President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Election Results.


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President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama responds to a question during a press conference in the East Room of the White House, Nov. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Hussein Obama Addresses The 2014 Mid Term Elections.

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Following Republicans’ big wins in the Senate and House on election night, President Barack Obama and incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said they would try to avoid the gridlock that has gripped the government lately.

“To everyone that voted — I hear you,” Obama said in news conference Wednesday. “To the two-thirds who didn’t participate, I hear you too.”

 

 

Yesterday, millions of Americans cast their ballots. Republicans had a good night, and I congratulate all the candidates who won.

 

But what stands out to me is that the message Americans sent yesterday is one you’ve sent for several elections in a row now. You expect the people you elect to work as hard as you do. You expect us to focus on your ambitions — not ours — and you want us to get the job done. Period.

 

I plan on spending every moment of the next two years rolling up my sleeves and working as hard as I can for the American people. This country has made real and undeniable progress in the six years since the 2008 economic crisis. But our work will not be done until every single American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most: in your own lives.

 

While I’m sure we’ll continue to disagree on some issues that we’re passionate about, I’m eager to work with Congress over the next two years to get the job done. The challenges that lay ahead of us are far too important to allow partisanship or ideology to prevent our progress as a nation.

 

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As we make progress, I’ll need your help, too. Over the weeks and months ahead, I’ll be looking to Americans like you, asking you to stay engaged.

 

I am optimistic about our future. Because for all the maps plastered across our screens today, for all the cynics who say otherwise, we are more than a simple collection of red and blue states. We are the United States.

 

And yesterday, millions of Americans — Democrats and Republicans, women and men, young and old, black and white — took the time out of their day to perform a simple, profound act of citizenship. That’s something we shouldn’t forget amid the din of political commentary. Because making progress starts with showing up.

 

Let’s get to work.

President Barack Obama

 

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Remarks by the President in a Press Conference

East Room

2:57 P.M. EST

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everybody.  Have a seat.

Today, I had a chance to speak with John Boehner and congratulated Mitch McConnell on becoming the next Senate Majority Leader.  And I told them both that I look forward to finishing up this Congress’ business, and then working together for the next two years to advance America’s business.  And I very much appreciated Leader McConnell’s words last night about the prospect of working together to deliver for the American people. On Friday, I look forward to hosting the entire Republican and Democratic leadership at the White House to chart a new course forward.

Obviously, Republicans had a good night, and they deserve credit for running good campaigns.  Beyond that, I’ll leave it to all of you and the professional pundits to pick through yesterday’s results.  What stands out to me, though, is that the American people sent a message, one that they’ve sent for several elections now.  They expect the people they elect to work as hard as they do.  They expect us to focus on their ambitions and not ours.  They want us to get the job done.

All of us, in both parties, have a responsibility to address that sentiment.  Still, as President, I have a unique responsibility to try and make this town work.  So, to everyone who voted, I want you to know that I hear you.  To the two-thirds of voters who chose not to participate in the process yesterday, I hear you, too.  All of us have to give more Americans a reason to feel like the ground is stable beneath their feet, that the future is secure, that there’s a path for young people to succeed, and that folks here in Washington are concerned about them.  So I plan on spending every moment of the next two-plus years doing my job the best I can to keep this country safe and to make sure that more Americans share in its prosperity.

This country has made real progress since the crisis six years ago.  The fact is more Americans are working; unemployment has come down.  More Americans have health insurance.  Manufacturing has grown.  Our deficits have shrunk.  Our dependence on foreign oil is down, as are gas prices.  Our graduation rates are up.  Our businesses aren’t just creating jobs at the fastest pace since the 1990s, our economy is outpacing most of the world.  But we’ve just got to keep at it until every American feels the gains of a growing economy where it matters most, and that’s in their own lives.

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Obviously, much of that will take action from Congress.  And I’m eager to work with the new Congress to make the next two years as productive as possible.  I’m committed to making sure that I measure ideas not by whether they are from Democrats or Republicans, but whether they work for the American people.  And that’s not to say that we won’t disagree over some issues that we’re passionate about.  We will.  Congress will pass some bills I cannot sign.  I’m pretty sure I’ll take some actions that some in Congress will not like.  That’s natural.  That’s how our democracy works.  But we can surely find ways to work together on issues where there’s broad agreement among the American people.

So I look forward to Republicans putting forward their governing agenda.  I will offer my ideas on areas where I think we can move together to respond to people’s economic needs.

So, just take one example.  We all agree on the need to create more jobs that pay well.  Traditionally, both parties have been for creating jobs rebuilding our infrastructure — our roads, bridges, ports, waterways.  I think we can hone in on a way to pay for it through tax reform that closes loopholes and makes it more attractive for companies to create jobs here in the United States.

We can also work together to grow our exports and open new markets for our manufacturers to sell more American-made goods to the rest of the world.  That’s something I’ll be focused on when I travel to Asia next week.

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We all share the same aspirations for our young people.  And I was encouraged that this year Republicans agreed to investments that expanded early childhood education.  I think we’ve got a chance to do more on that front.  We’ve got some common ideas to help more young people afford college and graduate without crippling debt so that they have the freedom to fill the good jobs of tomorrow and buy their first homes and start a family.

And in the five states where a minimum wage increase was on the ballot last night, voters went five for five to increase it. That will give about 325,000 Americans a raise in states where Republican candidates prevailed.  So that should give us new reason to get it done for everybody, with a national increase in the minimum wage.

So those are some areas where I think we’ve got some real opportunities to cooperate.  And I am very eager to hear Republican ideas for what they think we can do together over the next couple of years.  Of course, there’s still business on the docket that needs attention this year.  And here are three places where I think we can work together over the next several weeks, before this Congress wraps up for the holidays.

First, I’m submitting a request to Congress for funding to ensure that our doctors, scientists, and troops have the resources that they need to combat the spread of Ebola in Africa and to increase our preparedness for any future cases here at home.

Second, I’m going to begin engaging Congress over a new Authorization to Use Military Force against ISIL.  The world needs to know we are united behind this effort, and the men and women of our military deserve our clear and unified support.

Third, back in September, Congress passed short-term legislation to keep the government open and operating into December.  That gives Congress five weeks to pass a budget for the rest of the fiscal year.  And I hope that they’ll do it in the same bipartisan, drama-free way that they did earlier this year.  When our companies are steadily creating jobs — which they are — we don’t want to inject any new uncertainty into the world economy and to the American economy.

The point is it’s time for us to take care of business.  There are things this country has to do that can’t wait another two years or another four years.  There are plans this country has to put in place for our future.

And the truth is I’m optimistic about our future.  I have good reason to be.  I meet Americans all across the country who are determined, and big-hearted, and ask what they can do, and never give up, and overcome obstacles.  And they inspire me every single day.  So the fact is I still believe in what I said when I was first elected six years ago last night.  For all the maps plastered across our TV screens today, and for all the cynics who say otherwise, I continue to believe we are simply more than just a collection of red and blue states.  We are the United States.

And whether it’s immigration or climate change, or making sure our kids are going to the best possible schools, to making sure that our communities are creating jobs; whether it’s stopping the spread of terror and disease, to opening up doors of opportunity to everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility — the United States has big things to do.  We can and we will make progress if we do it together.  And I look forward to the work ahead.

So, with that, let me take some questions.  I think that our team has got my list.  And we’re going to start with Julie Pace at Associated Press.

 

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The question & answer session can be found here: Press Conference Q & A

 

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The Day After The Last 24™: Complete 2014 Mid Term Election Results

 

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The Day After The Last 24™


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Election Results

Last updated Nov 5 at 4:14 AM

 

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From Reuters:

 

Tough road ahead for Obama after Republicans seize Senate

 

BY STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES

 

(Reuters) – Republicans rode a wave of voter discontent to seize control of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, dealing a punishing blow to President Barack Obama that will limit his legislative agenda and may force him to make a course correction for his last two years in office.

 

The Republican rout was wide and deep in what was bound to be seen as a sharp rebuke to Obama, who has lurched from crisis to crisis all year and whose unpopularity made him unwelcome to Democratic candidates in many contested states.

 

The Republicans also strengthened their grip on the House of Representatives. When the new Congress takes power in January, they will be in charge of both chambers of Congress for the first time since elections in 2006.

 

The Republican takeover in the Senate will force Obama to scale back his ambitions to either executive actions that do not require legislative approval, or items that might gain bipartisan support, such as trade agreements and tax reform.

 

It will also test his ability to compromise with newly empowered political opponents who have been resisting his legislative agenda since he was first elected. And it could prompt some White House staff turnover as some exhausted members of his team consider departing in favor of fresh legs.

 

Obama, first elected in 2008 and again in 2012, called Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress to the White House on Friday to take stock of the new political landscape.

 

He watched election returns from the White House, and saw little to warm his spirits.

 

Before the election results, the White House had signaled no major changes for Obama. Officials said Obama would seek common ground with Congress on areas like trade and infrastructure.

 

“The president is going to continue to look for partners on Capitol Hill, Democrats or Republicans, who are willing to work with him on policies that benefit middle-class families,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Tuesday.

 

Obama, a one-term senator before he became president, has often been faulted for not developing closer relations with lawmakers.

 

He will find one familiar face in a powerful new position.

 

Republican Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who won a tough re-election battle against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, will replace Democrat Harry Reid as Senate majority leader. Reid has been one of Obama’s top political allies and helped him steer the president’s signature healthcare law through the Senate in 2010.

 

“Some things don’t change after tonight. I don’t expect the president to wake up tomorrow and view the world any differently than he did when he woke up this morning. He knows I won’t either. But we do have an obligation to work together on issues where we can agree,” McConnell said in his victory speech in Louisville.

 

TOSS-UPS BECOME REPUBLICAN WINS

In Tuesday’s comprehensive rout, Republicans won in places where Democrats were favored, taking a Senate race in North Carolina, pulled out victories where the going was tough, like a Senate battle in Kansas, and swept a number of governors’ races in states where Democrats were favored, including Obama’s home state of Illinois.

 

Of eight to 10 Senate seats that were considered toss-ups, Republicans won nearly all of them. They needed six seats to win control of the 100-member Senate, and by late evening they had seven.

 

The winning margin came when Iowa Republican Joni Ernst was declared the winner over Democrat Bruce Braley and Republican Thom Tillis defeated incumbent Democratic Senator Kay Hagan in North Carolina.

 

The Iowa race was particularly indicative of Republican fortunes. Ernst came from behind and surged in recent weeks despite herculean efforts by powerful Democratic figures to save Braley, including a campaign visit by Obama’s wife, Michelle.

 

Republican Senate candidates also picked up Democratic seats in Montana, Colorado, West Virginia, South Dakota and Arkansas.

 

‘RESPONSIBILITY … TO LEAD’

Once the euphoria of their victory ebbs, Republicans will be under pressure to show Americans they are capable of governing after drawing scorn a year ago for shutting down the government in a budget fight. That will be a factor in their ambitions to take back the White House in 2016.

 

Republican Senator Ted Cruz, a conservative firebrand who may run in 2016, told CNN: “The American people, they’re frustrated with what’s happening in Washington, but now the responsibility falls on us to lead.”

 

While there was talk of conciliation, no major breakthrough in Washington’s chilly climate is expected soon.

 

Partisan battles could erupt over immigration reform, with Obama poised to issue executive actions by year’s end to defer deportations of some undocumented immigrants, and over energy policy, as Republican press the president to approve the Keystone XL pipeline carrying oil from Canada.

 

Jay Carney, Obama’s former spokesman, said he expects Obama to make an “all-out push” on his priorities regardless of the makeup of Congress.

 

Whatever the case, Obama will face pressure to make changes at the White House. A Reuters/Ipsos poll showed 75 percent of respondents believe the administration needs to “rethink” how it approaches major issues facing the United States (bit.ly/1ph8sLs). Sixty-four percent said Obama should replace some of his senior staff after the election.

 

The Republican victory had been widely predicted ahead of Tuesday’s voting to elect 36 senators, 36 state governors and all 435 members of the House of Representatives.

 

Obama and other White House officials blamed the electoral map – noting that many key Senate races took place in conservative states that Obama lost in 2012.

 

Election Day polling by Reuters/Ipsos found a dour mood among the electorate with less than one-third of voters believing the country is headed in the right direction.

 

Roughly 40 percent of voters said they approved of the job Obama is doing as president, though they were split over whether they expected the economy to improve or worsen in the coming year.

 

In a consolation for Democrats, Jeanne Shaheen won re-election over Republican Scott Brown in New Hampshire in what polls had forecast as a tight race.

 

In Virginia, heavily favored Democratic incumbent Senator Mark Warner found himself in a surprisingly close fight against Republican challenger Ed Gillespie, with much of the vote counted. By late evening, he claimed victory but Gillespie had not yet conceded.

 

In the most closely watched governors’ races, Florida’s Republican Governor Rick Scott edged out Democrat Charlie Crist, and Republican Scott Walker survived a challenge from Democrat Mary Burke in Wisconsin.

 

(Additional reporting by Jeff Mason, Susan Heavey, Tim Ryan and Ian Simpson in Washington; Marti Maguire in Raleigh, North Carolina; David Beasley in Atlanta; Steve Bittenbender in Louisville, Kentucky; Barbara Liston in Orlando, Bill Cotterell in Tallahassee and Zachary Fagenson in Miami Beach; Colleen Jenkins in Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Jonathan Kaminsky in New Orleans; Editing by Frances Kerry)

 

Thank you Reuters & STEVE HOLLAND AND JOHN WHITESIDES.

 

Joni Ernst makes history in Iowa

 

Published on Nov 5, 2014

Joni Ernst addresses supporters after becoming the first female senator in Iowa state history.

 

 

 

Why Democrats Lost

 

Published on Nov 4, 2014

“Resurgent Republicans captured Democratic seats in Arkansas and West Virginia and bid for control of the U.S. Senate and a tighter grip on the House Tuesday in elections shaped by deep voter discontent with President Barack Obama.

 

 

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From POLITICO:

 

4 indicted N.Y. pols win reelection

 

Takeaways from the GOP romp

 

Big win for conservative big money

 

LePage survives Maine 3-way race

 

After drubbing, all eyes on Clinton

 

Minimum wage hikes win

 

Filibuster-proof majority for Keystone

 

Upsets of the night

 

Kansas Gov. Brownback edges Democratic foe

 

No Obama pivot after midterms

 

Walker victory humiliates labor

 

Coakley falls short again in Mass.

 

How Clintons’ candidates did

 

How Mitch did it

 

Cruz won’t commit to McConnell

 

Senate flips, GOP ready to rule

 

Election results: 2014 takeaways

 

D.C. approves pot legalization

 

Personhood movement loses twice

 

Reid to run for minority leader

 

Ernst beats Braley in Iowa

 

Election results 2014: Gubernatorial analysis

 

Tillis clinches GOP Senate majority

 

Rauner ousts Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn

 

 

Thank you POLITICO.

 

Click On Graphics Below To Enlarge

 

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Mediaite FULL LIST: 2014 Midterm Election Senate Results

 

The 2014 midterm elections have finally arrived and voting is underway in all 50 states. There are plenty of major gubernatorial and congressional races — not to mention some crucial ballot referendums — all across the country, but all anyone in the political media really seems to care about is one thing: the Senate.

 

Conventional wisdom seems to be that Republicans will win the six seats needed to take over the Senate from Democrats, giving them control of both house of Congress for PresidentBarack Obama’s final two years in office. But if you ask Vice President Joe Biden, Democrats are going to maintain a two-seat lead in the Senate, so you never know until polls have closed. And even then, potential run-offs in Georgia and Louisiana have some pundits predicting we won’t know which party really controls the Senate until January 2015.

 

Below are the 11 12 most competitive races of the cycle — the ones that will determine which way the Senate falls. We will be updating the winners throughout the evening as they are called so keep checking back here for the most complete picture of where things stand.

 

Alaska

Mark Begich* (Democrat)
Dan Sullivan (Republican)
Mark Fish (Libertarian)
Ted Gianoutsos (No Party Affiliation)

 

Arkansas

Mark Pryor* (Democrat)
Tom Cotton (Republican)
Nathan LaFrance (Libertarian)
Mark Swaney (Green)

 

Colorado

Mark Udall* (Democrat)
Cory Gardner (Republican)
Raul Acosta (Unaffiliated)
Bill Hammons (Unity)

 

Georgia

Michelle Nunn (Democrat)
David A. Perdue (Republican)
Amanda Swafford (Libertarian)

 

Iowa

Bruce Braley (Democrat)
Joni Ernst (Republican)
Douglas Butzier (Libertarian)
Bob Quast (Other)

 

Kansas

Pat Roberts* (Republican)
Greg Orman (Independent)
Randall Batson (Libertarian)

 

Kentucky

Mitch McConnell* (Republican)
Alison Lundergan Grimes (Democrat)
David Patterson (Libertarian)

 

Louisiana

Mary Landrieu* (Democrat)
Bill Cassidy (Republican)
Rob Maness (Republican)

Run-off projected, scheduled for December 6th.

 

New Hampshire

Jeanne Shaheen* (Democrat)
Scott Brown (Republican)

 

North Carolina

Kay Hagan* (Democrat)
Thom Tillis (Republican)
Sean Haugh (Libertarian)

 

South Dakota

Rick Weiland (Democrat)
Mike Rounds (Republican)
Larry Pressler (Independent)
Gordon Howie (Independent)

 

Virginia

Mark Warner* (Democrat)
Ed Gillespie (Republican)

*Incumbent

Bold = Projected winner

Current Senate Breakdown:

Democrats: 45
Republicans: 52

51 seats needed for a majority; Republicans must pick up 6 seats.

 

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From The Grio:

 

What last night’s election results mean for Obama’s final 2 years

 

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by

 

The 2014 midterm election results are in.  And in keeping with the expectations and conventional wisdom, the Republicans have taken control of the U.S. Senate from Harry Reid and the Democrats.  For the President, the results lay the groundwork for a very interesting final two years in office.  With no possibility of common ground with a GOP-controlled Congress, expect Obama to use his veto pen often, and go it alone through the use of executive orders.

 

With 36 Senate seats in play, mostly in red states, the deck was stacked against the Democrats from the outset.  Sen. Mary Landrieu—who faces a runoff election because no candidate broke through the required 50 percent threshold–created controversy when she suggested the obvious, which is that the South has a problem with Obama because of his race.

 

“I’ll be very, very honest with you. The South has not always been the friendliest place for African-Americans,” Landrieu said. “It’s been a difficult time for the president to present himself in a very positive light as a leader.”

 

Meanwhile, with Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) winning his race against challenger Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, the GOP lawmaker is poised to become majority leader of the upper chamber of Congress.  Grimes—who attempted to distance herself from the president in a state where he is unpopular— was faulted for refusing to say whether she voted for Obama.

 

Compounding the problem for Democrats this election cycle was the issue of lower turnout by the base in midterms, when President Obama was not on the ballot, and the specter of voter suppression efforts such as voter ID, purges and the gutting of the Voting Rights Act making an impact in key races.

 

Among the more high profile races, North Carolina incumbent Senator Kay Hagan (D-North Carolina) lost to Republican Thom Tillis.  In Georgia, Republican David Purdue beat Democrat Michelle Nunn, and Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia) held on to his seat, while incumbent Senator Mark Pryor (D-Arkansas) lost his reelection bid to Tom Cotton. In the New Hampshire race, incumbent Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire) defeated challenger Scott Brown, while Cory Gardner, a Republican, bested incumbent Mark Udall in Colorado.

 

The two African-American U.S. senators, Tim Scott (R-South Carolina) and Cory Booker (D-New Jersey) will return to the legislative body.  Booker is the first black senator elected in New Jersey.  Scott, who had been appointed by Gov. Nikki Haley in 2012 to finish the term of resigning Senator Jim DeMint, is the first black senator elected to the South since Reconstruction.

 

Republicans also maintained control of the House of Representatives, with its 435 seats at stake.  Looking at races for governors, a number of Republican incumbents, such as Scott Walker (R-Wisconsin), Rick Scott (R-Florida) and Rick Snyder (R-Michigan) won reelection, while the unpopular Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett lost as expected to Tom Wolf.  In Maryland, Anthony Brown, the African-American lieutenant governor, lost in his gubernatorial bid to Republican Larry Hogan.

 

With a Republican controlled Senate and Congress, Americans can expect more gridlock.  It is all but certain that the GOP—emboldened and full of hubris—will interpret their victory as a mandate to jam through all types of Tea Party-anointed pieces of legislation.  In the short term, conservative lawmakers are likely to pursue matters such as corporate tax reform, Keystone XL Pipeline and gutting the Affordable Care Act.

 

President Obama is expected to use his veto pen frequently, with continued, futile attempts by Republicans to repeal Obamacare.  Further, we should expect some intra-party strife within the GOP, as presidential aspirants such as Senators Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul position themselves for the 2016 contest, and Cruz expected to make things difficult for Mitch McConnell with calls to investigate the president.

 

Further, a Republican takeover of the Senate could result in a constitutional crisis over the president’s future appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court.  If there is a vacancy on the high court during Obama’s lame duck presidency, it is conceivable that the Senate simply will not hold hearings on a judicial candidate that fails to meet the GOP ultraconservative litmus test.  In addition, whether the Senate will stall on a replacement for Attorney General Eric Holder remains to be seen.

 

In the midst of partisan gridlock and a perpetually broken Senate that refuses to act on important matters, President Obama has the option to use executive orders on issues such as comprehensive immigration reform and amnesty for undocumented immigrants.  One could argue that the president should have pursued such an effort on immigration before the election—as he had promised—as a means to further energize Latinos and the rest of the Democratic base.  Certainly, such an executive move today would anger Obama’s opponents and may be interpreted as overreach.  But he is still the president, and the legislature does not pass legislation these days, mostly to make a black president look bad.

 

And in light of his GOP detractors who have sabotaged the government for political gain, maintaining a legislative logjam only to blame him for the mess, it would seem Obama has little choice.

 

Thank you The Grio & 

 

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Washington School Shooting: Marysville-Pilchuck High School Teacher Megan Silberberger Is Heroine. Jaylen Fryberg Is Lone Shooter.


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MARYSVILLE SCHOOL SHOOTING

 

Two Dead in Washington High School Shooting.

 

Teacher who tried to stop Washington school shooting credited as hero.

 

MARYSVILLE, Washington — A high school teacher tried to stop a gunman who opened fire on a crowded lunchroom north of Seattle, killing one girl and badly wounding four other students, authorities said Saturday.

 

Witnesses identified the shooter as Jaylen Fryberg, 14, a popular Marysville-Pilchuck High School freshman. Fryberg fatally shot himself, according to police, though they didn’t identify him by name.

 

Student Erick Cervantes saw the shootings and identified first-year social studies teacher Megan Silberberger as the woman who intervened, CBS affiliate KIRO in Seattle reported.

 

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“I believe she’s actually the real hero. She’s the one that intercepted him with the gun. He tried either reloading or tried aiming at her. She tried moving his hand away and he tried shooting and shot himself in the neck,” Cervantes told KIRO.

 

He said the gunshots followed a verbal altercation.

 

“It started off with an argument, but then I looked back and there was just gunshots and just people falling down,” Cervantes recalled. And immediately after the gunshots, the (woman) intervened, he said.

 

“She heard the gunshots first and she came in running through the door, right next to it,” Cervantes said.

 

Cervantes described the struggle between Silberberger and Fryberg as brief.

 

“It wasn’t (a) wrestle. She just grabbed his arm, and it lasted like two seconds, and I heard another shot.”

 

Randy Davis, the president of the Marysville Education Association, said he taught at the school for 20 years and knows Silberberger as someone who student-taught last year and just started her first semester as a social studies teacher.

 

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Davis described Silberberger as “your classic first-year teacher with high enthusiasm, a lot of passion for what she does.”

 

He told KIRO he felt “sadness that she had to do it,” but that he was “very proud of her efforts and her motivations.”

 

Detectives confirmed a school worker attempted to intervene in the attack, but Snohomish County Sheriff’s spokeswoman Shari Ireton provided no other details about Silberberger’s actions.

 

Three of the victims had head wounds and were in critical condition Saturday. Two 14-year-old girls were at Providence Everett Medical Center, and were identified by the facility as Shaylee Chucklenaskit and Gia Soriano. Andrew Fryberg, 15, was at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, a hospital official said.

 

Another victim, 14-year-old Nate Hatch, was listed in serious condition at Harborview, the hospital said. Family members told KIRO-TV that all three teenage boys are cousins. Two other students were treated at the high school for minor wounds, authorities said.

 

In a statement Saturday morning, Ireton said that the on-scene investigation at Marysville-Pilchuck High School was finished. A .40-caliber handgun was recovered, which authorities believe was the weapon used in the Friday morning shooting, Ireton said.

 

Brian Bennett, spokesman for the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Seattle, said his agency conducted a trace of the firearm and determined “the most recent purchaser of the gun.” He said he could not identify that person, adding it would be up to the local police to release that information.

 

Hero Teacher (Megan) 2

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Washington School Shooter Jaylen Fryberg ‘Happy,’ ‘Popular': Students.

 

Washington shooting: police investigate love triangle claims.

 

The headlines are numerous but the bottom line is simple. If states were intent on making it as hard, difficult, inconvenient to obtain a gun, assault weapon, shotgun, body armour and bullets as these same states make it to cast your vote in The United States Of AmeriKKKa….Marysville-Pilchuck High School and all the other Marysville-Pilchuck High School’s would NOT HAPPEN.

 

Marysville-Pilchuck High School Homecoming Court 2014

 

 

 

School shooting victims remain critically injured

 

From CBS/AP October 25, 2014

 

Four students shot by a classmate at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington remained hospitalized with serious injuries Saturday as the community struggled to understand the motive behind the attack.

 

Two 14-year-old girls were listed in critical condition at Providence Regional Hospital in Everett, Washington, after sustaining gunshot wounds to the head. Hospital officials identified them as Shaylee Chucklenaskit and Gia Soriano.

 

Dr. Joanne Roberts, chief medical officer at the hospital, said the next three days would be “crucial” in determining their survival and potential recovery.

 

Two male patients were being treated at Harborview Medical Center. The hospital identified one patient as 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg, who remains in critical condition after a gunshot wound to the head. A 14-year-old boy, identified by family members as Nate Hatch, was listed in serious condition with an injury to the jaw.

 

Both boys have been identified as cousins of the suspected gunman, 14-year-old freshman Jaylen Fryberg, according to CBS affiliate KIRO in Seattle.

 

One girl was killed in the attack and has yet to be identified. Fryberg fatally shot himself after the spree, witnesses said.

 

Fryberg was well liked and athletic, a football player named to his high school‘s homecoming court just one week ago.

 

The suspected shooter’s motives remained unclear. Some students described Fryberg as happy and social, even though he had recently fought with a boy over a girl.

 

Shaylee Bass, a 15-year-old sophomore, said he remained upset about that, but she was stunned by the shooting.

 

“He was not a violent person,” she said. “His family is known all around town. He was very well known. That’s what makes it so bizarre.”

 

He was also facing problems, writing of some unspecified troubles on his Twitter feed: “It breaks me… It actually does….”

 

On Wednesday, a posting read: “It won’t last … It’ll never last.” On Monday, another said: “I should have listened. … You were right … The whole time you were right.”

 

Students said the gunman stared at his victims as he fired. The shootings set off a chaotic scene as students ran from the cafeteria and building in a frantic dash to safety, while others huddled inside classrooms at the school 30 miles north of Seattle.

 

Marysville police declined to release the shooter’s identity, with Chief Rick Smith insisting he did not want to “dramatize someone who perpetuated a violent crime in a place where children should feel safe.”

 

However, CBS News confirmed Fryberg as the gunman.

 

Students and parents said Fryberg was a member of a prominent family from the nearby Tulalip Indian tribes and was a freshman football player. A week ago, he stood on the high school track during the team’s homecoming game in a vest, tie and white sash as he was introduced as a prince, according to a video recorded by parent Jim McGauhey.

 

“They’re real good people, very loving,” Ron Iukes, a youth counselor with the tribe, said of Fryberg’s family. “Jaylen was one of our good kids.”

 

State Sen. John McCoy, a tribal member, said the tribal community was devastated. “We’re all related in one shape or form. We live and work and play together.”

 

Hundreds of people prayed and sang songs at a church vigil Friday night for victims and family members.

 

The Oak Harbor high school football team, which had been set to play Marysville Friday night, lined the front row of Grove Church in their purple jerseys. The game was canceled and Oak Harbor offered to give the win to Marysville.

 

Pastor Nik Baumgart told the overflow crowd there was no script for reacting to Friday’s events.

 

“One moment we’re thinking, we can do this,” Baumgart said. “Another moment, we’re thinking, how can we do this?”

 

Witnesses described the shooter as methodical inside the cafeteria.

 

Isabella MacKeige, 18, was having lunch with a friend when the suddenly heard gunshots behind them.

 

“I heard six shots go off and I turned and saw people diving under the tables,” she told The Associated Press.

 

“In my brain I thought ‘run!’ So I left my backpack, my phone and my purse and got out the door as fast as I could.”

 

Some students got hurt when they tripped and fell in the chaos, she said. They ran across an open field to the fence that circles the schoolyard and climbed over.

 

She kept running until she felt safe and found a phone.

 

“I called my mom and she said, ‘stay where you are – I don’t want to lose you,'” MacKeige said.

 

Brian Patrick said his daughter, a freshman, was 10 feet from the gunman. She ran from the cafeteria and immediately called her mother.

 

Patrick said his daughter said, “The guy walked into the cafeteria, pulled out a gun and started shooting. No arguing, no yelling.”

 

A crowd of parents later waited in a parking lot outside a nearby church where they were reunited with their children.

 

Patrick said after the shooting that his other daughter, a senior at the school, was “hysterical” when she called him from her classroom.

 

“I thought, ‘God let my kids be safe,'” he said.

 

Thank you CBS/AP CBS News & Associated Press

 

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Washington High School Shooter Jaylen Fryberg

 

A government official, friends, and witnesses to the shooting identified the gunman Friday as Jaylen Fryberg, a freshman at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.

 

A teenage boy named Jaylen Fryberg opened fire in his high school cafeteria Friday.

 

Though police refused to name Fryberg, both witnesses and multiple media agencies identified him as the shooter.

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The shooting happened at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, about 37 miles north of Seattle, where Fryberg was a freshman.

 

Fellow freshman Brandon Carr spoke with The Seattle Times about the shooting. Carr said he “started hearing these loud banging noises, like someone hitting a trash can,” heard screaming, and ran.

“Once I knew it was gunshots, we just booked it,” Carr told the paper.

 

Students at the school hid under classroom desks and in closets, among other places, as the school was placed on lockdown.

Marysville Police Commander Robert Lamoureux confirmed two people were killed, including the shooter, who turned the gun on himself.

 

Fryberg’s motive remained unclear Friday night, though clues about his recent life suggest he experienced things ranging from relationship woes to trouble at school.

 

Two of the victims, 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg and 14-year-old Nate Hatch, are reportedly Fryberg’s cousins. He also shot two girls, both of whom are not yet identified and in critical condition as of Saturday afternoon.

A student at the school told The Seattle Times that Fryberg was angry about a girl. The student added that the girl was one of those shot. Fryberg’s recent tweets also include complaints about feeling broken.

 

“He shot people he cared about,” Dylen Boomer, a friend and football teammate of Fryberg’s, told the Seattle Times.

 

Fryberg also recently had been suspended after getting into a fight, CNN reported. A student said the incident involved bullying and “a couple words said towards him that he obviously didn’t like.”

Still, Fryberg reportedly was popular at his school and recently was crowned a homecoming prince.

 

Fryberg was voted the homecoming prince for his freshman class, ABC News reported. In a video posted Oct. 19, he appears standing beside a classmate, smiling, while an announcer reads off a list of his activities.

 

The freshman also was a student athlete and played on the school football team. A student told The Seattle Times that Fryberg was in good spirits at practice on Thursday.

 

Over the summer, he was given a hunting rifle for his birthday. A law enforcement official told CBS News, however, that they believe Fryberg used a Beretta 40-caliber handgun during Friday’s shooting.

 

Police traced the gun used in the shooting to Fryberg’s father, CNN reported.

Fryberg was also a member of the Tulalip Tribe. His grandfather is the director of fish and wildlife for the tribe.

 

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His Twitter account is troubling. It’s mostly a mix of pornography and angry tweets alluding to the fact he recently broke up with his girlfriend.

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Several students Fryberg injured remained hospitalized Friday.

 

Of the four injured survivors, two girls were shot in the head and underwent surgery Friday. Fryberg’s cousin, 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg, was also shot and later underwent surgery.

The fourth surviving victim, 14-year-old Nate Hatch — who is also Fryberg’s cousin — was shot in the jaw, The Seattle Times reported. Three of the victims were “very critically ill” Friday, with the fourth in serious condition, according to CNN.

 

 

Washington School Shooter Jaylen Fryberg ‘Happy,’ ‘Popular': Students

 

BY M. ALEX JOHNSON NBC NEWS:

 

A Washington state high school student who opened fire on a cafeteria table full of students, killing one, before fatally shooting himself was described by classmates as a happy, popular football player who’d recently gotten into a dispute with another student.

Two law enforcement sources identified the gunman as Jaylen Ray Fryberg, a freshman at Marysville Pilchuck High School, north of Everett. He pulled out a small handgun and opened fire on a table full of students about 10:30 a.m. (1:30 p.m. ET), killing a girl and wounding four other people, three of them critically, police and witnesses said.

The names of the slain victim and those wounded weren’t released, but police said all were under the age of 18.

“He seemed like a nice guy, and he had lots of friends,” Erick Cervantes, 16, a junior, told NBC News.

 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Nitorioussoapbox

 

“Jaylen wasn’t a bad kid… He was going through a lot. Feeling a way that nobody should ever feel. Don’t judge before you know! #RipJaylen” Jaylen killed a female student, and wounded several others because he was “going through a lot.” 

 

Michael Brown was a “thug.” A “thug”  who died because he walked down the middle of the street and was Black. Trayvon Martin was a “thug.” A “thug” who died because he ran home from a corner store (7-11) in the rain, hoodie up, after buying iced tea and a bag of candy, while Black.  
#VonderritMyers
#KajiemePowell
#JohnCrawford
#EzellFord
#EricGarner 

 

ALL “Thugs” who died unarmed at the hands of law enforcement. 

 

“Jaylen wasn’t a bad kid… He was going through a lot. Feeling a way that nobody should ever feel. Don’t judge before you know! #RipJaylen” Jaylen killed a female student, and wounded several others because he was “going through a lot.” 

 

“Thugs” are unarmed Black human beings…..who KILL NO ONE. Caucasians going thru bad times who act out by slaughtering innocent humans are either mental patients, drunk kids or just going through some bad times.

 

Anyone else notice the double standard?

 

deathmikebrown !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!fight !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11bottom peace5 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!000000000000000000obama-forward3

The Last 24™


Mr. MilitantNegro™

Mr. MilitantNegro™

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The President’s Day: October 2nd, 2014

 

On Thursday, the President will return from Chicago. In the evening, the President will deliver remarks at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s Annual Awards Gala at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

 

 

President Obama Delivers Remarks at Northwestern University

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

On October 2, 2014, President Obama spoke to young entrepreneurs at the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management about the new foundation of America’s 21st century economy.

 

 

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The President Speaks at Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Gala

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

President Obama delivers remarks at the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s 37th Annual Awards Gala in Washington, D.C., October 2, 2014.

 

 

barackobamapresidentobamaaddresseescongressionalemefsn-swwsl

barackobamapresidentobamaaddresseescongressionalmnvyxabuzrtl

 

President Obama meets with the Prime Minister of Israel

October 01, 2014 | 6:01 | Public Domain

President Obama held a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Netanyahu of Israel on October 1, 2014.

 

 

 

The President Honors the MLS Cup Champions

 

Published on Oct 1, 2014

On October 1, 2014, President Obama delivered remarks in honor of the Sporting KC, the MLS Cup Champions of 2013.

 

 

 

West Wing Week: 10/03/14 or “If the Body is Strong”

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

This week, the President convened summits on global public health and on the BRAIN Initiative, hosted the Prime Ministers of India and Israel, welcomed the 2013 MLS Champion Sporting Kansas City to the White House, and traveled to Chicago to speak on the resurgence of the American economy. That’s September 26th to October 2nd “If the Body is Strong.”

 

 

 

10/01/14: White House Press Briefing

 

 

Speeches and Remarks

 

Screenshot (811)

 

Remarks by the President at Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Gala

 

Remarks by the President on the Economy — Northwestern University

 

Remarks by the President Honoring the MLS Cup Champion Sporting KC

 

Remarks by President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu of Israel Before Bilateral Meeting

 

 

Statements and Releases

 

Readout of National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice’s Meeting with Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh of Vietnam

 

Readout of National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice’s Meeting with Indian National Security Advisor Doval

 

Readout of National Security Advisor Susan E. Rice’s Meeting with Foreign Minister Wang Yi of China

 

President Obama Signs Kentucky Disaster Declaration

 

President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts

 

Readout of Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Lisa O. Monaco’s Meeting with Security Officials from the Netherlands

 

Obama Administration Announces Climate Action Champions Competition to Recognize Climate Leaders Across the United States

 

 

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The White House Blog

 

Gary Pollard, Jr.: “One American’s Perspective”

 

The Foundation for Growth and Prosperity Revisited

 

“A New Foundation Is Laid”: President Obama on America’s 21st Century Economy

 

Have This in Front of You When You Watch the President Today

 

Watch and Engage: President Obama Speaks on the Future of America’s 21st Century Economy

 

President Obama Welcomes 2013 MLS Champs Sporting KC to the White House

 

You Told Us: Here’s What Raising the Wage Means to You

 

President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu Meet at the White House

 

Kevin Pearce: “I may never get to stand on the Olympic podium, but:”

 

Videos Are "Fallin" ALL Over The Place

 

What’s Behind the Ebola Crises and are U.S. Americans at Risk?

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

In an interview with Telesur’s The Global African, Johns Hopkins Infectious Disease Program co-director Taha E. Taha discusses the roots of the Ebola crisis and what can be done about it.

 

 

 

Ebola patient’s family still in apartment

 

 

 

This Insane Ad Shows Exactly How Republicans See Women

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

Republicans just continue their “reaching out” to women in all the most tone deaf ways. College Republican National Committee released a demented new ad targeting young women voters attempting to parody the TV show Say Yes to the Dress…

 

 

 

Should Justice Ginsburg retire?

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

When justices are named to the Supreme Court, they hold that seat for life. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 81, the oldest sitting justice and a powerful voice on the bench. Jeffrey Brown gets views from Erwin Chemerinsky of the University of California-Irvine and Jeffrey Rosen of George Washington University on the political ramifications of a retirement, and the idea of Supreme Court term limits.

 

 

 

Justice Scalia Is Utterly Stupid, Especially On Religion & The Constitution

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

“The separation of church and state doesn’t mean “the government cannot favor religion over non-religion,” Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia argued during a speech at Colorado Christian University on Wednesday, according to The Washington Times.

 

 

 

Massive Cyber Attack 76 million accounts from JPMorgan been compromised – LoneWolf Sager

 

 

 

36 Million Americans in the Path of Severe Weather From Dallas to Chicago

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

From Dallas to Chicago, powerful winds, hail, rain and floods all threaten the heartland. – LoneWolf & The Three Muskadoggies
“Please…. Remember Our Homeless, Hospitalized & Disabled Veterans & Fallen Heroes! Thank You….America!”
“WATCH OUT

 

 

 

Truck crashes during California high-speed police chase

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

A police chase spanning three counties in California Thursday ended after the driver, who was suspected of grand theft, crashed off the interstate.

 

 

 

PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 2, 2014

 

Published on Oct 2, 2014

Thursday on the NewsHour, we take a deeper look at the ongoing pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. Also: A debate on when Supreme Court justices should retire, students in Colorado protest changes to their curriculum, Walruses face dangers as sea ice retreats, taxi drivers push back against Uber and Lyft and actor Kevin Spacey cultivates an unsung talent.

 

 

 

Vice President Biden Speaks to the Urban Alliance and U.S. Chamber of Commerce

 

Scheduled for Oct 3, 2014

 

 

 

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The Last 24™


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West Wing Week: 9/26/14 or “Stronger When We Stand United”

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

This week, the President unveiled the “It’s on Us” campaign, signed the America’s Promise Summit Declaration and headed to New York City for the 69th session of the United Nations General Assembly.

 

 

 

President Barack Obama speaks at the Global Health Security Agenda Summit in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington.

 

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The President Delivers Remarks at the Global Health Security Agenda Summit

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

President Obama addressed 44 nations gathered at the White House for the Global Health Security Agenda Summit on September 26, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's Raining Videos™

It’s Raining Videos™

 

FAA: Fire at facility stops Chicago air traffic

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

Chicago air traffic has been stopped due to a fire at an FAA facility in Aurora, Illinois, according to an official.

 

 

 

NRA Women Love at First Shot | Ep. 1 Bonus Clip: Being Responsible

 

 

I believe you can’t see ignorance & dumbfuckery unless you see ignorance & dumbfuckery.

 

 

With cuts to similar programs, the Common Pantry feeds more New Yorkers

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

New York’s millionaires have increased cost of living, leaving many residents struggling to pay for both shelter and food.

 

 

 

Pierre Boussaguet Quartet – Live at The New Morning 2003 [Full HD]

 

 

 

President Obama Speaks at Meeting of the Open Government Partnership

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at a meeting of the Open Government Partnership in New York, New York on September 24, 2014. A text transcript can be found at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-o…

 

 

 

Muslim Cleric from Contentious Fox and CNN Interviews Arrested in Counterterrorism Raid

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

The Muslim cleric featured in heated interviews on both CNN and Fox News last month was arrested Thursday as part of a London police counterterrorism raid.

 

According to The Guardian, Anjem Choudary was among nine Islamic men arrested on suspicion of “being members of a proscribed organization, or supporting a proscribed organization, as well as encouraging terrorism.”

 

Choudary was once spokesman for al-Muhajiroun, a radical group now banned in England. The organization has reformed under various aliases, officials allege, while the cleric himself has denied ever supporting acts of terror.

 

Mediaite readers may be familiar with Choudary from his appearances on Fox’s Hannity and CNN’s Reliable Sources. Both TV hits were shouting matches: In the latter, host Brian Stelter confronted the cleric for making an off-color 9/11 joke during soundcheck; in the former, Sean Hannity shouted at the cleric, “Are you that dumb or ignorant?” during a discussion of “Sharia law.”

 

 

 

The Daily Show: 9/25/14 in :60 Seconds

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

Lindsey Graham worries about the safety of Americans, Native American activists protest the Redskins logo, and Steven Johnson discusses “How We Got to Now.”

 

 

 

Yes Please Comedy: Automated Teller Assholes

 

 

 

Top 5 Reasons to Prosecute Bush and Cheney

 

 

 

President Obama Addresses Deadly Ebola Outbreak

 

Published on Sep 26, 2014

President Obama urged nations to aid in the efforts to prevent the spread of ebola in West Africa during a speech at the Global Health Security Agenda Summit from the White House.

 

 

 

Ferguson Missouri Police Chief: I’m truly sorry the Michael Brown shooting saga

 

 

 

Arrests in Ferguson Missouri Following Police Chief’s Apology

 

 

 

Ferguson Police Chief & Ferguson Police Have Shoving & Riot Starts

 

 

 

‘Why did you shoot me?’ video shows police shooting unarmed man

 

 

 

South Carolina Officer in Dash-Cam Shooting Video Faces Charges

 

 

 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!twitterstorm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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