The Last 24™


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The President’s Last 24™

 

The President Makes a Statement on the Situation in Iraq

 

 

Today, after a meeting with his national security team, President Obama delivered a statement from the White House Press Briefing Room on the situation in Iraq and the U.S. response, in the wake of the terrorist organization ISIL making advances inside Iraq. Watch his remarks below:

 

Obama: No combat for U.S. troops in Iraq

 

 

 

President Obama Speaks on the Situation in Iraq

 

 

The President made clear that he has “no greater priority than the safety of our men and women serving overseas,” which is why he is taking steps to relocate some of our embassy personnel, and also sending reinforcements to better secure American facilities.

 

He noted that the U.S. has significantly increased intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets in order to get a better picture of what’s happening in Iraq. “This will give us a greater understanding of what ISIL is doing, where it’s located, and how we might support efforts to counter this threat,” he said.

 

The President also said that the U.S. will keep increasing our support to Iraqi security forces, reiterating that U.S. forces “will not be returning to combat in Iraq, but we will help Iraqis as they take the fight to terrorists who threaten the Iraqi people.”

 

The President emphasized that “the best and most effective response to a threat like ISIL will ultimately involve partnerships where local forces, like Iraqis, take the lead.”

 

Read the President’s full statement here.

 

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The President’s Export Council Meeting

 

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Remarks by the President at Export Council Meeting

 

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Eisenhower Executive Office Building

10:30 A.M. EDT

 

President Obama Joins a Meeting of the President’s Export Council

 

 

THE PRESIDENT:  I just wanted to say thank you to all of you who are here.  Some of you have been serving on our Export Council for quite some time.  Some of you are here as new additions, but all of you have been extraordinarily successful in your various fields.  And it gives us an enormous opportunity to hear from you in very concrete terms about how we can advance not just America’s export agenda, but how we can build the kind of economic future that we want for our kids and our grandkids.

 

For the last 51 months, we have created jobs here in the United States — 9.4 million jobs in all.  But we’re going to have to create more.  And one of the best ways to do it is to boost American manufacturing and American exports.  That’s why since I came into office we have been promoting American products and businesses when I travel overseas.  It’s why we created the President’s Export Council in 2010.  There are some of the most iconic companies in the world — Boeing being an example, Xerox being another one.

 

And with your help, exports have driven one-third of the economic growth in our recovery and now support over 11 million U.S. jobs.  Last year, we exported $2.3 trillion in goods and services, which was an all-time high.  And business executives around the globe say that the United States is the best place to locate, the best place to invest, and the best place to hire.  And that’s the first time that they’ve said that, that we are number one when it comes to their desirable location to invest.  This is the first time they’ve said that in over a decade.

 

So the “Made in America” brand is stronger than ever.  And as we saw yesterday at the first White House Maker Faire — I was out there watching these 22-year-olds coming up with incredible things — it is going to be a remarkable future that we have to look ahead to.  Because in many ways, manufacturing is becoming easier, some of the barriers to entry are lowering.  It gives inventors and entrepreneurs the opportunity to create new products and services in ways that we can’t even imagine.  And we want to make sure that all those trends accelerate here in the United States.

 

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So this is a moment of opportunity.  We’ve got a chance to extend our competitive advantage in the world.  That’s what this meeting is about.  One thing I want to focus on today is opening up even more new markets to “Made in America” products.  We’re working very hard to finalize trade agreements with our partners in Europe and in Asia that will make us the center of a free trade hub covering two-thirds of the world economy.  And Mr. Michael Froman has been putting in a lot of miles trying to make sure that that happens.  And I know he’s consulted with some of you — not just big companies, but a lot of small- and medium-sized businesses who have enormous opportunities if we’re able to open up these markets, and oftentimes are the ones that have the hardest time navigating through some of the barriers that are out there.

 

I especially want to increase trade and investment in the region.  And this is going to be one of the issues we discuss in August.  There has been some explosive growth in certain parts of the world where we’re just not doing enough, Africa as being a prime example.  You’ve got six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in Africa, a young population that is growing rapidly.  Some of these economies are doing very, very well, but we’re not penetrating those markets as well as we should.

 

And I think we’ve got a great opportunity in August with an African Leaders Summit that’s going to be taking place for us to talk about trade and commerce, because that’s really what that continent is interested in.  They’re not interested in aid as much as they are trade, development, and partnering with the private sector.

 

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And as your businesses know well, when we export products overseas, we’re creating jobs and opportunities here at home.  That’s the focus here today and every day of my presidency — how do we create thriving businesses that are also able to create great jobs that allow people not just to stay in the middle class, but to work their way into the middle class if they work hard and take responsibility.  And all of you have done that.

 

This council is doing great work.  And with that, I’m going to turn it back over to Jay to hear about some of the ideas that you’ve come up with and how we can help advance this agenda.

 

END
10:35 A.M. EDT

 

President’s Export Council Meeting Full Meeting

 

 

 

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Our hopes for a more peaceful and just world depend on respect for the rights and dignity of all people. It is for this reason that our foreign policy champions human rights and opposes violence and discrimination that targets people because of who they are and whom they love. President Obama’s groundbreaking Presidential Memorandum of December 6, 2011 reflected this commitment by directing the federal government to ensure that U.S. diplomacy and foreign assistance promote and protect the human rights of LGBT people abroad.

 

We have seen extraordinary advances for LGBT rights in the United States and in many countries around the world. But some governments have challenged this progress, with results that not only endanger local LGBT communities, but also pose a setback for all those around the world who share a commitment to freedom, justice, and equal rights.

 

The Government of Uganda’s enactment of the “Anti-Homosexuality Act” is precisely such a step in the wrong direction. As President Obama made clear in February, the enactment of the AHA is more than an affront to the LGBT community in Uganda — it calls into question the Government of Uganda’s commitment to protecting the human rights of all its people, and complicates our bilateral relationship.

 

After thorough consideration, the U.S. government is taking a number of actions to underscore the critical importance we place on human rights and fighting against discrimination, protecting vulnerable populations, respecting freedom of expression and association, and advancing inclusive governance.

 

In particular:

  • Restricting entry to the United States. We want human rights abusers, worldwide, to know their misdeeds are not unnoticed and would-be human rights abusers to understand that there are consequences for engaging in such actions. The State Department is therefore taking steps consistent with its current authorities (including Presidential Proclamation 8697) to restrict the entry into the United States of specific Ugandan individuals involved in serious violations or abuses of human rights, including those determined to have committed such violations or abuses against LGBT individuals. While we will not identify the individuals whom we have watch-listed in line with confidentiality requirements, this step makes clear our commitment to sanctioning individuals determined to have perpetrated human rights abuses or who are responsible for such acts in the future. In addition, the United States will also take steps consistent with current authorities to restrict entry into the United States by Ugandans who are found responsible for significant public corruption.
  • Ceasing support for Uganda’s community policing program. We are very concerned about the extent to which the Ugandan police may be involved in abusive activities undertaken in the name of implementing the AHA. These concerns relate to the April 3 raid on a U.S.-funded public health program at Makerere University, as well as credible reports of individuals detained and abused while in police custody. Therefore, even as we continue to press the police at every level to fulfill their responsibility to protect all Ugandans, we will also be discontinuing a $2.4 million program in support for the Uganda Police Force community-policing program.
  • Redirecting certain financial support for the Ministry of Health (MOH) to other partners. We remain steadfast in our commitment to supporting the health needs of the Ugandan people, but we seek to invest in partners and programs that share our commitment to equal access and our evidence-based approach to medicine and science. We are accordingly shifting a portion of our financial support for MOH salaries, travel expenses, and other items to health-related activities being undertaken by non-governmental partners in Uganda. These modifications will focus on MOH central headquarters staff in order to avoid negatively affecting health care workers and direct service providers in Uganda.
  • Relocating funds for a planned public health institute and other measures relating to health programming. For similar reasons, we are relocating to another African country the planned establishment of a National Public Health Institute, for which we would have provided approximately $3 million in funding. We have also relocated a National Institutes of Health genomics meeting from Uganda to South Africa.
  • Cancelling a military aviation exercise. We have also cancelled plans to conduct the Department of Defense’s Africa Partnership Flight exercise in Uganda. This was intended to be a United States African Command (AFRICOM)-sponsored aviation exercise with other East African partners.

 

These steps are in addition to the measures that we announced in March. Among other things, we took steps at that time to redirect funding away from program implementers whose actions called into question their willingness to serve all people in need, to shift certain military and intelligence engagements to other locations, and to suspend certain near-term invitational travel for Ugandan military and police officials.

 

In taking the measures that we have described, the U.S. government is mindful of the wide range of issues encompassed by our relationship with Uganda — including our development and humanitarian support for the Ugandan people, our efforts to counter the murderous Lord’s Resistance Army, and a partnership that advances our security interests in the region. We will seek to advance these interests while also working with both governmental and non-governmental partners to end discrimination against LGBT people in Uganda and around the world — a struggle central to the United States’ commitment to promoting human rights.

 

Uganda’s New Gay Death Penalty Bill

 

 

 

A gay Ugandan’s fears of persecution under new anti-homosexuality bill 

 

 

 

Statement by NSC Spokesperson Caitlin Hayden on the Response to Uganda’s Enactment of the Anti-Homosexuality Act

As President Obama has stated, the Government of Uganda’s enactment of the Anti-Homosexuality Act (AHA) runs counter to universal human rights and complicates our bilateral relationship. We announced in April a series of initial responses, and we have since considered how further to reinforce our support for human rights of all Ugandans, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

 

Today, we are announcing several additional steps. Specifically, the Department of State is taking measures to prevent entry into the United States by certain Ugandan officials involved in serious human rights abuses, including against LGBT individuals. In addition, the United States will take steps, consistent with current authorities, to prevent entry into the United States by Ugandans who are found responsible for significant public corruption.  We are also discontinuing or redirecting funds for certain additional programs involving the Ugandan Police Force, Ministry of Health, and National Public Health Institute, and cancelling plans to hold a U.S. military-sponsored aviation exercise in Uganda.

 

None of these steps diminishes our commitment to providing development and humanitarian support for the Ugandan people, or our partnership with the Ugandan government to counter the murderous Lord’s Resistance Army and improve security in Africa. We will seek to advance these interests even as we continue—in Uganda and around the world—to oppose discriminatory practices and champion human rights for all.

 

 

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Statement by the President on the Observance of Juneteenth

On this day in 1865 – more than two years after President Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation – word finally reached Galveston, Texas that the slaves there were free.

 

Juneteenth marked an important moment in the life of our nation.  But it was only the beginning of a long and difficult struggle for equal rights and equal treatment under the law.  This year, as we also mark the 50th Anniversary of Freedom Summer, we honor those who continued to fight for equality and opportunity for Americans of every race and every background.  And we recommit ourselves to the unending work of perfecting our Union.

 

15 Facts We Bet You Didn’t Know About Juneteenth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The President Awards the Medal of Honor to Corporal William “Kyle” Carpenter

 

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Remarks by the President at Presentation of The Medal of Honor to Corporal William Kyle Carpenter

 

 

East Room

2:33 P.M. EDT

 

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you, everybody.  Please be seated.  On behalf of Michelle and myself, welcome to the White House.

 

The man you see before you today, Corporal William Kyle Carpenter, should not be alive today.  Hand grenades are one of the most awful weapons of war.  They only weigh about a pound, but they’re packed with TNT.  If one lands nearby, you have mere seconds to seek cover.  When it detonates, its fragments shoot out in every direction.  And even at a distance, that spray of shrapnel can inflict devastating injuries on the human body.  Up close, it’s almost certain death.

 

But we are here because this man, this United States Marine, faced down that terrible explosive power, that unforgiving force, with his own body — willingly and deliberately — to protect a fellow Marine.  When that grenade exploded, Kyle Carpenter’s body took the brunt of the blast.  His injuries were called “catastrophic.”  It seemed as if he was going to die.  While being treated, he went into cardiac arrest, and three times, he flatlined.  Three times, doctors brought him back.

 

Along with his parents, who call Kyle’s survival “our miracle,” we thank God they did.  Because with that singular act of courage, Kyle, you not only saved your brother in arms, you displayed a heroism in the blink of an eye that will inspire for generations valor worthy of our nation’s highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor.

 

Now, Kyle and I have actually met before.  During his long recovery at Walter Reed, he and some of our other wounded warriors came to the White House to celebrate the World Series champion, the St. Louis Cardinals.  Some of you might be aware, I am a White Sox fan.  (Laughter.)  Kyle likes the Braves.  So it was a tough day for both of us.  (Laughter.)

 

But after the ceremony, Michelle and I had the chance to meet Kyle.  And at the time, he was still undergoing surgeries.  But he was up and he was walking, and he was working his way toward being independent again, towards the man you see here today.  And, Kyle, the main message we want to send is, welcome back.  We are so proud to have you here.

 

Read More

 

Marine who took grenade hit receives Medal of Honor

 

 

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“We Stand In Awe Of Your Service”: President Obama Makes A Surprise Trip To Thank Troops In Afghanistan.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Slide Show:President Barack Obama Visits U.S. Troops in Afghanistan

 

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“We Stand in Awe of Your Service”: President Obama Makes a Surprise Trip to Thank Troops in Afghanistan

Lindsay Holst
Lindsay Holst

May 25, 2014
02:43 PM EDT

President Obama made a surprise visit to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan today to thank the American troops and civilians stationed there for their service.

 

Following an opening performance by Brad Paisley, the President addressed about 3,000 troops in a hangar on the base.

 

He let them know that he was there “on a single mission” — and that was to say thank you.

 

“I thank you as your Commander-in-Chief because you inspire me,” the President said. “Your willingness to serve, to step forward at a time of war, and say ‘send me,’ is the reason the United States stays strong and free. Of all the honors that I have serving as President, nothing matches serving as your Commander-in-Chief.”

“I thank you as your Commander-in-Chief because you inspire me,” the President said. “Your willingness to serve, to step forward at a time of war, and say ‘send me,’ is the reason the United States stays strong and free. Of all the honors that I have serving as President, nothing matches serving as your Commander-in-Chief.”

 

The President went on to say that, after more than a decade of war, we’re at a “pivotal moment” in Afghanistan.

Last year marked a major milestone — for the first time, Afghan forces took the lead to secure their own country. And today, you’re in a support role — helping to train and assist Afghan forces. For many of you, this will be your last tour in Afghanistan. And by the end of this year, the transition will be complete and Afghans will take full responsibility for their security, and our combat mission will be over. America’s war in Afghanistan will come to a responsible end.

 

The President also noted that our progress in Afghanistan has come “at a heavy price.”

Tomorrow is Memorial Day. At bases here in Afghanistan and towns across America, we will pause and we’ll pay tribute to all those who’ve laid down their lives for our freedom. And that includes nearly 2,200 American patriots who made the ultimate sacrifice, that last, full measure of devotion, right here in Afghanistan. I know you’ve stood in front of those battle crosses. I know many of you carry the memories of your fallen comrades in your heart today. We will honor every single one of them — not just tomorrow, but forever.

 

In closing, the President described how, in spite of all our country has been though, “our flag is still there.”

… Our flag is still there because when our nation was attacked, a generation — this generation, the 9/11 Generation — stepped up and said “send me.”  Our flag is still there because you’ve served with honor in dusty villages and city streets, and in rugged bases and remote outposts, in Helmand and Kandahar, and Khost and Kunar and Paktika and Nuristan. Our flag is still there because through this long war you never wavered in your belief that people deserve to live free from fear — over here and back home. Our flag will always be there, because the freedom and liberty it represents to the world will always be defended by patriots like you.

Following his remarks, the President also visited with wounded troops in the military hospital at Bagram Air Base.

 

Read the President’s full remarks here.

 

President Barack Obama participates in a rally for American troops at Bagram Airfield in Bagram, Afghanistan

President Barack Obama participates in a rally for American troops at Bagram Airfield in Bagram, Afghanistan. May 25, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

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Memorial Day.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Memorial Day is a US federal holiday wherein the men and women who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces are remembered. The holiday, which is celebrated every year on the final Monday of May, was formerly known as Decoration Day and originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. By the 20th century, Memorial Day had been extended to honor all Americans who have died while in the military service. It typically marks the start of the summer vacation season, while Labor Day marks its end.

Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries.

Annual Decoration Days for particular cemeteries are held on a Sunday in late spring or early summer in some rural areas of the American South, notably in the mountains. In cases involving a family graveyard where remote ancestors as well as those who were deceased more recently are buried, this may take on the character of an extended family reunion to which some people travel hundreds of miles. People gather on the designated day and put flowers on graves and renew contacts with kinfolk and others. There often is a religious service and a “dinner on the ground,” the traditional term for a potluck meal in which people used to spread the dishes out on sheets or tablecloths on the grass. It is believed that this practice began before the American Civil War and thus may reflect the real origin of the “memorial day” idea.

Memorial Day is not to be confused with Veterans Day; Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving, while Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans.

 

Wes Moore: How to talk to veterans about the war

 

Published on May 23, 2014

Wes Moore joined the US Army to pay for college, but the experience became core to who he is. In this heartfelt talk, the paratrooper and captain—who went on to write “The Other Wes Moore”—explains the shock of returning home from Afghanistan. He shares the single phrase he heard from civilians on repeat, and shows why it’s just not sufficient. It’s a call for all of us to ask veterans to tell their stories — and listen.

 

 

 

Memorial Day
Graves at Arlington on Memorial Day.JPG

The gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery
are decorated by U.S. flags on Memorial Day
weekend.
Observed by United States
Type National
Observances Remembrance of American

war dead

Date Last Monday in May
2013 date May 27
2014 date May 26
2015 date May 25
2016 date May 30
Frequency annual

 

 

History of the holiday

The practice of decorating soldiers’ graves with flowers is an ancient custom. Soldiers’ graves were decorated in the U.S. before and during the American Civil War. A claim was made in 1906 that the first Civil War soldier’s grave ever decorated was in Warrenton, Virginia, on June 3, 1861, implying the first Memorial Day occurred there. Though not for Union soldiers, there is authentic documentation that women in Savannah, Georgia, decorated Confederate soldiers’ graves in 1862. In 1863, the cemetery dedication at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was a ceremony of commemoration at the graves of dead soldiers. Local historians in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, claim that ladies there decorated soldiers’ graves on July 4, 1864. As a result, Boalsburg promotes itself as the birthplace of Memorial Day.

Following President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865, there were a variety of events of commemoration. The sheer number of soldiers of both sides who died in the Civil War, more than 600,000, meant that burial and memorialization took on new cultural significance. Under the leadership of women during the war, an increasingly formal practice of decorating graves had taken shape. In 1865, the federal government began creating national military cemeteries for the Union war dead.

The first widely publicized observance of a Memorial Day-type observance after the Civil War was in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 1, 1865. During the war, Union soldiers who were prisoners of war had been held at the Charleston Race Course; at least 257 Union prisoners died there and were hastily buried in unmarked graves. Together with teachers and missionaries, black residents of Charleston organized a May Day ceremony in 1865, which was covered by the New York Tribune and other national papers.

The freedmen cleaned up and landscaped the burial ground, building an enclosure and an arch labeled, “Martyrs of the Race Course.” Nearly ten thousand people, mostly freedmen, gathered on May 1 to commemorate the war dead. Involved were about 3,000 school children newly enrolled in freedmen’s schools, mutual aid societies, Union troops, black ministers, and white northern missionaries. Most brought flowers to lay on the burial field. Today the site is used as Hampton Park. Years later, the celebration would come to be called the “First Decoration Day” in the North.

David W. Blight described the day:

“This was the first Memorial Day. African Americans invented Memorial Day in Charleston, South Carolina. What you have there is black Americans recently freed from slavery announcing to the world with their flowers, their feet, and their songs what the war had been about. What they basically were creating was the Independence Day of a Second American Revolution.”However, Blight stated he “has no evidence” that this event in Charleston inspired the establishment of Memorial Day across the country.

However, Blight stated he “has no evidence” that this event in Charleston inspired the establishment of Memorial Day across the country.

On May 26, 1966, President Johnson signed a presidential proclamation naming Waterloo, New York, as the birthplace of Memorial Day. Earlier, the 89th Congress adopted House Concurrent Resolution 587, which officially recognized that the patriotic tradition of observing Memorial Day began one hundred years prior in Waterloo, New York. According to legend, in the summer of 1865 a local druggist Henry Welles, while talking to friends, suggested that it might be good to remember those soldiers who did not make it home from the Civil War.

Not much came of it until he mentioned it to General John B. Murray, a Civil War hero, who gathered support from other surviving veterans. On May 5, 1866, they marched to the three local cemeteries and decorated the graves of fallen soldiers. It is believed that Murray, who knew General Logan, told Logan about the observance and that led to Logan issuing Logan’s Order in 1868 calling for a national observance.

 

The Tomb of the Unknowns located in Arlington National Cemetery

The Tomb of the Unknowns located in Arlington National Cemetery

Confederate Memorial Monument in Montgomery, Alabama

Confederate Memorial Monument in Montgomery, Alabama

Soldiers National Monument at the center of Gettysburg National Cemetery

Soldiers National Monument at the center of Gettysburg National Cemetery

 

Name and date

The preferred name for the holiday gradually changed from “Decoration Day” to “Memorial Day”, which was first used in 1882. It did not become more common until after World War II, and was not declared the official name by Federal law until 1967. On June 28, 1968, the Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to a specified Monday in order to create a convenient three-day weekend. The change moved Memorial Day from its traditional May 30 date to the last Monday in May. The law took effect at the federal level in 1971. After some initial confusion and unwillingness to comply, all 50 states adopted Congress’ change of date within a few years.

Memorial Day endures as a holiday which most businesses observe because it marks the unofficial beginning of summer. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) and Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) advocate returning to the original date, although the significance of the date is tenuous. The VFW stated in a 2002 Memorial Day Address:

Changing the date merely to create three-day weekends has undermined the very meaning of the day. No doubt, this has contributed a lot to the general public’s nonchalant observance of Memorial Day.

 

Starting in 1987 Hawaii‘s Senator Daniel Inouye, a World War II veteran, introduced a measure to return Memorial Day to its traditional date. Inouye continued introducing the resolution until his death in 2012.

 

 

Traditional observance

On Memorial Day, the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day

 

The half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who gave their lives in service of their country. At noon, their memory is raised by the living, who resolve not to let their sacrifice be in vain, but to rise up in their stead and continue the fight for liberty and justice for all.

The National Memorial Day Concert takes place on the west lawn of the United States Capitol. The concert is broadcast on PBS and NPR. Music is performed, and respect is paid to the men and women who gave their lives for their country.

For many Americans, the central event is attending one of the thousands of parades held on Memorial Day in large and small cities all over the country. Most of these feature marching bands and an overall military theme with the National Guard and other servicemen participating along with veterans and military vehicles from various wars.

One of the longest-standing traditions is the running of the Indianapolis 500, an auto race which has been held in conjunction with Memorial Day since 1911. It runs on the Sunday preceding the Memorial Day holiday. The Coca-Cola 600 stock car race has been held later the same day since 1961. The Memorial Tournament golf event has been held on or close to the Memorial Day weekend since 1976.

 

 

KNOW YOUR HISTORY: Memorial Day was started by former slaves on May, 1, 1865

 

Memorial Day 2013- African Americans in World War I and II

 

This Memorial Day Remember We’ve Been Screwing Veterans Over for at Least a Century

 

Holocaust Remembrance Memorial Day-70 years ago was the Warsaw ghetto uprising

 

While You Celebrate The Military This Memorial Day, Don’t Forget The Unjustly Imprisoned: Free The IRP6

 

 

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TheObamaCrat™ Wake-Up Call For Thursday The 10th Of April, 2014.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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White House Schedule – April 10th, 2014

In the morning, the President and First Lady will depart Houston, Texas en route Austin, Texas.  The departure from George Bush Intercontinental Airport and arrival at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport are open press.

 

In Austin, the President and First Lady will attend a Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. The President will deliver remarks at this event hosted by the LBJ Presidential Library. There will be out-of-town travel pool coverage of the President and First Lady’s tour of an exhibit in the museum, and the President’s remarks will be pooled for TV and open to pre-credentialed stills and correspondents.

 

Following this event, the President and First Lady will depart Austin en route Washington, DC. The departure from Austin-Bergstrom International Airport and the arrival on the South Lawn are open press.

 

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Thursday, April 10th 2014 All Times ET

10:50 AM: The President and First Lady depart Houston, Texas. Local Event Time: 9:50 AM. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
11:30 AM: The President and First Lady arrive in Austin, Texas. Local Event Time: 10:30 AM. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.
12:00 PM: The President and First Lady review an exhibit. Local Event Time: 11:00 AM. LBJ Presidential Library – Austin – Texas.
12:50 PM: The President delivers remarks at the Civil Rights Summit. Local Event Time: 11:50 AM. LBJ Auditorium.
2:25 PM: The President and First Lady depart Austin, Texas. Local Event Time: 1:25 PM. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport.
5:05 PM: The President and First Lady arrive at Joint Base Andrews.
5:20 PM: The President and First Lady arrive at the White House, South Lawn.

 

 

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LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm CST
Panel: Gay Marriage: A Civil Right?

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Pathway to the American Dream: Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Music and Social Consciousness

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Conversation with Former President Jimmy Carter

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm
Panel: LBJ and MLK: Fulfilling a Promise, Realizing a Dream

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Sports: Leveling the Playing Field

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Views from the Front Line

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Address by Former President William Jefferson Clinton

 

 

 

 

Legendary sports figures weigh in at Civil Rights Summit

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

Two of the greatest athletes of all time who have both been fighting the fight for civil rights since the 60s spoke Wednesday at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit Google Hangout with President Jimmy Carter

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Former U.S. President and humanitarian Jimmy Carter will answer questions about the Civil Rights Summit as well as his new book, A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power.

The public is encouraged to ask President Carter questions in advance on Google+ via https://plus.google.com/events/cadh8u…, or using #SummitHangout on Twitter or Facebook.

http://www.civilrightssummit.org

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit 

 

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Speeches and Remarks

 

Remarks by the President at Joint DCCC/DSCC Dinner

 

Remarks by the President at Fort Hood Memorial Service

 

 

 

Statements and Releases

 

Readout of the Vice President’s Meetings on Workforce Development and Job-Driven Training

 

 

Statement by the President

Today, Senate Republicans overwhelmingly blocked the Paycheck Fairness Act – preventing it from even receiving an honest debate, let alone a simple yes-or-no vote.  The Paycheck Fairness Act is commonsense legislation that would strengthen the 1963 Equal Pay Act and reinforce our country’s commitment to the principle of equal pay for equal work.  Yesterday, I took two actions that will make it easier for working women to earn fair pay, and my Administration will continue to do everything we can to make sure that every hard-working American earns the respect and wages that they deserve on the job.  But Republicans in Congress continue to oppose serious efforts to create jobs, grow the economy, and level the playing field for working families.  That’s wrong, and it’s harmful for our national efforts to rebuild an economy that gives every American who works hard a fair shot to get ahead.

 

 

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White House LIVE!!! Streaming

 

Next Up…

 

 

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The Vice President and Dr. Biden’s Support for Community Colleges and Apprenticeship Programs

 

 

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 94th Annual Convention of the American Association of Community Colleges in Washington, D.C., April 7, 2014.

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 94th Annual Convention of the American Association of Community Colleges. (Official White House Photo by David Lienemann)

Earlier this week, Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden spoke to 1,500 educational leaders at the American Association of Community Colleges 94th Annual Convention.

 

During the speech, the Vice President recognized that community colleges provide “a trusted pathway to good jobs in the middle class,” and spoke about the importance of matching job openings with skilled workers. The Vice President highlighted the Administration’s work in making higher education more affordable through further investment in Pell Grants and capping federal student loan repayments at 10% of income.

 

Dr. Biden, a lifelong educator and community college teacher, noted that she has visited innovative workforce partnerships at community colleges around the country – and that they are critical to America’s future.

 

Stating that the “very best job training is on-the-job training,” Vice President Biden announced the launch of the Registered Apprenticeship College Consortium.

 

Apprenticeships are some of the strongest and most successful forms of job training with 87 percent of apprentices remaining employed after completing their apprenticeship programs. The Consortium will make it easier for apprentices to receive college credits for their rigorous training that can then be applied to a degree.

 

Noting that 6 out of 10 jobs in the next 10 years are going to require a degree or a certificate beyond high school, Vice President Biden talked about the need to build partnerships between community colleges and local businesses.

 

“There are going to be hundreds of thousands of job openings in industries ranging from advanced manufacturing, to health care, to information technology, to energy,” stated the Vice President.

 

“The middle class has its best shot of growing through all of you,” he said in closing. “You really are the heart of expanding opportunity for millions of Americans.”

 

If you missed the Vice President and Dr. Biden’s remarks, check out some of the coverage from the event:

 

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Biden Announces Drive to Award Credit for Apprenticeships

 

Inside Higher Ed: Apprenticeship as Degree Pathway

 

 

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the annual conference of the American Association of Community Colleges Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/04/08/biden-announces-new-consortium-promote-apprenticeships-pathway-college-degree#ixzz2yUjfKqn6  Inside Higher Ed

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the annual conference of the American Association of Community Colleges
Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/04/08/biden-announces-new-consortium-promote-apprenticeships-pathway-college-degree#ixzz2yUjfKqn6
Inside Higher Ed

 

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Eric Holder Snaps at Louie Gohmert ‘Don’t Go There, Buddy!’

 

 

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In Case You Missed It: Fort Hood Memorial Service. LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit.


 

By Jueseppi B.

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Memorial Service at Fort Hood – April 9th 2014

 

 

 

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama board Air Force One

 

President Obama at Fort Hood: “It Is Love, Tested by Tragedy, That Brings Us Together Again.”

 

Today, the President and First Lady traveled to Killeen, Texas to attend a memorial ceremony at the Fort Hood Military Base, remembering those who lost their lives in last week’s tragic shooting at the base.

During his remarks at the memorial, the President explained that we must honor their lives “not in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.”

 

We must honor these men with a renewed commitment to keep our troops safe, not just in battle but on the home front, as well. In our open society, and at vast bases like this, we can never eliminate every risk. But as a nation, we can do more to help counsel those with mental health issues, to keep firearms out of the hands of those who are having such deep difficulties. As a military, we must continue to do everything in our power to secure our facilities and spare others this pain.

We must honor these men by doing more to care for our fellow Americans living with mental illness, civilian and military. Today, four American soldiers are gone. Four Army families are devastated. As Commander-in-Chief, I’m determined that we will continue to step up our efforts — to reach our troops and veterans who are hurting, to deliver to them the care that they need, and to make sure we never stigmatize those who have the courage to seek help.

And finally, we must honor these men by recognizing that they were members of a generation that has borne the burden of our security in more than a decade of war. Now our troops are coming home, and by the end of this year our war in Afghanistan will finally be over.

Read the President’s full remarks here.

 

 

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President Obama Speaks at a Memorial Service for Victims of the Shooting at Fort Hood

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

President Obama says that we must honor the lives of those killed in the tragedy at Fort Hood “not in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.” April 9, 2014.

 

 

 

 

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President and Mrs. Obama at today's Fort Hood memorial ceremony

President and Mrs. Obama at today’s Fort Hood memorial ceremony

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President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

President Obama accompanied by the First Lady lays a coin for each of the victims at Fort Hood

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects at #FortHood to the three fallen soldiers.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for a memorial service at Fort Hood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama pay their respects during a memorial service at #FortHood.

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Meeting of the President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

The President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking, which was established to coordinate federal efforts to combat trafficking in persons, holds its annual meeting at the White House. April 8, 2014.

 

 

 

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LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm CST
Panel: Gay Marriage: A Civil Right?

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Pathway to the American Dream: Immigration Policy in the 21st Century

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Music and Social Consciousness

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 1 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Time: Tuesday April 8, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Conversation with Former President Jimmy Carter

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Morning Panels (12:30-4:00 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 12:35pm – 1:40pm
Panel: LBJ and MLK: Fulfilling a Promise, Realizing a Dream

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 1:40pm – 2:40pm
Panel: Sports: Leveling the Playing Field

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 2:40pm – 4:00pm
Panel: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Views from the Front Line

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Library Civil Rights Summit – Day 2 – Evening Panel (6:00-7:30 pm CDT)

 

Streamed live on Apr 9, 2014

Time: Wednesday April 9, 2014 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Panel: Address by Former President William Jefferson Clinton

 

 

 

 

Legendary sports figures weigh in at Civil Rights Summit

 

Published on Apr 9, 2014

Two of the greatest athletes of all time who have both been fighting the fight for civil rights since the 60s spoke Wednesday at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit Google Hangout with President Jimmy Carter

 

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2014

Former U.S. President and humanitarian Jimmy Carter will answer questions about the Civil Rights Summit as well as his new book, A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power.

The public is encouraged to ask President Carter questions in advance on Google+ via https://plus.google.com/events/cadh8u…, or using #SummitHangout on Twitter or Facebook.

http://www.civilrightssummit.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

LBJ Civil Rights Summit 

 

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