Ferguson To Geneva.


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#FERGUSONTOGENEVA

 

Police Violence In America Is A Human Rights Issue. Ferguson Is An Example. Ferguson To Geneva Is Part Of The Solution.

 

THE GOAL

We are ready to take our case before the global community.

In the absence of justice from the local, state, and federal government, the family of Michael Brown and Ferguson protesters are ready to take our case before the global community. We have submitted a brief to the United Nations (UN), and we will formally present it on November 12th and 13th in Geneva, Switzerland. The goal is not only to achieve justice in Ferguson, but to unite governments around the world against the human rights violations that result from racial profiling and police violence.

 

HOW YOU CAN HELP

The #FergusonToGeneva contingent is comprised of:

 

The remaining cost of this trip for the contingent is $11,000, which includes airfare, room and board, and per diem from November 9-14th.

 

Please donate directly via PayPal here:

 

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Read The Full Report Here: Written Statement On The Execution Of Michael Brown By Ferguson PD

 

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COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS


Notice of Public Meeting of the Missouri Advisory Committee for a 
Meeting on a Project Proposal on Civil Rights and Law Enforcement in 
Missouri

AGENCY: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

ACTION: Notice of meeting.

 

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the 
rules and regulations of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights 
(Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act that the Missouri 
Advisory Committee (Committee) will hold a meeting on Monday, November 
17, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. for the purpose of discussing and voting on a 
project proposal on civil rights and law enforcement in Missouri. The 
proposal arose in the aftermath of recent events in Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Members of the public can listen to the discussion. This meeting is 
available to the public through the following toll-free call-in number: 
888-539-3696, conference ID: 6728111. Any interested member of the 
public may call this number and listen to the meeting. Callers can 
expect to incur charges for calls they initiate over wireless lines, 
and the Commission will not refund any incurred charges. Callers will 
incur no charge for calls they initiate over land-line connections to the 
toll free telephone number. Persons with hearing impairments may also follow
 the proceedingsby first calling the Federal Relay Service at 1-800-977-8339
 and providing the Service with the conference call number and conference ID number.


Members of the public are also entitled to submit written comments; 
the comments must be received in the regional office by December 17, 
2014. Written comments may be mailed to the Midwestern Regional Office, 
U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 55 W. Monroe St., Suite 410, Chicago, 
IL 60615. They may also be faxed to the Commission at (312) 353-8324, 
or emailed to Administrative Assistant, Carolyn Allen at 
callen@usccr.gov. Persons who desire additional information may contact 
the Midwestern Regional Office at (312) 353-8311.

 

Records generated from this meeting may be inspected and reproduced 
at the Midwestern Regional Office, as they become available, both 
before and after the meeting. Records of the meeting will be available 
via www.facadatabase.gov under the Commission on Civil Rights, Missouri 
Advisory Committee link. Persons interested in the work of this 
Committee are directed to the Commission's Web site, 
http://www.usccr.gov, or may contact the Midwestern Regional Office at the 
above email or street address.

 

Agenda

Welcome

12:00 p.m. to 12:05 p.m.
    S. David Mitchell, Chairman, Missouri Advisory Committee

Presentation of Project Proposal on Civil Rights and Law Enforcement in 
Missouri

12:05 p.m. to 12:20 p.m.
    Melissa Wojnaroski, Civil Rights Analyst, USCCR

Deliberation and Vote on Proposal

12:20 p.m. to 12:45 p.m.
    Missouri Advisory Committee

Planning Next Steps

12:45 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Adjournment

1:00 p.m.

DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, November 17, 2014, at 12:00 
p.m. CST.
 Public Call Information: Dial: 888-539-3696, Conference ID: 
6728111.

    Dated: October 30, 2014.
David Mussatt,
 Chief, Regional Programs Unit.
[FR Doc. 2014-26147 Filed 11-3-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6335-01-P

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The Washington Post Reports: Federal Civil Rights Charges Unlikely Against Darren Wilson In Ferguson Murder of Michael Brown.


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From The Washington Post, who don’t know jack shit:

 

Federal civil rights charges unlikely against police officer in Ferguson shooting

 

October 31

 

Justice Department investigators have all but concluded they do not have a strong enough case to bring civil rights charges against Darren Wilson, the white police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Mo., according to law enforcement officials.

 

When racial tension boiled over in Ferguson after the Aug. 9 shooting, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. traveled to the St. Louis suburb to meet with city leaders and protest organizers in an effort to bring calm. He assured them that the federal government would open a civil rights investigation into the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, but that investigation now seems unlikely to result in any charges.

 

“The evidence at this point does not support civil rights charges against Officer Wilson,” said one person briefed on the investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the case.

 

Justice Department officials are loath to acknowledge publicly that their case cannot now meet the high legal threshold for a successful civil rights prosecution. The timing is sensitive: Tensions are high in greater St. Louis as people await the results of a grand jury’s review of the case.

 

Many supporters of Brown say they are already convinced there will be no state-level indictment of the officer. Federal officials have wanted to show that they are conducting a full and fair review of the case.

Justice spokesman Brian Fallon said the case remains open and any discussion of its results is premature. “This is an irresponsible report by The Washington Post that is based on idle speculation,” Fallon said in a statement.

 

Other law enforcement officials interviewed by The Post said it was not too soon to say how the investigation would end. “The evidence we have makes federal civil rights charges unlikely,” one said.

 

A lawyer for the family of Michael Brown, Benjamin L. Crump, said he would not comment “on something that is not official.”

 

James P. Towey Jr., Wilson’s attorney, did not return calls or e-mails seeking comment.

 

The Justice Department is continuing its broad investigation of the policing practices of the Ferguson Police Department, which could result in wholesale reforms and reorganization. The department on Friday announced an agreement with the city of Albuquerque intended to overhaul the way its police department uses force, the result of one such civil rights investigation.

 

At a forum this week organized by the Aspen Institute and the Atlantic, Holder indicated that similar reform could be called for in Ferguson.“It’s pretty clear that the need for wholesale change in that department is appropriate,” Holder said.

 

Federal law sets a high bar in bringing civil rights charges against a police officer because prosecutors must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the officer intended to violate someone’s constitutional rights.

Authorities faced a similar challenge in the investigation of George Zimmerman in the 2012 shooting death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. Under federal law for hate crimes, prosecutors have to show that someone has been victimized intentionally because of a racial or other bias.

 

Law enforcement officials have said privately that there is insufficient evidence to bring federal charges in that case, although the two-year probe technically remains open.

 

The investigation of the Brown shooting is being conducted by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division under a federal statute that makes it a crime for a person with government authority — the legal term is “acting under color of any law” — to “willfully deprive a person of a right or privilege protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States.”

 

Sometimes the department is successful. In 2010 prosecutors won convictions of two New Orleans police officers for civil rights violations in connection with the killing of a man and the burning of his body during the disruption that followed Hurricane Katrina. The officers have appealed their convictions.

 

Holder and other officials have decried recent news reports about investigative findings in the Ferguson case that have revealed new but conflicting details about the three-minute encounter between Wilson and Brown. Some of those details potentially corroborate the officer’s accountthat the killing was an act of self-defense and could complicate a civil rights case against Wilson.

 

The St. Louis County autopsy report, published Oct. 21 by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, was interpreted by some forensic pathologists as indicating that Brown may have struggled for control of Wilson’s gun during their initial altercation, but they also said the evidence was inconclusive.

 

After two shots were fired inside Wilson’s patrol vehicle, the officer got out and Brown fled but later turned around as Wilson continued firing. Some pathologists said the report indicates — but not conclusively — that Brown’s hands were not over his head. Several witnesses said his arms were raised in surrender when the officer shot him again.

 

Rachel A. Harmon, a law professor at the University of Virginia and a former prosecutor in the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, said it is especially challenging to prove a civil rights case beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

“There is an extra burden in federal civil rights cases because the statute requires that the defendant acted ‘willfully,’ ” Harmon said. “It is not enough to prove that he used too much force. You have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he did so willfully.”

 

Harmon also said that if Wilson “genuinely believed he was acting in self-defense,” then his actions are not considered “willful,” meaning he did not intend to deprive Brown of his constitutional rights.

 

Brown was shot a total of nine times, including three times in the head, according to the county autopsy.

 

Dorian Johnson, the 22-year-old who was with Brown when the two encountered Wilson, has said the officer was the aggressor and did not act in self defense.

 

David Klinger, a former Los Angeles police officer and professor of criminology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, said enduring disputes over what happened likely raise reasonable doubt that would make a successful civil rights prosecution almost impossible.

 

“The autopsy report is devastating because it raises doubts about him standing still with his hands in the air in surrender,” said Klinger, who shot and killed a suspect in the line of duty when he was an officer. “If you have a halfway competent lawyer, the defense could raise reasonable doubt with this.”

 

Samuel Bagenstos, a former Justice Department principal deputy assistant attorney general for civil rights and now a law professor at the University of Michigan, said that the obstacles prosecutors face in the Ferguson case are typical, as are the frustrations of Brown’s supporters.

 

It is common to have a situation “that looks like a constitutional violation and may well be an injustice,” Bagenstos said. “But sometimes the Justice Department does not have the ability to bring a civil rights case under the statutes it enforces.”

 

Now for some facts and truth in reporting……..

 

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Ferguson Grand Jury Leaks Crucial Information From The Michael Brown Case. Prosecutor and Grand Jury Should Be Dismissed.

 

Ferguson Grand Jury Leaks Crucial Information From The Michael Brown Case

 

Published on Oct 23, 2014

Joe Madison The Black Eagle. The grand jury in the Michael Brown Ferguson, MO case has leaked serveral key pieces of information from their deliberations. Madison is calling for the grand jury to be dismissed and for a new group to be selected.

 

 

 

Brown’s Autopsy Report Was Taken Out Of Context, Says Forensics Expert

 

Published on Oct 23, 2014

“Judy Melinek, one of the forensic experts who was quoted by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Tuesday about the Michael Brown autopsy report, is taking issue with how the newspaper portrayed her comments.

The key piece of Melinek’s analysis, according to the Post-Dispatch’s original report, was that the report of Brown’s autopsy ‘supports the fact that this guy is reaching for the gun, if he has gunpowder particulate material in the wound. If he has his hand near the gun when it goes off, he’s going for the officer’s gun.’” *

 

 

 

Michael Brown Autopsy Facts & Truth:

 

It appears CNN has decided to out right lie about an autopsy report “leaked” TO CNN, the #FergusonOctober protest and everything Black in general. The MilitantNegro™ will not allow CNN to lie.

 

Michael Brown Autopsy Results by Doctor Baden

 

Published on Aug 20, 2014

There has been some false info and altered images circulated surrounding Mike Brown’s physical body. Watch this video for the source findings. Spend the 20 minutes to understand what medical and science professionals know about the shooting of Michael Brown.

 

 

 

New Michael Brown shooting Contractors Witnesses describe Scene

 

 

 

 

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck At Least 6 Times

 

From The New York Times:

 

Autopsy Shows Michael Brown Was Struck at Least 6 Times

 

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By FRANCES ROBLES and JULIE BOSMANAUG. 17, 2014

 

FERGUSON, Mo. — Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager who was killed by a police officer, sparking protests around the nation, was shot at least six times, including twice in the head, a preliminary private autopsy performed on Sunday found.

 

One of the bullets entered the top of Mr. Brown’s skull, suggesting his head was bent forward when it struck him and caused a fatal injury, according to Dr. Michael M. Baden, the former chief medical examiner for the City of New York, who flew toMissouri on Sunday at the family’s request to conduct the separate autopsy. It was likely the last of bullets to hit him, he said.

 

Mr. Brown, 18, was also shot four times in the right arm, he said, adding that all the bullets were fired into his front.

 

The bullets did not appear to have been shot from very close range because no gunpowder was present on his body. However, that determination could change if it turns out that there is gunshot residue on Mr. Brown’s clothing, to which Dr. Baden did not have access.

 

Dr. Michael Baden, right, and Prof. Shawn Parcells in Ferguson, Mo. Dr. Baden, based in New York, examined Michael Brown. Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

Dr. Michael Baden, right, and Prof. Shawn Parcells in Ferguson, Mo. Dr. Baden, based in New York, examined Michael Brown. Credit Eric Thayer for The New York Times

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said Sunday that the Justice Department would conduct its own autopsy, in addition to the one performed by local officials and this private one because, a department spokesman said, of “the extraordinary circumstances involved in this case and at the request of the Brown family.”

 

The preliminary autopsy results are the first time that some of the critical information resulting in Mr. Brown’s death has been made public. Thousands of protesters demanding information and justice for what was widely viewed as a reckless shooting took to the streets here in rallies that ranged from peaceful to violent.

 

Mr. Brown died last week in a confrontation with a police officer here in this suburb of St. Louis.

 

The police department has come under harsh criticism for refusing to clarify the circumstances of the shooting and for responding to protests with military-style operational gear.

 

“People have been asking: How many times was he shot? This information could have been released on Day 1,” Dr. Baden said in an interview after performing the autopsy. “They don’t do that, even as feelings built up among the citizenry that there was a cover-up. We are hoping to alleviate that.”

 

Dr. Baden said that while Mr. Brown was shot at least six times, only three bullets were recovered from his body. But he has not yet seen the X-rays showing where the bullets were found, which would clarify the autopsy results. Nor has he had access to witness and police statements.

 

Dr. Baden provided a diagram of the entry wounds, and noted that the six shots produced numerous wounds. Some of the bullets entered and exited several times, including one that left at least five different wounds.

 

“This one here looks like his head was bent downward,” he said, indicating the wound at the very top of Mr. Brown’s head. “It can be because he’s giving up, or because he’s charging forward at the officer.”

 

He stressed that his information does not assign blame or justify the shooting.
“We need more information; for example, the police should be examining the automobile to see if there is gunshot residue in the police car,” he said.

 

Dr. Baden, 80, is a well-known New York-based medical examiner, who is one of only about 400 board-certified forensic pathologists in the nation. He reviewed the autopsies of both President John F. Kennedy and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and has performed more than 20,000 autopsies himself.

 

He is best known for having hosted the HBO show “Autopsy,” but he rankles when he is called a “celebrity medical examiner,” saying that the vast majority of what he does has nothing to do with celebrities.

 

Dr. Baden said that because of the tremendous attention to the case, he waived his $10,000 fee.

 

Prof. Shawn L. Parcells, a pathologist assistant based in Kansas, assisted Dr. Baden.

 

“You do this for the families,” Mr. Parcells said.

 

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The two medical experts conducted the four-hour examination Sunday at the Austin A. Layne Mortuary in St. Louis. Benjamin L. Crump, a lawyer for Mr. Brown’s family who paid their travel expenses, hired them.

 

“The sheer number of bullets and the way they were scattered all over his body showed this police officer had a brazen disregard for the very people he was supposed to protect in that community,” Mr. Crump said. “We want to make sure people understand what this case is about: This case is about a police officer executing a young unarmed man in broad daylight.”

 

A spokesman for the Ferguson Police Department, Tim Zoll, said the police had not seen a report of the autopsy and therefore had no comment on it.

 

Dr. Baden said he consulted with the St. Louis County medical examiner before conducting the autopsy.

 

One of the bullets shattered Mr. Brown’s right eye, traveled through his face, exited his jaw and re-entered his collarbone. The last two shots in the head would have stopped him in his tracks and were likely the last fired.

 

Mr. Brown, he said, would not have survived the shooting even if he had been taken to a hospital right away. The autopsy indicated that he was otherwise healthy.

 

Dr. Baden said it was unusual for the federal government to conduct a third autopsy, but dueling examinations often occur when there is so much distrust of the authorities. The county of St. Louis has conducted an autopsy, and the results have not yet been released.

 

He stressed that his examination was not to determine whether the shooting was justified.

 

“In my capacity as the forensic examiner for the New York State Police, I would say, ‘You’re not supposed to shoot so many times,’ ” said Dr. Baden, who retired from the state police in 2011. “Right now there is too little information to forensically reconstruct the shooting.”

 

No matter what conclusions can be drawn from Dr. Baden’s work, Mr. Brown’s death remains marked by shifting and contradictory accounts more than a week after it occurred. The shooting is under investigation by St. Louis County and by the F.B.I., working with the Justice Department’s civil rights division and the office of Attorney General Holder.
According to what has emerged so far, on Saturday, Aug. 9, Mr. Brown, along with a companion, Dorian Johnson, was walking in the middle of Canfield Drive, a fistful of cigarillos in Mr. Brown’s hand, police say, which a videotape shows he stole from a liquor store on West Florissant Ave.

 

At 12:01 p.m., they were stopped by Darren Wilson, a police officer, who ordered them off the road and onto the sidewalk, Mr. Johnson, who is 22, later said.

 

The police have said that what happened next was a physical struggle between Mr. Brown and Officer Wilson that left the officer with a swollen face. Mr. Johnson and others have said that it was a case of racial profiling and police aggression from a white officer toward a black man. Within minutes, Mr. Brown, who was unarmed, was dead of gunshot wounds.

 

The sequence of events provided by law enforcement officials places Mr. Brown and Mr. Johnson at Ferguson Market and Liquors, a store several blocks away on West Florissant Ave., at about 11:50 a.m. After leaving the store with the cigarillos, the two walked north on West Florissant, a busy commercial thoroughfare, toward Canfield Drive, a clerk reported to the police.

 

Mr. Brown was a big man at 6-foot-4 and 292 pounds, though his family and friends described him as quiet and shy, a homebody who lived with his grandmother.

 

It is about a 10-minute walk from Ferguson Market to the spot where Officer Wilson, 28, with six years’ experience, approached Mr. Brown and Mr. Johnson.

 

The police tell of an officer who was enforcing the minor violation of jaywalking, as Mr. Brown and Mr. Johnson ignored the sidewalk and strolled down the middle of the road instead.

 

The morning after the shooting, Chief Jon Belmar of the St. Louis County police said that Officer Wilson was leaving his police car when Mr. Brown “allegedly pushed the police officer back into the car,” where he “physically assaulted the police officer.”

 

“Within the police car there was a struggle over the officer’s weapon,” Chief Belmar said. “There was at least one shot fired in the car.” At that point, the police said, Officer Wilson left his vehicle and fatally shot Mr. Brown. “More than a few” shell casings were recovered from the scene.

 

Mr. Johnson, who declined to be interviewed, has described the events differently in television interviews. While he and Mr. Brown walked, he said, Officer Wilson stopped his vehicle and told them to get on the sidewalk. When they refused, Officer Wilson slammed on his brakes and drove in reverse to get closer.

 

When the officer opened his door, it hit Mr. Brown. With his left hand, Officer Wilson reached out and grabbed Mr. Brown by the neck, Mr. Johnson said.

 

“It’s like tug-of-war,” Mr. Johnson said. “He’s trying to pull him in. He’s pulling away, that’s when I heard, ‘I’m gonna shoot you.’ ”

 

A neighbor, Tiffany Mitchell, said in an interview with MSNBC that she heard tires squeal, then saw Mr. Brown and Officer Wilson “wrestling” through the open car window. A shot went off from within the car, Mr. Johnson said, and the two began to run away from the officer.

 

According to Ms. Mitchell, “The officer gets out of his vehicle,” she said, pursuing Mr. Brown, then continued to shoot.

 

Mr. Johnson said that he hid behind a parked car and that Mr. Brown was struck by a bullet in his back as he ran away, an account that Dr. Baden’s autopsy appears to contradict.

 

“Michael’s body jerks as if he was hit,” Ms. Mitchell said, “and then he put his hands up.” Mr. Brown turned, Mr. Johnson said, raised his hands, and said, “I don’t have a gun, stop shooting!”

 

Officer Wilson continued to fire and Mr. Brown crumpled to the ground, Mr. Johnson said. Within seconds, confusion and horror swept through Canfield Drive. On that Saturday afternoon, dozens of neighbors were at home and rushed out of their apartments when they heard gunshots.

 

One person who claimed to witness the shooting began posting frantic messages on Twitter, written hastily with shorthand and grammatical errors, only two minutes after Officer Wilson approached Mr. Brown. At 12:03 p.m., the person, identified as @TheePharoah, a St. Louis-area rapper, wrote on Twitter that he had just seen someone die.

 

That same minute, he wrote, “Im about to hyperventilate.”

 

At 12:23 p.m., he wrote, “dude was running and the cops just saw him. I saw him die bruh.”

 

A 10-minute video posted on YouTube appeared to be taken on a cellphone by someone who identified himself as a neighbor. The video, which has collected more than 225,000 views, captures Mr. Brown’s body, the yellow police tape that marked off the crime scene and the residents standing behind it.

 

“They shot that boy ’cause they wanted to,” said one woman who can be heard on the video.

 

“They said he had his hands up and everything,” said the man taking the video, speaking to a neighbor.

 

Mr. Brown’s body remained in the street for several hours, a delay that Chief Jackson said last week made him “uncomfortable.” Antonio French, a St. Louis alderman who has been active in this case, said on ABC on Sunday that the body had remained in the street for nearly five hours.

 

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At one point, a woman can be heard shouting, “Where is the ambulance? Where is the ambulance?” The man taking the video, who remained off-camera, said, “God rest his soul. He’s gone.”

 

Thank you The New York Times

The above autopsy report released on August 17th, 2014 makes this autopsy report from The Washington Post, garbage, exactly like the Washington Post, who should stick to reporting the news and not predicting the news.

 

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Remember the days when ALL media reporting was reliable, honest, fact based and truthful? Remember when we trusted and believed what was reported in newspapers, TV reports and radio newscasts? Those days are long gone. MSNBC, CNN, Fox and even PBS have all made serious speculation errors in the recent past. Who can you trust to report facts, researched news and tell us what is and not what “they” want it to be?

 

If the Washington Post can’t supply anything other than “one person briefed on the investigation, who spoke on condition of anonymity”, why not sit their asses down and shut the fuck up, until they have a source they can name? Now read this…..”Justice spokesman Brian Fallon said the case remains open and any discussion of its results is premature. “This is an irresponsible report by The Washington Post that is based on idle speculation,” Fallon said in a statement.”

 

Mr. Fallon is a NAME who speaks without “condition of anonymity.” Like I said, Washington Post, sit the fuck down and shut the fuck up.

 

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BBC Africa: Escaping Boko Haram: How Three Nigeria Girls Found Safety.


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Escaping Boko Haram: How three Nigeria girls found safety

 

The story of three Nigerian girls who escaped Boko Haram

For six months the world has waited for news of the fate of more than 200 girls abducted by Nigerian militant group Boko Haram. As the Nigerian government insists a deal to release the “Chibok girls” is being negotiated, three girls who escaped their captors have told their story to BBC Hausa.

Lami, Maria and Hajara were at school in Chibok, north-eastern Nigeria, when they were kidnapped in April. Best friends Lami and Maria escaped by jumping from the back of a truck. Hajara was taken to a camp but later fled with another girl.

 

To protect the girls’ identity we have portrayed their story as an animation, and provided an edited transcript of their account below.

 

The girls’ names have been changed for their protection.

 

Animation by Luis Ruibal.

 

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Lami: It was Monday night. We had exams the following day. Then we started to hear shootings in the town. So we went out. We phoned our parents to tell them what was happening in the town. They told us to run away when we got the chance. We told them that the town was already surrounded so there was no way we could run.

 

Maria: Lami woke me up saying: “Maria didn’t you hear what’s happening? Haven’t you heard sounds of shooting from the town?”

 

I said we should climb the wall and run away. She said: “No. No-one has run away. We should gather in one place and wait to see what’s going to happen.”

 

Other girls said nothing would happen to us. “We’re girls. They don’t do anything to girls. We should wait and see what God would do.”

 

Lami: We were at the school when suddenly three Boko Haram members entered.

 

They said: “If any of you attempt to leave we’ll kill all of you.” When we went out they were everywhere. They gathered us where we have our school assembly. As we were there they kept burning the school. They burnt everything.

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Hajara: They asked us to get out of the gate, saying that when we were out they would let us go back to our homes. They said whoever did not have a headscarf or shoes should go and get them. They then asked us to climb on to a lorry, on top of the food loaded in it. The lorry was so high that we couldn’t easily climb on.

 

Maria: They said to us: “You’re only coming to school for prostitution. Boko (Western education) is haram (forbidden) so what are you doing in school?”

 

We kept quiet. I think there could have been about 100 Boko Haram members – they were all over the school. They outnumbered us. They took us away in their vehicles. We were sitting on oil drums in the vehicle. Our vehicle was really overloaded. We were saying to one another that we should throw away our shoes and scarves so that if our parents came they would know the road we had taken.

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Hajara: The vehicle became full before I could get on. There were about 100 of us walking. We stopped at one town and people brought us water. I saw one of those who brought us water changed his clothes and joined the Boko Haram men. They then put us in other vehicles.

 

They put the rest in the boots of cars. Some of the Boko Haram members were so small that if I were to grab their necks I could break them. Some couldn’t even carry their guns properly.

 

Maria: We were wondering where we were being taken to. When we entered the vehicle, Lami said to me: “Shouldn’t we jump out of the vehicle here so that we may possibly escape? There are no other vehicles close by.”

 

Hajara: I thought, it’s preferable to have these people shoot me as I run than have them humiliate me. They kept saying to us: “Make sure you put on your scarves. Make sure you put on your scarves. We’ll shoot any girl we see without a scarf. And any girl who jumps out will die.”

 

I was about to jump out when one girl held me back and said they’d shoot me if I did.

 

“What’s the difference,” I said. “Is it not to the same death we’re going? They should shoot me here and let my corpse be collected.”

 

I was crying and praying until we reached the camp.

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Lami: There was a lot of dust on the road, they couldn’t see us. When we jumped out, we started to run. We were running without shoes. We found other people. We started to run away from them thinking they were Boko Haram. But they too had run from the town.

 

Hajara: Boko Haram gathered us in a forest around noon. Some of the girls were tired and were lying down. But I couldn’t lie down. The spirit of God was asking me to go. It was telling me: “Get up and go. Get up and go.”

 

So I went. Another girl followed me. When we were going I saw some of them [Boko Haram members] performing ablutions. We stooped as if we were trying to pull out thorns from our shoes, as if we were just going to wee. We’d walk a little then bend down for a little while as if we were looking for something we’d lost.

 

After walking for a while they couldn’t see us properly since it was forest. We then started to run. After we had run for a short distance, we heard them saying “catch those girls.” We kept running. Whether they came after us not, we didn’t know.

 

Hajara: We kept going and our shoes were ripped. We found a house, where a girl could speak Hausa. Her parents gave us a place to sleep. We reached the Chibok area in the morning. A man looking for a relative among the missing girls drove us on motorbike into town.

 

When I saw my elder and younger brothers, I fell to the ground crying. My mother and father were crying and all members of my family cried. Before I reached home it was as if there was a death in the house. Mats were spread. People were consoling my father and mother thinking that I had died.

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Lami: The people we met said: “Your town is far away. You can’t go there now. Come here and wait until morning when we’ll take you into the town to get transport back home.” We stayed there till morning when they asked us to get up so that we go to the town. We couldn’t walk. Our feet were full of thorns.

 

They said: “Let’s go find a vehicle to take you home.”

 

Maria: The men who helped us took us to Chibok, and I cried. It was the second time that something like that had happened to me. My dad was a pastor; Boko Haram went to our house and killed him. They also shot my mum in the stomach; they gave her 2,000 Naira ($12) to have the bullet.

 

Lami: My parents warmed up water and cared for my feet. I was taken to the hospital and it was two weeks before I could stand up.

 

Maria: I continued to live with the thought that Boko Haram members were coming to get me. I couldn’t sleep.

 

Hajara: I was having nightmares every day. There was even a day when I dreamed that they gathered all of us who fled in one place, and said to us: “You girls have defied us and fled. We’re now going to burn you alive.”

 

I haven’t forgotten about the other girls who are still in the hands of those people. I keep praying for them.

 

Lami: God will never make us meet these people again. And for our sisters who are still in the forest, may God help them. And may the whole world cry out for these girls to get out so that we continue with our education in school again.

 

Maria: They should pray to God to forgive them their sins. I’d also ask them to bring back the girls they have kidnapped because their parents are in distress. Some of the parents of the girls have already died. It was the thought of their girls that killed them.

 

Hajara: God will do what he wills, but I don’t want to look at them because of what they have done to my life. They think they’ve ruined me, but God willing, they haven’t ruined me. I’ll continue with my education.

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More on This Story

 

 

 Who are Boko Haram?

 

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  • Founded in 2002
  • Initially focused on opposing Western education – Boko Haram means “Western education is forbidden” in the Hausa language
  • Launched military operations in 2009 to create Islamic state
  • Thousands killed, mostly in north-eastern Nigeria – also attacked police and UN headquarters in capital, Abuja
  • Some three million people affected
  • Declared terrorist group by US in 2013

 

Who are Boko Haram?

 

Profile: Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau

 

Will ‘truce’ with Boko Haram free Chibok girls?

 

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The Bring Back Our Girls Hashtag Campaign

 

Published on May 9, 2014

All across the globe a campaign has started using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. Be a part of this magnificent effort to bring the kidnapped Nigerian girls home. Make your own sigh and post it on social media today.

 

 

 

#BringBackOurGirls

 

Published on May 5, 2014

The leader of an Islamic extremist group in Nigeria says his group has started kidnapping women and children as part of its bloody guerrilla campaign against the country’s government, according to a video released Monday. Scores of girls and young women kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry their Islamic extremist abductors, a civic organization reported Wednesday.

 

 

 

#BringBackOurGirls Worldwide Protest

 

Published on May 7, 2014

Images of people the world over weeping and protesting for the return of 276 young girls kidnapped from a Nigerian boarding school. #BringBackOurGirls #BringBackOurDaughters #276

 

 

 

BBC News100 WOMEN

Who is 100 Women for?

I don’t know her name, because she lives in a remote village in India – or was it Afghanistan? She’s not a politician – nor will she ever be. She does not seek publicity, or wear shoes that cost more than a Bangladeshi worker will earn in 10 years. But hopefully one day she or her daughter will break free from male-dominated society and carve out a living as a small-scale businesswoman.

BBC audience survey

 

Screenshot (1441) Screenshot (1440)

 

100 Women BBC NEWS

 

BBC News Africa: Nigeria’s Boko Haram Abducts More Women And Girls.

 

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From The Daily KOS: Since St. Louis Has Decided Against Releasing A Report, Here’s The Timeline Of Mike Brown’s Murder.


 

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Since St. Louis has decided against releasing a report, here’s the timeline of Mike Brown’s death

 

by Shaun King for shaunking

 

Mike Brown, an unarmed teenager, was shot and killed in the middle of the street by Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson on a hot and hazy Saturday afternoon on August 9, 2014.

 

For over two months, people have practically begged the St. Louis County Police Department to release a detailed incident report of the shooting. Rather quietly, it was recently announced that the police will not be doing any such thing. In an interview with the Washington Post, Officer Brian Schellman, spokesman for the department, confirmed that that the police have no intention of releasing it whatsoever. Schellman said there are only two conditions in which the report will ever be released: If the grand jury in the Darren Wilson case decides against an indictment, or if Wilson is indicted and the report is used in court. Otherwise, we won’t be seeing it.

 

With this absence of information, the public has practically been forced to piece together public evidence to create a timeline of the day.

 

Below is a working theory of the killing of Mike Brown based on five things: six eyewitness accounts, confirmed audio of the fired gunshots, dozens of photos from the Aug. 9 shooting scene on Canfield Drive, visits to the crime scene by volunteers, and the publicly released autopsy results.

 

The typical police firearm usually holds 12-15 rounds (up to 17) to a magazine with possibly one bullet in the chamber, and Wilson may have nearly unloaded his entire gun during this incident.

 

Amazingly, a young man living in an apartment on Canfield Drive was using a mobile app called Glide in which he was recording a message to his girlfriend during the final moments of Brown’s life. The time stamp and location of the recording were authenticated by the technology company.

 

From the moment Mike Brown first saw Darren Wilson until he was laying face down, dead, on Canfield Drive, was less than two-and-half minutes. Jump below the fold for the timeline.

 

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Before Glide App Video Messaging Audio:12:00 PM: Mike Brown and Dorian Johnson are casually walking in the middle of Canfield Drive. This was/is a common practice on this street on a Saturday afternoon in this neighborhood. They notice a police SUV coming toward them. 

12:00 PM: Officer Darren Wilson, driving past them, slows down and tells them “to get the fuck on the sidewalk.” Brown remains silent while Dorian Johnson tells Wilson that they are just a minute away from their destination.

 

12:00 PM: Wilson, having passed them by, violently puts the car in reverse, screeching the tires in the street, nearly hitting Brown and Johnson, who are forced to jump out of the way, stops right next to them, and thrusts open his door. The driver’s side door only opens only a few inches because it hits Mike Brown and ricochets back into Wilson.

 

12:01 PM: A struggle ensues at the window of the police SUV, which causes Brown to lose his red, fitted baseball cap, found at this exact location after the shooting. Wilson immediately grabs at the neck of Brown as Brown tries to pull away, Wilson pulls his weapon, and threatens to shoot Brown. Brown’s hands remain outside of the SUV, and he uses the vehicle as leverage to pull away.

 

During this struggle, the first shot is fired from inside the vehicle by Wilson. It hits Brown in his chest/arm area.

 

Fearing for their lives, Brown and Johnson flee in different directions. Brown loses one of his flip-flops approximately 20 feet from the SUV. Johnson hides behind a black Monte Carlo.

 

Wilson, gun drawn, exits his SUV and prepares to fire at a fleeing Brown.

 

Begin Glide App Audio:

12:02:14 PM.: Wilson pursues Brown as he flees some 100-plus feet from the police vehicle.  During the pursuit, firing at the back of Brown, Wilson fires shots two (12:02:16 PM), three (12:02:16 PM), four (12:02:17 PM), five (12:02:17 PM), and six (12:02:17 PM)within milliseconds under three seconds, missing a fleeing Brown.

 

12:02:18 PM: Shot seven grazes Brown’s right forearm, at which point Brown turns aroundto surrender. There is a three-second pause after shot seven, as Wilson continues his pursuit of a surrendering Brown, closing the pursuit gap significantly. Brown, with his hands up, says, “Okay, okay, okay. I’m unarmed, don’t shoot…” Before Brown can finish his plea, Wilson begins to fire the last four shots that hit Brown.

 

12:02:22 PM: In just under two seconds shots eight through eleven strike Brown (making the encounter from shots two through eleven mere milliseconds under eight seconds.)

 

Shots eight and nine (12:02:22 PM) strike Brown’s arm/hand while Brown’s hands are up. Brown’s hands come down and he staggers forward a few feet in the direction of Wilson.

 

12:02:23 PM: While falling to the ground, Brown cradles his arms close to him as Wilson fires shot ten (12:02:23 PM) into his eye and shot eleven (possible fatal bullet fired at 12:02:23 PM) into the top of his head.

 

12:02:25 PM: Brown is dead on Canfield Drive—over 108 feet away from Wilson’s SUV. The time from the confrontation at the SUV to Brown’s death takes just about one minute.

 

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(Vincent Heck was a key contributor to this report.)

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED TO SHAUNKING ON WED OCT 15, 2014 AT 08:22 AM PDT.

 

ALSO REPUBLISHED BY DAILY KOS AND COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT.

 

Thank you Shaun King & DAILY KOS

 

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Steve Harvey’s Emotional Chat With Michael Brown’s Mom, Ms. Lesley McSpadden. Ferguson Grand Jury Investigated For Misconduct.


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From The Steve Harvey Show:

 

“I Haven’t Any Time To Myself To Grieve.” Mike Brown’s Mother Lesley McSpadden Opens Up On Steve Harvey Show

 

An emotional Lesley McSpadden, the mother of slain teen Michael Brown appeared on the Steve Harvey show, to open up about what she has been through since the passing of her son: 

 

“I was at work, I got a call from my sister’s mother. She said ‘They shot Mike Mike!’ I didn’t want to think he was dead. All I could think was run, just run. I ran back into my job and told them get me to him. The first thing I seen that let me know he was dead was the yellow tape. I wanted to see him, to know it was really him and the cop told me no. For four and a half hours they told me no.” she said tearfully.

 

Next Steve asks her where does she find comfort these days: 

 

“Prayer. My other children”

 

When asked has she had a chance to grieve she says: 

 

“No. This is public. This is so public. Most people get to grieve in silence. I haven’t had any silence.I haven’t had any time to grieve at all.” 

 

Steve then speaks about teaching his sons how to interact with police so they don’t become victims with tears starting to pool in his eyes: 

 

“And for those out there who have to do like I do, because I have three sons and every time an incident happens like this, we have to go over, we have to go over the things again. Why do I have to teach my sons to assume the position? Why do I have to teach my sons “10 and 2,” palms up? I have to teach my son, when the window goes down, show both hands on both sides. Why am I teaching my sons this?”

 

Steve Harvey’s emotional chat with Michael Brown’s mom

 

Published on Sep 30, 2014

It’s a story we all remember. None of us could miss the headlines and the national issues it dug up; violence, race and dignity. They’re topics we must talk about as a society but we can’t let that overshadow the loss Michael’s family is going through right now, the grief they can only hope to one day overcome.

Steve talked with Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown’s mom, about overcoming grief.

 

 

#Ferguson grand jury being investigated for misconduct

#Ferguson grand jury being investigated for misconduct

 

From The Washington Post:

 

Grand jury considering the Ferguson shooting is being investigated for misconduct

 

By Kimberly Kindy

 

The St. Louis County prosecutor’s office is investigating an accusation of misconduct on the grand jury that is hearing the case against the Ferguson police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

 

Ed Magee, the spokesman for county prosecutor Robert McCulloch, said they received the information from a “Twitter user” Wednesday morning.

 

“We are looking into the matter,” he said.

 

An account of possible jury misconduct surfaced Wednesday morning on Twitter, when several users sent messages about one juror who may have discussed evidence in the case with a friend.

 

In one of those messages, a person tweeted that they are friends with a member of the jury who doesn’t believe there is enough evidence to warrant an arrest of the officer, Darren Wilson.

 

The same person who tweeted about being friends with a member of the jury has also tweeted messages of support for Wilson.

 

Magee confirmed that the Twitter user and feed came from an activist, Shaun King.

 

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The jury has been weighing evidence on the case since Aug. 20, within days of the Aug. 9 shooting. McCulloch told The Washington Post last week that both the FBI and county police’s investigations into the shooting are “pretty much done.” He also said that jurors should be done hearing all the evidence by later this month, but they could meet through mid-November.

 

Grand jury proceedings are confidential and if there has been a breach, the prosecutor’s office may have to start over with a newly empaneled group.

 

Meanwhile, Ferguson is grappling with continuing protests amid the wait over whether Wilson will face charges.

 

Attorney’s for the Brown family did not immediately respond to requests for commentregarding the investigation into the grand jury. 

Reached on Wednesday evening, King told the Post that the potential link was further evidence that the current legal proceedings may be flawed.

 

“At a time where so many people in Ferguson already don’t believe that Prosecutor Bob McCulloch will take this case seriously, this potential leak is a disaster,” King said. “If it’s found to be true and the Grand Jury has to be dismantled, McCulloch should be taken off of the case immediately and replaced with a special prosecutor.”

 

-Wesley Lowery contributed to this report

 

Kimberly Kindy is a government accountability reporter at The Washington Post.

 

 

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