The St. Louis Post Dispatch Op-Ed: Attorney General Eric Holder, A Message To The People Of Ferguson.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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A Message To The People Of Ferguson

 

The St. Louis Post Dispatch:

 

Since the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown, the nation and the world have witnessed the unrest that has gripped Ferguson, Mo. At the core of these demonstrations is a demand for answers about the circumstances of this young man’s death and a broader concern about the state of our criminal justice system.

 

At a time when so much may seem uncertain, the people of Ferguson can have confidence that the Justice Department intends to learn — in a fair and thorough manner — exactly what happened.

 

Today, I will be in Ferguson to be briefed on the federal civil rights investigation that I have closely monitored since I launched it more than one week ago. I will meet personally with community leaders, FBI investigators and federal prosecutors from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office to receive detailed briefings on the status of this case.

 

The full resources of the Department of Justice have been committed to the investigation into Michael Brown’s death. This inquiry will take time to complete, but we have already taken significant steps. Approximately 40 FBI agents and some of the Civil Rights Division’s most experienced prosecutors have been deployed to lead this process, with the assistance of the United States Attorney in St. Louis. Hundreds of people have already been interviewed in connection with this matter. On Monday, at my direction, a team of federal medical examiners conducted an independent autopsy.

 

We understand the need for an independent investigation, and we hope that the independence and thoroughness of our investigation will bring some measure of calm to the tensions in Ferguson. In order to begin the healing process, however, we must first see an end to the acts of violence in the streets of Ferguson. Although these acts have been committed by a very small minority — and, in many cases, by individuals from outside Ferguson — they seriously undermine, rather than advance, the cause of justice. And they interrupt the deeper conversation that the legitimate demonstrators are trying to advance.

 

The Justice Department will defend the right of protesters to peacefully demonstrate and for the media to cover a story that must be told. But violence cannot be condoned. I urge the citizens of Ferguson who have been peacefully exercising their First Amendment rights to join with law enforcement in condemning the actions of looters, vandals and others seeking to inflame tensions and sow discord.

 

Law enforcement has a role to play in reducing tensions, as well. As the brother of a retired law enforcement officer, I know firsthand that our men and women in uniform perform their duties in the face of tremendous threats and significant personal risk. They put their lives on the line every day, and they often have to make split-second decisions.

 

At the same time, good law enforcement requires forging bonds of trust between the police and the public. This trust is all-important, but it is also fragile. It requires that force be used in appropriate ways. Enforcement priorities and arrest patterns must not lead to disparate treatment under the law, even if such treatment is unintended. And police forces should reflect the diversity of the communities they serve.

 

Over the years, we have made significant progress in ensuring that this is the case. But progress is not an endpoint; it is a measure of effort and of commitment. Constructive dialogue should continue — but it must also be converted into concrete action. And it is painfully clear, in cities and circumstances across our great nation, that more progress, more dialogue, and more action is needed.

 

This is my pledge to the people of Ferguson: Our investigation into this matter will be full, it will be fair, and it will be independent. And beyond the investigation itself, we will work with the police, civil rights leaders, and members of the public to ensure that this tragedy can give rise to new understanding — and robust action — aimed at bridging persistent gaps between law enforcement officials and the communities we serve. Long after the events of Aug. 9 have receded from the headlines, the Justice Department will continue to stand with this community.

 

As we move forward together, I ask for the public’s cooperation and patience. And I urge anyone with information related to the shooting to contact the FBI by dialing 800-CALL-FBI, option 4.

 

Eric H. Holder Jr. is attorney general of the United States.

 

Thank you The St. Louis Post Dispatch.

 

 

Michael Brown Funeral Planned for Monday

 

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The funeral for Michael Brown Jr. will be on Monday, August 25, a lawyer for his family announced on Tuesday. Attorney Benjamin Crump said more details would follow.

 

 

Brown’s fatal shooting by a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer on August 9 has touched off over a week of angry protests in the community.

Brown’s parents, Michael Sr. and Lesley McSpadden, say prosecution of the officer who shot their unarmed son is the only thing that can bring peace to the streets of Ferguson. “Justice will bring peace,” McSpadden told TODAY’s Matt Lauer Tuesday.

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I Don’t Have The Words. The Ferguson, Missouri Images Will Have To Do.

 

 

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

Trayvon Martin’s mom speaks out on #MichaelBrown

 

Published on Aug 19, 2014

The mother of slain teen Trayvon Martin Sybrina Fulton speaks out on the shooting and killing of Michael Brown .

 

 

 

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Themuthafuckingospel

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St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch, Recuse Yourself.


The Militant Negro

The Militant Negro

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Appoint a Special Prosecutor to Investigate the Murder of Michael Brown.

 

Petition by Jamilah Nasheed

 

To be delivered to Robert P. McCulloch, St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney

 

Please SIGN THIS PETITION

 

The death of Michael Brown at the hands of Ferguson, MO police has stoked tensions and caused unrest across our community, state and nation. This racially charged climate demands an independent, impartial investigation that the St. Louis County Prosecutor’s office simply cannot provide.

 

There are currently 27,505 signatures. NEW goal – We need 30,000 signatures!

 

PETITION BACKGROUND

 

Bob McCulloch must fully recuse himself and his office from the investigation related to the murder of Michael Brown.

 

McCulloch’s decision not to charge officers who murdered two unarmed African American men in 2000 by shooting into their car 20 times, especially in the face the U.S. Attorney Office’s independent investigation that those officers lied about their actions, gives us no confidence that his office can provide a fair and impartial investigation into this current matter.

 

That failure, coupled with McCulloch’s recent participation in one of the most racially-polarizing elections in the history of St. Louis County means that his office’s continued oversight of this tragedy will only sow further distrust and discord in our community.

 

For the good of the entire St. Louis region and the nation as a whole, we call on Robert P. McCulloch to recuse himself and his office from this matter, and appoint a special prosector to investigate the murder of Michael Brown.

 

SIGN THIS PETITION

 

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20,000 sign petitions seeking special prosecutor in Michael Brown shooting

 

 

Organizers said Sunday that more than 20,000 people had signed online petitions seeking a special prosecutor to investigate the death of Michael Brown.

 

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch is in charge of the investigation. The petition asks him to step aside.

 

“Many community members don’t believe he can be fair and impartial,” state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, said. She launched the petition drive with the goal of gathering 50,000 signatures. “We will continue to put pressure on him to resign,” she said.

 

Nasheed cited McCulloch’s investigation into the actions of two undercover drug detectives who killed a suspect and his passenger in a car on the parking lot of the Jack in the Box restaurant in Berkeley in 2000.

 

Grand jury proceedings are secret. McCulloch, in telling the public what the grand jury had found, repeatedly insisted that “every witness” had testified that the two detectives fired to defend themselves after the suspect tried to run them over with his car.

 

The Post-Dispatch reviewed the previously secret grand jury tapes and found that McCulloch’s public statements were untrue.

Only three of the 13 detectives who testified said the suspect’s car had moved forward, in the direction of the two officers who shot him and his passenger. Two of those were the shooters themselves. The third was a detective who McCulloch later said he considered charging with perjury because his account was so at odds with the facts.

 

Contrary to McCulloch’s public statements, the grand jury tapes showed that four other detectives testified that they never saw the suspect’s car travel toward the officers.

 

McCulloch never brought independent evidence before the grand jury to sort out who was right.

 

Nor did he request the testimony of a nationally noted collision expert who investigated the case for the Justice Department. He determined that the suspect’s car had always been in reverse — added proof that it did not move toward the detectives.

 

Another controversial case involving McCulloch’s use of the grand jury was dubbed “Kinkogate.”

 

In 1997, McCulloch used a grand jury subpoena to identify a whistleblower who contacted the FBI and reported what he said was improper behavior by a member of then St. Louis County Executive George “Buzz” Westfall’s cabinet. The whistleblower was Russ Signorino, then an employee of the St. Louis County Economic Council. He sent an anonymous fax to the media from a Kinko’s store in Creve Coeur.

 

Without telling the grand jury what he was doing, McCulloch gave the subpoena to the St. Louis County police, who used it to obtain a video recording from Kinko’s showing who sent the fax. After he was identified, Signorino was forced to quit his county job.

 

McCulloch at first claimed that he had issued the grand jury subpoena because the fax contained a “threat.”

 

He later admitted that there never had been any threat and conceded that no crime was involved. He denied that he had abused the grand jury process to identity a whistleblower who was acting lawfully.

 

According to the Missouri attorney general’s office, only an order from a judge can remove McCulloch from the case; he can also step aside himself. Nasheed said the petition would put pressure on McCulloch to step down voluntarily.

 

McCulloch did not respond to a request for comment. On Saturday, he said the county grand jury would begin hearing evidence in the Brown shooting case this week.

 

Manuel Blair, 41, of Florissant, said he is supporting the petition drive for a special prosecutor. He noted that McCulloch’s father was a police officer who was killed in the line of duty. McCulloch’s father, brother, nephew and cousin all served with the St. Louis Police Department; his mother was a clerk there.

 

“I don’t think he will effectively prosecute a police officer,” Blair said.

 

Denise Hollinshed of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

 

Thank you St. Louis Post Dispatch.

 

 

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Objectivity of prosecutor in Missouri shooting of Michael Brown is questioned

 

By Kimberly Kindy & Washington Post:

 

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley on Friday said he is leading an effort to remove the county prosecutor from investigating the Michael Brown case because he thinks the prosecutor’s personal experiences and recent statements have tainted his ability to act objectively.

 

Brown, a black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by Officer Darren Wilson last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. Wilson is white.

 

Dooley’s spokeswoman, Pat Washington, said there have been long-standing concerns among many black leaders in the community regarding County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch’s ability to handle such cases because his father was killed in the line of duty when McCulloch was 12 years old. The man who shot his father was black.

 

Most recently, she said, Dooley feels McCulloch crossed a line when he publicly criticized a decision this week by Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) to bring in the State Highway Patrol to lead efforts to quell the violent street protests that erupted after the shooting of Brown.

 

“He injected himself in a matter in a way that further exacerbates the community distrust of him,” Washington said. “Rather than stay focused on the investigation, the prosecuting attorney decided to wade over into a whole other area and challenge the governor. He inflamed the community, which already distrusts him.”

Washington said Dooley had called the state attorney general’s office to determine how a special prosecutor could be appointed in place of McCulloch and was told there was a petition process for doing so, which he is looking into. Dooley was planning to meet Friday night with several local and state elected officials who Washington said have voiced similar concerns about McCulloch, but she declined to identify who would be at the private meeting.

 

Ed Magee, a McCulloch spokesman, said his office believes the county prosecutor cannot be removed from the case.

 

“There is no petition process,” Magee said. “We are working with the county police. We will continue to work with them if it proceeds to the grand jury and beyond if necessary.”

 

Magee declined to comment further about Dooley’s accusations.

 

McCulloch has been the St. Louis County prosecutor for more than 20 years, and during that time has been involved with a support group called BackStoppers, which helps the families of police officers killed in the line of duty.

 

The prosecutor’s father, Paul McCulloch, was a St. Louis police officer when he was gunned down July 2, 1964, at age 37 while trying to arrest a kidnapper. He had answered a call by an officer in need of assistance at a housing complex and died in a shootout. One of the shooters was wounded and was later convicted of murder.

 

This is not the first time McCulloch’s objectivity has been questioned because of how his father died.

In July 2000, questions were raised about his leading an investigation into two white police officers who fatally shot two black men. The two officers, undercover drug agents, shot Earl Murray and Ronald Beasley, both unarmed, on June 12, 2000, in the parking lot of a fast-food restaurant in the St. Louis suburb of Berkeley. A county grand jury declined to indict the officers; McCulloch said he agreed with the decision.

 

“My father was killed many, many years ago, and it’s certainly not something you forget, but it’s certainly not something that clouds my judgment in looking at a case,” McCulloch told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at the time. “It certainly makes you more aware of the severity of it.”

 

Alice Crites, Mark Berman, Carol Leonnig and Manuel Roig-Franzia contributed to this report.

 

Kimberly Kindy is a government accountability reporter at The Washington Post.

 

Thank you Kimberly Kindy & Washington Post.

 

 

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Is The Prosecutor In The Michael Brown Case Biased?

 

Some say that county prosecutor Bob McCulloch has an unsettling history of siding with the police

 

By  & Salon.com

 

A grand jury could begin to hear evidence regarding 18-year-old Michael Brown’s fatal shooting as soon as Wednesday, according to the office of the county prosecutor in St. Louis. “We’re going to attempt to present evidence to the grand jury on Wednesday,” said Ed Magee, a spokesman for St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch. McCulloch is the only one who has the power to actually charge Darren Wilson with murder, if he sees fit, but some object to McCulloch being the prosecuting attorney in the case given its extremely high profile and his potential bias.

 

Rep. William Lacy Clay, (D-St. Louis) has been outspoken in his disapproval of the prosecutor: “We don’t have any confidence in the St. Louis County prosecuting attorney’s office… I have no faith in him, but I do trust the FBI and the justice department.”

 

The prosecutor has received criticism for his disapproval of Gov. Jay Nixon’s decision to put the Highway Patrol in control of keeping the peace in Ferguson, with some arguing that he disapproved of the decision to put Capt. Ron Johnson in charge. “It appears like the county police and the Ferguson police were upset because they put a black man in charge,” said Judy Jones, a St. Louis resident. “And in this country, white people don’t like black people telling them anything. That’s why they have problems with Obama.”

 

The prosecutor has also been criticized for his role in a 2000 case in which two black men were fatally shot by two white undercover drug officers in the parking lot of a Jack in the Box chain restaurant. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, McCulloch agreed with a grand jury’s decision not to press charges because of evidence that the two men had attempted to escape and drove toward the officers. A federal investigation later showed that the men were unarmed and that their car had not moved when the officers fired 21 shots, although because the officers feared for their safety, the shootings were legal.

 

McCulloch later said of the two slain men, “These guys were bums.”

 

Other critics point to the fact that McCulloch has deep ties to the police: his brother, nephew and cousin have also served as police officers in St. Louis, and his father, also a police officer, was killed in the line of duty by a kidnapper who also happened to be black.

 

Civil rights activist Martin Luther King III has said, “He has displayed so much bias that he needs to remove himself from the case. That would be a victory for this community.”

 

McCulloch’s political relationships make it even more difficult to determine where his allegiances lie. St. Louis Public Radio reports:

 

“The governor and I have known each other since he was a state senator,” McCulloch recalled. As for their relationship, he added drily, “We’ve had our ups and downs.”

 

The two, both Democrats, tangled occasionally during Nixon’s 16 years as Missouri’s attorney general. But McCulloch said Saturday that he wasn’t going to replay any of those old disputes.

 

McCulloch appears to have a more amiable relationship with current Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, who the prosecutor called a friend. McCulloch said they’ve been talking regularly since the unrest in Ferguson began…

 

McCulloch contends that [St. Louis County Executive Charlie] Dooley’s call for a special prosecutor may be related to McCulloch’s active campaigning on behalf of County Councilman Steve Stenger, who handily defeated Dooley in the Aug. 5 primary.

 

Regardless of public opinion, McCulloch will not be replaced unless he steps down because he is an elected official.

 

Joanna Rothkopf is an assistant editor at Salon, focusing on sustainability. Follow @JoannaRothkopf or email jrothkopf@salon.com.

 

Thank you  & Salon.com.

 

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Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch talks about Mike Brown shooting

 

CLAYTON, MO (KTVI) – St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch addresses reporters about the investigation into the police shooting death of Michael Brown.  He says that his office is still collecting evidence and is looking for witnesses.  They are working in parallel  to a federal civil rights violation investigation.  The two offices have been in contact and are working on coordinating their efforts.

 

Evidence will not be released to the public until after the Grand Jury makes a ruling.  The investigation is expected to last more than two weeks.

 

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Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

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I Don’t Have The Words. The Ferguson, Missouri Images Will Have To Do.


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Ferguson, Missouri For ALL To See

 

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Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.

 

Capt. Johnson’s Powerful Speech At Ferguson Rally 8/17/2014

 

Melissa Harris-Perry’s Searing Tribute To Black Men Killed By Police

 

Mail Online: Ferguson Cop, Darren Wilson, Left Town Days Before He Was Named Michael Brown’s Shooter.

 

Press Conference In Ferguson: Curfew, State Of Emergency Declared In Ferguson, So Says Governor Jay Nixon (D).

 

Statement From The Family Of Michael Brown & Their Attorneys.

 

Ferguson Police Release Michael Brown Convenience Store Surveillance Video: Strong Arm Robbery?

 

Officer Responsible For #MikeBrown Murder Is Named, As Chicago Protest Gets Emotional. Meet Captain Ronald S. Johnson.

 

What A Difference A Day Makes. Just 24 Little Hours.

 

KKK Raising Money For Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown In Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Thats All Folks! Thats All I Have To Say About That.

 

In Defense Of Black Rage: Michael Brown, Police And The American Dream.

 

The Death Of Michael Brown: Some Racist Racial History From “The Show-Me Racism State.”

 

Michael Brown, Ferguson, Missouri.

 

TheObamaCrat SoapBox™: NObody Black Is Safe.

 

Are Black Lives Important In A Caucasian World Of “White Privilege”?

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Gun Down 18 Year Old Mike Brown, Shooting Him TEN Times…For Shoplifting Candy.

 

 

Trayvon Martin’s mom speaks out on #MichaelBrown

 

Published on Aug 19, 2014

The mother of slain teen Trayvon Martin Sybrina Fulton speaks out on the shooting and killing of Michael Brown .

 

 

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MY President Of The United States Of America, Barack Hussein Obama, Has Dropped The Ball On #Ferguson & #Michael Brown.


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I have been a supporter of President Barack Hussein Obama since 1995. I will continue to support him and his family and most of his administration. I am however very disappointed and saddened by his response to the cold blooded murder of Michael Brown Jr. in Ferguson, Missouri on Saturday the 9th of August, 2014. I am so hurt by how he has handled this slaughter of yet another Black male, that I have not had the heart to blog about him since this happened, except for his return to Washington D.C. today.

 

John Crawford, murdered by police in an Ohio Walmart for holding a toy BB gun.

 

Eric Garner choked to death by police for selling cigarettes in NYC

 

Ezell Ford shot to death on a LA street by cops, for what I have no clue.

 

Michael Brown shot down by 6 bullets for walking down the middle of the street in Ferguson, Missouri, by police.

 

Four (4) Black men, THAT WE KNOW OF, murdered since July 17th, 2014. Thats 31 days.

 

And here’s MY POTUSA‘s response……

 

President Obama returns from vacation

 

Published on Aug 18, 2014

President Obama returned to D.C. just after midnight Monday for a two-day break from a summer vacation, interrupted by airstrikes in Iraq and violent clashes in a St. Louis suburb.

 

 

 

President Obama discusses advances in Iraq and his concerns about Ferguson, Missiouri

 

Published on Aug 18, 2014

President Obama announced on Monday that Attorney General Eric Holder would travel to Ferguson, Missouri to meet with Department of Justice and FBI personnel there, overseeing a federal investigation into the death of Michael Brown. The President also gave an update on progress in Iraq, announcing that U.S. forces had enabled Iraqis to retake a dam near Mosul.

 

 

 

Transcript of the President remarks on the situation in Ferguson

 

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 Earlier this afternoon, I spoke with Governor Nixon as well as Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill. I also met with Attorney General Eric Holder.

 

The Justice Department has opened an independent federal civil rights investigation into the death of Michael Brown. They are on the ground and along with the FBI, they are devoting substantial resources to that investigation.

 

The attorney general himself will be travelling to Ferguson on Wednesday to meet with the FBI agents and DOJ personnel conducting the federal criminal investigation and he will receive an update from them on their progress.

 

He will also be meeting with other leaders in the community who’s support is so critical to bringing about peace and calm in Ferguson.

 

Ronald Davis, the director of the DOJ’s Office of Community- oriented Policing Services, or COPS, is also traveling to Ferguson tomorrow to work with police officials on the ground. We’ve also had experts from the DOJ’s community relations service, working in Ferguson since the days after the shooting to foster conversations among the local stake holders and reduce tensions among the community.

 

So, let me close just saying a few words about the tensions there. We have all seen images of protesters and law enforcement in the streets. It’s clear that the vast majority of people are peacefully protesting. What’s also clear is that a small minority of individuals are not.

 

While I understand the passions and the anger that arise over the death of Michael Brown, giving into that anger by looting or carrying guns, and even attacking the police only serves to raise tensions and stir chaos. It undermines rather than advancing justice.

 

Let me also be clear that our constitutional rights to speak freely, to assemble, and to report in the press must be vigilantly safeguarded: especially in moments like these. There’s no excuse for excessive force by police or any action that denies people the right to protest peacefully.

 

Ours is a nation of laws: of citizens who live under them and for the citizens who enforce them. So, to a community in Ferguson that is rightly hurting and looking for answers, let me call once again for us to seek some understanding rather than simply holler at each other. Let’s seek to heal rather than to wound each other.

 

As Americans, we’ve got to use this moment to seek out our shared humanity that’s been laid bare by this moment. The potential of a young man and the sorrows of parents, the frustrations of a community, the ideals that we hold as one united American family.

 

I’ve said this before. In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement. In too many communities, too many young men of color are left behind and seen only as objects of fear. And through initiatives like My Brother’s Keeper, I’m personally committed to changing both perception and reality. And already, we’re making some significant progress, as people of good will of all races are ready to chip in. But that requires that we build, and not tear down. And that requires we listen, and not just shout. That’s how we’re going to move forward together — by trying to unite each other and understand each other, and not simply divide ourselves from one another. We’re going to have to hold tight to those values in the days ahead. And that’s how we bring about justice, and that’s how we bring about peace.

 

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ANN COMPTON: Let me ask you. This is an interesting time in your presidency …. and one of the things that you have so emphasized in the last few months, the last year or so, is this reach-out to Brothers — My Brother’s Keeper and to a generation that doesn’t feel that it has much chance. Sending the attorney general to Ferguson is a step. Has anyone there asked you, or have you considered going yourself? Is there more that you personally can do, not just for Ferguson, but for communities that might also feel that kind of tension and see it erupt in the way it has in Ferguson?

 

PRESIDENT: Well, Ann, obviously, we’ve seen events in which there’s a big gulf between community perceptions and law enforcement perceptions around the country. This is not something new. It’s always tragic when it involves the death of someone so young. I have to be very careful about not prejudging these events before investigations are completed. Because, although these are, you know, issues of local jurisdiction — you know, the DOJ works for me. And then when they’re conducting an investigation, I’ve got to make sure that I don’t look like I’m putting my thumb on the scales one way or the other.

 

So, it’s hard for me to address a specific case, beyond making sure that it’s conducted in a way that isn’t (ph) transparent, where there’s accountability, where people can trust the process, hoping that, as a consequence of a fair and just process, you end up with a fair and just outcome.

 

But, as I think I’ve said in some past occasions, part of the ongoing challenge of perfecting our union has involved dealing with communities that feel left behind, who, as a consequence of tragic histories, often find themselves isolated, often find themselves without hope, without economic prospects.

 

You have young men of color in many communities who are more likely to end up in jail or in the criminal justice system than they are in a good job or in college.

 

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And, you know, part of my job, that I can do, I think, without any potential conflicts, is to get at those root causes.

 

Now, that’s a big project. It’s one that we’ve been trying to carry out now for a couple of centuries. And we’ve made extraordinary progress, but we have not made enough progress.

 

And so, the idea behind something like My Brother’s Keeper is can we work with cities and communities and clergy and parents and young people themselves, all across the country, school superintendents, business, corporations, and can we find models that work, that move these young men on — on a better track?

 

Now part of that process is also looking at our criminal justice system to make sure that it is upholding the basic principle of everybody’s equal before the law.

 

And — and one of the things that we’ve looked at during the course of where we can make — during the course of investigating where we can make a difference is that there’re patterns that start early.

 

Young African American and Hispanic boys tend to get suspended from school at much higher rates than other kids, even when they’re in elementary school. They tend to have much more frequent interactions with the criminal justice system at an earlier age.

 

Sentencing may be different. How trials are conducted may be different.

 

And so, you know, one of the things that we’ve done is to include Department of Justice in this conversation under the banner of my brother’s keeper to see where can we start working with local communities to inculcate more trust, more confidence in the criminal justice system.

 

And — and I want to be — I want to be clear about this because sometimes I think there’s confusion around these issues and this dates back for — for decades.

 

There are young black men that commit crime. And — and — and we can argue about why that happens because of the poverty they were born into or the lack of opportunity or the school systems that failed them or what have you, but if they commit a crime, then they need to be prosecuted because every community has an interest in public safety.

 

And if you go into the African American community or the Latino community, some of the folks who are most intent on making sure that criminals are dealt with are people that have been preyed upon by them.

 

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So, this is not an argument that there isn’t real crime out there and that law enforcement doesn’t have a difficult job. And you know, that they — you know, they have to be honored and respected for the danger and difficulty of law enforcement. But what is also true is that given the history of this country, where we can make progress in building up more confidence, more trust, making sure that our criminal justice system is acutely aware of the possibilities of disparities in treatment, there are safeguards in place to avoid those disparities where, you know, training and assistance is provided to local law enforcement who, you know, may just need more information in order to avoid potential disparity. All those things can make a difference.

 

One of the things I was most proud of when I was in the state legislature, way back when I had no grey hair and none of you could pronounce my name was, you know, I passed legislation requiring videotaping of interrogations and confessions. And I passed legislation dealing with racial profiling in Illinois.

 

And in both cases, we worked with local law enforcement. And the argument was that you can do a better job as a law enforcement official if you have built up credibility and trust. And there’s some basic things that can be done to promote that kind of trust, and you know, in some cases, it’s just a lack of information. And we want to make sure that we get that information to law enforcement.

 

So, there are things that can be done to improve the situation, but short term, obviously, right now what we have to do is make sure that the cause of justice and fair administration of the law is being brought to bear in Ferguson. In order to do that, we’ve got to make sure that we are able to distinguish between peaceful protesters who may have some legitimate grievances, and maybe longstanding grievances, and those who are using this tragic death as an excuse to engage in criminal behavior and tossing Molotov cocktails or looting stores. And that is a small minority of folks, and it may not even be residents of Ferguson, but they are damaging the cause. They are not advancing it.

 

All right? Thank you very much everybody.

 

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No Mr. President, It’s NOT Alright.

 

I don’t care about Iraq. Let Iraq handle it’s own war, remember, we just left an Iraqi war. We should be taking care of our American citizens, making sure THEY are safe as they walk the streets of America. YOUR very first concern should NOT be Iraq and some damn dam. I fully understand and concur with your duty to protect those innocents trapped on the mountain by ISIS forces. Humanitarian aid and protection must be a priority there, understood.

 

I do NOT understand why speaking of a dam in Iraq BEFORE addressing Michael Brown Jr. and his murder, was your strategy. You have asked not one thing that must be asked. Why was Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson allowed to leave Ferguson AFTER murdering unarmed 18 year old Michael Brown Jr.? Why was the body of Michael Brown Jr. allowed to lay in the middle of the street for an estimated 4 hours? Why was there no checking of Michael Brown Jr.’s vitals  to ensure he was indeed dead? Why were there no emergency medical personnel on scene immediately following the murder of Michael Brown Jr.? WHY was it the top priority of Ferguson police chief Jackson to protect and shelter the man who murdered Michael Brown Jr., and not care for the emotions and concerns of  Michael Brown Jr.’s parents?

 

You, sir, have two daughters, imagine if one of your children had been treated in this disrespectful manner by Ferguson, Missouri police. You are The Comforter-In-Chief for flood victims, tornado victims, hurricane victims, victim families massacred by insane mass killers. WHY no comfort for these men and their families….

 

John Crawford, murdered by police in a n Ohio Walmart for holding a toy BB gun.

 

Eric Garner choked to death by police for selling cigarettes in NYC

 

Ezell Ford shot to death on a LA street by cops for, what I have no clue.

 

Michael Brown shot down by 6 bullets for walking down the middle of the street in Ferguson, Missouri, by police.

 

Four (4) Black men, THAT WE KNOW OF, murdered since July 17th, 2014. Thats 31 days.

 

Clearly The United States Of America has a serious policing problem with regards to Black Men. Clearly there is NO Justice for us. There is only Just “US.”

 

I am A Nobody and not nearly intelligent enough to second guess the President Of The United States Of America, a man I voted for twice, and would vote for again if possible.

 

I am smart enough to recognize we have a problem with America’s police system. Local law enforcement agencies are systematically murdering unarmed Black men.

 

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Enough is enough Mr. President. When will you visit Ferguson, Missouri. When will you Stand Up for us Black Men. When will you represent and comfort Black Men murdered by law enforcement?

 

You’re not the President of red states, blue states, Caucasian America, Black America, Pink America, Purple America…but the entire United States Of America.

 

That includes Black men murdered by law enforcement.

 

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The Press Is NOT Allowed Their 1st Amendment Rights By Ferguson Law Enforcement…….

 

WATCH: Cops Physically Push CNN’s Don Lemon During Tense Ferguson Protest

 

 

 

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Michael Brown Jr.

Michael Brown Jr.

Shannon Watts, Everytown For Gun Safety: Guns In Aisle Three At Kroger.


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Kroger, the largest grocery chain in the country, has policies that allow customers to openly carry guns in its stores — where moms and their kids shop every day.

 

A grocery store is one of the last places I should expect to see someone openly carrying a loaded weapon. But Kroger, the largest grocery chain in the country, has policies that allow customers to openly carry guns in its stores — where moms and their kids shop every day.

 

We’ve already seen the results of Kroger’s current policies: gun extremists have been demonstrating at Kroger stores, and there have been more than a dozen shootings and threats across the country. In February, a man shot two people in a Lawrenceville, GA Kroger, and just last month, a woman threatened to shoot an employee at a Nashville, TN store. That’s why we’re calling on Kroger to keep families safe by prohibiting the open carry of guns in its stores.

 

Click here to automatically sign the petition asking Kroger’s CEO to adopt gun sense policies that will keep families safe in Kroger stores.

 

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Most states have weak gun laws that say anyone can carry loaded guns in public, even without a background check or training. When the law doesn’t protect us, private businesses like Kroger have the responsibility to prohibit the open carry of guns where they don’t belong.

 

How can we possibly know if an armed person at a Kroger store is a responsible gun owner, or a serious threat to our children? This isn’t something we should have to worry about when we’re grocery shopping. Moms will support businesses that protect the safety of our children.

 

Let’s tell Kroger to uphold its core value of creating a “safe and secure workplace and shopping environment” by adopting gun sense policies.

 

Click here to automatically add your name to the #GroceriesNotGuns petition.

 

Thanks for speaking up,

 

Shannon Watts
Founder
Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America

 

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Related Reading:

 

Hallelujah: Federal Judge Rules Millions Of AR-15 Rifles Not Covered By Second Amendment.

 

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