empathy, and enough perseverance, and enough courage, people who love their country can change it.

In his final year, President Johnson stood on this stage, racked with pain, battered by the controversies of Vietnam, looking far older than his 64 years, and he delivered what would be his final public speech.

“We have proved that great progress is possible,” he said.  “We know how much still remains to be done.  And if our efforts continue, and if our will is strong, and if our hearts are right, and if courage remains our constant companion, then, my fellow Americans, I am confident, we shall overcome.”  (Applause.)

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We shall overcome.  We, the citizens of the United States.  Like Dr. King, like Abraham Lincoln, like countless citizens who have driven this country inexorably forward, President Johnson knew that ours in the end is a story of optimism, a story of achievement and constant striving that is unique upon this Earth.  He knew because he had lived that story.  He believed that together we can build an America that is more fair, more equal, and more free than the one we inherited.  He believed we make our own destiny.  And in part because of him, we must believe it as well.

Thank you.  God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

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12:46 P.M. CDT

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When Hope And History Rhyme: President Obama Embraces Rep John Lewis

When Hope And History Rhyme: President Obama Embraces Rep John Lewis

Julian Bond hugs Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon Baines Johnson, after singing "We Shall Overcome".

Julian Bond hugs Luci Baines Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon Baines Johnson, after singing “We Shall Overcome”.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are introduced at the LBJ Library #CivilRightsSummit in Austin.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are introduced at the LBJ Library #CivilRightsSummit in Austin.

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TheObamaCrat™ Wake-Up Call For Thursday The 10th Of April, 2014.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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White House Schedule – April 10th, 2014

In the morning, the President and First Lady will depart Houston, Texas en route Austin, Texas.  The departure from George Bush Intercontinental Airport and arrival at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport are open press.

 

In Austin, the President and First Lady will attend a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. The President will deliver remarks at this event hosted by the LBJ Presidential Library. There will be out-of-town travel pool coverage of the President and First Lady’s tour of an exhibit in the museum, and the President’s remarks will be pooled for TV and open to pre-credentialed stills and correspondents.

 

Following this event, the President and First Lady will depart Austin en route Washington, DC. The departure from Austin-Bergstrom International Airport and the arrival on the South Lawn are open press.

 

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Thursday, April 10th 2014 All Times ET

10:50 AM: The President and First Lady depart Houston, Texas. Local Event Time: 9:50 AM. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
11:30 AM: The President and First Lady arrive in Austin, Texas. Local Event Time: 10:30 AM. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.
12:00 PM: The President and First Lady review an exhibit. Local Event Time: 11:00 AM. LBJ Presidential Library – Austin – Texas.
12:50 PM: The President delivers remarks at the Civil Rights Summit. Local Event Time: 11:50 AM. LBJ Auditorium.
2:25 PM: The President and First Lady depart Austin, Texas. Local Event Time: 1:25 PM. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.
5:05 PM: The President and First Lady arrive at Joint Base Andrews.
5:20 PM: The President and First Lady arrive at the White House, South Lawn.

 

 

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LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm CST
Panel: Gay Marriage: A Civil Right?

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Pathway to the American Dream: Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Music and Social Consciousness

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Conversation with Former President Jimmy Carter

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm
Panel: LBJ and MLK: Fulfilling a Promise, Realizing a Dream

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Sports: Leveling the Playing Field

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Views from the Front Line

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Address by Former President William Jefferson Clinton

 

 

 

 

Legendary sports figures weigh in at Civil Rights Summit

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

Two of the greatest athletes of all time who have both been fighting the fight for civil rights since the 60s spoke Wednesday at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit Google Hangout with President Jimmy Carter

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Former U.S. President and humanitarian Jimmy Carter will answer questions about the Civil Rights Summit as well as his new book, A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power.

The public is encouraged to ask President Carter questions in advance on Google+ via https://plus.google.com/events/cadh8u…, or using #SummitHangout on Twitter or Facebook.

http://www.civilrightssummit.org

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit 

 

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Speeches and Remarks

 

Remarks by the President at Joint DCCC/DSCC Dinner

 

Remarks by the President at Fort Hood Memorial Service

 

 

 

Statements and Releases

 

Readout of the Vice President’s Meetings on Workforce Development and Job-Driven Training

 

 

Statement by the President

Today, Senate Republicans overwhelmingly blocked the Paycheck Fairness Act – preventing it from even receiving an honest debate, let alone a simple yes-or-no vote.  The Paycheck Fairness Act is commonsense legislation that would strengthen the 1963 Equal Pay Act and reinforce our country’s commitment to the principle of equal pay for equal work.  Yesterday, I took two actions that will make it easier for working women to earn fair pay, and my Administration will continue to do everything we can to make sure that every hard-working American earns the respect and wages that they deserve on the job.  But Republicans in Congress continue to oppose serious efforts to create jobs, grow the economy, and level the playing field for working families.  That’s wrong, and it’s harmful for our national efforts to rebuild an economy that gives every American who works hard a fair shot to get ahead.

 

 

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White House LIVE!!! Streaming

 

Next Up…

 

 

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The Vice President and Dr. Biden’s Support for Community Colleges and Apprenticeship Programs

 

 

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 94th Annual Convention of the American Association of Community Colleges in Washington, D.C., April 7, 2014.

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 94th Annual Convention of the American Association of Community Colleges. (Official White House Photo by David Lienemann)

Earlier this week, Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden spoke to 1,500 educational leaders at the American Association of Community Colleges 94th Annual Convention.

 

During the speech, the Vice President recognized that community colleges provide “a trusted pathway to good jobs in the middle class,” and spoke about the importance of matching job openings with skilled workers. The Vice President highlighted the Administration’s work in making higher education more affordable through further investment in Pell Grants and capping federal student loan repayments at 10% of income.

 

Dr. Biden, a lifelong educator and community college teacher, noted that she has visited innovative workforce partnerships at community colleges around the country – and that they are critical to America’s future.

 

Stating that the “very best job training is on-the-job training,” Vice President Biden announced the launch of the Registered Apprenticeship College Consortium.

 

Apprenticeships are some of the strongest and most successful forms of job training with 87 percent of apprentices remaining employed after completing their apprenticeship programs. The Consortium will make it easier for apprentices to receive college credits for their rigorous training that can then be applied to a degree.

 

Noting that 6 out of 10 jobs in the next 10 years are going to require a degree or a certificate beyond high school, Vice President Biden talked about the need to build partnerships between community colleges and local businesses.

 

“There are going to be hundreds of thousands of job openings in industries ranging from advanced manufacturing, to health care, to information technology, to energy,” stated the Vice President.

 

“The middle class has its best shot of growing through all of you,” he said in closing. “You really are the heart of expanding opportunity for millions of Americans.”

 

If you missed the Vice President and Dr. Biden’s remarks, check out some of the coverage from the event:

 

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Biden Announces Drive to Award Credit for Apprenticeships

 

Inside Higher Ed: Apprenticeship as Degree Pathway

 

 

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the annual conference of the American Association of Community Colleges Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/04/08/biden-announces-new-consortium-promote-apprenticeships-pathway-college-degree#ixzz2yUjfKqn6  Inside Higher Ed

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the annual conference of the American Association of Community Colleges
Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/04/08/biden-announces-new-consortium-promote-apprenticeships-pathway-college-degree#ixzz2yUjfKqn6
Inside Higher Ed

 

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Eric Holder Snaps at Louie Gohmert ‘Don’t Go There, Buddy!’

 

 

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In Case You Missed It: Fort Hood Memorial Service. LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Memorial Service at Fort Hood – April 9th 2014

 

 

 

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

 

President Obama at Fort Hood: “It Is Love, Tested by Tragedy, That Brings Us Together Again.”

 

Today, the President and First Lady traveled to Killeen, Texas to attend a memorial ceremony at the Fort Hood Military Base, remembering those who lost their lives in last week’s tragic shooting at the base.

During his remarks at the memorial, the President explained that we must honor their lives “not in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.”

 

We must honor these men with a renewed commitment to keep our troops safe, not just in battle but on the home front, as well. In our open society, and at vast bases like this, we can never eliminate every risk. But as a nation, we can do more to help counsel those with mental health issues, to keep firearms out of the hands of those who are having such deep difficulties. As a military, we must continue to do everything in our power to secure our facilities and spare others this pain.

We must honor these men by doing more to care for our fellow Americans living with mental illness, civilian and military. Today, four American soldiers are gone. Four Army families are devastated. As Commander-in-Chief, I’m determined that we will continue to step up our efforts — to reach our troops and veterans who are hurting, to deliver to them the care that they need, and to make sure we never stigmatize those who have the courage to seek help.

And finally, we must honor these men by recognizing that they were members of a generation that has borne the burden of our security in more than a decade of war. Now our troops are coming home, and by the end of this year our war in Afghanistan will finally be over.

Read the President’s full remarks here.

 

 

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President Obama Speaks at a Memorial Service for Victims of the Shooting at Fort Hood

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

President Obama says that we must honor the lives of those killed in the tragedy at Fort Hood “not in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.” April 9, 2014.

 

 

 

 

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President and Mrs. Obama at today's Fort Hood memorial ceremony

President and Mrs. Obama at today’s Fort Hood memorial ceremony

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President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

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Meeting of the President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

The President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking, which was established to coordinate federal efforts to combat trafficking in persons, holds its annual meeting at the White House. April 8, 2014.

 

 

 

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LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm CST
Panel: Gay Marriage: A Civil Right?

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Pathway to the American Dream: Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Music and Social Consciousness

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Conversation with Former President Jimmy Carter

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm
Panel: LBJ and MLK: Fulfilling a Promise, Realizing a Dream

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Sports: Leveling the Playing Field

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Views from the Front Line

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Address by Former President William Jefferson Clinton

 

 

 

 

Legendary sports figures weigh in at Civil Rights Summit

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

Two of the greatest athletes of all time who have both been fighting the fight for civil rights since the 60s spoke Wednesday at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit Google Hangout with President Jimmy Carter

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Former U.S. President and humanitarian Jimmy Carter will answer questions about the Civil Rights Summit as well as his new book, A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power.

The public is encouraged to ask President Carter questions in advance on Google+ via https://plus.google.com/events/cadh8u…, or using #SummitHangout on Twitter or Facebook.

http://www.civilrightssummit.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit 

 

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President Barack Hussein Obama At The Fort Hood Memorial Service.


 

By Jueseppi B.

President Barack Obama speaks at a memorial for victims of last week's shooting on the U.S. Army post at Fort Hood military base on April 9, 2014 in Kileen, Texas. During the shooting rampage on April 2, Army Spc. Ivan Lopez killed three people and wounded 16 others before taking his own life. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama speaks at a memorial for victims of last week’s shooting on the U.S. Army post at Fort Hood military base on April 9, 2014 in Kileen, Texas. During the shooting rampage on April 2, Army Spc. Ivan Lopez killed three people and wounded 16 others before taking his own life. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

 

Remarks by the President at Fort Hood Memorial Service

 

 

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President Obama: “We must honor these men by doing more to care for our fellow Americans living with mental illness, civilian and military.”

 

 

President Obama honors soldiers killed at Fort Hood shooting

 

 

President and Mrs. Obama at today's Fort Hood memorial ceremony

President and Mrs. Obama at today’s Fort Hood memorial ceremony

 

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

President Obama spoke at a memorial service for soldiers killed last week at the Fort Hood Army post in Texas. It comes almost five years after a similar tragedy took place at the base.

 

 

 

Remarks by the President at Fort Hood Memorial Service

 

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Fort Hood
Killeen, Texas

2:06 P.M. CDT

 

THE PRESIDENT:  In our lives — in our joys and in our sorrows — we’ve learned that there is “a time for every matter under heaven.”  We laugh and we weep.  We celebrate and we mourn.  We serve in war and we pray for peace.  But Scripture also teaches that, alongside the temporal, one thing is eternal. “Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.  Love never ends.”

 

Deputy Secretary Fox; General Dempsey; Secretary McHugh; Generals Odierno and Milley; and most of all, the families of the soldiers who have been taken from us; the wounded — those who have returned to duty and those still recovering; and the entire community of Fort Hood, this “Great Place”:  It is love, tested by tragedy, that brings us together again.

 

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It was love for country that inspired these three Americans to put on the uniform and join the greatest Army that the world has ever known.  Sergeant First Class Daniel Ferguson.  Staff Sergeant Carlos Lazaney-Rodriguez.  Sergeant Timothy Owens.

 

And Danny and Carlos joined two decades ago, in a time of peace, and stayed as the nation went to war.  Timothy joined after 9/11, knowing he could be sent into harm’s way.  Between them, they deployed nine times.  Each served in Iraq.  Danny came home from Afghanistan just last year.  They lived those shining values — loyalty, duty, honor — that keep us strong and free.

 

It was love for the Army that made them the soldiers they were.  For Danny, said his fiancée, being in the Army “was his life.”  Carlos, said a friend, was “the epitome of what you would want a leader to be in the Army.”  Timothy helped counsel his fellow soldiers.  Said a friend, “He was always the person you could go talk to.”

 

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And it was love for their comrades, for all of you, that defined their last moments.  As we’ve heard, when the gunman tried to push his way into that room, Danny held the door shut, saving the lives of others while sacrificing his own.  And it’s said that Timothy — the counselor, even then — gave his life, walking toward the gunman, trying to calm him down.

 

For you, their families, no words are equal to your loss.  We are here on behalf of the American people to honor your loved ones and to offer whatever comfort we can.  But know this:  We also draw strength from you.  For even in your grief, even as your heart breaks, we see in you that eternal truth: “Love never ends.”

 

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To the parents of these men — as a father, I cannot begin to fathom your anguish.  But I know that you poured your love and your hopes into your sons.  I know that the men and soldiers they became — their sense of service and their patriotism — so much of that came from you.  You gave your sons to America, and just as you will honor them always, so, too, will the nation that they served.

 

To the loves of their lives — Timothy’s wife Billy and Danny’s fiancée Kristen — these soldiers cherished the Army, but their hearts belonged to you.  And that’s a bond that no earthly power can ever break.  They have slipped from your embrace, but know that you will never be alone.  Because this Army and this nation stands with you for all the days to come.

 

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To their children — we live in a dangerous world, and your fathers served to keep you safe and us safe.  They knew you have so much to give our country; that you’d make them proud.  Timothy’s daughter Lori already has.  Last Wednesday night, she posted this message online: “I just want everyone to think for a moment.”  Love your family, she said, “because you never know when [they’re] gonna be taken from you.  I love you, daddy.”

 

And to the men and women of Fort Hood — as has already been mentioned, part of what makes this so painful is that we have been here before.  This tragedy tears at wounds still raw from five years ago.  Once more, soldiers who survived foreign warzones were struck down here at home, where they’re supposed to be safe.  We still do not yet know exactly why, but we do know this:  We must honor their lives, not “in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.”

 

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We must honor these men with a renewed commitment to keep our troops safe, not just in battle but on the home front, as well.  In our open society, and at vast bases like this, we can never eliminate every risk.  But as a nation, we can do more to help counsel those with mental health issues, to keep firearms out of the hands of those who are having such deep difficulties.  As a military, we must continue to do everything in our power to secure our facilities and spare others this pain.

 

We must honor these men by doing more to care for our fellow Americans living with mental illness, civilian and military.  Today, four American soldiers are gone.  Four Army families are devastated.  As Commander-in-Chief, I’m determined that we will continue to step up our efforts — to reach our troops and veterans who are hurting, to deliver to them the care that they need, and to make sure we never stigmatize those who have the courage to seek help.

 

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And finally, we must honor these men by recognizing that they were members of a generation that has borne the burden of our security in more than a decade of war.  Now our troops are coming home, and by the end of this year our war in Afghanistan will finally be over.

 

In an era when fewer Americans know someone in uniform, every American must see these men and these women — our 9/11 Generation — as the extraordinary citizens that they are.  They love their families.  They excel at their jobs.  They serve their communities.  They are leaders.  And when we truly welcome our veterans home, when we show them that we need them — not just to fight in other countries, but to build up our own — then our schools and our businesses, our communities and our nation will be more successful, and America will be stronger and more united for decades to come.

 

Sergeant First Class Daniel Ferguson.  Staff Sergeant Carlos Lazaney-Rodriguez.  Sergeant Timothy Owens.  Like the 576 Fort Hood soldiers who have given their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan, they were taken from us much too soon.  Like the 13 Americans we lost five years ago, their passing shakes our soul.  And in moments such as this, we summon once more what we’ve learned in these hard years of war.  We reach within our wounded hearts.  We lean on each other.  We hold each other up.  We carry on.  And with God’s amazing grace, we somehow bear what seems unbearable.

 

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

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“Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.  Love never ends.”  May God watch over these American soldiers, may He keep strong their families whose love endures, and may God continue to bless the United States of America with patriots such as these.

 

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

 

END
2:18 P.M. CDT

 

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding the Marine One helicopter.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding the Marine One helicopter.

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

 

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TheObamaCrat™ Wake-Up Call For HuMpDaY The 9th Of April, 2014. Fort Hood Memorial. Houston


 

By Jueseppi B.

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White House Schedule – April 9th, 2014

 

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle fly to Texas on Wednesday  to attend a memorial for the victims of the latest shooting in Fort Hood. Later, they head to Houston for fundraisers to benefit the House and Senate campaign operations.

 

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 9th, 2014

 

DAILY GUIDANCE AND SCHEDULE FOR
WEDNESDAY, April 9th, 2014

 

 

In the morning, the President and First Lady will travel to Killeen, Texas. The departure from the South Lawn and arrival at Robert Gray Army Airfield are open press.

 

In Killeen, the President and First Lady will attend a memorial ceremony on Fort Hood.  The President will deliver remarks paying tribute to the victims of the tragedy that occurred on April 2.  The ceremony is pooled for TV and open to limited, pre-credentialed stills and correspondents.

 

Following this event, the President and First Lady will depart Killeen en route Houston, Texas. The departure from Robert Gray Army Airfield and the arrival at George Bush Intercontinental Airport are open press.

 

While in Houston, the President will attend a DNC event. Following this, the President will deliver remarks and answer questions at a joint DCCC/DSCC dinner. The first event is closed press, and the dinner is open to the print pool for remarks only.

 

The President and First Lady will remain overnight in Houston.

 

 

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Wednesday, April 9th 2014 All Times ET

 

 

9:05 AM: The President and First Lady depart the White House, South Lawn.

 

9:20 AM: The President and First Lady depart Joint Base Andrews.

 

12:30 PM: The President and First Lady arrive in Killeen, Texas. Local Event Time: 11:30 AM. Robert Gray Army Airfield.

 

3:00 PM: The President and First Lady attend a memorial ceremony, Local Event Time: 2:00 PM. Fort Hood, Sadowski Field.

 

5:20 PM: The President and First Lady arrive in Houston, Texas. Local Event Time: 4:20 PM. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

 

6:00 PM: The President attends a DNC event. Local Event Time: 5:00 PM. Private Residence’

 

8:20 PM: The President delivers remarks and answers questions at a joint DCCC/DSCC dinner. Local Event Time: 7:20 PM. Private Residence.

 

The President and First Lady will remain overnight in Houston.

 

 

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Barack Hussein Obama Week Ahead Schedule, April 9th, To 11th, 2014

 

On Wednesday, the President and the First Lady will travel to Houston, TX. The President will attend DCCC and DSCC events.  More details regarding the President and First Lady’s travel to Houston will be forthcoming.

 

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will attend Wednesday’s memorial service for the victims of last week’s shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, a top White House official announced.

 

Obama vowed after the shootings that “We’re going to get to the bottom of exactly what happened” at Fort Hood, where three soldiers were killed and 16 wounded Wednesday afternoon by a soldier who then took his own life. Investigators have identified the killer as Spc. Ivan Lopez, a 34-year-old Iraq war veteran with a history of depression and anxiety.

White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer confirmed the trip Sunday morning during an appearance on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” Obama also addressed the memorial service for an earlier massacre at Fort Hood, in 2009.

 

On Thursday, the President and the First Lady will travel to the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library in Austin, TX.  The President will deliver remarks at a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. The President and the First Lady will return to Washington, DC, in the afternoon.

 

On Friday, the President will travel to New York, NY to deliver remarks at the National Action Network’s 16th Annual Convention.

 

 

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White House LIVE!!! Streaming

 

Next Up…

 

Fort Hood TexasWhite House LIVE!!! Streaming

 

 

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Press Briefing

4/8/14: White House Press Briefing

 

Published on Apr 8, 2014

White House Press Briefings are conducted most weekdays from the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing.

 

 

 

 

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President Obama Speaks on Equal Pay for Equal Work

 

Published on Apr 8, 2014

Following an introduction by Lilly Ledbetter, President Obama announces two new executive actions to strength

 

 

 

 

Raw: Hagel Tours Forbidden City Amid Dispute

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

During a trip to China, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel toured Beijing’s Forbidden City, Wednesday, a day after he and his Chinese counterpart squared off over territorial disputes in the East China Sea. (April 9)

 

 

 

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk from the White House before boarding the Marine One helicopter, for a short trip to Andrews Air Force base, Md., then onto Fort Hood, Texas for a memorial service in honor of those who died.

 

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding the Marine One helicopter.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding the Marine One helicopter.

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

 

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breakingnews

 

 

PENNSYLVANIA School Stabbing.

 

As many as 20 people were injured Wednesday morning at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, where a student began stabbing people just before the start of the school day, according to Westmoreland County emergency management…Not all 20 of the injured people were actually stabbed, Stevens said. Some of the injuries were described as cuts and scrapes. Several police cars and ambulances are at the high school. Three medical helicopters are also there. A student reported that someone came into the school with a knife and started slashing people, including some of his friends. That information has not been confirmed by police.

 

 

BREAKING: 20 Stabbed at Franklin Regional High School Pennsylvania

 

MASS STABBING: As many as 20 injured in stabbings at Pennsylvania school, 1 arrested.
MURRYSVILLE, Pa. (AP) – April 9, 2014 (WPVI) — As many as 20 people may be injured after a stabbing incident at a high school near Pittsburgh Wednesday morning, WTAE reports.

 

Dan Stevens, the spokesman for Westmoreland County emergency management, says a suspect has been taken into custody at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville. That’s about 15 miles east of Pittsburgh.

 

 

 

 

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